Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Mooney M20C, registered to Nelson Flying Service and operated by the pilot, N113TA: Fatal accident occurred November 26, 2018 near Santa Fe Municipal Airport (KSAF), New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N113TA

Location: Santa Fe, NM
Accident Number: CEN19FA032
Date & Time: 11/26/2018, 1950 MST
Registration: N113TA
Aircraft: Mooney M20C
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On November 26, 2018, about 1950 mountain standard time, a Mooney M20C airplane, N113TA, impacted terrain about 1/3-mile south of the Santa Fe Municipal Airport (SAF), Santa Fe, New Mexico. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to Nelson Flying Service and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on flight plan. The flight originated from the Phoenix Goodyear Airport (GYR), Goodyear, Arizona about 1500 and was destined for the Colorado Plains Airport (AKO), Akron, Colorado.

A friend reported that the pilot had recently purchased the airplane and was planning to relocate it to AKO in order to have an annual inspection completed.

Employees of the Lux Air Jet Center at GYR reported that the pilot had completed some maintenance on the airplane during the preceding few weeks. However, they had not provided any maintenance services to the pilot and, to their knowledge, there had been no other third-party maintenance work done on the airplane. The airplane was fueled about one month before the accident flight at the request of the pilot.

A witness stated that he observed the airplane twice shortly before the accident. Initially, he heard the airplane but did not see it. He was only able to locate it from the ambient lighting surrounding the airport because there were "no lights whatsoever on the airplane." The airplane appeared to be on an "abbreviated" left downwind for runway 20 at SAF. In both instances, the airplane turned and crossed over the approach end of the runway before he lost sight of it. His perception was that the pilot was not trying to land at that time, rather he may have been trying to attract the attention of the tower controller. The airplane appeared to be in a "clean" configuration, with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted. The engine sounded as if it was at a "medium" power setting and he did not suspect any issues with the engine. Shortly after losing sight of the airplane the second time, he heard sirens related to the emergency response to the accident.

The airplane impacted a shallow ravine south of the airport. The fuselage and empennage were consumed by a post-impact fire. The wings were located in position relative to the fuselage and exhibited leading-edge crushing damage along the entire span of both wings. The inboard portions of the wings were damaged by the post-impact fire. The engine and propeller were located with the wreckage.

At 1953, the recorded weather conditions at SAF included a clear sky and wind from 360 degrees at 4 knots. Sunset occurred at 1652 on the day of the accident, with civil twilight ending at 1719. The moon set at 1015 and did not rise again until 2034. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N113TA
Model/Series: M20C No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Nelson Flying Service Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: SAF, 6349 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Goodyear, AZ (GYR)
Destination: Akron, CO (AKO)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  35.617222, -106.089444 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

In 1985, Larry Nelson stands next to the Mooney he owned, which was similar to the plane he lost his life in, his daughter Catherine Nelson wrote in an email.


Larry Nelson holding his grandson, Wen, in October 2017.

The man who died in a fiery plane crash near Santa Fe Regional Airport on Monday night was an experienced pilot, an accountant and a grandfather, his daughter said Tuesday.

Larry Nelson, 73, of Wheat Ridge, Colorado, had been flying recreationally for around 40 years, his daughter, KC Nelson, said.

“He loved it; he did. He seemed to feel free in the air,” she said. “He would talk about being sick of being on the ground.”

On Monday, Nelson was making a trip from Arizona to Akron, Colorado, his daughter said, when she thinks he made an emergency diversion to the Santa Fe airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. Santa Fe police Lt. Matthew Champlin told The New Mexican on Monday that it appeared Nelson crashed just short of the runway. Area residents reported seeing flames, and a fire crew learned of the crash around 7:50 p.m.

Nelson’s plane, a single-engine Mooney M20C, was destroyed, according to a Federal Aviation Administration preliminary report. Nelson was the only person on board.

