Sunday, September 27, 2015

Cessna 550 Citation II, N622PG: Incident occurred September 27, 2015 at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport (KSRQ), Florida

Date: 27-SEP-15
Time: 23:06:00Z
Regis#: N622PG
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 550
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: SARASOTA
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY, SARASOTA, FL

WSW RENTAL OF SARASOTA LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N622PG



A private jet airplane skidded off the runway tonight while landing at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport. 

According to Kevin Angell at SNN-TV, the plane, which was flying to Sarasota from Boca Raton, made the landing at about 7 p.m. No injuries were reported. The jet was going to be moved by a crane, Angell tweeted.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration's website, the plane, a Cessna built in 1978, is owned by WSW Rental of Sarasota LLC on Longboat Key.

Story and photo:  http://www.heraldtribune.com



Dallas Love Field Airport (KDAL) gate fight heats up with court hearings

Travelers could see changes in flights at Dallas Love Field depending on whether a federal judge in Dallas agrees this week to let Delta Air Lines keep flying there — at least for a while.

A decision also would affect Dallas-based Southwest Airlines, the dominant carrier at the city-owned airport that is letting Delta use one of its gates there.

Whatever happens, it will be only temporary relief for an increasingly complex, contentious fight that began late last year.

“The city brings this action to resolve the disputes, to enable it to perform its obligations and to prevent disruption of service to the flying public,” the city of Dallas said in its lawsuit seeking guidance on how to deal with the situation.

The battle heats up Monday and Tuesday, when U.S. District Judge Ed Kinkeade is scheduled to hear arguments from Southwest, Delta, Dallas and the U.S. Department of Transportation on whether to keep Delta flying at Love Field until the parties settle their dispute.

The city, Delta, Southwest, the Transportation Department and the Federal Aviation Administration — all parties to the lawsuit — declined to comment Friday.

Delta now operates five daily flights to its home base of Atlanta from one gate at Love Field under an agreement with Southwest, but that deal ends Wednesday.

Southwest wants to use the gate to accommodate the expansion it’s carried out since federal flying restrictions at the airport were lifted last October. Since then, it has expanded from 118 departures to 16 cities to 180 flights to 50 cities.

Also since then, Delta has been fighting to get a permanent foothold at Love Field.

This is the second time a request is being made to extend Delta’s operations beyond a scheduled deadline. The airline’s right to fly out of Love Field was set to expire July 7, but Southwest, at Kinkeade’s urging, agreed to let Delta stay until Wednesday.

Southwest leases 16 of the 20 gates at Love Field from the city. In January, the airline said it would gain two more gates in March through a sublease with United Airlines, which left the airport. At the time, Delta was using one of United’s gates for its flights to Atlanta.

“The city, Southwest and Delta indicate that they have discussed possible methods for resolving the case but have been unable to reach agreement,” Kinkeade said in an August court filing. “The parties are directed to continue to work in good faith.”

Here’s where the parties stand based on their court filings and statements.

Southwest


The airline wants its gate back.

Southwest says its lease with Dallas gives it “preferential use of the Love Field gates.” It also argues that a 2006 agreement by the airline, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and American Airlines regarding future service at Love Field “prohibits the DOT from compelling the city [of Dallas] to force Southwest to accommodate Delta.”

Southwest further argues that Delta, which also flies out of D/FW Airport, shouldn’t be allowed to operate out of two airports in the same market.

Delta


Delta wants the judge to approve a preliminary injunction that will let it continue flying at Love Field. The airline also said Southwest should lose the two gates it leases from United and the judge should make them available to any airline, not just Delta.

Delta argues that the terms of the Love Field lease agreements and various provisions of federal law give it the right to “long-term accommodation at Love Field.” It also disputes Southwest’s single-market claim about Love Field and D/FW Airport.

City of Dallas


The city wants guidance in what to do with leases at Love Field. It first asked the DOT for guidance in December regarding Delta’s request for long-term accommodation of its five daily departures at Love Field.

“Mandates from two federal agencies under color of federal law and conflicting legal claims and litigation threats by several airlines under federal law have put the city in an impossible situation that only this court can resolve,” the city said in its original lawsuit, filed in June against Delta, Southwest, three other airlines that fly at Love Field, the DOT and the FAA.

In a July court filing, the city said it expects Southwest to win the fight at Love Field.

DOT

The federal agency and its FAA division last week asked the court to release them from the case or put it on hold until a separate but related legal proceeding in Washington reaches a conclusion. That suit, filed by Southwest in a federal appeals court in Washington, asked the court to clarify a December letter from the DOT to Dallas regarding Delta at Love Field.

The federal agencies also are investigating why the city hasn’t taken action at Love Field.

Source:  http://www.dallasnews.com

Military aircraft flies over Tumon Bay at low altitude (with video)



KUAM News has received a video of what appears to be a U.S. Air Force C-130 aircraft flying low over Tumon Bay. 

According to a witness the plane made two passes over the water.

The incident occurred around 5pm Sunday.

The witness told KUAM he was at the beach with his family and was alarmed when he saw how low the aircraft was flying near the water and  shore. He caught the second pass of the plane on video.

Story, photo and video:  http://www.kuam.com


Air Tour to make stop in Garden City, Kansas

The annual Fly Kansas Air Tour will make a stop in Garden City Wednesday morning, as part of its five-day, 12-community barnstorming of the state to promote aviation in Kansas.

The tour kicks off in Wellington Tuesday and concludes in Newton on Oct. 3, making stops in Pratt, Dodge City, Liberal, Garden City, Colby, Hays, Concordia, Junction City, Emporia and Beaumont.

“The Fly Kansas Air Tour is a unique chance to see the state and learn about general aviation up close,” KDOT Aviation Director Tiffany Brown said. “We hope to connect with both students and members of the community to demonstrate the important role their airport plays in their community.”

At stops along the tour, students will be invited to learn about topics that include basic flight principles and aviation education opportunities, as well as discuss careers in aviation with air ambulance operations, airport managers, aerial applicators, engineers, airline pilots and meet the 1st Aviation CombatBrigade from Fort Riley.

