Friday, June 07, 2019

Fuel Starvation: Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N3772F, accident occurred December 27, 2016 in Bridgeport, Jackson County, Alabama



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3772F

Location: Bridgeport, AL
Accident Number: ERA17LA075
Date & Time: 12/27/2016, 1600 CST
Registration: N3772F
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 27, 2016, about 1600 central standard time, a Cessna 172H, N3772F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing. The airline transport pilot was not injured, the passenger sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Marin County Airport-Brown Field (APT), Jasper, Tennessee.

The pilot stated that he departed for a local flight with 11 gallons of fuel, and during the flight he noted that there was more fuel in the right tank than then left. He switched the fuel selector from the BOTH position to the RIGHT position. The pilot then performed a series of steep turns to the right, varying between 45° to 60° of bank, over a relative's house. While rolling out from the steep turns the engine began to surge, sputter, and lose power. After attempting to restart the engine to no avail, he performed a forced landing in a field. The airplane flipped over and came to rest inverted resulting in substantial damage to the left wing. After the accident, the pilot moved the fuel selector back to the BOTH position.

A postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector revealed that the right fuel tank contained about 4.5 gallons of fuel, and the left tank contained about 3.5 gallons of fuel. The pilot reported that prior to the loss of engine power, there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation and that the low quantity of fuel in the right fuel tank likely resulted in fuel starvation.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land, as well as a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single, and instrument airplane. He reported 5,572 hours of total flight experience, his most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on July 28, 2016.

According to a note in the airplane's Owner's Manual under the heading Power Recovery Techniques, "Should power irregularities occur when operating on a single tank, power can be restored by switching to the opposite tank. In addition, the vapor accumulation in the tank on which the power irregularity occurred will rapidly dissipate itself such that that tank will also be available for normal operation after it has been unused for approximately one minute."

Review of the airplane's Illustrated Parts Catalog showed that the fuel pickup for both wing-mounted fuel tanks was located at the inboard side of each tank.

The weather conditions at Winchester Municipal Airport (BGF), Winchester, Tennessee, located about 20 nautical miles northwest of the accident site, at 0355, included wind 350° at 6 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, overcast at 4,400 ft, temperature 12° C and dew point of 5° C, and altimeter setting of 30.20 inches of mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/28/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/15/2016
Flight Time:  5572 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1361 hours (Total, this make and model), 1361 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N3772F
Model/Series: 172 H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17255267
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/15/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3155.16 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBGF, 978 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2055 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 304°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: JASPER, TN (APT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: JASPER, TN (APT)
Type of Clearance:None 
Departure Time: 1540 CST
Type of Airspace: Class C; Class D 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 34.985833, -85.722778 (est)

Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage / JetProp DLX, N709CH: Fatal accident occurred June 07, 2019 in Castalia, Nash County, North Carolina


Pictured are Eva and Gregory Boll


Pictured are Felix and Roberta Laquidara


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N709CH


Location: Castalia, NC
Accident Number: ERA19FA188
Date & Time: 06/07/2019, 1333 EDT
Registration: N709CH
Aircraft: Piper PA46
Injuries:4 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 7, 2019, about 1333 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA 46-350P, N709CH, broke up in flight following an encounter with weather near Castalia, North Carolina. The private pilot, a pilot-rated passenger, and two other passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to the pilot and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Naples, Florida (APF) and was destined for Easton Airport (ESN), Easton, Maryland.

According to preliminary air traffic control radar and voice communication information from the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight was on a northeasterly ground track at flight level (FL) 270 over eastern North Carolina when the pilot reported that there was weather ahead on his radar. After discussing the weather with the controller and reviewing options, the flight was eventually cleared direct to the Franklin VOR. About two minutes prior to the accident, the pilot reported that they were entering an area of rain. The airplane was then observed climbing to FL273, followed by a rapidly descending right turn and loss of radio and radar contact. The controller made numerous attempts to contact the pilot, to no avail. A postaccident review of recorded weather radar data indicated that the airplane was in the vicinity of heavy rain and thunderstorms at the time of the accident.

