Friday, June 8, 2018

Beech A36 Bonanza, N222JB: Incident occurred June 08, 2018 at Mineta San Jose International Airport (KSJC), Santa Clara County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose

Gear collapsed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N222JB 

Date: 08-JUN-18
Time: 23:08:00Z
Regis#: N222JB
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN JOSE
State: CALIFORNIA


A small plane suffered a gear collapse upon landing Friday afternoon at Mineta San Jose International Airport, an airport spokeswoman said.

No one was hurt during the 4:08 p.m. landing, airport spokeswoman Rosemary Barnes said. Two people were aboard the plane, a Beechcraft Bonanza.

“We are happy to report both are safe,” she said.

It appears the aircraft landing gear, the structure that stabilizes an aircraft upon landing, collapsed as the plane touched down on the airport’s left runway. The airport has two runways that run parallel to each other, both measuring 11,000 feet in length.

“This doesn’t happen that often, but when it does occur, this is why we have a safety plan in place,” Barnes said.

It wasn’t immediately known how old the plane is or where it was arriving from.

Barnes said that flight operations would be up and running again within the hour; in the meantime, planes scheduled to land on the runway are being rerouted to the second runway.

“We’re in good shape here. Our other runway is operational, so we don’t expect major delays,” she said.

As of 5:30 p.m., the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board were investigating the incident and working to remove the plane from the runway.

In addition to the airport’s operations team, San Jose firefighters and San Jose police also responded.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mercurynews.com

Source of sonic boom may have been identified

WEST PLAINS, Mo. — The source of an extremely loud sonic boom that was heard over a wide swath of the Ozarks Wednesday afternoon may no longer be “up in the air”.

Dispatchers at the Howell County Sheriff’s Office and West Plains Police Department told Ozark Radio News Wednesday that several dozen calls were fielded after the 12:15 pm incident. Several calling in to the agencies reported seeing an airplane either before or after the boom. No major damage was reported.

After the sound rocked the region, reports came in to area emergency services and to Ozark Radio News from a area ranging from as far south as Pocahontas, Ark. to as far west as Gainesville and as far east as Summersville, and north to Salem, Mo.

Rumors began to swirl on social media of the source of the sound — from a sonic boom from a jet breaking the sound barrier overhead, to earthquakes or dynamite, to the possibility of a meteor exploding high in the atmosphere.

Ozark Radio News reached out to officials at Whiteman Air Force Base near Knob Noster, Missouri and Little Rock Air Force Base in Arkansas to see if there were military exercises in the area at that time. Officials from both bases stated they had not been conducting exercises at the time the sound occurred, however, 2nd Lt. Hunter Rininger with Little Rock AFB stated that testing may have been done at Fort Chaffee as part of an annual training regimen. We’ve reached out to Fort Chaffee for confirmation.

Ozark Radio News also reached out to aircraft manufacturer Boeing for information on possible testing. Shaniqua Manning Muhammad with Boeing’s test and evaluation division told us that the company did conduct an acceptance flight for an F-15 jet in that area Wednesday afternoon.

Acceptance flights are test flights typically conducted by the customer after the purchase of an aircraft.

Fighter jets are known for breaking the sound barrier, which is when the plane travels faster than the speed of sound. The speed of sound, or Mach 1, is roughly 767 mph. F-15s can reach over Mach 2, or 1,656 mph.

No major damage has been reported in connection with the sound.

Original article ➤  https://www.ozarkradionews.com

Senator Blunt backs Kirksville Regional Airport (KIRK) to continue Essential Air Service Program



KIRKSVILLE, Mo. — A U.S. Senator from Missouri is offering support to the City of Kirksville and its airport.

It was announced last month, that a federal program aimed at keeping airfare low in Kirksville could be tentatively terminated.

Kirksville city staffers had received a letter from the Department of Transportation.

It stated that the city and Kirksville Regional Airport went over the subsidized amount tied to the Essential Air Service or EAS Program.

That program provides 173 rural communities with subsidies for air travel across the country, totaling nearly $300 million.

