Saturday, July 28, 2018

A Pilot’s Best Job Perk: His Bike Flies Free; Flying from city to city for JetBlue allows an avid mountain biker to explore new territory

Mr. Chue sits in the cockpit of an A320 aircraft at Boston’s Logan International Airport. He uses a cyclist chat group to discover new trails around the cities he flies to for work.


The Wall Street Journal
By Jen Murphy
July 28, 2018 9:00 a.m. ET

Work travel can take time away from favorite hobbies. But James Chue has figured out how to turn time on the road into more time on his mountain bike. A pilot for JetBlue, Mr. Chue requests specific trips that allow him to use layovers to explore new terrain or compete in enduro races: mountain bike races where only the downhill portion is timed.

“Travel can be an easy excuse to fall out of shape,” he says. “I see it as an opportunity to go play.” Mr. Chue, 37, tries to do three-day trips so that he can be home four days with his wife and two children in Kingston, Mass.

Most airlines charge a fee to check a bike, but Mr. Chue is exempt from paying $50 each way for his bike with JetBlue. “One perk of being the pilot,” he says.

He discovered some of his favorite mountain biking terrain, including Tiger Mountain near Seattle and South Mountain Park in Phoenix, on layovers. He belongs to a cycling chat group on the messaging app Slack and uses it to connect with local mountain bikers—both casual riders and pros—ahead of his trips. “People will pick me up from my hotel and we head to the trails for a few hours or the whole day,” he says.

He discovered some of his favorite mountain biking terrain, including Tiger Mountain near Seattle and South Mountain Park in Phoenix, on layovers. He belongs to a cycling chat group on the messaging app Slack and uses it to connect with local mountain bikers—both casual riders and pros—ahead of his trips. “People will pick me up from my hotel and we head to the trails for a few hours or the whole day,” he says.


The Workout

Mr. Chue alternates between bike and weight days. “I lift so I can mountain bike,” he says. “Strength training prevents a lot of injuries.” He says strong legs, core and shoulder muscles are important for mountain biking. “If you flip over the handlebars while flying down a rocky trail, your shoulders will dislocate if they’re weak,” he says. A strong core also helps him maintain good posture and avoid low back pain when sitting in the cockpit.

He hits the gym three days a week. Workouts are dedicated to different muscle groups and he always throws in core work. He does four sets of each exercise and aims for 14 reps. “I grunt through those last reps,” he says. “I’m the guy in the gym that you glare at thinking, ‘Can’t you please be quiet?’ ”

If he can’t access a gym, he works out in his hotel room and does crunches, push-ups and the superman exercise, where he lies on his stomach and alternates lifting his opposite arm and leg to work his lower back. He always travels with resistance bands, even stretching briefly in the cockpit after autopilot is engaged at cruising altitude.

On layovers of 18 hours or longer, he hits mountain bike trails. At home, he has five single-track mountain bike trails 5 miles from his home. On weekends he likes to drive to Highland Mountain Bike Park in Northfield, N.H. “You put your bike on a chairlift, so riding here is really just about the down, no climbing,” he says. “I love getting a little crazy and hitting massive jumps.” He has a small gym in his unfinished basement. “Rather than sit on the couch at night, I’ll watch TV and ride my spin bike,” he says.

The Diet

Mr. Chue travels with Mason jars of fresh-cut oats for breakfast. Thai food is his go-to on the road. He orders a ginger chicken stir-fry with brown rice and saves half to eat on the plane. At home, he has scrambled egg whites and avocado slices on top of whole wheat toast along with coffee and a banana for breakfast. Lunch is a turkey sandwich or smoothie made with yogurt, blueberries, banana, avocado and whey protein. Chicken with broccoli and ziti is a family dinner favorite. The children eat pasta, but Mr. Chue and his wife make their portion with spaghetti squash. Post-dinner ice cream motivates him to put in extra miles on the bike. He snacks on Sour Patch Kids when he rides.

The Gear & Cost

“I sound like a bike snob, but I like fancy gear,” he says. “I use it so much, I get my money’s worth. If you chintz out, you end up paying the same amount fixing or replacing parts.” His 2019 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 29 cost $9,500. He paid $3,000 for his 2017 Specialized Fatboy Comp Carbon, a bike with wider tires. His EVOC bike bag cost $399. He pays $20 a month for his gym membership.

The Playlist

At the gym, he listens to modern or early 1990s hip hop, including the Notorious B.I.G., Tupac Shakur and Logic & Marshmello. “I like my cadence to match the tempo of the music, so I put on techno and go into beast mode on the trails,” he says.