The airplane impacted wooded terrain about 4 miles northeast of the town of Castalia. The outboard sections of the wings and a section of the elevator were found about 1.4 miles northeast of the main wreckage. Several components of the empennage have not been located due to the dense forest in the area. The main wreckage consisted of the entire fuselage and the inboard sections of the wings. The fuselage was found inverted on a heading of 045°. There was no fire.

The pilot, seated in the left cockpit seat, was also the registered owner and operator of the airplane. He held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He did not hold an instrument rating. A review of his pilot logbook revealed that he had logged about 312 hours total flight time, including 147 hours in the accident airplane. His latest flight review was recorded on October 3, 2017.

The pilot-rated passenger, seated in the right cockpit seat, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held an instrument rating. A review of his pilot logbook revealed that he had logged about 1,062 hours total flight time, including 173 hours in the accident airplane. His most recent flight review was recorded on April 14, 2017. He had not logged any actual instrument time or instrument approaches during the 12 months prior to the accident.

The low wing, retractable tricycle landing gear airplane was manufactured in 2007. In 2017, the original reciprocating engine was removed and a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-35 turboprop engine was installed per a JetProp LLC supplemental type certificate. An annual inspection was completed on April 29, 2019. The total time on the airframe at the time of the accident was 1,449 hours and the engine had accumulated 226 hours time in service since new.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N709CH
Model/Series: PA46 350P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RWI, 157 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3600 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Naples, FL (APF)
Destination: Easton, MD (ESN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.137222, -77.995833 (est)




















Loss of Engine Power (Total): Bell UH-1H, N4085L; accident occurred June 06, 2019 in Bethel, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N4085L



Location: Bethel, AK
Accident Number: GAA19CA344
Date & Time: 06/06/2019, 1400 AKD
Registration: N4085L
Aircraft: Bell UH 1H
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load

Analysis

The pilot reported that, before departure, he was told the helicopter was topped off with fuel for the multistop flight. He added that he did not verify the fuel quantity but that, when he departed for the last leg about 60 miles from the destination airport, the fuel gauge showed just below 600 lbs of fuel, and he decided to fly at 120 knots with a tailwind. He added that, about 3 miles from the destination airport, the engine lost power. He performed an autorotation, but the helicopter landed hard.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tailboom and transmission mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, after landing, the fuel quantity gauge showed that there was about 225 lbs of fuel remaining and that the 20-minute fuel light, which did not illuminate during the flight, illuminated once on the ground. He estimated that the helicopter's fuel burn was about 75 to 80 gallons per hour (gph).

The chief pilot, who was also the helicopter's owner, reported that he had refueled the helicopter on uneven terrain before the flight. He filled the tank to the bottom of the filler cap on the left side, which he estimated was about 10 to 15 gallons less than the total fuel capacity of the 210-gallon tank. He estimated that the helicopter burned about 90 gph. He added that there were no open mechanical squawks on the helicopter and that he was not aware of any mechanical issues.

The Federal Aviation Administrator inspector who examined the helicopter at the accident site reported that the fuel quantity gauge had been serviced and calibrated earlier in the year but continued to indicate that fuel was onboard even after the helicopter ran out of fuel. The 20-minute low fuel light appeared to be functioning normally.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and a total loss of engine power, and his improper landing flare during a forced autorotation, which resulted in a hard landing. Contributing to the accident were the inoperative fuel gauge, which was not accurately calibrated, and the pilot's reliance on the gauge.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid level (Cause)
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Fuel indication system - Incorrect service/maintenance (Factor)
Fuel - Inadequate inspection

Personnel issues
Fuel planning - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Factor)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering
Fuel exhaustion
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Autorotation
Hard landing

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/07/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/12/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 5275 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2500 hours (Total, this make and model), 4795 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 78 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 62 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N4085L
Model/Series: UH 1H No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 68-15655
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: T53-13
Registered Owner: Yukon Helicopters Inc
Rated Power: 1400 hp
Operator: Yukon Helicopters Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137); Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PABE, 102 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 257°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1600 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Bethel, AK (None)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Bethel, AK (BET)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: AKD
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 60.792222, -161.764722 (est)

Cessna 150F, N6617F: Accidents occurred October 03, 2019 and June 06, 2019 in Davis, Yolo County, California


Two people sustained minor injuries Thursday night when a small plane crash-landed near the southeastern edge of Davis, according to the Davis Police Department.

