Sunday, November 22, 2020

Visual Flight Rules encounter with Instrument Meteorological Conditions: Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N24MG; accident occurred February 06, 2020 near Murray Field Airport (KEKA), Humboldt County, California









Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N24MG

Location: Eureka, California
Accident Number: WPR20CA089
Date & Time: February 6, 2020, 06:56 Local
Registration: N24MG
Aircraft: Cessna 208 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

Analysis

While the pilot was on a visual approach to the airport and descending over water on the left base leg, about 100 ft above the water's surface, the airplane entered instrument meteorological conditions with no forward visibility. The pilot looked outside his left window to gauge the airplane's altitude and saw "black waves of water approaching extremely rapidly." He tried to pull back on the yoke to initiate a climb, but the nosewheel contacted the water. Subsequently, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted in the water. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's delayed response to initiate a go-around during a night visual approach over water after the airplane entered instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in a loss of forward visibility and subsequent impact with the water.

Findings

Personnel issues Delayed action - Pilot
Environmental issues Low visibility - Effect on personnel

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern base VFR encounter with IMC (Defining event)
Approach-VFR pattern final Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Flight instructor
Age: 57,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane multi-engine; Airplane single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: June 24, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 6, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 10156 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1282 hours (Total, this make and model), 9644 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 153 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 51 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N24MG
Model/Series: 208 B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 208B0850
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: January 2, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8752 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo prop
Airframe Total Time: 19184 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, activated 
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-42A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 850 Horsepower
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: ACV
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 06:45 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 190°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 9 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Sacramento, CA (MHR )
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Arcata/Eureka, CA (ACV )
Type of Clearance: IFR;VFR flight following
Departure Time: 05:30 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: MURRAY FIELD EKA
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 10 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3011 ft / 75 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.823333,-124.14167(est)

Drone grounds helicopters working Cameron Peak Fire


Larimer County, Colorado -- A drone illegally flying over the Cameron Peak Fire area grounded helicopters that were dropping water in the Pingree Park area as part of the firefighting effort on Saturday, November 21st.

Firefighters continue to work on the last pieces of containment for the 208,913-acre fire that has been burning since August 13th and is considered 92% contained. Crews worked by hand, with heavy equipment and with the help of aircraft dropping loads of water on areas that are still hot in the fire perimeter.

Helicopters dropped about 20 loads of water on Saturday before “a drone was discovered to be flying over the fire area,” according to a Sunday morning briefing on the fire. Aircraft cannot safely work with drones in the area, so the choppers were grounded for the rest of Saturday.

Drones are not allowed over the fire area, and fire officials on Sunday urged people to not fly drones in that area because it affects their ability to fight the fire.

Also, fire managers reported that traffic has been spotted on roads that are still closed in the fire area, creating safety issues for both firefighters and the public. They asked people to respect the closures in place, which are listed at nocoalert.org.

“Please stay safe and help us stay safe,” fire officials said in a written briefing on Sunday morning.

Crews on Sunday saw sunny and windy weather with gust expected to reach as high as 60mph overnight on Sunday and continue into Monday. Winds were expected to calm down Monday with clouds that are predicted to move over the fire with a chance of precipitation on Monday night.

Collision During Landing: Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N988FX; accident occurred February 07, 2020 at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (KBWI), Maryland






Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland 
Federal Aviation Administration / Certificate Management Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N988FX

Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Accident Number: ERA20CA095
Date & Time: February 7, 2020, 04:15 Local
Registration: N988FX
Aircraft: Cessna 208
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled 

Analysis

The pilot was conducting an instrument landing system approach in night instrument meteorological conditions. The pilot was using the autopilot for the approach to the destination airport and disengaged it when he had the runway and airport lighting system in view. The pilot reported that, as he approached the runway, he heard a sound and thought the airplane had hit a bird. He felt the airplane pitch up, so he increased engine power and pitched down to reach the runway. After the pilot landed and taxied to the ramp, he saw that a large piece of an approach light was caught on the right main landing gear. Further examination revealed that the empennage, right horizontal stabilizer, right wing strut, and front cargo pod had sustained substantial damage. The operator reported that the airplane had struck four approach light towers and a localizer antenna.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from the approach lights during an instrument approach.