The pilot’s family suspects there might have been an issue with the plane, which Nelson had just recently purchased, or perhaps Nelson had a health issue. KC Nelson said her father recently had been having issues with his kidneys and had undergone dialysis.

Still, KC Nelson said, her father had made countless interstate flights and made his fair share of emergency landings.

“He would always say that a good pilot can get an airplane on the ground no matter what, as long as they kept themselves together and followed their checklist,” she said. “So we really think something bad might have happened with the airplane or with him.”

KC Nelson described her father as a jack-of-all-trades of sorts, who worked as an accountant, computer programmer and contractor, and was a certified flight instructor.

He was the kind of father who took his daughters up in his airplane on the Fourth of July so they could see the fireworks from the sky, KC Nelson said — the kind of man who wanted to fly behind KC as she made her own cross-country flight to make sure she got where she was going safely.

“He was a very safe pilot. Unless something was very wrong, he never would have crashed an airplane,” his daughter said. “He was extremely smart and funny, and a capable pilot. … We all miss him.”

Nelson leaves behind two daughters and a 23-month-old grandson.

Original article ➤  http://www.santafenewmexican.com






A Santa Fe police officer keeps watch over the scene of a plane crash near Santa Fe Municipal Airport. 


SANTA FE, N.M. - The pilot who died when his plane crashed in Santa Fe Monday night has been identified as 73-year-old Larry Nelson of Wheat Ridge, Colorado. 

Federal investigators are still looking into what caused the plane to crash.

The Mooney M20C aircraft went down near the Santa Fe Municipal Airport as it attempted to land just before 8 p.m.

Officials said the Nelson was the only occupant of the plane and was not in contact with air traffic controllers prior to the crash.

Gabriel Jaramillo, who lives near the crash site, said his fiancee called 911 after they witnessed the plane go down.

"I ran down there see if there's anything I can do, started yelling out to see if anybody was alright. I didn't get any answers," Jaramillo said. "There were still explosions going on while I was down there."

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration said Nelson did not file a flight plan with the control tower. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was registered to Nelson Flying Service Incorporate, which is based in Aurora, Colorado.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kob.com

Beech A36, N345CR: Incident occurred November 26, 2018 at Rock Hill - York County Airport (KUZA), South Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina

Aircraft landed gear up.

Albion Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N345CR

Date: 26-NOV-18
Time: 18:19:00Z
Regis#: N345CR
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROCK HILL
State: SOUTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-32-300, N1132Q: Incident occurred November 26, 2018 in Palmer, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft ran off the end of the runway while landing at a private strip.

Wattum Investments LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N1132Q

Date: 26-NOV-18
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N1132Q
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PALMER
State: ALASKA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N21621: Accident occurred November 21, 2018 at Ogden-Hinckley Airport (KOGD), Weber County, Utah

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N21621

Location: Ogden, UT
Accident Number: GAA19CA076
Date & Time: 11/21/2018, 2030 MST
Registration: N21621
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The flight instructor reported that, during a night landing, the student pilot relaxed back pressure and the nose landing gear struck the runway. The airplane bounced, the instructor took the flight controls, and he settled the airplane back onto the runway. They taxied off the runway, did not observe anything wrong with the airplane, and continued two more take offs and landings without further incident.

During the 100-hour inspection the next day, it was observed that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/19/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  
Flight Time: (Estimated) 314 hours (Total, all aircraft), 267 hours (Total, this make and model), 237 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 83 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 72 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/29/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 12 hours (Total, all aircraft), 12 hours (Total, this make and model), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N21621
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S9530
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/29/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: Bonneville Investments Llc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Cornerstone Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOGD, 4439 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 25°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ogden, UT (OGD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ogden, UT (OGD)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 2000 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: OGDEN-HINCKLEY (OGD)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4472 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5195 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.189444, -112.015000 (est)

ELA Aviation Eclipse 10, N512EA: Accident occurred November 21, 2018 in Kanab, Kane County, Utah

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N512EA

Location: Kanab, UT
Accident Number: GAA19CA077
Date & Time: 11/21/2018, 1600 MST
Registration: N512EA
Aircraft: SCOTT TAYLOR ECLIPSE 10
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during takeoff, from an unimproved soft dirt road, the tires started to "dig in" and the gyroplane veered left, he over corrected, and the gyroplane rolled onto its left side.

