Thursday, July 12, 2012

Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority committee to consider more money for Reno Air Races

The Reno Air Racing Association has received a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration to hold the 49th Reno National Championship Air Races in September, but the association still needs to raise $1 million to secure insurance for the event, KRNV News 4 reported Thursday.

Mike Houghton, president and CEO of the association, plans to appear before the Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority Finance Committee at 8 a.m. today to seek additional funding from the tourism organization, KRNV reported.

The RSCVA agenda packet does not detail how much additional funding is being sought.

Reno Air Races officials could not be reached for comment Thursday evening.

Houghton told KRNV that he remains optimistic the funds will be raised.

“It is a lot of money, but our board is committed, our staff is committed, our fans are committed and we’re going to do everything we possibly can to make sure we can make that payment,” he said.

The air racing association has raised about half of the $2 million needed to cover the insurance premium for this year’s event and is facing a Sept. 1 deadline to secure the remaining funds, KRNV reported.

Read more here:  http://www.rgj.com

DANA PLANE CRASH: How Captain battled with failed engines mid-air – Report


Preliminary report on the Dana plane that crashed on 3rd June 2012 at Iju-Ishaga, Lagos released yesterday by the Accident Investigation Bureau, AIB, said that the Captain tried starting the failed two engines mid-air when the engines packed up and after several failed attempt ‘’the Capt informed the Flight Officer, FO, “we just lost everything, we lost an engine. I lost both engines”.

This is coming  as the report said the crash was not caused by contaminated fuel. The plane, a Boeing MD-83, with registration no 5N-RAM on a domestic scheduled commercial flight, operated by Dana Airlines Limited as flight 992 (DAN 992), crashed into a densely populated area during a forced landing following a total loss of power in both engines while on approach to Muhammed Murtala Airport (LOS), Lagos, Nigeria.

According to the report, ‘’the airplane was on the fourth flight segment of the day, consisting of two round-trips between Lagos and Abuja. The accident occurred during the return leg of the second trip. DAN 992 was on final approach for runway 18R at LOS when the crew reported the total loss of power.

‘’According to interviews, the flight arrived in ABV as Dana Air flight 993 about 1350. According to Dana Air ground personnel, routine turn-around activities occurred, including refueling of the airplane. DAN 992 initiated engine startup at 1436, taxied to the runway and was later airborne at 1458 after the flight had reported that it had a fuel endurance of 3.5 hours.

“Shortly after takeoff, DAN 992 reported 1545 as the estimated time of arrival at LOS as the flight climbed to a cruise altitude of 26,000 ft. DAN0992 made contact with Lagos Area Control Center at 1518 hours.  ‘’According to the report,the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) retained about 31 minutes of the flight and starts about 1515 at which time the captain and first officer were in a discussion of a non-normal condition regarding the correlation between the engine throttle setting and an engine power indication.

“However, they did not voice concerns then that the condition would affect the continuation of the flight. The flight crew continued to monitor the condition and became increasingly concerned as the flight transition through the initial descent from cruise altitude at 1522 and the subsequent approach phase.

‘’DAN 992 reported passing through 18,100 and 7,700 ft, respectively, at 1530 and 1540 hours. After receiving a series of heading and altitude assignments from the controller, DAN 992 was issued the final heading to intercept the final approach course for runway 18R.

 Read more here:  http://www.vanguardngr.com

Viewpoint: New way to manage airlines

George Faktaufon 

The airline industry is one of the few real global industries that transcends international borders.

Safety, therefore, is of paramount importance not only to the airlines but also to the states that the airlines operate to.

The industry has been regulated through safety standards established by states through the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Although the system worked well over the years, many states, particularly the developed states, made their own standards because the ICAO standard was considered inadequate and did not meet their requirements.

The result is a multitude of different standards all over the place, resulting in confusion.

To avoid this situation and in an effort to standardize airline safety, IATA (International Air Transport Association) began developing a new airline safety standard based on the world’s best practices and standards.

The IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) program is an internationally recognized and accepted evaluation system designed to assess the operational, management and control systems of an airline.

IOSA’s quality audit principles are designed to conduct audits in a standardized manner.