Findings

Personnel issues Monitoring environment - Pilot
Environmental issues Runway/taxi/approach light - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-IFR final approach Collision during takeoff/land (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial 
Age: 35,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 23, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: August 23, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2011 hours (Total, all aircraft), 400 hours (Total, this make and model), 1352 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 62 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N988FX
Model/Series: 208 B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 208B2400
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 26, 2019 AAIP 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8752 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 97 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Turbo prop
Airframe Total Time: 3497.4 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-114A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 675 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: 
Operator Designator Code: MTNA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument (IMC) 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: BWI,143 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 04:30 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Visibility: 1.8 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Unknown 
Visibility (RVR): 1600 ft
Wind Speed/Gusts: /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.18 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: In the vicinity - None - Fog
Departure Point: Newark, NJ (EWR )
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Baltimore, MD (BWI )
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 04:03 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class B

Airport Information

Airport: Baltimore/Washington Intl Thur BWI
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 143 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10 
IFR Approach: ILS
Runway Length/Width: 10503 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.175834,-76.668891(est)

Last plane from Pearl Harbor comes to American Heritage Museum: 79 years after its base was attacked, the final P-40B Tomahawk finds new home





HUDSON, Massachusetts — Eight battleships, over 300 airplanes and more than 2,400 American lives. That’s what was lost Dec. 7, 1941, the date of the attack on Pearl Harbor where Japanese fighter planes bombed American military forces and set the two nations to collide with each other in World War II.

But despite all the damage and death that took place 79 years ago, there are still plenty of pieces of that history preserved as a tribute to what’s gone.

One of those pieces is a true survivor: a Curtiss P-40B Tomahawk fighter plane that was stationed at the Wheeler Army Airfield on the island of O’ahu, Hawaii.

That American aircraft base was one of the additional targets of the Japanese due its extensive supply of hangars and fighter planes the enemy believed could assist those under attack. Though two pilots were able to get their P-40s off the ground when the Japanese attacked, most of the rest of the planes were destroyed.

Today, only one P-40 remains in pristine flying condition and it’s in Hudson. The American Heritage Museum is the current home of the final P-40, sitting with wings out and cockpit open in the attraction’s Pacific War Gallery displaying other vehicles from World War II.

Rob Collings, president of the museum, said the plane has been through decades of moving and restoration before coming to Hudson. After Pearl Harbor, the plane crashed during a routine training flight on Jan. 24, 1942, and the wreckage was later abandoned. Its remains were found in 1985 and then, in 1989, the Curtiss Wright Historical Association in Torrance, Calif., began restoring the plane. It was then moved to the The Fighter Collection, another historical plane collection at the Duxford Airfield in Cambridge, U.K., in 2003 where it stayed until 2013.

“With the anniversary of Pearl Harbor coming up, we thought it was important for it to be here,” Collings said Sunday.

Colin Rixon, a volunteer coordinator at the museum, said this is the first time the P-40 will be on display at American Heritage and it only arrived a week ago from a Worcester hangar. It was transported via low-loading tractor in the dead of night to avoid any traffic congestion. Rixon said the museum will honor the anniversary of Pearl Harbor with audio and video displays throughout the building with presentations on the attack and its longstanding impact on American history.

The P-40 is not the only WWII machinery on display at the museum, as vehicles from both sides of the war are featured in the collection. Visitors can see a wide variety of tanks, including an SU-100 Soviet tank destroyer, a German Panther A tank and the American M4 Sherman tank.

For the aviation enthusiasts, the museum features everything from a PBY Catalina used by the U.S. to destroy U-boats to the Fieseler Fi-156 Storch used by Germans for quick landings and take-offs. The museum also has military vehicles used in conflicts from World War I all the way to the War on Terror, which started in 2001, the upkeep of which requires constant attention.

“It’s about cleaning them, mainly,” Rixon said. “Occasionally, we’ll turn the engines over. Ninety percent of the vehicles here will and can run, it’s just a question of putting the batteries and fuel in and doing service on them. We do take them out occasionally and do exhibitions. People can pay extra money to drive them, but it’s well worth it. How often do you get to drive a tank?”

There’s so much world history embedded in the museum’s vehicles that stretch across multiple generations. Rixon himself has military history, being a former member of the British Army Cavalry. As he walks along the museum floor, seeing the likes of tanks used in Afghanistan and hearing the stories of soldiers in combat, he still feels a bond regardless of rank or location.

“Until you’ve lived it and been there, you don’t understand the camaraderie in the unit of military,” he said. “The bond is there for the rest of your life.”

Fuel Exhaustion: Cessna 150M, N714ER; accident occurred February 15, 2020 near Wadsworth Municipal Airport (3G3), Ohio

 




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N714ER

Location: Wadsworth, Ohio 
Accident Number: CEN20LA092
Date & Time: February 15, 2020, 13:00 Local
Registration: N714ER
Aircraft: Cessna 150 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Factual Information

On February 15, 2020, about 1300 eastern standard time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N714ER, was substantially damaged following a loss of engine power near Wadsworth, Ohio. The pilot was not injured. The flight was operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91 as a personal flight.