Rachelle Powell, Garden City Regional Airport's aviation director, said up to 24 airplanes will begin arriving shortly before 9 a.m. Wednesday. The public is invited, and students from Garden City and Holcomb schools are expected to attend the roughly hour-long event.

Local community members are welcome and encouraged to visit the airport to watch the mass arrival of aircraft and visit with the pilots.

“It's basically like an open house where people can walk around and look at the airplanes,” Powell said. “We'll also have tours of the air traffic control tower, some heavy equipment the airport utilizes on display and the aircraft rescue and firefighting truck will be out. That way, it will give people and the children an opportunity to talk to people about careers in aviation, and just kind of have fun.”

The event is open to anyone with an interest in aviation or learning more about the airport.

This is the second year for the air tour, but the first time Garden City will be one of the stops, Powell said.

“We love aviation. We're always excited to see airplanes and talk to pilots and share the thrill of aviation with the community,” she said. “It's going to be a fast and furious hour, but it will be a good time.”

On Oct. 3, the air tour will stop at the Newton airport and participate in the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 88 fly-in, which features Young Eagle flights and commemorative Air Force aircraft, as well as a banquet dinner.

The air tour is organized by the Kansas Commission on Aerospace Education, in partnership with the Kansas Department of Transportation, Division of Aviation.

Source:  http://www.gctelegram.com

Cessna 182A Skylane, N3921D, Texas Skydiving Center: Fatal accident occurred September 27, 2015 near Lexinton Airfield (TE75), Lee County, Texas

AUSTIN SKYDIVING CENTER INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3921D

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Houston FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA427
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 27, 2015 in Lexington, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/02/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N3921D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was returning the airplane to the departure airport for landing after a skydiving flight. Two witnesses reported observing the pilot fly the airplane over the runway; one witness said it was about 50 ft above ground level (agl), and the other witness said it was about 100 ft agl. One of the witnesses added that, when the airplane reached the end of the runway, it pitched up about 45 degrees, gained about 200 ft of altitude, and then entered a turn with a 45 bank angle. The witness added that, after the airplane had turned about 90 degrees to a westerly heading, its nose dropped, and the airplane "immediately dove." The airplane subsequently entered a left spin and rotated about 180 degrees before impacting trees and then the ground. A second witness noted that the engine sounded like it was at "full throttle" during the descent as if the pilot was attempting to recover from the dive.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions. The airplane wreckage was confined to the vicinity of the accident site. Tree breaks in the immediate vicinity of the accident site were consistent with a high-angle descent immediately before impact. Based on the witness statements, it is likely that the pilot intentionally initiated a turning climb but failed to maintain adequate airspeed and exceeded the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin from which he could not recover.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack during a climbing turn, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin at too low of an altitude to recover.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT 
On September 27, 2015, about 1830 central daylight time, a Cessna 182A airplane, N3921D, was substantially damaged during an in-flight collision with trees and terrain near Lexington, Texas. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Austin Skydiving Center, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a part of a skydiving flight operation. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Lexington Airfield (TE75), Lexington, Texas, about 1800. 

A witness, who was one of the skydivers onboard the initial portion of the accident flight, reported that the flight to the jump altitude of 10,000 feet was "routine." After exiting the airplane, his parachute descent was uneventful. After his parachute landing, he observed the airplane overfly the runway northbound about 50 feet above ground level (agl). When the airplane reached the north end of the runway, it pitched up about 45 degrees. Once the airplane had gained about 200 feet of altitude, it entered a left 45-degree banked turn. After it had completed about 90 degrees of the turn, to a westerly heading, the nose dropped and it "immediately dove." The airplane subsequently entered a left spin, rotating about 180 degrees before impacting the ground. He estimated that 1-1/2 to 2 seconds elapsed from the time the nose dropped until the airplane impacted the ground. 

A second witness reported that he was on the back porch of his home at the time of the accident. He recalled hearing the airplane for 5 to 10 seconds before seeing it. He added that it approached from the north and sounded "loud," which drew his attention toward the airplane. He noted that the engine "sounded like it was at full throttle" as if the pilot was attempting to recovery from the dive. His view of the airplane was initially obscured by the house roof and the trees. Once he saw the airplane it was nose down, descending toward a wooded area behind his home. He noted that the airplane appeared to be intact, with both wings and the tail visible. The airplane subsequently impacted the trees. 

A third witness reported that the accident occurred on the last or second to last flight of the day. After the skydivers had landed, the jump airplane approached the runway and appeared to be in a position to land. However, as the airplane neared the runway, it leveled off about 100 feet above the ground and overflew the runway. The airplane crossed over approximately perpendicular to the main road passing the airport. Shortly after crossing the road, he observed the airplane enter a left turn, expecting it to complete the turn and return for a landing. However, before it completed the turn, the airplane seemed to lose its momentum and the nose dropped abruptly. 

Another skydiver, who had been onboard the initial portion of the accident flight, reported that the takeoff and the subsequent climb to the jump altitude was "not noteworthy at all". He did not observe the airplane after he exited until he saw it at the accident site. He commented that they had started about 1000 that morning, and had been skydiving for most of the day. He estimated there had been about 10 or 11 airplane loads of skydivers during that timeframe. He added that the airplane was refueled immediately before the accident flight. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 
The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings, which was issued on November 1, 2014. He was issued a first class airman medical certificate with a restriction for corrective lenses on January 13, 2015. 

A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that his most recent flight entry was dated September 25, 2015; two days before the accident. He had logged 862.0 hours total flight time, including 846.2 hours in single-engine land airplanes and 605.5 hours in Cessna model 182 airplanes. Of the total flight time, 780.8 hours were logged as pilot-in-command and 238.2 hours were logged as dual instruction received. The pilot's logbook included endorsements for complex and high performance airplane operations. 

A colleague of the accident pilot described him as a "skilled pilot." The colleague added that he had felt safe when flying with the accident pilot, more so than other pilots he had flown with in the past. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 
The accident airplane was a Cessna model 182A (s/n 18234621). The Cessna 182A is a single-engine, four-place design, with a fixed tricycle landing gear arrangement. It was powered by 230-horsepower Continental Motors O-470-L six-cylinder, reciprocating engine (s/n 67911-7-L). Thrust was provided by a two-blade McCauley model 2A34C203-C/G-90DCA-8 constant speed (variable pitch) propeller assembly (s/n 010632). 