In Kirksville, Cape Air is part of the Essential Air Service.

Kirksville Regional Airport Director Glenn Balliew says in order to participate in the program, flights must average a certain amount of revenue to qualify.

He said in fiscal year 2017, substantial weather during the winter caused a number of canceled flights, which resulted in a drop in passenger numbers.

Balliew, who is confident Cape Air will continue service in Kirksville, has been in contact with Republican U.S. Senator Roy Blunt's Office.

Blunt recently sent a letter to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

The letter stated that Kirksville exceeded the subsidy cap by just over $3. Blunt went on to say that the airport is successful, and helps provide economic growth to the area.

This is the first time Kirksville has ever exceeded the EAS cap. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://ktvo.com

New lights being installed at La Crosse Regional Airport (KLSE)



LA CROSSE, Wis. (WKBT) - The next time you take off from the La Crosse Regional Airport, you may notice one glaring change. 

Crews are busy replacing nearly every single light bulb on the runways.

The majority of the lights will be LED lights, which will be more efficient and provide some cost savings.

Officials say it will save them about $10,000 a year.

Airline pilots also prefer them while landing planes at night.

"Technically they're the same brightness as the existing lights. All these lights have to be FAA approved. But they do have a different  look to them. So if you do hold that LED light up to your incandescent they do have a crisper look to them," said Clinton Torp, La Crosse Airport Director.

The wiring of the lights also needed to be replaced... because it was starting to degrade and cause electrical issues.

Story and video: https://www.news8000.com

Beech 58 Baron, N190RS, registered to Bonanza Partners LLC and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred June 08, 2018 at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (KBTR), Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N190RS

Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Accident Number: CEN18LA221
Date & Time: 06/08/2018, 1605 CDT
Registration: N190RS
Aircraft: BEECH 58
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On June 8, 2018, about 1605 central daylight time, a Beech 58 airplane, N190RS, sustained substantial damage during initial climb from the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (BTR), Baton Rouge, Louisiana, when the right wing caught on fire. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to Bonanza Partners LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight was being operated on an instrument flight plan. The flight was departing BTR and was en route to the Jonesboro Municipal Airport (JBR), Jonesboro, Louisiana.

The pilot reported that during the initial climb from runway 31 about 200 ft above ground level, she heard a loud bang from the right wing and subsequently saw fire near the right wingtip. She made an emergency landing on runway 13 at BTR and the airport fire department extinguished the fire. The location of the fire was outboard of the right engine near the wingtip and auxiliary fuel tank. The aluminum wing skin exhibited black charring, burn holes, popped rivets, and buckling on the top and bottom of the wing.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N190RS
Model/Series: 58
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Kirby Wagner
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BTR, 69 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Baton Rouge, LA (BTR)
Destination: Jonesboro, LA (JBR)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: In-Flight
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.533056, -91.150000


BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -  Emergency crews responded to a small aircraft on fire at the Baton Rouge Airport Friday afternoon.

The call went out around 4:15 p.m. on Friday, June 8. 

A spokesperson with the airport says during pre-flight, before takeoff, a twin engine aircraft caught fire due to something sparking near the engine. 

The BTR fire team was able to quickly extinguish the fire.

One person was on-board the plane.

No injuries were reported in the incident, say emergency officials. There was also no impact to overall operations at the airport.

Story and video:  http://www.wafb.com




BATON ROUGE - The Baton Rouge Fire Department responded to reports of a plane on fire at the BTR Airport Friday afternoon.

The fire was first reported around 4:15 p.m. at the Baton Rouge Airport. 

An airport spokesperson initially said the fire occurred aboard a small plane during pre-flight checks.

However, the airport later clarified that the fire happened while the plane was still in the air and the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing.

The pilot reportedly heard a loud noise and spotted fire coming from the aircraft's right wing, prompting the landing.

The fire was quickly brought under control and operations at the airport were not impacted, according to the spokesperson.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.wbrz.com

Rockford, Illinois: Mercyhealth REACT receives new helicopter



ROCKFORD - The Mercyhealth REACT team has a new helicopter.