With the implementation and international acceptance of IOSA, airlines and regulators have achieved the following benefits:

• A reduction of costs and audit resource requirements for airlines and regulators by sharing mutual acceptance audit reports;

• Continuous updating of standards to reflect regulatory revisions and the evolution of best practices within the industry;

• Accredited Audit and Training Organizations with formally trained and qualified auditors and structured auditor training courses; and

• A structured audit methodology, including standard checklists.

Read more here:   http://www.islandsbusiness.com

Possible airline pilot shortage raises safety concerns

WASHINGTON — An industry forecast that nearly half a million new airline pilots will be needed worldwide over the next 20 years as airlines expand their fleets has raised safety concerns that airlines will hire lower caliber pilots as they struggle to fill slots. 

 Boeing, one of the world's largest makers of commercial jetliners, forecasts about 465,000 new pilots will be needed worldwide between now and 2031 as global economies expand and airlines take deliveries of tens of thousands of new commercial jetliners. The forecast includes 69,000 new pilots in the North America, mostly in the U.S. The greatest growth will be in the Asia-Pacific region, where an estimated 185,600 new pilots will be needed.

Likewise, Boeing predicts 601,000 new aircraft maintenance technicians will be needed over the same period, with greatest demand ó 243,500 technicians in the Asia-Pacific region. An estimated 92,500 new technicians will North America.

The rising global demand for airline pilots has raised concern among industry and government officials that there will be a global and a domestic pilot shortage.

"In many regions of the world, a pilot shortage is already here," the Boeing forecast said. "Asia Pacific in particular is experiencing delays and operational interruptions due to pilot scheduling constraints."

Read more here:  http://www.clarionledger.com

Has the F-22 oxygen problem been solved?

 

(CBS News) The F-22 Raptor is America's most advanced fighter plane. It ought to be: Each one costs $143 million.

However, for months something mysterious has been happening to F-22 pilots in flight, putting them in jeopardy.

The F-22 is on a very short leash. After first being grounded, the world's most sophisticated and expensive jet fighter is flying again, but limited to flights within 30 minutes of a landing field.

The reason: A mysterious problem that without warning has caused pilots to suffer hypoxia - become disoriented from lack of oxygen. Over the past 10 months, says Col. Kevin Robbins, commander of the First Fighter Wing at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia, there have been 11 incidents of hypoxia.


"No one has gotten to the point where they're completely, where they're delirious. They're still able to function, still able to bring the aircraft back safely," Col. Robbins says.

CBS News correspondent David Martin experienced hypoxia first hand in an F-22 simulator as Maj. Tom Massa reduced the flow of oxygen to his mask. It is like being dizzy.

When it got too bad, Martin pulled the emergency oxygen, and only then did he realize how far downhill his ability to function had gone. When he thought his simulated flight was going straight and level, he was actually continuing to climb.

The real F-22 can pull 9 Gs, subjecting the pilot to a force nine times the weight of gravity.
One standard piece of equipment is an inflatable vest. It provides chest counter-pressure during rapid decompression.

Read more here:   http://www.cbsnews.com

Lagos plane crash: Coroner threatens to order arrest of Dana Air management

Magistrate Oyetade Alexander Komolafe, the coroner in charge of the inquest into the cause of the June 3, 2012 fatal crash of a Dana Air plane that occurred at Iju-Ishaga, Lagos, on Thursday, threatened to arrest the management of Dana Air if it continues to ignore the inquest sittings. 

At the resumed hearing of the inquest at the Lagos Magistrate Court sitting in Oja Oba, Abule Egba, Magistrate Komolafe frowned on the continuous absence of Dana Air since it was absent at the first hearing.

"I do not think Dana Air is represented. If you are summoned and you are not here, you can be arrested. A publication has been made in a newspaper and you should be aware," Komolafe said.

He added that the court sheriff had duly served Dana Air with the summons of the court and urged members of the public who have anything to contribute to the inquest not to shy away from doing so.

"Don't sit down and criticize. Come forward, if you have anything that will help."

After series of arguments among parties on the format the inquest will take, Magistrate Komolafe held that parties represented by counsels could file written depositions which would be served on all parties by the sheriff of the court.