According to maintenance records, the most recent annual inspection was completed on June 30, 2015, at a recording tachometer time of 4,178.3 hours. An airframe logbook entry, dated August 25, 2015, indicated that the recording tachometer hour meter failed at 4,200 hours and that a recording hour (Hobbs) meter was installed, which indicated 0 hours at that time. The most recent inspection consisted of a 100-hour inspection completed on September 24, 2015. The airframe had accumulated about 4,282 hours total time. The recording hour (Hobbs) meter indicated 82.7 hours at that time. 

The accident engine was overhauled in November 2011, at 3,058.7 hours total time. The overhauled engine was installed on the accident airframe on November 30, 2014, and subsequently accumulated 919.5 hours. According to the maintenance logbook, the engine was disassembled and inspected due to a propeller strike before installation on the accident airframe. At the time of the most recent 100-hour inspection, the engine had accumulated about 4,124 hour total time, with about 1,066 hours since overhaul. The propeller assembly had accumulated about 1,116 hours total time. 

Two modifications related to parachute jumping (skydiving) had been made to the accident airplane. The first modification removed the right front and rear seats, and installed floor level seat belt brackets to accommodate four occupants in addition to the pilot. The second was related to a modification of the right cabin door to allow for the in-flight operation of the door for parachute jumping. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 
Weather conditions recorded by the Giddings-Lee County Airport (GYB) Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS), located about 15 miles south of TE75, at 1835, were: wind from 120 degrees at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 27 degrees Celsius, dew point 19 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 29.87 inches of mercury. 

Weather conditions recorded by the Caldwell Municipal Airport (RWV) AWOS, located about 15 miles northeast of TE75, at 1830, were: wind from 110 degrees at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 27 degrees Celsius, dew point 18 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 29.87 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION 
The airplane impacted trees and terrain about one-quarter mile north-northwest of TE75. The accident site was located in a wooded area, on the slope of an embankment surrounding a small pond. Tree breaks in the immediate vicinity of the accident site were consistent with a high angle of descent prior to impact. One tree limb, approximately 6 inches in diameter, was partially severed consistent with a propeller strike. The end of severed tree limb was oriented about 45 degrees relative to the horizon, which was consistent with an approximate 45-degree nose down airplane attitude. The airplane came to rest upright on the sloped side of the embankment and all wreckage was confined to the vicinity of the point of impact. All airplane structural components were located in the relative positions of an intact aircraft. 

The nose and forward fuselage was deformed and fragmented consistent with impact forces. The engine was dislocated aft into the firewall to a point approximately in-line with the leading edge of the wings. The cockpit area was compromised and fragmented. The fuselage exhibited buckling and deformation in the vicinity of the aft cabin and baggage area. The empennage remained attached to the aft fuselage and appeared intact. The rudder and elevators remained attached to the vertical and horizontal stabilizers, respectively. Control continuity was confirmed from the rudder and elevators to the cockpit area. At the time of the postaccident examination, both cabin doors were separated and located adjacent to the fuselage. 

The left wing was separated and located adjacent to the fuselage at the time of the postaccident examination. The forward spar and wing strut both exhibited cuts at the wing root and mid-span, respectively, consistent with a postaccident removal of the wing. Separation of the aft spar was consistent with an overload failure due to impact forces. The wing structure was deformed and the leading edge exhibited aft crushing along the entire span. The aileron and flap remained attached to the wing. Control continuity was confirmed from the aileron and the flap to the wing root. 

The right wing remained attached to the fuselage. The wing structure was deformed, with aft crushing along the entire leading edge. The aileron and flap remained attached to the wing. The right aileron control tube was separated between the bellcrank and the control surface consistent with an overload failure. Control continuity was confirmed from the aileron bellcrank to the wing root. The aileron cross-over cable was separated inboard of the wing root; the separation appeared consistent with an overload failure. Control continuity of the right wing flap was confirmed to the wing root. 

The engine sustained damage consistent with impact forces. All six cylinders remained attached to the crankcase. Internal engine and accessory section continuity were confirmed through crankshaft rotation. Suction and compression were noted at all cylinders. A lighted borescope examination of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies related to the individual cylinders, pistons, or intake/exhaust valves. The upper spark plugs exhibited normal combustion signatures. The left magneto was separated from the engine mounting pad; the right magneto remained secured to the engine. Both magnetos produced a spark across all leads when rotated. The carburetor housing was fractured consistent with impact forces. The fuel screen was intact and unobstructed. 

The propeller separated from the engine due to a fracture of the propeller hub adjacent to the mounting flange. Both propeller blades remained with the forward portion of the hub, which was located near the engine at the accident site. The aft portion of the hub remained attached to the engine propeller flange. The appearance of the fracture surface was consistent with an overstress failure due to impact forces. The propeller blades exhibited minor bending and twisting over the span of the blade. One blade sustained minor scuffing damage in an area located about one-third span from the blade root and over the outboard one-third of the blade span. 

The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 
An autopsy of the pilot was performed by the Travis County Medical Examiner's Office in Austin, Texas, on September 29, 2015. The pilot's death was attributed to blunt force injuries sustained as a result of the accident. 

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) toxicology report noted: 
No Ethanol detected in Vitreous; 
Dextromethorphan detected in Liver; 
Diphenhydramine detected in Liver; 
Doxylamine detected in Liver.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA427 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 27, 2015 in Lexington, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N3921D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 27, 2015, about 1830 central daylight time, a Cessna 182A airplane, N3921D, was substantially damaged during an in-flight collision with trees and terrain near Lexington, Texas. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Austin Skydiving Center, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a skydiving flight operation. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Lexington Airfield (TE75), Lexington, Texas, about 1800.

A witness reported that the airplane overflew the runway northbound about 50 feet above ground level. When the airplane reached the north end of the runway, it pitched up about 45 degrees. Once the airplane had gained about 200 feet of altitude, it entered a left 45-degree banked turn. After it had completed about 90 degrees of the turn, to a west heading, the nose dropped and it "immediately dove." The airplane subsequently entered a left spin, rotating about 180 degrees before impacting the ground. He estimated that 1-1/2 to 2 seconds elapsed from the time the nose dropped until the airplane impacted the ground.