The Cessna 150F came down at about 7:45 p.m. on county land near Montgomery Avenue and Willowbank Road, Lt. Paul Doroshov said.

It landed upside-down in what appeared to be a recently disced field, sustaining front-end damage in the process.

Both the plane’s pilot and mechanic were on scene Friday morning. The pilot indicated he was accompanied by his son when the plane crashed, but declined a further interview with The Enterprise.

Federal Aviation Administration officials also responded to the scene Friday to determine the cause of the crash.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.davisenterprise.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

June 06, 2019: Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N6617F


Location: Davis City, CA

Accident Number: WPR19LA160
Date & Time: 06/06/2019, 1930 PDT
Registration: N6617F
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 6, 2019, about 1930 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 150F, N6617F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Davis, California. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot as a personal flight, conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed, for the cross-country flight that departed Sacramento, California at 1915 and was destined for Yolo County Airport (DWA), Davis, California.

The pilot stated that he borrowed the airplane from a friend for a flight with his son, a student pilot, around the Sacramento area. During the preflight inspection, the pilot's son observed significant levels of water while sumping the fuel tanks and gascolator. He continued to drain the fuel tanks until he no longer observed any water contamination. They subsequently taxied the airplane to a fuel farm at DWA where they filled both fuel tanks with 100 low lead aviation grade gasoline, totaling 26 gallons. The pilot's son sumped the fuel tanks again and observed more water. After 5 subsequent rounds sumping the tanks, they began to observe water-free fuel samples. The pilot rocked the wings before he re-sumped the fuel tanks once more, but did not observe any further water contamination.

They departed DWA and performed touch-and-go landings at multiple airports. While en-route to an intermediate airport at 1,500 ft and south of Davis, California, the pilot retarded the throttle so his son could practice the engine failure emergency procedure. As the airplane reached 500 ft, the pilot asked his son to advance the throttle to full power, and he complied. The engine maintained full rpm without hesitation for about 40 seconds before the engine rpm dropped to an engine idle position, about 1,000 rpm. The pilot took control of the airplane and attempted to restart the engine while he established the airplane's published best glide speed. He then made several unsuccessful attempts to restart the engine, which was no longer producing any power. The pilot turned the airplane into the wind and executed a forced landing in a field. However, the main landing gear impacted the dirt during touchdown and the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed damage to the engine firewall, engine mount, and rudder.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6617F
Model/Series: 150 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Cecil McLemore
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None  

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: , 68 ft msl
Observation Time: 0720 PDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.76 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sacramento, CA (KSAC)
Destination: Yolo County, CA (KDWA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.525278, -121.703889 (est)

Piper PA-28-161, N453ND: Incident occurred June 06, 2019 near Treasure Coast International Airport (KFPR) and incident June 04, 2018 in Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

June 06, 2019: Aircraft crashed on takeoff.

Ari-Ben Aviator Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N453ND

Date: 06-JUN-19
Time: 20:35:00Z
Regis#: N453ND
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: FORT PIERCE

State: FLORIDA

June 06, 2019: Aircraft reported a rough running engine and subsequent engine failure. Landed on road.

Date: 06-JUN-19
Time: 20:35:00Z
Regis#: N453ND
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
City: FORT PIERCE
State: FLORIDA

June 04, 2018: Aircraft landed and rolled out onto the grass at Treasure Coast International Airport (KFPR), Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida.

Date: 04-JUN-18
Time: 21:45:00Z
Regis#: N453ND
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 161
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FORT PIERCE
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 340A, N107FT: Incident occurred June 06, 2019 at Lakeland Linder International Airport (KLAL), Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft skidded partially off runway after landing due to landing gear malfunction.

