Friday, June 16, 2017

Five airlines seek to serve Quincy Regional Airport (KUIN)

QUINCY -- Five airlines are vying for a federal contract to serve Quincy Regional Airport, and some of the proposals would offer flights to Chicago as well as St. Louis.

The U.S. Department of Transportation opened bids Thursday and sent them to Quincy city officials for consideration.

"We're looking over the specifics of all the proposals," Mayor Kyle Moore said Friday. "We want to find a good match for the community."

Cape Air, which has been providing flights between Quincy and St. Louis since late 2009, has submitted two proposals.

The first would offer 24 weekly flights to St. Louis Lambert International Airport and 12 weekly flights to Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. The combined annual subsidy costs would be $3.14 million under a four-year contract.

Cape Air also is offering a continuation of its 36 weekly flights to St. Louis at an annual cost of $2.66 million for a four-year contract.

"Flights to Chicago are something the community has asked for," Moore said. "Our business travelers say they would have more flexibility if they take flights through Chicago."

In addition, Cape Air points out that it is updating its fleet of aircraft. The Cessna 402C, which has been manufactured since the 1980s, is now used by the airline. They are being replaced with Tecnam P2012 aircraft, a twin-engine turboprop which requires less take off and landing room, and offers more interior space for passengers.

The airline also operates a downtown Quincy ticket office and is seeking American Airlines branding in St. Louis.

Meanwhile, Air Choice One of St. Louis offered five proposals for Quincy flights. Some involve only flights to St. Louis, others offer only flights to Chicago and three would offer a mix of flights to both destinations.

In its proposal, Air Choice One said the cost of 36 weekly round trips between Quincy and St. Louis would be $2.39 million annually for three- or four-year contracts. Flights would be aboard Cessna Grand Caravan single-engine aircraft.

Air Choice One also is proposing 18 round-trip flights to Chicago and 18 to St. Louis at an annual subsidy of $2.76 million. Or the airline could provide 12 round-trip flights to St. Louis and 24 to Chicago each week for a subsidy of $2.86 million per year.

Costs would rise to $3.16 million for 36 weekly flights to Chicago only.

A final Air Choice One option would offer flights on either the Cessna Grand Caravan or Beechcraft 1900 twin-engine aircraft at a subsidy of $3.36 million for 18 weekly flights each to St. Louis and Chicago.

Southern Airways Express of Hernando, Miss., has proposed 29 weekly flights to St. Louis and seven to Chicago at a cost of $2.49 million aboard Cessna Caravan aircraft. A second option would offer 36 weekly flights to St. Louis at a cost of $2.36 million.

Boutique Air from San Francisco proposed 36 weekly flights to St. Louis at a cost of $2.9 million; 30 weekly flights at costs of $2.76 million for three flights to St. Louis and two to Chicago; or $2.83 million for three weekday flights to Chicago and two to St. Louis.

Flights would be aboard a mix of single- and twin-engine aircraft.

SkyWest Airlines of St. George, Utah, proposed 12 weekly flights to Chicago aboard Canadair Regional Jet 200 aircraft with a capacity of 50 seats. The annual subsidy would be $2.66 million.

Federal officials will consider the mix of aircraft, schedules and costs. The city's choice of options, as well recommendations by local and federal elected officials, will be important in the final decision.

Although funding for the Essential Air Service was not included in President Donald Trump's proposed federal budget, airline officials are hopeful the funds will be included in the final spending plan approved by Congress. Moore said members of Congress also told him they're hopeful that funding will be approved.

"One thing they said we need to be mindful of is that there's a $200 per ticket cap for subsidies," Moore said.

Current costs for Quincy flights have been closer to $100 per ticket. Cape Air had more than 7,600 departing passengers last year, down from more than 10,200 in 2013.

The USDOT schedule calls for a contract to be in place by Dec. 1.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.whig.com

Fly Iowa is on city's radar




OTTUMWA — Ottumwa Regional Airport is going to be a very busy place this August, and the city is preparing to help.

Ottumwa was selected last year for Fly Iowa’s annual fly-in. It’s the 25th anniversary for the event, which is sponsored by the Iowa Aviation Promotion Group. The organization uses Fly Iowa to help increase interest in flying.