The airplane impacted trees and terrain about 0.25nm north-northwest of TE75. The accident site was located in a wooded area, on the slope of an embankment surrounding a small pond. Limited tree breaks were consistent with a high angle of descent immediately prior to impact. The airplane came to rest upright on the sloped side of the embankment and all wreckage was confined to the vicinity of the point of impact. All airplane structural components were located at the accident site and in the relative positions of an intact aircraft; all flight control surfaces remained attached to the airframe.


The witness described the weather conditions at the time of the accident as hazy, with a few high clouds and no precipitation. The wind was light, 3 or 4 knots, with no wind gusts.

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Christopher Colly Lyons


LEXINGTON, Texas (AP/KXAN) — Investigators are trying to determine what caused a skydiving school plane to stall and crash in Central Texas, killing the pilot.

The Texas Department of Public Safety on Tuesday identified the victim as 32-year-old Christopher Colly Lyons, of Lexington.

DPS says the accident happened Sunday night near an airfield in Lexington, about 45 miles east of Austin.

Trooper Robbie Barrera says the pilot was attempting to land when the Cessna 182A, a single-engine plane operated by Austin Skydiving Center, stalled and crashed. Barrera says the plane went down on private property.

Investigators had no immediate information on whether any skydivers had been on board just prior to the accident.

A message left with Austin Skydiving Center wasn’t immediately returned Tuesday.

Christopher Colly Lyons



A Texas Skydiving Center pilot was killed Sunday evening in a crash in Lee County.

Within hours, investigators working for the FAA headquartered out of San Antonio were at the crash site off F.M. 696 East in Lexington, about 45 miles west of Bryan-College Station.

Texas DPS Trooper Robbie Barrera confirmed that the plane belonged to Texas Skydiving Center, which is on Private Road 7022 in a rural area. It wasn't clear whether anyone else was  on board the plane or whether skydivers already had been dropped off.

Details about the crash - including the name of the pilot and information about the plane's history - were not available. Barrera referred all questions to the FAA; those officials couldn't be reached.

A woman answering the phone late Sunday at the skydiving school said they'd have no comment until all the family members of the pilot who perished were contacted.

A DPS official from the Bryan office contacted Department of Public Safety staffers at 6:58 p.m. to report the crash, but the time of the crash wasn't released.

The skydiving company's safety record is mentioned on its website, saying that all the equipment surpasses the safety standards of the U.S Parachute Association and the Parachute Industry Association. The business is affiliated with Skydive University, which is considered an advanced school for skydiving instructors.

Source:  http://www.theeagle.com


One person is dead after his plane crashed in Lexington. This is northeast of Elgin. 

DPS Trooper Robbie Barrera confirms they received a call about a plane going down just at 6:58 p.m. Sunday night. 

The plane went down at 1953 FM 696 E. This is near the Texas Skydiving Center located at 1055 PR 7022, Rt 696, Lexington, TX. 

So far officials can confirm that the pilot was killed in the crash but are not speaking to any other injuries or fatalities. 

The Federal Aviation Administration out of San Antonio will be the lead investigative agency on this crash.

 

LEE COUNTY, Texas (KXAN) — A plane crashed on private property in Lee County Sunday night.

The Lee County Sheriff’s office says the crash happened at 6:30 p.m. on private land on FM 696 East, outside of Lexington.

According to the Department of Public Safety, the pilot of the plane has died in the crash. The condition of the other passengers and model of the plane is unknown at this time.

The pilot has not been identified at this time.

The Texas Skydiving Center: Skydiving Austin is located outside of Lexington in Lee County. It is not confirmed whether or not the plane was from the center.

Flying high for 50 years

Terry Stern pauses on the tarmac on a foggy Saturday morning at the Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport near his T-6 Texan aircraft after receiving the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, which is given to pilots who fly for 50 years without incident or accident. 


Having a clean driving record spanning 50 years is hard enough, which makes Terry Stern's achievement of an incident-free 50-year flight career seem downright impossible.

On Saturday, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration presented Stern with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, which is given to pilots who fly for 50 years without incident or accident.

The ceremony took place early on a foggy Saturday morning at the Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport, where Stern meets almost every Saturday morning at the Wings Cafe with his pilot friends.

Stern told the Brainerd Dispatch Wednesday he took his first solo flight in February of 1964 when he was 17 years old. Now 68, Stern is coming up on the 52nd anniversary of his solo flight.

Stern said he wasn't surprised by the award, as he knew once he hit the 50-year mark of his flight career, he could apply for the distinction. He submitted his application and a couple of his pilot friends Chuck Datko, Bruce Olson and Janaka Bolduc submitted recommendation letters on his behalf, and that was that.

"I didn't even put an application in for it right away," Stern said.

Stern said he's logged about 6,500 pilot hours, which isn't much compared to airline pilots who can log 20,000-30,000 hours.

The Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award is quite the recognition for someone "who doesn't like to toot his own horn," said Jeff Wig, Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport manager. That humble attitude is part of the reason for Stern's understated awards ceremony, which took place without much fanfare.

All four pilots are part of a group called T-6 Thunder North American Flight Team, which performs flyovers for different events, Stern said. For those flyovers, Stern pilots his 1944 North American Aviation T-6 Texan.

Stern's T-6 is quite a sight to see when he takes it out on the airfield, Wig said.

"It's got the old radial engine that just rumbles," Wig said. "You stand near it and you can feel it in your gut."

Saturday morning's blanket of fog prevented the arrival of friends who planned to arrive by air with vintage aircraft.

Stern worked as a corporate pilot for a time, was on-call flying for different companies, which gave him the chance to fly a wide variety of planes. He's spent the last 15 years flying in the Commemorative Air Force, which gave him the chance to fly more classic, military-style planes.

Along with his brother Donovan, Stern started Stern Rubber Company in 1969, and the company has been located in Staples since 1973. Flying played a key role in the company's development, Stern said.

"We used aircraft to visit customers and to deliver parts to the customers," Stern said. "Just being able to move people around quickly and help a customer out if they had a problem."