The coroner also held that oral testimonies and evidence on oath would also be accepted by the court. 

http://tribune.com.ng

Oakland resident recalls years as local air traffic reporter

She was our eye in the sky for 12 years. Oakland Realtor and longtime broadcaster Katie O'Shea took her last look at traffic from the seat of a Cessna, June 30, after KGO Radio eliminated airborne traffic reports in a cost-cutting move under new ownership. 

It was the end of an era for the venerable news-talk station, and O'Shea could see it coming. "With cameras everywhere and people calling in -- I think it's a dying breed," she says of the concept of traffic reports from a chopper or plane. "It's still great for covering fires and protests -- stories that filter over to news."

O'Shea was no stranger to flying when she landed her first radio job with Shadow Traffic in 1995, as Don Bleu's sidekick and traffic reporter on K101. She'd already had a successful career as a flight attendant for American Airlines and was used to multi-tasking at 35,000 feet. Her sharp eye and bubbly banter on the popular morning music show made her a household name for tens of thousands of listeners. When she left K101, she was soon hired by Metro Traffic and assigned to cover afternoon traffic on KGO, a position she held for a dozen years.

Like so many things, there's a real art to airborne reporting. A strong stomach is only part of the package. "You have to be in and out in 10 seconds and there are so many things to report," says O'Shea, who would take off from Hayward Airport at 4 p.m. to deliver her first report at 4:05. With her trusty pilot (whoever was scheduled that day), they'd scan the 880 and skim the Bay Bridge, then check out San Francisco and Marin and fly back to the East Bay and down 680. "We felt like we were cowboys in the sky -- galloping where we were needed," she says.

Read more here:   http://www.mercurynews.com

Flight Attendant Falls Ill Aboard Flight Diverted To KBWI - Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, Baltimore, Maryland

 
A flight attendant becomes ill aboard a Southwest Airlines flight that landed at BWI Thursday afternoon.




LINTHICUM, Md. - A flight attendant became ill Thursday aboard a plane, prompting an investigation by hazardous materials crews in Maryland. 

Southwest Flight 709 took off from Norfolk, Va., shortly before 4 p.m. Thursday and landed at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport shortly before 4:30 p.m. without incident. The plane was bound for BWI, and then Chicago, and it was not diverted as initially reported.

Anne Arundel County and BWI hazmat and fire crews boarded the aircraft to sample the air, trying to determine whether anything unusual was in the air. There's no conclusive information as of 6:30 p.m., BWI spokesman Jack Cahalan said.

Authorities have yet to determine a cause for the flight attendant's illness, or the identity of the possible substance aboard the plane. The flight attendant was taken to Baltimore Washington Medical Center for treatment.

As a precaution, crews also checked the pilot to determine whether he had any health issues. The passengers deplaned safely, and there were no illnesses reported among them, Cahalan said.

The passengers were moved to another gate to continue on their flight to Chicago on another aircraft.

There were 139 people aboard the plane, including the crew. 

Article and photos:  http://www.wbaltv.com

Colombian Rebels Say They Downed Air Force Plane

Photos released by the FARC 
By: Elespectador.com
Radio Caracol revealed these photographs taken by FARC guerrillas. The rebel group claims to be responsible for bringing down the aircraft of the Air Force who was supporting operations in Jambaló, Cauca.

Fotos entregadas por las Farc
Por: Elespectador.com
Caracol Radio reveló estas fotografías tomadas por guerrilleros de las Farc. El grupo subversivo dice ser el responsable de derribar la aeronave de la Fuerza Aérea que se encontraba apoyando operaciones en Jambaló, Cauca.




 

Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca 2 
 Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca. 

 
Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca 
1 Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca.

 
Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca 
3 Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca.

 
Tripulación del Súper Tucano 
Tripulación del Súper Tucano accidentado en Cauca.


The Colombian Air Force said Thursday afternoon two crew members manning a crashed airplane, which may have been shot down by guerrillas, had been found dead in the southwestern Cauca department.

Air Force Commander General Tito Pinilla confirmed the deaths and identified the two crew members as Oscar Castillo and Andres Serrano Lemus.

The commander said there were “no indications that [the plane] was shot down by the FARC," despite the group's "Jacobo Arenas" column issuing photographs that supposedly proved they were responsible for the attack. Earlier on Thursday Pinilla said it “could not be ruled out” that FARC guerrillas had shot the plane down.