The gyroplane sustained substantil damage to the tailboom, and mast.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the gyroplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SCOTT TAYLOR
Registration: N512EA
Model/Series: ECLIPSE 10
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 05164841014
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/20/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 284 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 914UL
Registered Owner: ETTE Llc
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KKNB, 4868 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2315 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 100°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / -10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hurricane, UT (1L8)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Kanab, UT
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1315 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  37.046944, -112.780000 (est)

Monday, November 26, 2018

Cape Air, Cessna 402: Incident occurred November 26, 2018 at Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport (KRUT), Clarendon, Vermont

CLARENDON — No one was injured Friday when a Cape Air flight on its way into Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport from Boston had to make an emergency landing.

Airport Manager Christopher Beitzel said Monday that the Cessna 402 aircraft reported having engine trouble at around 3:43 p.m. It landed safely, carrying five passengers and two crew members. Three fire trucks from the Clarendon Fire Department and one from the City of Rutland Fire Department responded, along with a truck from the airport’s fire service.

Beitzel said about two gallons of fuel spilled as a result. He’s not sure if that was related to the engine problem itself or a byproduct of addressing said problem.

The emergency landing didn’t interrupt scheduled flights, Beitzel said, however a “Notice to Airmen” or a “NOTAM” was issued and for a few hours no one could land.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.rutlandherald.com

Robinson R22 BETA, VH-KZV: Fatal accident occurred November 24, 2018 in Alice Springs, Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR19WA032
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, November 24, 2018 in Alice Springs, Australia
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On November 24, 2018, at 1200 local time, a Robinson R22 BETA, VH-KZV, collided with terrain near Alice Springs, NT, Australia. The helicopter sustained substantial damage. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger was fatally injured. The flight was operated under the pertinent civil regulations of the Government of Australia.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia and authority of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: (61) 2 6257-4150
http://www.atsb.gov.au

Collision with terrain involving Robinson R22 Beta, VH-KZV, 130km ENE of Alice Springs, Northern Territory, on November 24, 2018

Investigation number: AO-2018-077

Summary

The ATSB is investigating a collision with terrain involving a Robinson R22 Beta, VH-KZV, 130km ENE of Alice Springs Airport, Northern Territory on 24 November 2018.

The helicopter collided with terrain about 130km ENE of Alice Springs Airport. A passenger and pilot were on board. The passenger sustained serious injuries and the pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was destroyed.

A final report will be released at the end of the investigation.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

An Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) team has begun its investigation of a helicopter crash in Central Australia on Saturday, which left one man dead and another with critical injuries.

The crash occurred approximately 125 kilometres north east of Alice Springs near the Old Ambalindum station in the East MacDonnell Ranges. The Robinson R22 helicopter, which is commonly used for cattle mustering, crashed into a riverbed.

An ATSB spokesman said it was too early to speculate on what could have caused the accident.

“At team of three ATSB transport safety investigators travelling from Canberra are anticipated to arrive in the Northern Territory on Sunday afternoon to begin the evidence collection phase of the investigation,” he said.

The spokesman said the investigators are expected to spend several days inspecting the scene.

“The evidence collection phase will define the size and scope of the investigation and determine the expected time frame for the completion of a final report,” he said.

“Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of an investigation, the ATSB will immediately communicate it to relevant parties so that appropriate safety action can be taken.”

St John Ambulance spokesman Craig Garraway said paramedics had a tough job in transporting the critically injured patient to the hospital in Alice Springs.