Plenty of Brainerd area companies rely on aircraft to connect their businesses to their customers, Stern said.

"It's important to all of us," Stern said. "Being able to move people around quickly without having to be on an airline schedule is very important."

Stern's flying career has been without incident, but he said that doesn't mean he hasn't had to deal with mechanical issues. He's run across engine or cylinder issues while he's been flying, but he's been able to make sure the issue didn't grow into a big problem.

"It's all stuff you train for," Stern said. "And for me at least, everything worked out very well."

When Stern describes a situation where he fixed an issue mid-flight, people often ask him if the situation was scary, he said. But fear doesn't factor into the situation.

"When there is an emergency, the training kicks in and you take care of it," Stern said. "You just deal with the situation and take care of it."

There's a mix of luck and skill involved in having an incident-free flight career, Stern said. But in his case, it's more the result of good training and preparedness.

"If you lose an engine in a multi-engine aircraft it can be a disaster," Stern said. "But it shouldn't be, with the proper training and preparedness."

The Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award also shows aviation is a safer form of transportation than people think, Stern said.

"I'm not the only one that's gone 50 years without an incident," Stern said.

Stern's honor goes to show there's a thriving aviation community in the Brainerd lakes area, Wig said, filled with "true-blue aviation enthusiasts."

"Aviation has a lot of wonderful people with interesting backgrounds and personalities and interests," Wig said. "I just think it's a wonderful thing to have here in Brainerd."

According to the FAA's online database of Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award winners, there are currently 55 honorees in Minnesota, but Stern is the first from the Brainerd lakes area.

Stern's time behind the yoke varies now, but he averages a couple flights per week. He'll go two to three weeks without flying, and then have a weekend like a recent one where he flies in five different airshows.

With the Commemorative Air Force, Stern does a lot of missing man formation flyovers at funerals for fallen pilots or veterans.

"The idea is to remember the people that sacrificed everything for us," Stern said. "That's probably our biggest mission, is remembering the veterans and the people that gave everything they had to protect our freedom."

Award background


Jay Flowers, from the Flight Standard District Office in Fargo, presented the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award to Stern Saturday. Flowers said the FAA started presenting the awards on Aug. 11, 2003, to honor pilots with 50-year, clean records.

"As long as they have a clean record, and have been very active in aviation, then they basically qualify for the award," Flowers said.

The FAA also evaluates applicants for "good, moral character," Flowers said, so there is a processing or vetting process applicants go through. Flowers brought a record book of all of Stern's flight data, about an inch thick, going back to his very first flight. Friends and family looked on as Flowers noted Stern's achievements and presented the award in the airport's conference room.

One pilot who Flowers gave the award to only had 600 hours of flight time in his lifetime, Flowers said. The amount of flight hours depends on how active the pilot has been over those 50 years.

"You can't say that it's one demographic, one or the other, that gets it," Flowers said. "It's just the guys that have been dedicated that long."

Many private or recreational pilots follow a similar flight career path, Flowers said. They start flying when they're young, and then aviation goes on the back burner as they start and raise families. Then, when they hit 55 or 60 years old, they come back to it.

"Some guys need something to do, maybe they've been retired from some other job," Flowers said. "And they'll start doing small charters here and there for different companies."

In the past two years, Flowers said his office has given out around 24 Wright Brothers Master Pilot Awards. It's the recipient's decision on how or where they get the award. Some are fine with a little recognition, he said, but most don't want any fanfare. For those apprehensive pilots, Flowers proposes a solution. He brings the award to the pilot's regular coffee group, buys a round of joe, and presents the award.

A pilot himself, Flowers said it's quite the experience presenting the award to another pilot, some of whom have been flying since World War II.

"Most of these guys had a career before I was even born," Flowers said. "I was born in '62, and these guys were active back in the '40s."

Aviation is an evolving, volatile environment, Flowers said, so many of these pilots have a wealth of knowledge to pass on to the next generation of pilots.

"The scars that these guys carry is the knowledge that they're passing forward to their students," Flowers said.

Pilots come from all walks of life, Flowers said, but one thing is constant: They love to fly.

"If you're a pilot, you love it, you don't back down from it, and it's all you think about," Flowers said. "They're all walks of life, and they all love the profession."

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.brainerddispatch.com


Jay Flowers (left) Federal Aviation Administration program manager from Fargo, N.D., shares a laugh with pilot Terry Stern Saturday morning at the Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport moments after presenting him with The Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for 50 years of flying without incident or accident.

Zenith Zodiac CH 601, N401: Fatal accident occurred September 26, 2015 near St. Charles Airport (LS40), Ama, Louisiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N401 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA426
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 26, 2015 in Ama, LA
Aircraft: JONES RALPH D ZODIAC CH 601 HD, registration: N401
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 26, 2015, at an unknown time, a Zodiac CH-601-HD, single-engine airplane, N401, impacted terrain near St. Charles Airport (LS40), Ama, Louisiana. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Buffalo RD, LC; New Orleans, Louisiana; and was operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. The airplane had departed LS40 about 1430 central daylight time for a local flight.

After the airplane failed to return a search began and a ground search party found the wreckage about 1300 on the following day. Evidence at the scene showed the airplane struck the top of a 40 foot tall tree in a thickly wooded area and was in about an 80 degree nose-down attitude when it impacted terrain. Other trees about 20 feet from the wreckage were not damaged.

The closest official weather reporting station was at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (KMSY), New Orleans, Louisiana, about 3 miles northeast from the accident location. At 1353 the Automated Surface Observation System at KMSY reported wind from 060 degrees at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 4,000 feet, overcast clouds at 20,000 feet, temperature 27 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 21 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of Mercury.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



Guy Seghers

The flag at the airfield in Ama flies at half-staff Monday.



Guy Seghers, a 56-year-old recreational pilot from New Orleans, had planned on driving out to a small airfield in St. Charles Parish over the weekend to meet someone who was interested in buying an airplane from him.

But the meeting fell through, according to his sister, Simone Seghers Barker, so Seghers decided to spend Saturday afternoon in the air, as he often did.

It was still not clear Monday exactly what went wrong, but the routine flight proved deadly when Seghers crashed in a wooded area near the airfield, perhaps not long after takeoff.