Pressurized LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N107FT

Date: 06-JUN-19
Time: 16:50:00Z
Regis#: N107FT
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C340
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAKELAND
State: FLORIDA

Hard Landing: Ercoupe 415-C, N3667H; accident occurred June 06, 2019 at Purdue University Airport (KLAF), Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Plainfield, Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N3667H

Location: Lafayette, IN
Accident Number: GAA19CA329
Date & Time: 06/06/2019, 2030 EDT
Registration: N3667H
Aircraft: Ercoupe 415
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

The flight instructor reported that he was going to demonstrate a simulated engine failure on takeoff for the student pilot. After climbing the airplane several hundred feet, he reduced the engine power to idle and pitched the airplane to maintain best glide speed. He applied back pressure to the yoke during the landing flare and realized the airplane was going to land harder than desired. The airplane landed hard on the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's failure to maintain pitch control and his improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Pitch control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Simulated/training event
Hard landing (Defining event)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 30 hours (Total, this make and model), 220 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Ercoupe
Registration: N3667H
Model/Series: 415 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4292
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/20/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3206.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: A-85
Registered Owner: Able Flight Inc
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: Able Flight Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLAF, 637 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2354 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 191°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lafayette, IN (LAF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Lafayette, IN (LAF)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Purdue University (LAF)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 605 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 6600 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Simulated Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.412222, -86.936944 (est)

Piper PA-28-161, N9476R: Accident occurred June 06, 2019 at Carroll County Regional Airport (KDMW), Westminster, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bel Air, Maryland

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9476R

Location: Westminster, MD
Accident Number: ERA19TA195
Date & Time: 06/06/2019, 1102 EDT
Registration: N9476R
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On June 6, 2019, at 1102 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28-161, N9476R, was substantially damaged while landing at the Carroll County Regional Airport (DMW), Westminster, Maryland. The student pilot was not injured. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Montgomery County Airpark (GAI), Gaithersburg, Maryland at 0930.

According to the student pilot, he was practicing full stop landings at DMW when the accident occurred. He said during the first full stop landing the airplane's nose wheel bounced during landing roll. The second landing was normal, but on the third landing the nose wheel bounced and he "added power" to regain control of the airplane. The airplane veered off the left side of the runway and down an embankment before coming to a stop.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the firewall and engine mount.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N9476R 
Model/Series: PA28 161
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDMW, 789 ft msl
Observation Time: 1100 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Gaithersburg, MD (GAI)
Destination: Westminster, MD (DMW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.608333, -77.007778 (est)

Avid Magnum, N3062B: Accident occurred June 06, 2019 at Frederick Municipal Airport (KFDK), Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3062B

Location: Frederick, MD
Accident Number: ERA19LA187
Date & Time: 06/06/2019, 1602 EDT
Registration: N3062B
Aircraft: Avid AVID MAGNUM
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On June 06, 2019, about 1602 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Avid Magnum, N3062B, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain and construction equipment shortly after takeoff at Frederick Municipal Airport (FDK), Frederick, Maryland. The flight instructor and private pilot both sustained minor injuries. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight.

A review of records from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot purchased the airplane on March 2, 2019.

According to the pilot, on the day of the accident he and the instructor completed two flights earlier in the day, during which he accumulated 3 of the 5 hours of dual instruction that was required by his insurance company.

During the engine run-up prior to the accident flight, he noticed that the control stick would not move to the left. He shut down the airplane and discovered that one of the wheel chocks stowed behind the seats was blocking the control movement. He secured the chocks, and the flight controls then moved freely.

The pilot began the takeoff roll on runway 30 (3,600 x 75 ft, asphalt) using full power. During the takeoff roll, the airplane made a "small swerve to the left" which he initially corrected to the right; however, the airplane continued to turn right uncontrollably. He said that he could move the rudder pedal, but it had no apparent effect. He advised that his training had emphasized that he should respond to directional control problems on takeoff roll (in tailwheel airplanes) by "getting the airplane into the air, if possible." As the airplane veered right, he pulled back to lift off, however the airplane would not climb and continued to veer to the right, then struck the construction equipment and a small hill. He said he did not shut down the engine.