“Where they could land the responding helicopter was about a 10 minute walk to where the crash site was. They had to walk into the site and then had to stretcher the patient, once he was stabilised, back to the helicopter where there was a doctor waiting,” he said.

“The weather was apparently not very good there so what they had to do is one responding helicopter had to take off to get the patient back out and the other helicopter had to stay there because it couldn’t take off.”

NT Police are preparing a report for the coroner and their investigations are also ongoing.


https://www.ntnews.com.au

Chicago, Illinois: Curious About The Cessna Caravan Circling Overhead Recently? It’s Researching City’s Construction Boom



DOWNTOWN — For over a week, a low-flying small aircraft making daily flights over the city and surrounding suburbs was spotted by residents throughout Chicago.

The plane, a Cessna Caravan owned and operated by the commercial real estate information database CoStar, was gathering data and images of new construction in the greater Chicago metro area.

The team wrapped up its latest assignment in Chicago prior to Thanksgiving.

Overseeing the effort is aerial research photographer Amber Surrency, a United States Marine Corps veteran based in Florida.

For the Chicago assignment, the team was tasked with updating imagery and information on over 400 sites.

“We’ll fly each market gathering construction data while verifying the status and collecting images on known construction properties,” Surrency said. “Anything new we find is submitted to the research gatherers.”



Surrency and crew complete two three-hour flights each day and document high-resolution images and other data utilizing a 6K RED Dragon camera mounted to a carbon fiber Cineflex stabilization system.

Surrency, who was in Chicago for an assignment at the same time last year, said she has documented a noticeable increase in new multi-unit buildings and hotels. And with numerous mega-developments in advanced planning stages, the city’s landscape will continue to change dramatically in the coming years.

Chicago’s notoriously unpredictable weather and congested airspace presents challenges to completing the entire assignment in the alloted time. However, Surrency said the team does typically complete a market on schedule.

Despite the growing popularity of drones for video and imagery, Surrency said that using a small aircraft is much more efficient, allowing the team to cover more territory and ultimately complete more research. Small aircrafts are also more conducive to covering data points in both developed urban and rural areas, she adds.

“We fly in the plane for five to six hours per day, while a drone can only fly for about 20 to 30 minutes per battery,” Surrency said. “With pilots, you can also coordinate with restricted airspace while drones are limited to line of sight.”

Covering 136 different metro areas throughout the country, Surrency said Chicago is one of the most unique markets to document.

“Flying over the lakefront and Sears Tower is always an amazing experience,” she said.

Story and photo gallery ➤ https://blockclubchicago.org

Business use of Grand Haven Memorial Airpark (3GM)



Have you ever wondered how the Grand Haven Memorial Airport is used by Grand Haven's business community?

Although we don't see airlines or charter services regularly flying into our airport, there's lots of "business" going on at our local airport.

Electro-Media, Inc., headquartered in Spring Lake, provides technology, communication, and security services for customers throughout Michigan and the Midwest. The company employs 22 people, who work in Spring Lake and Mishawaka, Indiana.

Local resident Pete Boon is the president of Electro-Media, Inc., and like many small business owners, he often needs to be in two places at once, in order to be accessible to his customers and employees. Since Pete can't clone himself, he does the next best thing – he uses his 2006 Cessna Skylane, based at the Grand Haven airport, to get quickly from place to place.

Pete says he uses his airplane in almost every aspect of his business – traveling between offices, visiting customers, making sales calls, delivering parts, attending conferences, taking employees to job sites, and turning two-day trips into one-day trips. Pete says that his Skylane and the Grand Haven airport allow him to support his 22 employees and to live and work in the community he loves.

Jamie Abraham owns Universal Tool & Engineering in Johnson City, Tennessee. Earlier this year, Jamie flew his beautiful red, black and silver Cirrus SR22 GTS into Grand Haven to meet with local manufacturing executives regarding the CNC tube bending machines his company produces.