DO HOMEWORK BEFORE FLYING WITH A BIKE

To fly with a bike or to rent one on the road is the money question, says Jim Potter, owner of Vecchio’s Bicicletteria in Boulder, Colo. The destination often dictates the decision.

If you’re traveling to a place with a strong bike culture, you can probably rent a serious bike. Touring companies like Trek Travel usually have access to fancier bikes. “More often than not, standard bike shops rent recreational city bikes with a generic fit,” he says. “If you’re tall or short or looking for performance, you’ll probably be more comfortable with your own bike.”

A good bike case can cost $300 or more. “That’s not a terrible amount if you’ve already spent $4,000 on your bike,” he says. There are two major styles. Soft cases roll up when the bike is removed. Hard, plastic cases are more protective but, he says, can be fairly bulky and hard to fit in the trunk of a car.

Snap pipe insulation tubing, available at most hardware stores, over the frame of the bike for added protection, he says. Don’t let the air out of the tires—that protects the rims of the wheels. Check with your airline about baggage fees, which typically range from $75 to $200. Some, like Southwest Airlines, count bike bags under a certain size and weight toward the standard carry-on allowance.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.wsj.com

Friday, July 27, 2018

Fuel Starvation: Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N171Q, accident occurred July 24, 2018 near North Cubs Strip (8AK8), Wasilla, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N171Q 


Location: Meadow Lakes, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA454
Date & Time: 07/24/2018, 1730 AKD
Registration: N171Q
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during the initial climb, the engine experienced a total loss of power. He added that he realized the wrong fuel tank had been selected for takeoff. He subsequently performed a forced landing on a gravel stream bed north of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's selection of the wrong fuel tank for departure, which resulted in fuel starvation and the subsequent total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid management (Cause)
Fuel selector/shutoff valve - Incorrect use/operation (Cause)

Personnel issues
Incorrect action selection - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Initial climb
Fuel starvation (Defining event)
Loss of engine power (total)

Landing
Off-field or emergency landing

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/04/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/31/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 2300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1225 hours (Total, this make and model), 2260 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 123 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 67 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N171Q
Model/Series: 172 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1956
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 28197
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/10/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5674 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAWS, 354 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0156 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 130°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Meadow Lakes, AK (8AK8)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Anchorage, AK (AK12)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1730 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: North Cubs Strip (8AK8)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 350 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1500 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage:Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.630000, -149.682500 (est)

Cessna 140, N1902V: Accident occurred July 26, 2018 at Healdsburg Municipal Airport (KHES), Sonoma County, California

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1902V

Location: Healdsburg, CA
Accident Number: GAA18CA455
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 1100 PDT
Registration: N1902V
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, he had performed two previous touch-and-go takeoffs and landings. During the third landing roll, the tailwheel settled on the runway and then the airplane nosed over.

He reported that, "I am not certain whether I accidentally stepped on the brakes or the brakes seized."

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer and the rudder.

A post-accident airplane examination performed by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector revealed that no issues with the brake system was found. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s):  Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/28/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/10/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4 hours (Total, this make and model), 4800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1902V
Model/Series: 140 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 14093
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4333.5 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C85
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 104 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSTS, 114 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 155°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Smoke; No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Healdsburg, CA (HES)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Healdsburg, CA (HES)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Healdsburg Muni (HES)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 280 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2652 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Stop and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire:  None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:  None
Total Injuries:  2 None

Latitude, Longitude:  38.652778, -122.898611 (est)

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6427P: Fatal accident occurred July 26, 2018 at Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Putnam County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida 
Lycoming Engines; Dallas, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Palatka, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA200
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 2007 EDT
Registration: N6427P
Aircraft: Piper PA24
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 26, 2018, about 2007 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250, N6427P, was destroyed when it impacted the ground during the initial climb after takeoff from Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Palatka, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A witness was standing in his hangar about 200 yards from the end of runway 17, when he heard an airplane's engine rev-up. He then noticed that the airplane's brakes were engaged while the engine was at full throttle. He believed the pilot was going to perform a soft field or short field takeoff. As the airplane rolled down the runway, the front wheel lifted off the ground then went back down for a few seconds, then the pilot rotated the airplane and it lifted off the ground. He further stated the pilot rotated early as the airplane was slow at that point. He added that the airplane kept climbing "steeper and steeper" and the pilot did not lower the nose to gain airspeed. When the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level, it "stalled, and the left wing drop down and spiraled to the ground." The witness further stated that the engine was running at full power during the entire flight.

An airport security video at 28J showed the airplane immediately after takeoff as it climbed to about 150 ft. The video then showed the airplane's left-wing drop and the airplane spiral to the ground.