The Ottumwa Noon Lions are tentatively scheduled to host breakfasts beginning at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 26 and Sunday, Aug. 27. Flight kicks off each day with model airplanes, but these will be a bit different than the ones you may have used as a kid. These are jets. A similar event last year with model jet airplanes drew considerable interest.

After the models finish, the real thing gets to take off. An air show is scheduled for 1 p.m. each day. Four nationally-known stunt pilots are scheduled, and they’ll be flying a range of airplanes during the shows. A pilots' dinner, entertainment and a beer garden wrap up the evening Saturday.

With all that happening, it’s not a surprise the city is getting involved. City staff will provide some in-kind support, and the city plans to get a liquor license and insurance for the event.

Those steps require council approval, though. That’s why the fly-in is on the agenda for Tuesday’s meeting.

A more down-to-earth concern on the agenda is a contract for the city’s bridge inspection program. There are more bridges that fall under the program in Ottumwa than most people realize — 19 in all. The state requires inspection of the bridges every two years.

The contract covers 2017 and 2018. Four bridges are scheduled for inspection this year, and 12 more next year. The three pedestrian bridges also fall under the 2018 schedule.

City staff propose that Calhoun-Burns & Associates, Inc., conduct the inspections. The work is more detailed than a visual check for problems. The company will be responsible for updating the calculations for load limits, if necessary, and updating the scour evaluations if that is needed.

Completing the inspections is required for Ottumwa to maintain access to some funding sources and remain in compliance with the Iowa Department of Transportation.

The meeting is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the council chambers at city hall.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ottumwacourier.com

Fatal accident occurred June 16, 2017 near Harnett Regional Jetport Airport (KHRJ), Erwin, Harnett County, North Carolina




Friday was a picture-perfect day with warm weather and bright sunshine with slight wind gusts. Those slight wind gusts caused the ultralight piloted by 71-year-old Marshall Watkins of Raleigh to veer toward a group of trees. Mr. Watkins, a grandfather, tried to correct the path he was going, but ended up going down in Sawyer Field right next to Pierce Lane in Erwin. This stretch of airfield is not far from Harnett Regional Airport.

The crash call came in to the Harnett County 911 Center at 2:55 p.m. Mr. Watkins was pronounced dead at the scene.

Many pilots who fly into this field rushed out to see if they knew the pilot who had crashed. Jimmy Dorman, a fellow pilot, said, “It’s a bad situation and it had me worried to death when I heard that it might be some of my friends that hang around here and fly.” 

 Harnett County Sheriff’s Maj. Gary McNeill said witnesses said Mr. Watkins’ plane was hit by a gust of wind as he took off. He then tried to correct his path, but ended up going down.

Edie Pierce has lived on Pierce Lane for 32 years and said she has never witnessed a plane crash that ended with the loss of life.

“Most of the time pilots are able to get up and push their planes back to their storage area,” Mrs. Pierce said.

She was out running errands when she received an alert on her phone at 3:24 p.m., which informed her on the plane crash. Mrs. Pierce then received a text message from her daughter asking her if she was at home.

When she replied no, her daughter told her that she might want to get home that there had been a plane crash on her driveway.

Many of the residents who live along this road looked on in disbelief that something like this could happen.

Ricky Keeling, who had been flying since 1996, said that on a hot day like Friday it gives this type of aircraft a lot of thermal, which causes the aircraft to lift.

“Thermal can help or hurt you,” Mr. Keeling said.

He described this type of plane as fun, but it can also have the potential of danger. Mr. Keeling suggested he best time to fly this type of plane is early morning or late in the evening. He said during those times pilots do not have any wind.

Mr. Dorman said of flying an ultralight, “It’s like being a bird. You get in it and leave all your worries aside. You are free.”

Sawyer Field is a private airfield with a small hangar where ultralight aircraft are stored. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.mydailyrecord.com



ERWIN, North Carolina (WTVD) -- Officials are investigating a small plane crash just east of Lillington that took the life of a Raleigh man. 

Pictures from Chopper 11 showed the ultralight aircraft down behind a home on Pierce Lane in the Erwin area.

Officials said the pilot - the only person on board - was killed.

He's been identified as 71-year-old Marshall Thomas Watkins.