The new Airbus EC 145 will allow crews to fly farther and faster to aid patient around the Stateline area. the helicopter is equipped with all the critical care supplies found in an emergency room or Intensive Care Unit.

Safety features, like an advanced autopilot, will allow pilots to operate more safely. 

Lead REACT pilot, Clark Pollard, says it all comes down to size.

"The big difference, the big takeaway [is], this is a larger helicopter, overall, and what it really provides for is a better environment for our med crews to be able to execute better patient care," Pollard said.

The larger cabin not only means more room for crew, but it allows for specialized equipment - like a neonatal incubator - to help even the smallest of patients.

Story and video ➤ http://www.mystateline.com

Zodiac 601 HD, N318MH: Accident occurred August 21, 2014 at Gillespie County Airport (T82), Fredericksburg, Texas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N318MH


Location: Fredericksburg, TX
Accident Number: CEN14LA447
Date & Time: 08/21/2014, 1450 CDT
Registration: N318MH
Aircraft: HERDER MICHAEL ZODIAC 601 HD
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

After a cross-country flight and as the pilot approached his destination airport, he checked the wind. After flying a normal traffic pattern for runway 14, he made two unsuccessful landing attempts. On the third attempt, the airplane experienced a wind gust, and the airplane banked 90 degrees. The pilot applied power; however, the left wing impacted the runway. The airplane cartwheeled twice and then came to rest inverted next to the runway. There were no reported malfunctions with the airplane before the accident. A review of the airport's automated weather reporting station report indicated that, about the time of the accident, the airplane would have experienced about a 15-knot crosswind gusting to 20 knots. The accident is consistent with a loss of control during windy conditions.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's loss of airplane control during a gusting crosswind landing.

Findings

Aircraft

Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Gusts - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information 

On August 21, 2014, about 1450 central daylight time, a Zodiac 601 HD airplane, N318MH, impacted terrain near the Gillespie County Airport, (T82), Fredericksburg, Texas. The private rated pilot, sole occupant, was seriously injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a Saavy Biz, Inc, Roanoke, Texas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan.

According to the pilot, as he approached T82, the wind was 18 to 22 knots. He flew a normal traffic pattern to runway 14, but made two unsuccessful attempts to land. On his third attempt to land, while 100 feet above the runway at 55 knots, a wind gust hit the airplane and banked the airplane 90-degrees. The pilot reported that he applied power; however, the left wing impacted the runway. The airplane cartwheeled twice before coming to rest, inverted next to the runway.

There were no reported malfunctions with the airplane prior to the accident, and examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the fuselage, wings, and empennage. A review of the automated weather reporting station report, about the time of the accident, revealed that the pilot would have experienced a crosswind of about 15 knots gusting to 20 knots. 

History of Flight

Approach

Other weather encounter

Approach-VFR pattern final

Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Approach
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/14/2014
Flight Time: 380 hours (Total, all aircraft), 145 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HERDER MICHAEL
Registration: N318MH
Model/Series: ZODIAC 601 HD
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 6-7356
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/13/2013, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: JABIRU
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 3300
Registered Owner: SAAVY BIZ INC
Rated Power: 120 hp
Operator: SAAVY BIZ INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: T82
Observation Time: 1455 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots/ 21 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hamilton, TX (KMNZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fredericksburg, TX (T82)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1330 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Gillespie County Airport (T82)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1695 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 14
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  30.248889, -98.913333

de Havilland Dash 8-100, N815EX, operated by Piedmont Airlines d/b/a US Airways Express: Accident occurred August 10, 2014 near Harrisburg International Airport (KMDT), Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N815EX

Location: Harrisburg, PA
Accident Number: DCA14CA147
Date & Time: 08/10/2014, 0605 EDT
Registration: N815EX
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 8 102
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 20 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

On August 10, 2014 at about 0605 eastern daylight time, a deHavilland DHC-8-100, N815EX, operated by Piedmont Airlines d.b.a. USAirways Express flight 4206, struck a flock of geese during the takeoff roll from Middletown Harrisburg International Airport (KMDT), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There were no injuries to the passengers or crew and the airplane sustained damage. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight between KMDT and Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The captain was the pilot flying and the first officer was the pilot monitoring. According to the flight crew, about 15 seconds into the takeoff roll and prior to V1, the captain observed a large group of geese flying from right to left in front of the airplane. He immediately initiated a rejected takeoff as the airplane impacted multiple geese on the front windshield and the right engine propeller, which caused a severe vibration. The flight crew shut down the right engine as the airplane slowed and returned to the gate.