“It was supposed to be a little normal thing,” said Barker, who survives Seghers along with his wife, a daughter in her early teens and three siblings. “Unfortunately, he died doing the thing that he loved.”

Pilots at the airfield in Ama grew worried when Seghers didn’t return from his flight on schedule.

His dog, a Yorkie named Gigi, had been left behind in the hangar, Barker said.

Seghers was reported missing to the St. Charles Parish Sheriff’s Office about 7 p.m. Saturday.

St. Charles Sheriff Greg Champagne said a search for Seghers got underway immediately. It involved personnel from various agencies — including a helicopter from the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office — and civilians, some of whom flew over the area in private planes.

The air search was grounded by stormy weather Sunday morning, but searchers on foot and in all-terrain vehicles finally spotted the wreckage of Seghers’ plane in a wooded area south of the private, turf airfield, which is under the control of the St. Charles Aviation Association and is about 3 miles southwest of Louis Armstrong International Airport in Kenner.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not respond Monday to a request for comment about any preliminary findings investigators may have made.

Aviation Association President John Lawrence said his group’s best guess was that Seghers lost control of his plane as he took off and then crashed in the trees near the airfield.

Lawrence said Seghers, a veteran dues-paying member of the association, was only the second pilot flying out of the airfield to die in a crash since it opened in 1961, as far as he was aware.

“Any time you lose a member for any reason is sad,” Lawrence said, “but especially in this kind of case.”

Barker said Seghers earned his living renting out various properties he owned in the New Orleans area. He had flown planes recreationally for some time, she said, and it was his main hobby outside of spending time with his wife, Mayumi, and their daughter, Josie.

Barker said her brother had planned on eating out with the family on Sunday.

“To hear that he had gone missing ... was just a tremendous jolt,” Barker said. “That was so not typical of him.”


Source:  http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com




The cause of a fatal plane crash at a private airport in St. Charles Parish on Saturday (Sept. 26) is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board. The aircraft, a single-engine Zenith 601CH crashed after

leaving the airport in Ama, killing the pilot, according to a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman.

The pilot, identified as 56-year-old Guy Seghers of New Orleans, was alone in the two-seater plane, authorities said. According to FAA records, registration of the experimental plane is pending.

The FAA classifies the plane as an experimental aircraft because the model is often amateur built from a kit. The FAA doesn't certify either the individual kits or their builders. Segher's plane, according to the FAA records, was built in 2002.

Seghers was reported missing around 7 p.m. Saturday after he failed to return to the Ama airport following a flight. The crash site was discovered in a wooded area south of the airport around 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

Seghers was a member of the St. Charles Parish Aviation Association, the private club that oversees the St. Charles Parish airport, and kept his plane there.

"He had a love of flying and flew often," said Tab Troxler, an aviation enthusiast and club member, who is also the parish's tax assessor. "We are all sad for his passing."

The private airport, also known as the "Ama Airport" has been operating since 1960. This is the second fatal accident in the airport's 55-year history, Troxler said.

Two people were killed in 2009 after their plane veered and hit trees during takeoff.

http://www.nola.com

'Ghost planes' display aid at O'Hare helping safety, capacity problems

"Ghost" images of planes landing at O'Hare are helping air-traffic controllers to more safely stagger jets operating on converging flight paths.

"Ghost" images of planes landing at O'Hare International Airport are helping air-traffic controllers safely stagger jets on converging flight paths in the crowded airspace near the airfield, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The ghost planes are also helping restore some of the efficiency that was lost last year when safeguards were introduced at O'Hare to reduce the chance for a collision on converging flight paths, officials said.

The potentially deadly traffic intersection in the sky is less than 1 mile from the ends of two runways — one for arrivals, the other for departures. Last year, the FAA prohibited the specific runway combination during the busiest daytime hours, when planes are taking off or landing roughly every 20 seconds, until a better plan came along.

The two runways themselves do not physically intersect, but planes could cross flight paths under one scenario:

A plane cleared by O'Hare tower for takeoff on diagonal runway 32 Left, which points to the northwest, could fly too close to or even hit or be struck by a plane landing toward the west on east-west runway 27 Right if, instead of completing the landing, the pilot of the plane needed to execute an unplanned go-around procedure.

Last year, to eliminate the possibility of a close call or an even worse outcome, the FAA banned planes during the day from landing on 27 Right while other planes were taking off on 32 Left.

The move was part of a national strategy to improve the safety of converging runway operations at a number of major airline hubs. The change was recommended by the National Transportation Safety Board in response to some near midair collisions, including a 2006 incident involving a United Airlines plane and an American Airlines plane at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas.

An automated tool that was recently introduced at O'Hare provides visual guidance to air-traffic controllers to space two planes involved in a converging runway operation more than 1 1/2 miles apart from the critical intersection point, officials said.

Called the Converging Runway Display Aid, the computer program creates a ghost aircraft in a window on the controller's screen, said Paul Litke, the FAA's air-traffic manager for the Lake Effect District and a former controller and manager at O'Hare tower. The ghost plane's final approach to land on 27 Right matches an actual aircraft flying to the runway.

The display aid calculates a safe gap between the arriving and departing planes. If either a ghost aircraft or a real aircraft is in the runway 27 Right window, the controller must hold the plane that is lined up to depart on 32 Left until the all-clear is given, Litke said.

The computer program maximizes safety and the rate of takeoffs and landings, Litke said.

"It allows us to use this departure runway (32 Left) again, which we haven't been able to do for more than a year," Litke said. "We are still learning, and it will take some time" to use the converging runway automation to its full potential, he said.

The Converging Runway Display Aid, which since July is being phased into O'Hare's operations, has resulted in an increased number of daytime departures on 32 Left over the past few months, as well as on diagonal runway 4 Left, which points to the northeast and also has a flight path that converges with the flight path of 27 Right arrivals, FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro said.

The increased use of the diagonals has produced a small side benefit to some of O'Hare's noise-weary neighbors who live east and west of the airport. For much of the summer, before the display aid was activated, daytime departures from 32 Left were near zero, according to data provided by the Chicago Department of Aviation. Currently, five to 10 flights per day, or 200 to 300 per month, depart 32 Left during the day, the FAA said. In addition, about 200 daytime flights depart runway 4 Left monthly.