The Harnett County Sheriff's Office said witnesses reported that the aircraft was taking off from a grassy private airstrip located next to Pierce Lane. 

It appeared to the witnesses that a gust of wind pushed the aircraft toward a group of trees near the runway, the aircraft made a sharp turn away from the trees and went down.

Story and video:   http://abc11.com

  



ERWIN, N.C. (WNCN) — A weight-shift control trike crash Friday in Harnett County has killed one person, authorities confirmed.

The crash happened near Pierce Lane in Erwin, officials said. More details were not immediately available.

Marshal Thomas Watkins, 71, of Raleigh was killed in the crash, the Harnett County Sheriff’s Office said.

“Witnesses stated that the aircraft was taking off from a grassy private airstrip located next to Pierce Lane,” the Harnett County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. “It appeared to the witnesses that a gust of wind pushed the aircraft toward a group of trees near the runway, the aircraft made a sharp turn away from the trees and went down.”

Story and video:  http://wncn.com




 ERWIN, N.C. — One person died when a weight-shift control trike crashed Friday afternoon near Harnett County JetPort at Pierce Lane.

71-year-old Marshall Thomas Watkins of Raleigh was piloting the craft and was the only person on board.

Maj. Gary McNeill of the Harnett County Sheriff's Office said witnesses saw Watkins' craft hit by a gust of wind as he took off. He tried to correct his path but ended up going down in a nearby field.

Jimmy Dorman, a fellow pilot, said, "It's a bad situation, and it had me worried to death when I heard that it might be some of my friends that hang around here and fly."

Dorman was among a number of pilots to converge on the airfield after the incident.

Story and video:  http://www.wral.com

Air Tractor AT-802A, N915AJ, C&C Flying Service Inc: Accident occurred June 15, 2017 in Pocahontas, Randolph County, Arkansas

Additional Participating Entity:
 Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

 C&C Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N915AJ

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA342
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, June 15, 2017 in Pocahontas, AR
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 802, registration: N915AJ
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The aerial application pilot reported that, during the initial climb as soon as the airplane "broke ground," he turned left and subsequently encountered turbulence that caused the left wing to "dip." He added that, he applied full right aileron and rudder, but the airplane continued to sink and turn left. Subsequently, the left wing impacted terrain, the airplane cartwheeled, and a post-crash fire ensued.

The fuselage, empennage, and both wings sustained substantial damage during the impact and post-crash fire. 

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


An automated weather observation station, 12 nautical miles south, about the time of the accident, reported the wind as calm, clear skies, temperature 84°F (29°C), and dewpoint 64°F (18°C).

Bell 206L-3 LongRanger III, N83WP, City of Los Angeles / Department of Water and Power: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 in Bishop, Inyo County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno

City of Los Angeles / Department of Water and Power:   http://registry.faa.gov/N83WP

Rotorcraft, during powerline operation, struck a powerline.  Landed without incident. 


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    18:00:00Z
Regis#:    N83WP
Aircraft Make:    BELL
Aircraft Model:    206
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    MINOR
Activity:    OTHER
Flight Phase:    UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator:    CITY OF LOS ANGELES
City:    BISHOP
State:    CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172R, N5182A, IASCO Flight Training Inc: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento

IASCO Flight Training Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5182A

Aircraft, while in the runup area, caught fire, was extinguished.


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    13:56:00Z
Regis#:    N5182A
Aircraft Make:    CESSNA
Aircraft Model:    C172
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    UNKNOWN
Activity:    INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase:    STANDING (STD)
City:    REDDING
State:    CALIFORNIA

Beech E18S, N911E: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 at Palm Beach County Park Airport (KLNA), Lantana, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Lauderdale

http://registry.faa.gov/N911E

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed. 


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    21:29:00Z
Regis#:    N911E
Aircraft Make:    BEECH
Aircraft Model:    BE18
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    UNKNOWN
Activity:    UNKNOWN
Flight Phase:    LANDING (LDG)
City:    LANTANA
State:    FLORIDA

Douglas AD-1 Skyraider, N2AD, Skyraider Historic Military Aircraft LLC: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 at Waukegan National Airport (KUGN), Lake County, Illinois



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines

Skyraider Historic Military Aircraft LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N2AD

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and struck a light.