Examination of the airplane indicated damage to the right propeller, a broken passenger window, and damage to the fuselage skin and stringers near the broken window.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
the airplanes collision with geese during the takeoff roll.

Findings

Environmental issues
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Effect on equipment (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff-rejected takeoff
Birdstrike (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/08/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  36000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18000 hours (Total, this make and model), 205 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 67 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 30, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/14/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  4022 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3662 hours (Total, this make and model), 223 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 75 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: DEHAVILLAND
Registration: N815EX
Model/Series: DHC 8 102 103
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1992
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 321
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 41
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/09/2014, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 34500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 53834 Hours
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time:  at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt and Whitney
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PW120A
Registered Owner: PIEDMONT AIRLINES INC
Rated Power: 2000 hp
Operator: PIEDMONT AIRLINES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As: US Airways Express
Operator Designator Code: HNAA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dawn
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMDT
Observation Time: 0556 EDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  9 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Harrisburg, PA (MDT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Philadelphia, PA (PHL)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: HARRISBURG INTL (MDT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 309 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10002 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 17 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 20 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.193333, -76.762778 (est)

CubCrafters CC19-180, N7XC: Accident occurred June 07, 2018 at Santa Monica Airport (KSMO), California



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles

Aircraft ground looped on landing.

Abida Babida LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7XC

Date: 07-JUN-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N7XC
Aircraft Make: CUB CRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: CC19 180
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SANTA MONICA
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-34-200, N4907T: Incident occurred June 07, 2018 at Kissimmee Gateway Airport (KISM), Osceola County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft landed and experienced a prop strike.

South Florida Aviation Group LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N4907T

Date: 07-JUN-18
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N4907T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 34 200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KISSIMMEE
State: FLORIDA

Bell UH-1H (UH-1D-BF) Iroquois, N624HF: Incident occurred June 02, 2018 in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Rotorcraft departed and reported cargo door detachment which struck the rotorcraft, returned and landed without incident.

Army Aviation Heritage Foundation Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N624HF

Date: 02-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N624HF
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: UH 1H
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: SIGHT SEEING
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: ROME
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 182G, N2387R: Incident occurred June 04, 2018 at Clermont County Airport (I69), Batavia, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati

Aircraft landed hard, veered off the runway and struck a runway light.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2387R

Date: 04-JUN-18
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N2387R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182G
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BATAVIA
State: OHIO

Bellanca 7GCBC, N3202H: Accident occurred June 07, 2018 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KAWO), Snohomish County, Washington

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

 http://registry.faa.gov/N3202H

Location: Arlington, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA328
Date & Time: 06/07/2018, 1130 PDT
Registration: N3202H
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCBC
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during the landing roll, he applied the brakes too hard and the tailwheel-equipped airplane nosed down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) , 323 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 22 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Registration: N3202H
Model/Series: 7GCBC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Aerobatic; Normal
Serial Number: 524-73
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/03/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1740.9 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAWO, 137 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1827 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 132°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3600 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Snohomish, WA (S43)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Arlington, WA (AWO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: ARLINGTON MUNI (AWO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 141 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5332 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  48.163611, -122.163333 (est)

Chadron Municipal Airport (KCDR) History and Other Flying Incidents Since 1951

Sept. 1951 1st Lt. John Hoke, 31, of Chadron was missing in action in Korea after the F-51 Mustang fighter plane he was piloting was seen making a pass over enemy targets and crashed. Hoke was a graduate of Chadron High and had attended Chadron State for three years before moving with his wife and two sons to Cheyenne. He was called into active duty with the Wyoming National Guard.