Jamie says he uses his airplane for business travel about every other week, making trips as short as 100 miles and as far away as 1,200 miles. He says local airports like Grand Haven's are a key community and business resource.

"For me, the biggest advantage of flying a private plane to a local airport is time savings. To make a trip to Grand Haven, flying commercial or driving, would be a two- or three-day endeavor. Flying myself to the Grand Haven airport, I can turn this into an overnight or day trip."

Visitors to Grand Haven also arrive hungry and eager to shop. Did you ever consider that the couple sitting next to you at one of our iconic local restaurants or retail stores may have arrived via airplane? Pilots love to use their airplanes to visit their favorite beaches, parks, stores, and restaurants.

Earlier this summer, I ran into a couple of beach bums who had flown from Indiana to Grand Haven to buy a kiteboard from MACkite on Hayes Street. Just a few weeks later, I sat next to a couple at Porto Bello who had flown in from Chicago because they love the variety, atmosphere, and food at our local restaurants.

All in all, Grand Haven enjoys a thriving business community, and our local airport is a one-of-a kind gateway for our vibrant city businesses.

Original article ➤ https://www.grandhaventribune.com

Van's RV-6. LN-AAL: Fatal accident occurred November 07, 2018 near Meråker-Øyan airstrip, Trøndelag, Norway

NTSB Identification: CEN19WA027
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 07, 2018 in Meraaker, Norway
Aircraft: Vans (EX) RV-6, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On November 7, 2018, about 1410 hours central European standard time, a Vans RV-6 airplane, Norwegian registration LN-AAL, impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Meråker, Norway. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The flight departed from the Værnes Airport (ENVA), Trondheim, Norway.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Accident Investigation Board Norway (AIBN). This report is for informational purposes and contains only information released by or obtained from the government of Norway.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:
Accident Investigation Board Norway
P. O. Box 213
N-2001 Lillestrøm
Norway
Tel: + 47 63 89 63 00
Website: http://www.aibn.no
Email: post@aibn.no


Stig Harald Hoff (t.v.) og Espen Andreas Holdnes Hoff (t.h.) døde i flystyrten i Meråker.




Politiet har frigitt navnene på de omkomne i flystyrten i Meråker. De to omkomne er brødre, Espen Andreas Holdnes Hoff, 54 år gammel, bosatt i Trondheim, og Stig Harald Hoff, 59 år gammel, bosatt i Ørland. Begge etterlater seg familie og barn.

Lensmann i Stjørdal, Kjetil Ravlo, forteller til NRK at det trolig var Espen Andreas Holdnes Hoff som var pilot på flyet.

Han skal ha vært en meget erfaren flyver, med bakgrunn som flykaptein i Widerøe. Det opplyser Tor Andre Weiseth, leder i Værnes Flyklubb, hvor også Espen Andreas Holdnes Hoff var medlem. Ifølge Weiseth var Holdnes Hoff eieren av flyet som styrtet.

– De fleste i klubben har flyving som hobby, men Espen var yrkespilot. Vi har ingen å miste i flyklubbmiljøet, sier Weiseth til NRK.

Leteaksjonen i Meråker i Trøndelag ble satt i gang etter at et småfly av typen Vans Aircraft RV-6 utløste nødsignal onsdag ettermiddag. Halvannen time senere ble flyet funnet i et skogholt en snau kilometer fra Øian flyplass sørøst for Meråker sentrum i Trøndelag.

Politiet har ventet med å hente dem ut av hensyn til de krimtekniske undersøkelsene, og fordi det var svært vanskelig å få dem ut.