“We have already found the lost aircraft. One body is at the site, the other is with the FARC,” said Pinilla, adding that intercepted FARC messages revealed that the guerrilla group were planning to plant mines around the site of the crash to hinder the military's recovery efforts.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos commented on the news Thursday, saying “We still don’t know what happened, but it is very improbable the plane was shot down by the FARC because they have no capacity to do it," referring to the group's lack of anti-aircraft weaponry. If the FARC has managed to procure anti-aircraft weaponry it could be a game-changer in the Colombian conflict, as the government's ability to carry out airstrikes has been one of its most powerful counterinsurgency tools.

Cauca is a traditional FARC stronghold, and a string of violent incidents in recent days highlighted the troubling security situation in the department.

A motorcyle loaded with explosives, allegedly by the FARC, detonated Tuesday killing a nine-year-old boy and injuring five others.

A privately-owned helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing in the town of Argelia Tuesday, after which the aircraft's two-man crew were believed to be kidnapped by FARC guerrillas, and remain missing.

400 people occupied a military base near the troubled town of Toribio Wednesday, where ongoing conflict between the FARC and government troops forced an estimated 600 people from their homes in recent weeks, to demand the withdrawal of armed groups -- whether legal or not -- from their town. "We will not attack the military(...) We will only ask them to withdraw, as has been done with the guerrillas," said Toribio's former Mayor Gabriel Pavi. 

Santos visited the indigenous community Wednesday to announce a security strategy aimed at curbing violence in Cauca. The plan would increase military presence in the region and encourage social development.

Source:  http://colombiareports.com


VERMONT - State Reorganizes Some Airports To Improve Bottom Line

 
Cape Air 
Cape Air flies Cessna 402 planes such as this in and out of Rutland airport.





The twin-engine roar of a Cape Air nine passenger Cessna 402 is the sound of success at the state owned Rutland-Southwest airport. 

State aviation director Guy Rouelle says a record 11,000 passengers flew out of Rutland last year, and the state expects a 25 percent increase this year. Cape Air recently added a fourth daily flight. 

"It's in the right place in the state and it's a good partnership we have with them," he said. "It's a JetBlue code share. So you can fly to Boston, and then fly to China, from Rutland." 

Business is much, much slower at the state-owned Caledonia County airport in Lyndonville. There are no commercial flights. And on some days, no flights at all. 

"You could go four or five days without a single plane," said Tim Peters of the Vermont Pilots Association. "And then on the sixth day you might have four or five flights. So that's the typical operation of Caledonia County." 

The state Transportation Agency doesn't expect every one of the 10 state-owned airports to be as successful as Rutland. But officials are trying to cut losses and improve financial performance. Some of the changes have been controversial, and it's not yet clear whether the reforms will fly. 

At the Caledonia airport, officials replaced the private operator with a state employee in an effort to improve the bottom line. 

Until the end of June, the Vermont Pilots Association was the Caledonia's fixed based operator, or FBO. The association sold fuel and managed airport operations.  

But the state imposed new management. The pilot's association is out and a temporary state employee is now running the place. 

The changes come as the state looks closely at how well all the publicly owned air fields are run. Guy Rouelle of the aviation division said contracts with private operators were recently reviewed at seven of the 10 airports, and three - Newport, Morrisville and Highgate - were found to be performing well.
"Four of the other airports in the state were running some pretty steep deficits," he said. 

Caledonia airport cost the state about $50,000 last year, he said. The other financially troubled airports are Middlebury, Springfield's Hartness Field, and the William H. Morse airport in Bennington.   

Rouelle wants four minimum services at each airport: flight instruction, aircraft rental, fuel sales and a maintenance shop. 

He said the state has added its own employees at some airports, and taken over operations such as fuel sales in order to erase deficits. 

"The goal for the aviation program is to put these airports on a sustainable path where they not only are able to pay for themselves, but in addition to that are able to provide the public with all of the services that three of our airports are producing currently and are strong financial drivers for their region," he said. "And there's no reason why these other airports cannot do the same." 

The state's approach is if they build it, the planes will come. So if an airport provides a mechanic or offers flight lessons, for example, officials expect demand to grow for that service. 