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    22:05:00Z
Regis#:    N2AD
Aircraft Make:    EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model:    AD1 WARBIRD
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    NONE
Activity:    UNKNOWN
Flight Phase:    UNKNOWN (UNK)
City:    WAUKEGAN
State:    ILLINOIS

Bell 47G-2, N90529, registered to NorthLand Helicopters Inc and operated by Scott's Helicopters: Accident occurred June 15, 2017 in Hastings, Marshan Township, Dakota County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Northland Helicopters Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N90529

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA232
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, June 15, 2017 in Hastings, MN
Aircraft: BELL-TELLIJOHN 47G, registration: N90529
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 15, 2017, about 1000 central daylight time, a Bell 47G helicopter, N90529, experienced a hard landing near Hastings, Minnesota. The pilot was seriously injured and the helicopter was substantially damaged. The helicopter was registered to NorthLand Helicopters Inc and operated by Scott's Helicopters, La Sueur, Minnesota under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and which operated without a flight plan.

According to preliminary information obtained by the responding Federal Aviation Administration inspector, after completing an aerial application, the helicopter entered in cruise flight for the return flight. The helicopter then experienced a loss of engine power. The helicopter descended and impacted terrain.

The helicopter was retained for further examination.




A pilot spraying insecticide suffered only minor injuries when the helicopter he was flying crashed Thursday morning in Dakota County, the sheriff’s office said.

The Bell 47 helicopter went down around 10:10 a.m. in a farm field near the intersection of 180th Street and Hwy. 61 in Marshan Township, just south of Hastings, said Sgt. Chris Melton.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, walked to an ambulance and was taken to a hospital, Melton said.

It was not immediately clear what caused the helicopter to drop from the sky and land in a potato field, said FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro.

He said the agency will send a team to the crash scene to investigate.

The rotorcraft was a total loss, Melton said.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.startribune.com

Sportine Aviacija LAK-12, N4206N: Accident occurred June 14, 2017 at Air Sailing Gliderport   (NV23), Sparks, Washoe County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA340
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 14, 2017 in Reno, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: SPORTINE AVIACIJA LAK 12, registration: N4206N
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The glider pilot reported that, during an aerotow takeoff and after becoming distracted by something in the cockpit, he looked back outside and noticed that he was about 100 ft higher than the tow airplane. He added that he attempted to correct, “but the tow hook released on its own.” The pilot turned the glider to the left, the left wing impacted the ground, and the glider came to rest in some brush.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s Glider Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-13A, “Normal Assisted Takeoff” section, stated, in part:

One of the most dangerous occurrences during aerotow is allowing the glider to fly high above and losing sight of the towplane. The tension on the towline caused by the glider pulls the towplane tail up, lowering its nose. If the glider continues to rise, pulling the towplane tail higher, the tow pilot may not be able to raise the nose. Ultimately, the tow pilot may run out of up elevator authority.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The glider pilot’s failure to maintain proper pitch during an aerotow takeoff. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N4206N


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA340
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 14, 2017 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: SPORTINE AVIACIJA LAK 12, registration: N4206N
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The glider pilot reported that during an aerotow takeoff, after becoming distracted by something in the cockpit, he looked back outside and noticed he was about 100 ft. higher than the tow airplane. He added that he attempted to correct, "but the tow hook released on its own". The pilot turned to the left, the left wing impacted the ground, the glider came to rest in some brush.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Glider Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-13A, "Normal Assisted Takeoff" section, stated in part:


One of the most dangerous occurrences during aerotow is allowing the glider to fly high above and losing sight of the towplane. The tension on the towline caused by the glider pulls the towplane tail up, lowering its nose. If the glider continues to rise, pulling the towplane tail higher, the tow pilot may not be able to raise the nose. Ultimately, the tow pilot may run out of up elevator authority.

Sikorsky S-76B, N7TP, DT Connect II LLC: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 at West 30th St Heliport (KJRA), New York, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale

DT Connect II LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N7TP

Rotorcraft on landing on helipad struck a fence. 