Sept. 1952 Two Chadron men died in a single-engine plane crash about 5 ½ miles southwest of Chadron. They were Solomon (Sully) Luft, 33, manager of the Chadron Airport and owner of Luft Aviation, and Dick Carlson, 28, a salesman for Chicoine Motor Co. Both had been World War II pilots. One wing of the plane struck a power pole. Carlson was a Crawford native and left a wife and two sons. Luft was from Sterling, Colo., and came to Chadron in 1947. He was survived by his wife and a son. (P.S. His wife eventually married a minister, was married to him more than 50 years and she was in her 90s when she died in early 2018.)

Jan. 1954 Chris Abbott, 64, of Hyannis, prominent rancher and president of the Bank of Chadron, eight other banks in Nebraska and a bank at Winner, S.D., died in an airplane crash near Shreveport, La., where he, nine other businessmen and two pilots were returning from hunting ducks.

Jan. 1954 Two Sioux County ranchers, Harry Engebretsen and Billy Andrews, died in a small plane crash 15 miles southwest of Harrison, where they were hunting coyotes.

July 1955 Harry Halstead, 61-year-old aerial crop sprayer, died 10 miles northeast of Chadron when the J-3 Piper cub he was flying crashed in a ravine on the Charlie Littrel ranch. Halstead was preparing to spray a wheat field owned by Carl Lindeken. The plane was owned by Carl and his brother Bill.

Oct. 1958 Frontier Airlines began east-west airline service to Chadron with its daily flights from Omaha to Casper.

December Chadron voters rejected a $30,000 bond issue by a 335 to 301 margin to construct an east-west runway and expand the loading ramp at the Chadron Airport. The entire project would have cost $120,000, including a $60,000 federal grant and $30,000 from the state.

Feb. 1959 The airport improvement bond issue that had failed in December 1958 was voted on again and passed by a 903 to 761 margin following “spirited campaigning.”

June 1959 The Nebraska Safety Patrol announced that it would begin nabbing speeders by using airplanes. Lines would be painted across highways a mile apart. Personnel in the planes would check the speed of motorists with stopwatches and use radios to notify patrolmen in cars of violations.

Nov. 1959 Frontier Airlines announced plans to abandon its northern route from Chadron to Omaha because of low passenger boardings. Stops also were made in Valentine, Ainsworth and Norfolk.

April 1960 Because of heavy fog, an Oklahoma pilot with a passenger aboard landed a single engine plane on a stretch of Highway 20 nine miles west of Crawford. The plane traveled 640 feet on the highway before it veered into a ditch and hit a fence.

Oct. 1961 Following months of legal hassling, the Civil Aeronautics Board in Washington, D.C., ruled that Frontier Airlines could abandon the northern route from Chadron to Omaha effective in December. The action came more than a year after Frontier discontinued its flights from Chadron to Casper. The CAB had anticipated that 34,000 passengers would use the service into Wyoming annually, but the total was only 6,600.

Dec. 1965 Chadron voters approved construction of a 6,000-foot runway to accommodate Frontier Airlines’ new Convairs. The vote was 666-93.

Oct. 1966 Construction of a runway at the Chadron Municipal Airport to help accommodate Frontier Airlines new Convair aircraft began after a contact for $291,870 was awarded. (See 2015-16 item about replacement of the runway.)

Jan. 1968 The first airmail taxi service left the Chadron Airport on Jan. 21.

Oct. 1969 Three men from Indianapolis died in airplane crash in the rugged buttes south of Whitney, probably while planning to land at the Chadron Airport. They reportedly were returning from a hunting trip to Wyoming.

May 1971 Pilot Darrell Moore of Lead, S.D., died in a plane crash southwest of Chadron while intending to land at the Chadron Airport because of bad weather. He initially was planning to fly to Kearney.

Jan. 1972 Lyle Kime, 29, manager of the Chadron Airport, and two passengers, Daniel French, 24, of Chadron, and Leo Pederson, 53, of Hot Springs, died in an airplane crash near Chambers, Neb.