According to the flight instructor, the takeoff roll was normal until just after the tailwheel lifted off, when the airplane "swerved left and then hard back to the right." He then "grabbed the stick" and yelled "power power power" because it seemed to him that the engine was not developing full power based on its sound, and the airplane's performance. As the airplane crossed over the right edge of the runway, he struggled to keep the wings level and believed the airplane was at or near its stall speed. He attempted to avoid the construction equipment; however, the controls were "mushy" and the airplane "would not respond properly to control inputs." After the airplane came to rest, he recalled turning off the engine magneto switches.

According to a witness located at the nearby construction project, the airplane "took off in a steep climb, making small corrections in bank, getting bigger as they went."

An examination of the wreckage by a FAA inspector revealed that all major components of the airplane were present at the accident site. The airplane came to rest inverted against a hill of construction dirt located about 1,400 feet down runway 30, and about 400 feet right of the runway centerline. The right wing was impact-damaged and bent downward outboard of the lift struts. The right lift struts were buckled upward against the bottom side of the wing. The rudder and vertical stabilizer were bent toward the left. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the flight surfaces for the rudder and elevator. The aileron controls could not be examined due to the position of the airplane. One of the propeller blades was bent aft about midspan.

According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on June 28, 2018, at which time he reported 750 hours of total flight experience. The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane, and a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single engine and instrument airplane. At the time of the accident, he had accrued 6,030 hours of total flight experience, of which 3 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane (flown earlier on the day of the accident).

At 1547, the weather conditions at FDK included, temperature 31° C, dewpoint 18° C, wind from 330° at 4 knots, altimeter setting 29.82 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Avid
Registration: N3062B
Model/Series: AVID MAGNUM No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFDK, 303 ft msl
Observation Time: 1547 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 330°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Frederick, MD (FDK)
Destination: Frederick, MD (FDK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.421667, -77.372222 (est)


FREDERICK, Maryland (WJZ) — Police are on the scene of a plane crash at the Frederick Municipal Airport.

The crash happened sometime Thursday afternoon, Maryland State Police said.

Police said the Avid Magnum flipped over during takeoff to the airport.

A student pilot and flight instructor were aboard the plane when it crashed. The flight instructor was taken to Frederick Memorial Hospital with minor injuries. The student refused medical treatment.

The Federal Aviation Administration is on its way to the airport to conduct an investigation.

The cause is unknown; police are investigating.

Story and video ➤ https://baltimore.cbslocal.com



Two people were injured Thursday after a small passenger plane crashed near a construction site as it approached Frederick Municipal Airport.

The crash occurred around 4 p.m., and the plane ended up overturned near a dirt mound east of Monocacy Boulevard, less than a mile from the western end of the airport’s runway.

Frederick Police Capt. Patrick Grossman said that two people were taken to Frederick Memorial Hospital with “very minor injuries.” Maryland State Police is investigating the crash, he said.

A group of Frederick police officers, Maryland state troopers and Airport Manager Rick Johnson were surveying the scene Thursday afternoon. The plane’s right wing was damaged.

Grossman said Frederick police went to the scene to assist with the investigation, including taking photographs.

Original article ➤ https://www.fredericknewspost.com




FREDERICK, Maryland - Maryland State Police determined a small plane flipped over during takeoff onto construction at the Frederick Municipal Airport shortly after 4 p.m. There were two minor injuries, according to the Frederick Police Department. The incident is still under investigation by state police as well as the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Avid Magnum was operated by a student pilot and a flight instructor who are both unidentified at this time. The flight instructor was taken to Frederick Memorial Hospital with minor injuries, state police tweeted.

Maryland State Police tweeted both occupants on the plane refused medical treatment, and the cause is under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.localdvm.com