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    02:15:00Z
Regis#:    N7TP
Aircraft Make:    SIKORSKY
Aircraft Model:    S76B
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    MINOR
Activity:    UNKNOWN
Flight Phase:    LANDING (LDG)
City:    NEW YORK
State:    NEW YORK

Cessna A188B, N4877Q, Industrial Aviation Services Inc: Accident occurred June 14, 2017 in Brooks, Marion County, Oregon

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Industrial Aviation Services Inc:    http://registry.faa.gov/N4877Q


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA359
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 14, 2017 in Salem, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA A188, registration: N4877Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff roll for an agricultural flight, the airplane drifted left of the runway center, and the left wing and spray boom encountered tall grass. Subsequently, the airplane spun approximately 270°.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported in the Operator/Owner Safety Recommendation section of the NTSB Form 6120.1 that, the tall grass next to the runway "will be maintained shorter".

Grob G-103C TWIN III ACRO, N103GH, San Antonio Soaring Society Inc: Accident occured June 15, 2017 at Boerne Stage Field (5C1), San Antonio, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

San Antonio Soaring Society Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N103GH


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA343
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 15, 2017 in Boerne, TX
Aircraft: BURKHART GROB G103C, registration: N103GH

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Glider landed short of the runway and ground looped. 


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    20:40:00Z
Regis#:    N103GH
Aircraft Make:    BURKHART GROB
Aircraft Model:    G103C
Event Type:    ACCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    SUBSTANTIAL
Activity:    INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase:    LANDING (LDG)
City:    SAN ANTONIO
State:    TEXAS

Bell UH1H, N72594, Department of Homeland Security: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 in San Manuel-Linn, Hidalgo County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

Department of Homeland Security:  http://registry.faa.gov/N72594

Rotorcraft force landed in a field.


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    20:15:00Z
Regis#:    N72594
Aircraft Make:    BELL
Aircraft Model:    UH1H
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    UNKNOWN
Activity:    PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase:    UNKNOWN (UNK)
City:    SAN MANUEL
State:    TEXAS

Piper PA-28-161, N3940M, Condair Flyers Inc: Incident occurred June 15, 2017 at Rutland–Southern Vermont Regional Airport (KRUT), North Clarendon, Rutland County, Vermont

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Condair Flyers Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N3940M

Aircraft landed and wingtip struck a sign. 


Date:    15-JUN-17
Time:    16:20:00Z
Regis#:    N3940M
Aircraft Make:    PIPER
Aircraft Model:    PA28
Event Type:    INCIDENT
Highest Injury:    NONE
Aircraft Missing:    No
Damage:    UNKNOWN
Activity:    UNKNOWN
Flight Phase:    LANDING (LDG)
City:    RUTLAND
State:    VERMONT

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, VH-FYN: Fatal accident occurred June 16, 2017 in Ballina, Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR17WA127
Accident occurred Friday, June 16, 2017 in Ballina, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On June 16, 2017, about 0845 local time, a Cessna 172M, VH-FYN, collided with terrain near Ballina/Byron Gateway Aerodrome, New South Wales, Australia. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of the Australian Civil Aviation Regulations. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed. The personal flight departed Heck Field, Queensland.

The accident is under the jurisdiction of and is being investigated by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Further information can be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau

62 Northbourne Avenue

Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

Phone +61 2 6257 4150

Web site: www.atsb.gov.au

This report is for information purposes only, and contains only information obtained for, or released by, the Government of Australia.



Friday 2.37pm: 
Members of the tight-knit Gold Coast Sports Flying Club are struggling to come to terms with the loss of fellow pilot Doug Braund in a light plane crash near Ballina this morning.

Mr. Braund, 71, was flying his Cessna 172 Skyhawk from Heck Field at Jacob's Well on the Gold Coast this morning en route to Ballina airport when the plane crashed into dense bushland at Brooklet.

A member of the club, who did not wish to be named, said Mr Braund was a long-term member of the club who was "well respected" by his fellow pilots and "very experienced".

"It's a great loss," the man said.

"He was one of our staunchest members . . . a heart of gold.

"He was a good friend to everybody."

Many of the club's 120 members have already been informed about the tragic incident and are still in shock from the news.

A formal statement will be issued soon.

Police are still at the scene of the crash on a Brooklet property where the wreckage of the light plane remains suspended in the trees.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has commenced an investigation into the causes of the crash and will release a preliminary report in 30 days. 