But Peters at the Pilot's Associations questions the logic. He said there's never been a mechanic on hand at Caledonia. And student pilots can learn to fly at nearby Newport airport. He said a flight school is not financially viable at Caledonia. 

"My personal opinion... is that there simply isn't a market for these types of things," he said.

The effort to erase deficits at the state's small airports is not new. Former Transportation Secretary David Dill recalls legislative debates in the 1990s that led to calls to close airports to save taxpayers money.

"The communities look at it as an economic development for the region, but a tool that should be supported b y the state and funded by the state for the benefit of the region," he said. "I don't think that kind of dilemma has really changed." 

Dill points out that other forms of transportation - such as public transit and rail - are also subsidized by taxpayers. He says the big question is whether it's more efficient in the long run to have state employees run airport operations as opposed to private contractors. 

Source:  http://www.vpr.net

High-flying adventure on tap for Geneseo Air Show


GENESEO, N.Y. — 

Three event highlights

1 The Geneseo Air Show never fails to delight and wow aviation and history buffs alike. This year, the tentative flight schedule includes the crowd-pleasing B-17 Movie Memphis Belle, plus acts from the Liberty Jump Team, WWI Great Flying Museum and aerobatic master Rob Holland.

2 Besides flights, ground events include an up-close view of historic planes, plus tours of some of the larger historic aircraft (at a fee), plus see a WW2 reenactment camp.

3 The airshow is sponsored by the Geneseo-based 1941 Historical Aircraft Group. Its museum is open year-round for tours, and conducts other events. For more information on the group, go to 1941hag.org or call 585-243-2100.

Why you should attend

“We’re the only airshow in western New York this year. We’re one of a very few airshows that is devoted to War II warbirds, and we’re an inexpensive family-friendly event with free parking, free admission for children under 12, and visitors are welcome to bring their own coolers, food, and even lawn chairs.” — Cherie Bevona, air show public relations

Read more:   http://www.dansvilleonline.com

Reno Air Racing Association needs $1 Million to happen



~
RENO, Nev. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- The Reno Air Racing Association has about a month and a half to raise roughly $1 million or else the Air Races will not take flight this year. 

Mike Houghton, President and CEO of the Air Racing Association, went in front of the Airport Authority Board today and said they have raised about half of the $2 million insurance premium needed for this year's event.

The hotel-casino industry has committed to pledge $600,000 to support the event, and Houghton plans to go in front of the RSCVA Board tomorrow to continue to ask for support. If the insurance premium is not reached by September 1, the races will come to an end. Houghton, however, is confident, and went on to say the FAA has approved changes made to the race course and granted the necessary waivers to run the event this year. He is urging the community and local businesses to continue to support the event.

Article and video:   http://www.mynews4.com

First Flight: $99 lessons let you find out if flying is right for you - Ace Aviation and Flight School at Reno/Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

 
RGJ reporter Scott Oxarart, right, listens to basic flight instructions from Jack Suierveld of Ace Flight School at the Reno-Stead Airport on June 11. Oxarart was able to pilot the plane — with lots of oversight from Suierveld — his first time out.  




 
RGJ reporter Scott Oxarart takes off in a Diamond DA20-C1 aircraft with instructor Jack Suierveld during a flight lesson with Ace Flight School at the Reno-Stead Airport on June 11. 




I pushed the throttle of a Diamond DA20-C1 single-engine propelled aircraft, gently tugged on the control stick and slowly lifted it off the runway of the Reno-Stead Airport.

I put pressure on the two rudder pedals at my feet — trying to keep the plane straight. It was the first time I had ever been in an airplane that didn’t say “Southwest” on the tail.

Confused by the dozens of gauges and numbers on the dashboard of the two-seat, $130,000 plane, I was learning on the fly in every sense of the phrase.

Ace Aviation and Flight School is one of three in Stead that puts you in the captain’s seat. The school offers introductory flight lessons for $99 to see if flying a plane is your next hobby or job.

If it is, you can work toward your private pilot’s license, which enables you to rent or buy a plane to take on direct trips for leisure or business. If you don’t like it, you can stick with commercial flights and at least say you tried.