The wreckage was located about 60 ft to the left side of midfield runway 17, which was a 3,510-ft-long runway. The wreckage came to rest on a heading of 270°. The propeller was fractured from the engine and located 2 ft into the ground. The engine was displaced into the instrument panel and cockpit. The landing gear was extended, and the flaps were retracted. Both wings exhibited accordion crushing on the leading edges. Flight control cable continuity was established to all flight controls. The stabilator trim control was fragmented and the trim position could not be verified. Both pitch and trim servos rotated freely, and the clutch was not engaged. The fuselage was crushed, and the tail was bent over top of the cabin. The vertical stabilizer, rudder and elevator were not damaged.

The engine was removed from the airframe for further examination. The top spark plugs were removed and a lighted borescope was used to look inside the cylinders. All valves and pistons showed normal wear. Thumb compression was confirmed on all cylinders. Drive train continuity was established through the engine and accessory case by rotating the propeller flange and observing the movement of the gears. Both magnetos were removed and turned by hand. All leads sparked to ground.

The four seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane, was manufactured in 1959. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540-A1C5, 250-horsepower engine, equipped with a three-bladed McCauley propeller. The last annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2018. At the time of the accident, the airframe total time was 3,435.73 hours which was 13.73 hours since the annual inspection, and the engine had accrued 1,268 hours since major overhaul.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He held a basic medical certificate, issued July 14, 2018. According to the pilot's logbook, he had a total of 704.4 hours of flight experience. He had a total of 15.1 hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane; of which, 12.6 was logged as dual instruction. The accident flight was the pilot's second flight in the airplane without a flight instructor.

At 2015, the recorded weather at 28J, was: wind from 180° at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 27° C; dew point 26° C; altimeter 29.98 inches mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6427P
Model/Series: PA24 250
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation:  28J, 47 ft msl
Observation Time: 2015 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 26°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Palatka, FL (28J)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  29.656389, -81.688611 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Kimberly and David Niblett


Dan Boggs
Air Safety Investigator, National Transportation Safety Board



PALATKA, Fla. - A married couple from Alachua County died Thursday night when their small plane crashed in Palatka, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The Piper PA-24 aircraft crashed upon takeoff just before 8:30 p.m. at Palatka-Kay Larkin Airport on Reid Street, near County Road 216.

On Friday morning, the FHP identified the victims as David Niblett and Kimberly Niblett, both 44, of Archer.

Warren Cilliers, of Cilliers Aviation, witnessed the crash and described the terrifying scene, saying the aircraft tried to do a short takeoff.

"The nose came up, but the aircraft did not lift off the ground until a few seconds later," Cilliers said. "It was going super slow, and it was really close to a stall, and I was expecting the nose to come down for them to pick up speed, but it never did as it was climbing up."

Cilliers said the angle of the plane's ascent kept getting steeper until the left wing stalled about 100 or 150 feet in the air.

"He went into a spiral and crashing to the ground," Cilliers said. "It is something that you never want to see."

He said it was very loud as the plane came down but after the impact, "it got very quiet."

He said it was immediately clear that no one could have survived the crash, but he called 911 and ran over to the crash to see if "by some miracle somebody survived."

But, Cilliers said, no one responded to his calls.

"It was very silent," he said. "There was no movement at all."

Airport manager John Youell said Palatka emergency responders were on scene immediately, but the couple coudn't be saved.

"I’m very proud of the first responders," Youell said. "If there’s a better emergency response team, I’d be amazed."



NTSB investigates

The National Transportation Safety Board arrived Friday to take over the investigation. NTSB spokesman Dan Boggs said weather was not a factor and David Niblett's family said he was an experienced pilot. 

The airport manager said the couple flew in from Gainesville and were stopping for fuel. Authorities said as part of the investigation, the airport has a hold on the fuel so it can be inspected, which is protocol.

Over the next two days, federal investigators will remove the wreckage, then examine all systems: fuel, mechanical, electrical and the wing flaps.

Until the wreckage is cleared, one runway will remain closed.

The plane was manufactured in 1959 and the NTSB said it was well-maintained. No flight plan was filed.

The preliminary crash report is expected to be posted in two weeks. But aviation expert Ed Booth said it could take a year and half to two years before there are definitive answers.

"Palatka is a very busy airport with a lot of recreational flying. Recreational flying, of course, isn't as safe as airline travel," Booth said.

Booth said the investigators will be busy from the start as they look at many possibilities.