Friday 1.10pm: 
An investigation is underway after a Cessna 172 airplane crashed at Brooklet this morning, killing the 71-year-old pilot.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau have confirmed they have deployed a team of four investigators to the accident site with expertise that includes aircraft engineering and maintenance.

"While on site the team will be examining the site and wreckage, gathering any recorded data, and interviewing any witnesses," a statement from the ATSB said.

"The ATSB will provide an update on its website outlining the facts of the accident within 30 days."

Friday 12.15pm: 
Police have confirmed that a 71-year-old pilot who took off from Queensland died in this morning's aircraft crash near Bangalow.

At 8am today the aircraft took off from Heck Field Flying Club in Jacobs Well, Queensland, on route to Ballina Airport, a spokesperson for NSW Police Media stated.

About 8.55am, local residents in Brooklet, heard a loud noise and found the aircraft had crashed into bushland. There was heavy fog at the time and debris was scattered over a large area.

A 71-year-old-man was located deceased at the scene.

He was the sole occupant of the aircraft.

NSW Police Media have said said the aircraft was a Cessna 172 Skyhawk.  

Story and video:   https://www.centraltelegraph.com.au 





Collision with terrain involving Cessna 172, VH-FYN, 12 km WNW of Ballina, NSW, on 16 June 2017

Investigation number: AO-2017-061
Investigation status: Active
Investigation in progress

Summary:

The ATSB is investigating a fatal aircraft accident involving a Cessna 172 aircraft, registered VH-FYN, that occurred about 12km WNW of Ballina, NSW on 16 June 2017.

The aircraft collided with terrain and the pilot, the only person on board, was fatally injured.

The ATSB has deployed a team of four investigators to the accident site with expertise that includes aircraft engineering and maintenance.

While on site the team will be examining the site and wreckage, gathering any recorded data, and interviewing any witnesses.

The ATSB will provide an update on its website outlining the facts of the accident within 30 days.

Aviation safety investigation report: http://www.atsb.gov.au

Jet Airways: Incident occurred June 16, 2017 at Jaipur International Airport, India

Jaipur: A Delhi-bound Jet Airways plane from Leh, with 125 passengers onboard, made an emergency landing on Friday at the Jaipur International Airport (JIA) as it was unable to land at the destination due to bad weather and was running low on fuel, an airport official said.

The aircraft landed safely and all passengers were safe, he said. The plane from Leh reached Delhi but it could not land there due to adverse weather conditions, JIA director J S Balhara said.

The aircraft was hovering over Delhi but bad weather could not allow it land, as a result it ran short of fuel following which it was diverted to Jaipur, he said. The plane landed safely here, he added. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.eenaduindia.com

Pilatus PC-6/B2-H4 Turbo Porter, PK-BVC, Susi Air: Incident occurred June 16, 2017 in Indonesia



A Susi Air Pilatus PC-6/B2-H4 Turbo Porter (PK-BVC) was forced to make an emergency landing at Kota Mulia airport in Puncak Jaya regency on Friday morning after one of its tires was apparently shot out by an unidentified gunman, police said. 

The aircraft was carrying a pilot and seven passengers, consisting of five Mobile Brigade police officers and two civilians. 

The plane has just arrived from Lumo district and landed when the pilot found the tire was flat. 

“Police found apparent bullet holes in the aircraft tire and fuselage,” the police said as quoted by kompas.com on Friday. 

One of passengers said he heard at least three fire shots when the aircraft took off from Lumo. 

No information is immediately available from the police as to the possible identity of the shooter.

Original article can be found here: http://www.thejakartapost.com




JAYAPURA, KOMPAS.com – Pesawat Susi Air jenis Pilatus PK-BVC mendarat darurat di Bandara Kota Mulia Kabupaten Puncak Jaya, Jumat (16/6/2017) sekitar pukul 09.20 WIT.

Subbid Penmas Bid Humas Polda Papua dalam siaran pers menjelaskan, pesawat yang dipiloti Steven, warga Australia, itu mendarat darurat karena mengalami ban pecah akibat ditembak.

Pesawat tersebut membawa 8 penumpang yang terdiri atas 5 anggota Brimob dan 2 orang masyarakat sipil.