The pilot reported that while on approach to land on runway 20 at the Wadsworth Municipal Airport, Wadsworth, Ohio, the airplane's engine lost power. The airplane landed about 300 yards short of the runway. Substantial damage was sustained to an engine mount.

The pilot visually checked the fuel tanks and estimated 7 gallons total prior to flight. The airplane flew 2 legs for slightly over an hour of flight time. Following the accident, a local mechanic drained approximately 2 gallons of fuel from the airplane. The airplane type certificate data sheet lists 3.5 gallons of fuel are unusable. Federal Aviation Administration inspectors were unable to find any evidence that the airplane had been fueled prior to the accident flight. The circumstances of the accident are consistent with the loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 14, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 56 hours (Total, this make and model), 929 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N714ER
Model/Series: 150 M 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15079124
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 100 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBJJ,1137 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 17:56 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 217°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ravenna, OH (POV )
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Wadsworth, OH (3G3 )
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 12:30 Local
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Wadsworth Muni 3G3
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 973 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3529 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 41.003055,-81.756385(est)

"I planned that landing from a mile out," balloon pilot Gilbert Martin


GLEN ALLEN, Virginia — A hot air balloon carrying three passengers and a pilot landed in a Glen Allen neighborhood Sunday morning.

It was a planned landing, according to the pilot, Gilbert Martin, who is also the president of Balloons Over Virginia.

"I planned that landing from a mile out," Martin said Sunday. "It was never a question of anyone being injured. All three passengers knew we were landing there."

It's a fairly routine circumstance to land in a subdivision with no above-ground power lines, according to Martin. The pilot has up to 10 landing spots picked out during a flight, depending on the wind, he said. The balloon touched down on Nuckols Road in the Crystal Creek subdivision around 8:30 a.m.

Martin, who has been flying balloons for 32 years and has flown more than 16,000 people, said he initially wanted to land at Glen Allen High School, where another balloon he was flying with landed. But when the wind changed, he picked the subdivision, which was less than a mile away.

"It was the next-best place to land," Martin said. "We land in neighborhoods all the time."

"I was trying to steer to the school, but the wind shifted," he said, adding that he would never try to land a balloon if there were above-ground power lines.

Martin lives in Richmond's West End and is familiar with the area.

"I knew there were no power lines," he said. "It's not atypical that we land [in neighborhoods]. It was essentially a four-lane road."

Martin said he chose the landing spot because it was at a dead-end street, and he knew it wouldn't disrupt traffic.

Martin's Balloons Over Virginia crew, which tracks the flights on GPS, was there in minutes after the landing.

Martin said because of how big the balloon is — 90 feet tall and some 120,000 cubic feet — it seems like landing anywhere but an open field is dangerous. But what people fail to realize, he said, is that it's very safe.

"The only thing I'm landing is the basket," he said. "It's smaller than a car. ... You have a lot of control."

Martin, a commercial pilot, said he never has had an incident or accident in his 32-year career.

"Of course you want to land [in an open field], but it doesn't always work out that way," he said.

The balloon took off near Route 1 in Hanover County and the flight lasted about an hour, according to Martin.

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 182A Skylane, N969KM; accident occurred February 18, 2020 in Koyuk, Alaska




Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Location: Koyuk, Alaska
Accident Number: ANC20CA022
Date & Time: February 19, 2020, 
Registration: N969KM
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 54,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: January 30, 2020
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 3850 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2500 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N969KM
Model/Series: 182 A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1958 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 51506
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel; Ski/wheel 
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-470
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAKK,110 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 23:56 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 46°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1300 ft AGL
Visibility 2.5 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2400 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 320° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.27 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: -11°C / -13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: N/A - None - Mist
Departure Point: Koyuk, AK (PAKK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Nome, AK (94Z ) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport

Airport: 
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 
Runway Surface Condition: Ice; Snow
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 64.751663,-161.601104(est)

Dennis Munoz: Retired police officer realizes lifelong dream




EGG HARBOR CITY, New Jersey — Former Atlantic City police Officer Dennis Munoz knew at an early age that he wanted to spend a good part of his time up in the skies. When he was 7 years old his mother asked him what he wanted to be when he grew up. “I want to be a paratrooper,” he said.

He eventually realized that dream when he enlisted in the Army. “You are only in the air for a few seconds in that role,” he said. “I always wanted to stay up in the air much longer.”

After leaving the Army he assumed a couple of other roles in the military serving in a special forces outfit as well as a reconnaissance commando. He then became an Atlantic City police officer and served for 30 years, retiring in 2005.