Begravelsesbiler har fraktet dem til St. Olavs hospital, hvor de skal obduseres fredag.

https://www.nrk.no

Loss of Control on Ground: Airdrome Aeroplanes Sopwith Pup, N1916Z, accident occurred November 26, 2018 at Rio Vista Municipal Airport (O88), Solano County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N1916Z

Location: Rio Vista, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA075
Date & Time: 11/26/2018, 1230 PST
Registration: N1916Z 
Aircraft: Darren M. Vinelli Sopwith PUP
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during landing, the airplane encountered a variable crosswind gust and the left wing lifted. He was able to keep the airplane on the runway and established a landing roll. The ground speed was about 20 miles per hour and the airplane encountered another wind gust. The airplane weathervaned to the left and exited the left side of the runway, rolled into mud and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder.

The pilot reported that the wind at the time of the accident was variable at 5 knots and gusting to 8 knots.

The METAR at the nearest airport was about 12 miles to the west of the accident site, and reported that about the time of the accident, the wind was out from 02 at 6 knots. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 25.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/21/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 535 hours (Total, all aircraft), 79 hours (Total, this make and model), 459 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Darren M. Vinelli
Registration: N1916Z
Model/Series: Sopwith PUP
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 001
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/28/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 78 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-290G
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 125 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSUU, 62 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2058 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 292°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  7 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Rio Vista, CA (O88)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Rio Vista, CA (O88)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1115 PST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Rio Vista Muni (O88)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 22 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4199 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.193333, -121.703611 (est)



RIO VISTA — A escaped without injury after a small plane overturned during landing at an airport, authorities said.

The plane, an Airdrome Sopwith Pup with a tail number of N1916Z, was landing at Rio Vista Municipal Airport about 12:30 p.m. Monday, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

Federal Aviation Administration records list the plane as a fixed-wing single-engine model built from a kit.

No information was immediately available about the circumstances that led to the crash or any plane damage, but Gregor said the FAA will investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.eastbaytimes.com

RIO VISTA (CBS13) — A man flying a World War I replica biplane flipped over Monday while practicing landing in crosswinds at Rio Vista Municipal Airport, police said.

Police said the plane caught a gust of wind and flipped over in the landing, but the pilot was able to walk away unharmed.

Both Rio Vista police and firefighters responded to the incident. Officials closed the runway for two hours while righting the plane and moving it to a hangar.

The man was flying an Airdrome Aeroplanes Sopwith Pup.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://sacramento.cbslocal.com

Beech B36TC Bonanza, N6453C: Incident occurred November 26, 2018 at North Platte Regional Airport (KLBF), Lincoln County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aircraft nose gear collapsed during landing.

Advanced Systems Group Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N6453C


Date: 26-NOV-18
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N6453C
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NORTH PLATTE
State: NEBRASKA





Part of the landing gear of a single-engine airplane collapsed Monday morning after a plane landed at the North Platte Regional Airport, bringing the plane to a sudden stop on the side of the runway.

No one was injured.

The pilot was arriving from Tulsa to provide an “Angel Flight” — to pick up someone who needs medical attention, Airport Manager Sam Seafeldt said.

Angel Flights provide free air transportation for legitimate, charitable, medically related needs.

Operations Supervisor Justin Gosnell was the first to respond, driving the airport’s firefighting unit. Gosnell alerted the North Platte fire and rescue department as he drove to the crash site, but was able to tell them not to come after finding the pilot was okay and there was no fire.

The right-side landing gear collapsed as the plane was slowing on the runway. The nose gear also collapsed.

The runway was clean. Ice was not immediately suspected to be a contributing factor, Gosnell said.

The accident happened shortly after 10 a.m.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://northplattebulletin.com




NORTH PLATTE, Neb. – Emergency crews responded to the North Platte Regional Airport on Monday morning after a Beechcraft Bonanza B36TC suffered a collapsed landing gear while arriving at the airport.

The call came in around 10 a.m.

The pilot walked away unharmed.

The plane was lifted by a crane, put on a flatbed and towed to the onsite mechanic shop for further inspection.

According to FlightAware, the plane took off from Tulsa, Oklahoma around 7 a.m. and was scheduled to land in North Platte at 10:09 a.m

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.knopnews2.com