Peristiwa itu berawal sekitar pukul 08.50 WIT, pesawat Pilatus PK-BVC terbang dari Mulia menuju Distrik Lumo. Lalu pada pukul 9.20 Wit, pesawat Pilatus PK-BVC kembali mendarat di Bandara Mulia.

Namun pada saat landing dengan jarang sekitar 300 meter dari apron, pilot mematikan mesin pesawat karena mengalami kempes di ban kanan.
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Kemudian dengan bantuan aparat keamanan dan masyarakat, pesawat bisa dievakuasi dengan didorong menuju tempat parkir di apron pesawat dengan jarak sekitar 300 meter, pada pukul 10.04 WIT.

"Setelah diperiksa oleh personel kepolisian, didapati lubang yang diduga akibat tembakan pada pelek ban roda sebelah kanan pesawat serta terdapat sebuah lubang pada badan pesawat bagian bawah depan," tulis siaran pers tersebut.

Dari keterangan salah satu penumpang, sempat didengar 3 kali tembakan dari arah ujung lapter sebelah kali pada saat pesawat lepas landas dari lapter Lumo menuju Bandara Mulia.

Akibat kejadian tersebut, aktivitas penerbangan sempat tergangu selama sekitar 45 menit. Saat ini, penerbangan dapat kembali berjalan normal.

Original article can be found here: http://regional.kompas.com

JAYAPURA - Pesawat jenis Pilatus Porter milik maskapai Susi Air yang mengangkut logistic hasil Pemungutan Suara Ulang (PSU), di Distrik Luma Puncak Jaya ditembaki oleh Kelompok Kriminal Bersenjata (KKB).

Kejadian tersebut terjadi sekira pukul 09.00 Wit. Pesawat yang juga membawa pasukan pengawalan logistik tersebut rencananya akan membawa logistik hasil PSU di wilayah tersebut ke Mulia Kota Kabupaten Puncak Jaya.

Kabid Humas Polda Papua Kombes A.M.Kamal mengatakan, penembakan oleh KKB terjadi saat pesawat tersebut hendak terbang ke Mulia.

"Saat hendak terbang pesawat ditembaki, dan mengenai dua titik yakni mengenai ban pesawat sebelah kanan dan ujung bagian belakang pesawat," ungkap Kamal, Jumat (16/6/2017).

Atas kejadian tersebut, pesawat gagal terbang, tidak ada korban jiwa dalam insuden tersebut, sementara logistik diamankan di bandara setempat.

"Rencana penerbangan untuk mengantar logistic, ada dua kali penerbangan, namun karena kejadian ini pesawat tidak jadi terbang, sementara untuk anggota yang mengawal logistic dan penumpang pesawat yang berjumlah 9 atau 11 orang tidak ada menjadi korban tembak, dan untuk logistic saat ini sudah diamankan di kantor bandara setempat,” ungkapnya.

Original article can be found here: http://news.okezone.com

Rules No Longer Rule Air Safety: After decades of mandatory rules, regulators in the U.S. and Europe are taking a more flexible, industry-friendly approach



The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
June 15, 2017 5:14 p.m. ET


BRUSSELS—Air-safety regulation is changing dramatically on both sides of the Atlantic, increasingly shifting from mandatory rules to voluntary standards dependent on enhanced government and industry collaboration that already has seen accident rates fall world-wide.

Capping years of gradual movement toward such cooperation, the more flexible, industry-friendly approach was spelled out this week by speakers at an international aviation conference in the Belgian capital. Senior European and U.S. regulators emphasized that formal, prescriptive rules—once the bedrock of aviation oversight—are now often their last resort in confronting difficult safety issues.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration previously announced its revised enforcement principles, which rely heavily on data analyses buttressed by joint efforts with industry to anticipate and resolve hazards. But for the European Aviation Safety Agency, which has spent much of the past few years recruiting staff and reorganizing, the conference provided a prominent public platform to unveil its new philosophy.

“We are not going to rely so much in Europe on rules,” Patrick Ky, EASA executive director, told the gathering Wednesday. Instead, he said the agency is looking to benefit from safety promotion, industry consensus on technical standards and other alternate ways to ensure safety.

On Thursday, Jean-Marc Cluzeau, head of strategy for the agency, gave a presentation on some of those new plans, saying EASA is determined to “consider systematically alternatives to rule-making.”