His love for aviation then lured him to take lessons at Big Sky Aviation in Millville that same year. “I soon discovered that renting a plane was cost prohibitive,” he said. “At $140 an hour I discovered it would be better to buy my own plane.”

Soon he did purchase one, but it was damaged in a hurricane.

“My dream for many years was to one day fly across the country from coast to coast by myself,” Munoz said. “I’ve read articles in aviation magazines and saw several videos on YouTube on the Vashon Ranger LSA aircraft. I was curious to see how well-built the aircraft was and how it handled when flying. I contacted the Vashon Company in Woodinville, Washington, and inquired if I, as an interested consumer, would be able to tour the facility and fly in the Ranger aircraft. They welcomed me and I arranged a trip to Washington.”

Following the tour, Munoz took a test flight. “The interior of the Ranger was spacious, clean lined and appeared to be built very well. We went flying and he allowed me to take the stick and make several turns. He was very patient in answering all my questions. The plane handled very nicely and felt comfortable.”

“After we landed, I was told that the company delivers planes to customers anywhere in the country. “On my return home in a commercial jet, I was astonished to see how beautiful the Rocky Mountains were and I thought to myself, what an experience it would be to fly over them in a small light sport aircraft.”

“Several days later I contacted a company representative and asked if the company would have a problem if I wanted to take delivery of my own plane. She stated no problem and the process to own a Vashon Ranger began.”

The pandemic slowed down production of the Ranger. The wait for the plane would extend an extra few months. He then received a call from pilot/ instructor Kurt Robinson in August. Robinson said a customer whose plane was almost completed backed off his delivery date and said he needed more time. Robinson asked if he would like his plane. Munoz said yes, and the correspondence between Kurt and Munoz became steady.

“In the middle of September, the call came from Kurt for me to make plans to pick up my Vashon Ranger in Everett, Washington, and begin the 10 hour transition training (flying) and ground school, required for me to safely fly the airplane.”

After a week of training, Munoz was given the go-ahead to begin his cross-country trip on October 6th.

Munoz encountered numerous difficulties on his trip east. Most notably was the turbulence he encountered when crossing the Rocky Mountains. “My poor Ranger and I were tossed up, down and sideways, so violently that I thought my plane was going to be torn apart,” he said. “The five-point harness kept me in my seat, but I still managed to bang my head against the ceiling several times. At first I didn’t know what was happening to me, then I realized that the autopilot was trying to keep the plane on its assigned heading and the wind was trying to blow my plane to the right, up and down. I quickly disengaged the autopilot, slowed the plane down and turned to the right with the wind. Then I used the tracking mode that I was taught, which allows you to turn the knob on the Dynon screen, which moves the heading bug and steers the plane while still keeping track of the GPS. I went around the side of the mountain instead of over it. I was shaken but regrouped and continued to my first refueling stop with a slight headache.”

“I landed at numerous small airports throughout my trip, all with automated fueling machines. Not one of those airports had an outhouse or porta-potty nor did they have any vending machines to buy snacks. I was angry and thought how unprofessional and inhospitable on the part of the municipality and/or airport authority, not to offer the most basic amenities to transient pilots. For the most part, if you land at one of these small airports after 4 pm, you are on your own. Thank goodness for the one bag of Raisinets I had. I stretched out for two days.”

“There was an exception, and only one: Lewistown airport in Montana. Even though the airport was closed, there was a sign on the door and some phone numbers. Calling one of the numbers told me where a car key was so you could borrow their loaner car to drive downtown to get a room or some food and return it when you were done.”

“I did originally plan for a relaxed 600- or 700-mile-a-day trip, to get home in four days, but after my experience with those small airports, I decided to take off at 4 a.m. I flew all day, fueling up several times and traveling the 1,000 miles remaining to get home. I arrived in New Jersey on Oct. 8 at 3 p.m.”

Munoz houses his plane at Buck’s Airport outside Bridgeton. His goal is to fly two or three times a week and plans future flights to Florida, Michigan and Texas. “I am on nobody’s schedule but my own,” he said.