Although the numbers are small in comparison to the roughly 2,500 takeoffs and landings each weekday at O'Hare, "those (32 Left) departures occur during the busiest hours, so they are very effective in taking pressure off" of the airport, Molinaro said.

Runway 32 Left is scheduled to close in 2019, when the sixth east-west parallel runway is set to open under the city's O'Hare expansion plans. The primary goals of the runway project include increasing O'Hare's capacity while reducing flight delays, and improving safety by eliminating runways that either physically intersect or that have converging flight paths. The fifth east-west parallel is scheduled to open Oct. 15.

Original article can be found here: http://www.chicagotribune.com

8.7 percent jump in passengers at St. George Regional Airport (KSGU), Utah

A record number of passengers were reported out of the St. George Regional Airport in 2014, continuing an upward trend seen since the facility opened five years ago.

According to new enplanement data released by the Federal Aviation Administration last week, there were 59,321 boardings counted at the airport last year. It represents an 8.7 percent increase over the previous year and a 60 percent increase over 2010, the last full year of operations at St. George’s old airport.

Renamed from a “municipal” airport to a “regional” one earlier this summer, the airport has seen a steady increase each of the last four years, with one big jump between 2011 and 2012 when Denver was added as a second destination along with Salt Lake City.

“It denotes bigger services, more commercial services available from a marketing standpoint,” Airport Manager Richard Stehmeier said of the name change. “I know as a pilot I’d take the ‘regional’ every time, because I’d know they had more services.”

According to the rankings, St. George Regional now ranks 266th out of 510 commercial service airports tracked by the FAA.

It is also Utah’s third busiest airport, according to the FAA data, trailing Salt Lake City (10.1 million passengers) and Provo (62,011).

Salt Lake City was the 25th busiest airport in the country.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International remained the busiest airport in the U.S. with 46.6 million passengers, followed by Los Angeles International (34.3 million) and Chicago O’Hare (33.8 million.)

The increases in St. George have come despite the limited destinations - passengers can choose between four daily flights between Salt Lake City or two flights between Denver.

Officials have been working to encourage an additional flight to a southwest destination like Phoenix or Los Angeles, but the area’s only current commercial airline, St. George-based SkyWest Airlines, has not announced any plans to expand.

The city applied for a grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation earlier this year to help facilitate an expansion, offering to chip in with local cash and pre-purchased tickets, but a list of grant recipients released last week did not include St. George.

When it opened in January of 2011, the $160 million project - the largest in St. George’s history - was touted as safer alternative to the old airport location atop a mesa in the center of the city, as well as a difference-maker for the local economy and overall image.

Market studies have indicated the demand for airline service is large in St. George and surrounding areas, but nearly 80 percent of the passengers in the market area use other airports. There is a relatively small population of potential passengers in the rest of southwest Utah and managers have cited difficulty competing with the low fares offered in nearby Las Vegas.

Source:  http://www.thespectrum.com

University of British Columbia study looks at wildfire pilot safety

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – Hundreds of pilots put their lives on the line this summer battling the 6,669 wildfires sparked across the province. A new study in partnership with UBC is looking to make things safer for them in the future.

The study will look into pilot fatigue and workload when fighting a fire.

Chris McNeil with UBC’s Health and Exercise Sciences says right now, all the current research comes from commercial airlines, but that’s not good enough for wildfire pilots.

“The working conditions for them are clearly very different to someone flying a plane that is dropping retardant on a forest fire. Hand flying is the way they term it so they are continually doing loops and they are changing directions, all these things all the time.”

McNeil notes it’s not just the amount of time they spend in the air that is worrying, but the conditions. “The more stressful a situation, the harder it is mentally and then you add different tasks. The wind conditions are changing constantly, you have smoke that influence their vision. They are constantly getting feedback.”

The study will take another 18 months and will help develop a program to provide new levels of safety.

Hundreds of pilots put their lives on the line this summer battling BC wildfires. A new UBC study is looking to make things safer for them in the air.

Source:  http://www.news1130.com

Runway work OK’d: Hugh Robinson Airport (KEOS), Neosho, Missouri

Neosho City Council gave final approval at a special Wednesday meeting to execute an agreement with the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission to seal and remark runway 1-19 and parallel and connecting taxiways at the Hugh Robinson Memorial Airport.

Council approved the measure on first reading at its regular meeting last week, a couple of days after being notified that the ordinance had to be finalized by the end of September, according to Development Services Director Dana Daniel.

“It’s an application for a block grant agreement with MoDOT (Missouri Department of Transportation) Aviation for our airport,” Daniel explained. “That allows us to use some federal funds toward a paving project at the airport.”

The federal funds can be accumulated for several years, Daniel said, as the city had until the end of the month to utilize the remaining $2,246 in 2012 funds. Some 2013 funds also will be used for the next step.

“We’re in the design phase right now with the engineer,” he said. “Once the design phase is done, we’ll put it out for bid, and then we’ll come back to the council for permission to appoint a contractor.”

Federal funds from 2013 and 2014 will be used to complete the project, Daniel said.

The city receives $150,000 in federal funds for airport projects annually, he mentioned, that can be accumulated for up to five years. The city will pay $29,000 toward the $290,000 project cost, the remainder coming from the federal funds.

Daniel plans to have the work done next spring.

“The runway and the taxiway is no different than a city, a county or a highway roadway,” he noted. “You get wear and tear due to weather, due to traffic, and especially with aircraft we have to make sure that the joints and cracks are maintained so we don’t damage any aircraft or cause any issues.”

Source:  http://www.neoshodailynews.com

Cessna 182G Skylane, N3147S: Accident occurred September 27, 2015 near Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport (KGWS), Garfield County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N3147S

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA430 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 27, 2015 in Glenwood Springs, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182G, registration: N3147S
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 27, 2015, about 0945 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182G airplane, N3147S, impacted rough terrain during a forced landing near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operating on a flight plan. The flight's origin and destination are unknown.