Sept. 1974 Gordon attorney E.A. Anderson, 51, died in the wreckage of his small airplane about 15 miles east of Gordon. He apparently was looking over some land he was interested in purchasing when the wing of the plane caught the ground.

Feb. 1975 Capt. David Frerichs, a Strategic Air Command pilot stationed at Offutt AFB near Omaha, and three passengers died in a crash in the buttes on the Levi Richardson ranch south of Whitney during bad weather. The passengers included an Omaha pastor who was scheduled to speak at a Full Gospel Businessman’s Retreat at Camp Norwesca. The plane reportedly had made one pass over Chadron in bad weather and was circling back for a second approach.

June 1977 Four young men died when a single engine plane slammed into a gully about nine miles northwest of Gordon. The victims were Darwin and Rodney Calkins of Gordon, Robert Grant of Alliance and Samuel Foster of Hay Springs. The crash occurred near the Calkins’ farm. A family member who saw the plane fly overhead said the engine seemed to die while the craft was in the air.

July 1977 Paul Hartman of Whitney, who had been paralyzed since age 9 because of after-effects of chicken pox, soloed in Frank Snook’s single-engine plane, giving him another milestone. Earlier, Hartman was a state archery champion and graduated from Chadron State College before becoming a social worker for the Panhandle Mental Health Center.

Sept 1977 About 2,000 attended the first air show in Chadron in 25 years with aerobatics, skydiving and the display of unusual and antique airplanes featured. Among the participants was Charles Curothers, a Lincoln dentist who was the American International Aerobatics championship in 1974 with his Pitts Special. Another feature was a stunt routine by airport manager Jim Strang, who dressed as a grandmother, revved up a plane and took off.

June 1978 Steve Myers and Eric Reid, members of prominent Chadron families, were en route to the Lincoln area for a fraternity get-together when they died in a small plane crash near Columbus after it was caught in bad weather. Myers had been the valedictorian of the Chadron High Class of 1978.

April 1979 The Chadron Airport received a $147,903 grant from the federal government to resurface the runway, add an apron around the runway and install runway taxi lights.

April 1979 Frontier Airlines announced its intention for termination of service in the Nebraska Panhandle because the airports at Chadron, Alliance and Sidney could not accommodate its Boeing 737s. The airline could not drop the flights until a suitable replacement was found.

July 1979 Larry Wineteer, a Chadron native and an Air Force pilot, flew several missions to war-torn Nicaragua, including the flight that returned the body of broadcast journalist Bill Stewart, who was murdered while covering the revolution. In a letter to his parents, Wineteer said the airport at the capital of Managua was surrounded by Sandinista guerrillas.

May 1980 Four airlines applied to take over Frontier Airlines’ flights in the Panhandle. Pioneer Airlines was selected and began service on Dec. 1.

Dec. 1980 Pioneer Airways began serving Alliance, Chadron, Denver, Rapid City and Sidney on Dec. 1.

May 1982 Pioneer Airways requested an additional $22,000 monthly in federal appropriation in federal subsidy for its Panhandle route.

May 1982 A Chadron man, Terry Hupp, who was taking a training flight to qualify for a pilot’s license, escaped with minor injuries when he tried to land the single-engine craft in a pasture about two miles northwest of the airport. The plane’s engine died and the craft flipped onto its top when a front wheel entered a depression where a pipeline had been placed.

Sept. 1982 Pioneer Airways was granted a 30-day extension to provide airline service to the Panhandle. The Nebraska Department of Aeronautics went on record supporting an alternate proposal for air service that the airline presented.

Sept. 1982 For the second time in 1982, a small plane crashed north of Chadron. It was piloted by Harold Featherngill. A passenger, Larry Bernard, sustained two broken ankles and a back injury.

March 1983 Pioneer Airline said it would continue to serve the Panhandle with two flights daily to Denver for at least another year after its subsidy from the Civil Aeronautic Board was increased by more than $300,000 from the previous year. The new subsidy of $796,465, was raised, in part, because Pioneer was using a 19-passenger Fairchild Metro aircraft.
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Dec. 1983 The Chadron City Council issued an ultimatum to Pioneer Airlines that it must pay its rent at the Chadron Airport or leave. The council said Pioneer was three months behind on its $150 monthly landing fee and $110 monthly charge for use of the old terminal.