Controlled Flight Into Terrain: Robinson R44 II, N716JL; accident occurred February 20, 2020 in Talkeetna, Alaska


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Location: Talkeetna, Alaska 
Accident Number: ANC20CA023
Date & Time: February 20, 2020, 
Registration: N716JL
Aircraft: Robinson R44 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) 
Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private 
Age: 53,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 12, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 14650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 475 hours (Total, this make and model), 14500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Passenger Information

Certificate: Age:
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N716JL
Model/Series: R44 II 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 10463
Landing Gear Type: N/A; Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: February 5, 2020 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2728 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540 AE1A5
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 245 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAEC,1400 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 27 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 23:49 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 119°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Visibility 5 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1000 ft AGL 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 28.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -2°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - None - Mist
Departure Point: Talkeetna, AK (09AA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Talkeetna, AK (PATK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Sheldon Chalet 09AA
Runway Surface Type: Snow
Airport Elevation: 5742 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Snow
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Valley/terrain following

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:63.048889,-150.770553(est)

Dona Ana County International Jetport (KDNA) runway gets $9 million facelift


SANTA TERESA - After a year of nonstop construction, the Doña Ana County International Jetport runway at 8014 Airport Road is complete and is now being used.

The planning and designing process first began in 2017 but it was not until October 2019 when construction crews hit the ground running with the development of the new runway.

The old runaway was built in 1983 in three sections, each with a different and uneven weight capacity — the center section was 20,000 pounds; the west section 64,000 pounds; and east section 94,000 pounds. Grants totaling $9 million from the New Mexico State Legislature Capital Outlay, with support from Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, along with the Federal Aviation Administration and New Mexico Aviation Division helped give the old runway a much needed update.

“It looks really good and all three sections are now nice and even,” said Jetport Manager William Provance. “We are really excited about it.”

The new runway is 9,950 feet long and 75 feet wide and can accommodate a 94,000-pound aircraft, which is equivalent to a Boeing 737-300 series. Included in the $9 million were the replacement of regular lights with LED lights, new runway wiring and lighting control systems.

The Doña Ana County International Jetport is a full-service general aviation airport serving southern Doña Ana County and the El Paso area. The jetport currently houses 141 aircraft, 19 of which are corporate jets, 32 corporate aircraft hangars and eight sets of T-hangars.

Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Kitfox 7 Super Sport, N92MH; Accident occurred February 28, 2020 at Kosciusko-Attala County Airport (KOSX), Mississippi

  






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Location: Kosciusko, Mississippi
Accident Number: CEN20CA106
Date & Time: February 28, 2020, 15:00 Local 
Registration: N92MH
Aircraft: Kitfox 7 Super Sport 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that, during the takeoff roll, he lost "lateral" control when he overcorrected to the left. The airplane subsequently lifted off at too high of an angle of attack, stalled, and impacted terrain left of the runway. The fuselage just forward of the empennage sustained substantial damage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's lifting off with the airplane at a high of angle of attack, which resulted in aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff Loss of control on ground
Initial climb Loss of control in flight
Initial climb Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)
Initial climb Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 64,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 8, 2018
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: May 20, 2018
Flight Time: 281 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18 hours (Total, this make and model), 242 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot-rated passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 70,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Glider
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 27, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 13, 2019
Flight Time: 5176 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model), 5019 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Kitfox 
Registration: N92MH
Model/Series: 57 Super Sport
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: KA11128197
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 20, 2019 Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 492 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912ULS
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 100 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 330° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Kosciusko, MS (KOSX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greenwood, MS (KGWO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 15:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Kosciusko-Attala County OSX
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 494 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32 IFR
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5009 ft / 75 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.057498,-89.587501(est)

Sale of an Airplane: Houston man charged in million dollar global cyber scam

HOUSTON - Cletus N. Anyanwu, 36, was arrested by Houston Police and the FBI Wednesday, November 18th on the first-degree felony of Engaging in Organized Criminal Activity, specifically money laundering of $300,000 or more.

Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg says Cletus Anyanwu was the mastermind behind a cyber scam that netted almost $1 million by interfering with the business emails between a company in New Zealand that was buying an airplane and a company in Australia that was selling it.

According to the District Attorney's Office, his arrest was the result of two and a half years of investigations and prosecutions. He faces 15 to 99 years, or life if convicted.

“Cyber fraud is among the fastest-growing crimes in the world,” said Ogg.  

“Small business can be crushed, a government can be held hostage, or a corporation brought to a standstill all by hacking and fraud.  We are dedicated to helping victims by bringing cyber terrorists and thieves to justice.”

Anyanwu was a local ringleader who organized co-defendants and bank accounts to receive funds redirected by hackers who infiltrated the email of two companies regarding the sale of an airplane for $1,028,000 in May 2018, according to charging documents.

By substituting the bank routing information on the deal, two bank transactions for $15,000 and $913,000 were redirected to accounts in Houston.

“We’re trying to stop all kinds of computer and email scams, including business scams like this. This company lost a million dollars, and that money is just gone,” said Assistant Harris County District Attorney Keith Houston, the prosecutor handling the case.