“Our first flight lesson is just an orientation,” Ace Aviation pilot Jack Suierveld said. “Not only about basically flying the airplane, the prospective student does the taxiing, the takeoff, the climb, the cruise and is instructed the whole way.

“But it’s one foot in front of the other, one step at a time throughout the learning process.”

Getting a commercial pilot license is a commitment, but Suierveld will work with students every step of the way. He has young people who want to learn to fly the family plane. He also has retired men and women who want to put a line through a bucket list and fulfill a lifetime dream.

First flight

When you arrive for your appointment, Suierveld goes over the basic instruments and tools you’ll be using to help take off, steer and maneuver while in flight. The process took just 20 minutes.

You then hop into the aircraft, which reminded me of a two-seater go-kart. Like the go-kart, the parent has full control. If the kid, or student in this case, takes control and has trouble, the parent can step in and make corrections.

Piper PA-34-200, VH-LCK: Accident occurred July 11, 2012 in Broome, Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR12WA334 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 11, 2012 in Broome, Australia

Aircraft: PIPER PA34, registration: VH-LCK
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


On July 11, 2012, at 2020 universal coordinated time, a Piper PA-34-200, VH-LCK, collided with terrain near Broome, Australia. The airplane was a charter flight operating under the pertinent civil regulations of Australia. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia

Tel: +612 6274 6054
Fax: +612 6274 6434
www.atsb.gov.au


 
Adam Gaffney, 27, reported to be the pilot who lost his life in Wednesday night's plane crash in Broome.


The pilot who died in a Broome plane crash was an experienced pilot who had flown the route numerous times before, according to the directors of Golden Eagle Airlines.

The 27-year-old pilot, who was reported yesterday to be Adam Gaffney, was killed on Wednesday when the light plane he was flying crashed into sand dunes at Broome's iconic Cable Beach just after take-off.

The Golden Eagle Airlines pilot was at the start of his shift on a regular return freight flight from Broome to Port Hedland when the incident occurred. He was travelling in a Piper Seneca plane.

Read more: http://www.watoday.com.au

Beechcraft 58 Baron, Moshe Menora, N3081N: Accident occurred July 13, 2010 in St. Ignace, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN10FA394 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 13, 2010 in St. Ignace, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/03/2011
Aircraft: BEECH 58, registration: N3081N
Injuries: 4 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses observed the airplane abort two takeoffs prior to the accident takeoff. During the second and third (accident) takeoff rolls, one engine did not sound like it was developing full power. In between the three takeoff attempts, the pilot did not perform an engine run-up. During the accident takeoff roll, one engine still did not sound like it was developing full power and the airplane rotated shortly before the end of the runway. The airplane briefly became airborne, with the wings rocking back and forth, and then impacted an interstate highway with its left wing, which was consistent with an aerodynamic stall. The airplane impacted a cable median barrier and a fire ensued. The airplane continued into a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engines revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot had some moderate heart disease and sleep apnea that were documented in his medical records. Toxicology findings noted the use of an unreported medication (atenolol) that was taken at an undetermined time prior to the accident. Approximately 10 minutes prior to the accident flight, the pilot amended his instrument flight rules clearance with an air traffic controller via the airplane's radio. No problems with the pilot's conversation or speech were noted during the recorded transmissions, and the investigation could not conclusively determine whether the pilot's medical conditions or medication use were related to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control during takeoff for undetermined reasons.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 13, 2010, at 1700 eastern daylight time, a Beech 58 twin-engine airplane, N3081N, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Mackinac County Airport (83D), St. Ignace, Michigan. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured and one passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Tri United, Inc., Skokie, Illinois, and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument rules flight (IFR) plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight was departing at the time of the accident.

According to information provided by air traffic control, local authorities, and witnesses, the airplane departed Chicago Executive Airport (PWK), Wheeling, Illinois, at 1210, and arrived at 83D at 1354. According to a 83D fixed based operator (FBO) representative, the pilot came into the lobby and asked if he was at Mackinac Island. The representative explained to him that 83D was not on the island and she then pointed the island out through a window to the pilot. Mackinac Island is located approximately 5 miles east of 83D. The airplane then departed 83D and arrived at Mackinac Island Airport (MCD) a few minutes later.