"They will look into the pilot's background, how the aircraft was loaded, whether the pilot had any sort of substances in his system," Booth said. "It's standard protocol that the NTSB goes through in every airplane crash like this."

3rd crash at airport this year

The NTSB said investigators were aware of two other crashes at Kay Larkin Airport.

News4Jax covered a March 6 crash when two people were hurt when their seaplane struck a tree, power line and home on Reid Street on approach to the airport. Ten days later, two planes crashed attempting to land at the same time. No one was injured in that incident. 

"There’s no common thread among the accident," Youell said. "One ran out of gas, two, another plane landed on top of another.  And now this one. There’s just no common thread."

Kay Larkin is what is known as an uncontrolled airport, meaning there's no control tower. Pilots can land, day or night, without coordinating with anyone on the ground.

Yet people who use the airport regularly feel it's safe.

"I come here pretty much every weekend," Cindy Gicala said. "I’m one of the skydive instructors at Skydive Palatka. I’m pretty much here all the time."

Gicala said that while she’s aware of the other crashes over the last five years, she’s never seen a safety issue at the airport.

Federal aviation authorities said they review safety trends at airports regularly, and the history of Palatka's airport would be part of this investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com


Married couple David and Kimberly Niblett from Alachua County died in a plane crash at a Palatka airport Thursday night.


The crash happened at Palatka-Kay Larkin Airport located at 4015 Reid Street.


The Florida Highway Patrol said the plane was a single-engine aircraft.


The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane was attempting to take off when it crashed in the grass on the left side of Runway 17.


According to a FHP report, a man and woman died on scene.


Airport authorities told Action News Jax the victims were a married couple in their mid-40s and who flew in from Gainesville. They said the couple stopped for fuel and took off immediately before crashing upon takeoff.


There have been four other plane incidents near this airport already this year.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.actionnewsjax.com





A married couple died after a small airplane crashed on the runway at the Palatka Municipal Airport Airport Thursday evening, the Palatka Airport manager confirmed to First Coast News.


The couple has been identified as David and Kimberly Niblett, both 44.


The manager said they stopped briefly at the airport to get fuel for their plane, then departed after.


According to the Florida Highway Patrol, a single-engine aircraft crashed during takeoff and the two were pronounced dead on the scene by Putnam Co. Fire Rescue.


On Friday, the NTSB arrived to investigate. The woman's father also arrived at the airport to get more information from investigators, First Coast News was told.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.firstcoastnews.com

Aero Commander 560, N2705B: Incident occurred July 26, 2018 at Bob Sikes Airport (KCEW), Crestview, Okaloosa County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham

Gear did not extend.

Wilcorp Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2705B

Date: 26-JUL-18
Time: 14:52:00Z
Regis#: N2705B
Aircraft Make: AERO COMMANDER
Aircraft Model: 560
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CRESTVIEW
State: FLORIDA

Mooney M20J 201, N681DB: Incident occurred November 10, 2018 in Albuquerque, New Mexico -and- Incident occurred July 26, 2018 at Southeast Iowa Regional Airport (KBRL), Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

November 10, 2018:  Crashed due to unknown circumstances. 


https://registry.faa.gov/N681DB


Date: 10-NOV-18

Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N681DB
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: ALBUQUERQUE
State: NEW MEXICO

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

July 26, 2018:  Went off the runway into the grass.

Date: 26-JUL-18
Time: 18:10:00Z
Regis#: N681DB
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BURLINGTON
State: IOWA

Air Tractor AT-502A, N254LA: Accident occurred July 26, 2018 at O'Brien Flying Service Airport (LA71), Iowa, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N254LA

Location: Iowa, LA
Accident Number: GAA18CA447
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 1130 CDT
Registration: N254LA
Aircraft: Air Tractor AT502
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped, restricted category airplane, he had performed an agricultural flight and was landing to take on another load.

He made a three-point landing with full flaps and closed the throttle. During the landing roll, the airplane "turned violently to the right and got very light on the gear." The nose of the airplane had turned 45° to the right of the runway centerline, so he applied left brake and left rudder, and then he added power.

As the power increased, and the airplane rolled to the left. He reported that the left wing struck the ground and he pulled the throttle to idle, and then he applied reverse thrust and full brakes. However, the airplane exited the runway and collided with a drainage culvert.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing spar and aileron.

The pilot reported that about the time of the accident the wind was light and variable, but dust devils were present.