At 0950, the recorded weather at the Eagle County Regional Airport, near Eagle, Colorado, was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 8 degrees C; dew point -2 degrees C; altimeter 30.30 inches of mercury.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07



Emergency workers transport one of the victims from the Sunday morning plane crash south of Glenwood Springs to a waiting ambulance.


The pilot and new owner of the plane that crashed Sunday south of Glenwood Springs is an Aspen resident, a former owner of the plane said Monday. 


Benoit De Lavaissiere bought the 1964 Cessna 182G within the past month, John Elling of Santa Fe, New Mexico, told the Post Independent by email.

According to investigators, De Lavaissiere, 54, and a passenger were injured when the plane went down in a field next to the Rio Grande Trail about 5 miles south of the Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport.

The two were taken to Valley View Hospital.

Federal authorities concluded their site inspection Sunday night, Garfield County sheriff’s spokesman Walt Stowe said, and the crash investigation will now be turned over to the National Transportation Safety Board. Crews from Beegles Aircraft Service were disassembling the wreckage Monday afternoon into the evening to haul it away.

Elling and two other Santa Fe residents are listed in federal records as owners of the plane, but that’s “because he [De Lavaissiere] submitted the registration only two weeks ago” to the Federal Aviation Administration, Elling said.

The crash occurred shortly before 10 a.m. Sunday. According to witnesses, the plane appeared to be having engine problems.

De Lavaissiere, reached by phone Monday by the Daily Sentinel of Grand Junction in his Valley View Hospital room, from which he expected to be released Monday night. He said he was flying from Aspen to Paonia when he started losing altitude and sought to land at Glenwood Springs.

“I was going down fast,” he told the Sentinel. He indentified his passenger as Dmitri Arapu, also of Aspen, and said both of them would be OK.

In a news release, Stowe said, “It appeared that the pilot was attempting an emergency landing when the plane flipped over onto its back. The passenger was able to get out of the plane, while the pilot had to wait for emergency responders to free him from the wreckage.”

The initial investigation indicated the plane had attempted an emergency landing in the field behind the old Sopris Restaurant where the River Edge subdivision is being planned. De Lavaissiere told the Sentinel he hit a ditch, causing the airplane to tip over and land upside down.

De Lavaissiere will be responsible for the salvage and reclamation of the airplane wreckage from the site.

Source:   http://alwaysmountaintime.com




The Federal Aviation Administration concluded its inspection of the site of a nonfatal, single-engine plane crash south of Glenwood Springs last night and a closed portion of a bike path has reopened.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office this morning also released the identity of the pilot. Beniot Delavaiffiere was flying a Cessna 182G Sunday morning when it crashed shortly after takeoff from the Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport about five miles northwest of the crash site, the sheriff’s office said.

It also identified his passenger as Dmitre, but said it didn’t have further information on the passenger’s name.

The sheriff’s office said in a news release that reports from witnesses indicated the plane seemed to have been having engine problems after takeoff and it appeared the pilot was making an emergency landing when the plane flipped over on its back. The passenger got out of the plane on his own but Delavaiffiere had to be extricated by emergency crews.

The two were taken to Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs.

The owner of the plane will be responsible for removing it from the site, the sheriff’s office said.






GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. — A small plane crashed on the west side of Highway 82 between Glenwood Springs and Carbondale Sunday morning, according to the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office.

Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District responded to an aircraft emergency at 9:53 a.m.  on the west side of Highway 82 at approximately the eight-mile mark. The crash was just off the Rio Grande Trail, police say.

Upon arrival, the firefighters found a single engine Cessna plane that had crashed in the field and was upside down.

Two people were in the plane at the time. The pilot was trapped and later freed, police say, and because no fire ensued, rescue operations were able to proceed. The pilot the and passenger were both transported to Valley View Hospital with injuries.

No names have been released.

“This plane crash happened in a tough spot with difficult access. I am grateful to all of all of the responders that worked well together get both occupants of the plane out alive. It was a team effort,” said Carbondale Fire Deputy Chief Rob Goodwin said.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

The Rio Grande Trail will be closed around the crash site to preserve the scene. Police advise those wishing to use the trail from Glenwood to Carbondale to use an alternative path along County Road 109 from the Hardwick Bridge.

Source:  http://kdvr.com






Two people were injured Sunday morning when a small plane crashed south of the Glenwood Springs airport.

The plane went down near Cattle Creek after circling and turning back upvalley in an apparent attempt to make an emergency landing next to the Rio Grande Trail where the River Bend subdivision is being planned for development.

The plane had flipped upside down and had significant damage to the front end.

Initial reports indicated the plane had taken off from Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport shortly before emergency calls came in at 9:53 a.m. and was experiencing engine troubles when the crash occurred.

One person was still in the aircraft when emergency crews arrived and had to be extricated.

The two occupants of the plane were taken to Valley View Hospital with unspecified injuries. There were no fatalities.

A witness said the plane had taken off from the airport a few minutes before the crash.

Another witness, Rick Carlson, who lives west of the Roaring Fork River across from the scene of the crash, said he observed the plane about 300 feet or so above the river and heard the engine sputtering.

“It looked like the pilot decided to land in the field and did a 180-degree turn,” Carlson said. “I did not see the landing but it stirred up quite a bit of dust.”

FAA records show the plane, registration number N3147S, as being a Cessna 182G owned by Heather Cook of Santa Fe, N.M. However, that registration expired on June 30, according to FAA records.

Other owners are listed as John Elling and Thomas Rising, who, according to his LinkedIn account, is a research and development engineer at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.

Emergency crews from the Carbondale and Glenwood Springs fire departments, Garfield County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado State Patrol and Glenwood Springs Police were on the scene of the crash.

“This plane crash happened in a tough spot with difficult access,” Carbondale Deputy Fire Chief Rob Goodwin said. “I am grateful to all of all of the responders that worked well together get both occupants of the plane out alive. It was a team effort.”

The crash will be investigated by the Garfield County Sheriff’s Department and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Rio Grande Trail was closed near Cattle Creek as crews checked for leaking fluids and cleanup operations began shortly before 11 a.m. The trail from Cattle Creek to County Road 154 at the CMC turnoff will be closed indefinitely while the crash is being investigated. 

Story and photo gallery: http://www.postindependent.com