Dec. 1987 A GP Express commuter plane crashed south of Whitney, killing the pilot and co-pilot. However, a passenger, William Prante, 18, of Rushville survived despite being thrown out of the craft. An all-night search was conducted before he was found and taken to the Chadron hospital.

Oct. 1988 The Federal Aviation Administration approved a $750,000 grant for the Chadron Airport to receive an instrument landing system designed to help prevent airplane crashes such as the one that claimed the lives of two GP Express pilot in December 1987. The equipment was installed in 1989. The Chadron Airport was one of the smallest in the nation to have the system.

Oct. 1988 While speaking at Chadron State, astronaut William Readdy predicted people will be living on the moon and going to Mars in 20 years, but he would not guarantee they would be Americans.

Nov. 1988 Ted Grant of Chadron was one of the first B-1 bomber pilots after the planes were put into operation in 1985. Stationed at Ellsworth Air Force Base near Rapid City, Grant said the planes were “so advanced they you can almost talk to it.”

1988 A new brick terminal was constructed at the Chadron Airport.

Jan. 1989 Les Mittleider, owner of L&D Aero at the Chadron Airport, walked away from his badly mangled Cessna 172 about 1.5 miles north of the airport. Mittleider said, “I feel very lucky.”

July 1989 Scott Hare, 36, of Gordon died in an airplane accident about eight miles southeast of Hay Springs where he was spraying crops. He was among the pilots who used their planes to fight the fire at Fort Robinson earlier in the month.

Sept. 1989 Two Chadron men, Mike Hollibaugh and Tim Jamison, were aboard a single-engine airplane that crashed about six miles southwest of Hyannis during a rainstorm. Hollibaugh suffered a broken collarbone, but Jamison was able to walk to the highway to summon assistance. The pilot, Wayne Wilkins of Alliance, also survived.

Sept. 1989 Chadron State science professor Jim McCafferty was the 1989 recipient of the Federal Aviation Administration’s “championship award for excellence in aviation administration” in the region covering Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri for his role in aviation education. Several summers he conducted aerospace education workshops at CSC. In the fall of 1988, he hosted several NASA experts and spacemobiles that visited every Panhandle community. The activities were culminated by a two-day visit by astronaut William Readdy. (Readdy also spoke at CSC in 1988)

May 1996 Great Lakes Aviation replaced GP Express in providing commercial airline passenger service in Chadron.

May 1997 Great Lakes Aviation voluntarily suspended its flights between Chadron and Denver in the wake of safety allegations raised by the Federal Aviation Administration. The flights resumed six weeks later after the aircrafts passed FAA inspection.

Oct. 2015 John Prickett of Double Oak, Texas, died when his Beech P-35 plane collided with trees and terrain south of Chadron shortly after leaving the Chadron Airport at 11:21 a .m. on Oct. 6 en route to Alliance. Neither foul weather nor mechanical failure was believed to be a cause of the crash.

2015-16 One of the main runways at the Chadron Airport was replaced a year-long construction project being in the summer of 2015. The runway is 100 X 6,000 feet and the concrete about a foot thick. Two 35-foot taxiways from the runway to the terminal also were replaced and another taxiway was constructed during the project. The cost of the project was $6 million with 95 percent of it paid for by the federal government (FAA). The city paid the remaining 5 percent, or $300,000.

2017 Boutique Airlines has been held Chadron’s flight service contract for several years, and appears to be flourishing. The airport is busier than ever before. Boutique has three flights coming and going daily from Chadron to Denver. Two of them make stops in Alliance. The passenger boardings the last three months in 2017 were 440 in October, 486 in November and 502 in December. Boutique uses a single-engine plane that has two pilots and room for 8 passengers. The airport receives a federal subsidy to provide flight service to Chadron.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://rapidcityjournal.com