With the proliferation of unmanned aircraft, EASA is examining ways to oversee startups, some of which have little aviation experience. Mr. Cluzeau said that requires a new strategy. “The best way to kill a new business model is to start regulating it,” he said.

At another point, Mr. Cluzeau asserted: “Maybe the best way to improve regulation is not to consider regulation.”

Airlines, plane manufacturers, equipment suppliers and other industry segments have applauded the less-confrontational approach of regulators in recent years. And aviation authorities have taken some of the credit for adopting new oversight and enforcement strategies that have produced an era of record low airline accident rates world-wide. But safety experts fret that growing traffic and long-term complacency could result in an uptick in crashes.

Many industry officials argue prescriptive rules simply aren’t able to mitigate risks because many crucial aviation technologies evolve too rapidly. Both sides, however, point to development of new FAA certification standards for general aviation and business aircraft, which go into effect this summer, as a successful example of more-nimble regulatory activity. By obtaining industry consensus and streamlining the process, the new, updated document whittled an unwieldy regulatory package of some 377 specific technical requirements down to 71 requirements.

Under the traditional system, the FAA mandated all small-plane manufacturers demonstrate the safety of seats by passing specific tests that limited how far seats could shift in a simulated crash. But “that doesn’t necessarily mean people [would] stay safe in the event of a crash” in the real world, said Gregory Bowles, vice president of policy for the General Aviation Manufacturers Association.

By contrast, the FAA’s new approach permits manufacturers to choose from among a range of engineering options—from various energy-absorbing materials to specialized harnesses to seat belts with built-in air bags—that “may be more effective” in protecting occupants and require less engineering work, according to Mr. Bowles

In the U.S. and Europe, it takes about four years on average from the time agency experts begin work on a specific regulation to its final adoption. In many cases, speakers at the conference agreed, that’s way too long to deal with fast-changing technologies.

One potential solution is to get regulators more deeply involved from the beginning, when companies start considering new hardware that will need to be certified by the FAA and EASA. “We have to get information early on” if industry hopes to reduce the rule-making delay, said Lirio Liu, director of the FAA’s office of rule-making.

Ms. Liu also told the conference that the FAA faces separate challenges to comply with governmentwide White House directives that for every new regulation, two existing regulations must be eliminated. She said the net impact of the rule changes is intended to avoid imposing additional costs on industry. “That will be a challenge for us in the future,” Ms. Liu said.

Those restrictions are one more reason the FAA, like EASA, wants to use alternative approaches to formal rules. Ms. Liu said the agency’s revised oversight strategy is the “culmination of events that have led us” to rely less on traditional rules specifying technical solutions and more on those giving manufacturers maximum flexibility to reach performance goals.

John Duncan, the FAA’s head of flight standards, said “it’s a big cultural change within our organization,” requiring a gradual phase-in. But Mr. Duncan added that, personally, he doesn’t want “to engage in any further rule-making that’s prescriptive in nature.”

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Boeing 747-400, Delta Air Lines flight 276, N668US: Incident occurred June 07, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N668US 

NTSB Identification: ENG17IA026
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Delta Air Lines
Incident occurred Wednesday, June 07, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan
Aircraft: BOEING 747 451, registration: N668US
Injuries: 324 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On June 6, 2017, about 0950 UTC, Delta Air Lines flight 276, a Boeing 747-400, N668US, experienced a loss of power during cruise flight from the No. 1 engine, a Pratt & Whitney PW4056 while in cruise flight over the Pacific Ocean. 

The flight crew reported the airplane was level at FL 320 when they heard a thump that was followed by a yawing of the airplane as the exhaust gas temperature increased to redline and then the engine auto shutdown. 

The flight crew declared an emergency and deviated from the track as the airplane descended to FL280 where they accomplished the checklist items. 

After consultation with dispatch and maintenance, the flight crew diverted back to Tokyo Narita International Airport (NRT), Japan where it landed without further incident. 

The post landing examination of the engine revealed metal in the tailpipe and a 360 degree crack in the low pressure turbine case just forward of the rear flange. 

The airplane was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as an international passenger flight from NRT to Detroit, Michigan.

 There were no injuries to the 4 pilots, 14 flight attendants, and 309 passengers on board.