Additionally, he reported that the accident could have been prevented by landing at a higher airspeed to keep air flow over the rudder, and by minimizing the engine thrust.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/29/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 21639 hours (Total, all aircraft), 965 hours (Total, this make and model), 21502 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 310 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 105 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Air Tractor
Registration: N254LA
Model/Series: AT502 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 502A-3054
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/20/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  10480 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 965 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:  Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-140AG
Registered Owner: Obrien's Flying Service Inc
Rated Power: 867 hp
Operator: Obrien's Flying Service Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCWF, 17 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1648 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 263°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Iowa, LA (LA71)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Iowa, LA (LA71)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: O'Brien Flying Service (LA71)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 26 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 03
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3800 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.224444, -93.000278 (est)

Cessna 150B, operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a solo-instructional flight, N1193Y: Accident occurred July 26, 2018 in Matthews, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1193Y


Location: Matthews, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA202
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 1900 EDT
Registration: N1193Y
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 26, 2018, about 1900 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150B, N1193Y, was substantially damaged during a precautionary landing in Matthews, North Carolina. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a solo-instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated at Wilgrove Air Park (8A6), Charlotte, North Carolina at 1810.

The pilot reported that the preflight procedures, taxi, takeoff, and departure were uneventful. The fuel tanks were full and no water was noted. About 40 minutes into the flight, about 1,800 feet above mean sea level, he noticed that the airplane was "sluggish" and would not "maintain lift." The engine indications were normal with no sputtering or hesitation noted. He applied carburetor heat and the engine speed dropped about 300 rpm. The airplane was still sluggish, so he turned off the carburetor heat. Since the airplane continued to fly sluggishly, the pilot decided to land the airplane in a grass field adjacent to a church. During the landing rollout, the airplane nosed over and came to rest, inverted.

The pilot reported in a postaccident interview and a written statement that there were no mechanical issues with the airplane in flight, and the engine would produce 2,750 rpm at full power. He also reported that the high ambient temperature (100°F) and the full fuel tanks may have contributed to the airplane's sluggishness.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the wings and fuselage sustained structural damage. His examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and reported 3.1 hours of dual instruction and 15 hours of solo flight time. He did not have an instructor's endorsement to operate the airplane in solo flight. The FAA inspector reviewed his pilot logbook and reported that there were "severe training deficiencies."

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/22/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 18 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1193Y
Model/Series: 150 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15059593
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/07/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1499 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 15 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6697 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JQF, 704 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1850 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Charlotte, NC (8A6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Charlotte, NC (8A6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1810 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class B

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.160278, -80.720556 (est)
=======

Location: Matthews, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA202
Date & Time: 07/26/2018, 1900 EDT
Registration: N1193Y
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 26, 2018, about 1900 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150B, N1193Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Matthews, North Carolina. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a solo-instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated at Wilgrove Air Park (8A6), Charlotte, North Carolina at 1810.

The pilot reported that the preflight procedures, taxi, takeoff, and departure were uneventful. About 40 minutes into the flight, about 1,800 feet above mean sea level, he noticed that the airplane was "sluggish" and would not "maintain lift." The engine indications were normal with no sputtering or hesitation noted. He applied carburetor heat and the engine speed dropped about 300 rpm. The airplane was still sluggish, so he turned off the carburetor heat. Unable to maintain altitude long enough to reach the airport, he landed the airplane in a grass field adjacent to a church. During the landing rollout, the airplane nosed over and came to rest, inverted.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the wings and fuselage sustained structural damage.

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and reported 3.1 hours of dual instruction and 15 hours of solo flight time.

The wreckage was retained by the pilot for further examination by the FAA. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1193Y
Model/Series: 150 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JQF, 704 ft msl
Observation Time: 1850 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Charlotte, NC (8A6)
Destination: Charlotte, NC (8A6) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.160278, -80.720556 (est)







MATTHEWS, NC (FOX 46 WJZY) - Emergency crews were on scene of after a small plane crashed in front of a church near the Charlotte-Matthews line.

According to Matthews police, the small plane crashed down just before 7 p.m. at 33001 Margaret Wallace Road, just over the Matthews line. Crews from Charlotte were also on scene.

Only the pilot was on board at the time of the crash and refused treatment by Medic, officials said.

It's unclear at this time what caused the plane to crash down.

National Transportation Safety Board has been called to investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox46charlotte.com





MATTHEWS, N.C. - A pilot walked away uninjured after his small single-engine plane crashed Thursday evening in Matthews, according to officials.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cessna 150 flipped after landing in a field on Margaret Wallace Road near Wilgrove Air Park.

Officials said the pilot was the only person on board.

“I don’t understand what happened. You just see a plane upside down,” said Ian McCluskey. “It's a little confusing, in front of a church."

Investigators will return to the scene Friday to determine why the plane went down.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsoctv.com