Approximately 1630, the airplane returned to 83D from MCD and obtained 60 gallons of fuel. At 1644, the pilot contacted air traffic control services via his airplane radio to amend his IFR clearance.

Witnesses, who were mechanics at a local maintenance facility, observed the airplane attempt to takeoff on runway 25 three different times. During the first attempt, the airplane traveled approximately half way down the runway and then the takeoff was aborted. The pilot taxied the airplane back to runway 25 and attempted a second takeoff without an engine run-up. During the second takeoff attempt, the airplane traveled approximately three-quarters of the way down the runway and the takeoff was aborted. One witness stated that during the second takeoff roll, it sounded as if the engines were not throttled up to full power, and it appeared that the pilot had problems maintaining directional control of the airplane.

The pilot taxied the airplane back to runway 25 and attempted a third takeoff without an engine run-up. One of the mechanic witnesses stated that during the third takeoff attempt, "It appeared and sounded as if the right engine was running properly and the left engine was not at the same RPM. The pilot was having difficulty maintaining directional control...with the left engine sputtering and misfiring and traces of black smoke coming from the left engine exhaust." Witnesses observed the airplane become airborne near the departure end of the runway with the wings rocking back and forth, and the left wing impacted the northbound lanes of Interstate 75, which is located approximately 1,000 feet from the departure end of runway 25. The airplane continued through the highway median, traveled across the southbound lanes of the interstate and came to rest inverted in a grassy area adjacent to the interstate. A post crash fire ensued and consumed a majority of the airplane.

The seriously injured passenger, who was seated in the rear seat, exited the airplane after it came to rest. According to the passenger, he was sleeping at the time of the accident and had no recollection of the accident sequence.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument ratings. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical examination was conducted on December 30, 2008. After review, the FAA issued the pilot a Class 3 Special Issuance Medical Certificate that was not valid for any class after December 31, 2010. In addition, the certificate noted a restriction for corrective lenses for near and distant vision.

The pilot's flight time logbook was destroyed during the accident. On his most recent medical application, the pilot reported 2,211 total flight hours and 67 in the previous six months.

A review of the pilot's FAA airman records showed that the pilot was issued his single engine land airplane rating on May 22, 1989, his instrument rating on May 27, 1990, and his multi-engine land airplane rating on August 29, 1991.

On December 7, 2006, the pilot was reexamined by the FAA in the accident airplane as the result of an undisclosed violation. The reexamination was disapproved by the FAA inspector for undisclosed reasons. On January 9, 2007, the pilot was reexamined by the FAA in the accident airplane. The reexamination was disapproved by the FAA inspector for undisclosed reasons. On that date, the pilot voluntarily surrendered his multi-engine land and instrument ratings.

On July 9, 2009, the pilot received his multi-engine land rating. On the rating application, the pilot reported 2,985 total flight hours and 2,097 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

On December 7, 2009, the pilot received his instrument rating for single engine land airplanes. On the rating application, the pilot reported 3,147 total flight hours.

On December 29, 2009, the pilot received his instrument rating for multi-engine land airplanes. On the application, the pilot reported a total of 3,166 total flight hours and 2,238 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a 1987 Beech 58 (Baron), serial number TH-1526. It was a six-place, twin-engine airplane, with a retractable tricycle landing gear configuration. The airplane was powered by two 300-horsepower Teledyne Continental Motors IO-550-C engines. The left and right engine serial numbers were 271844-R and 271853-R, respectively. The engines were equipped with 3-blade, constant speed McCauley propellers.

Maintenance records showed the most recent annual inspection was completed on November 18, 2009, at a total airframe time of 3,902.6 hours. The left and right engines' most recent 100-hour inspections were completed on November 18, 2009, at a total time since major overhaul of 378.9 hours.

The airplane's weight and balance documentation was not located. Based on the weight of the occupants, estimated fuel load, and estimated baggage, the airplane was within the gross weight limitations at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Weather conditions reported at the time of the accident were clear sky, calm winds, and a temperature of approximately 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The calculated density altitude was approximately 2,300 feet.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Mackinac County Airport is a public, non-towered airport located 2 miles northwest of St. Ignace, Michigan, at a surveyed elevation of 624 feet. The airport features one runway, Runway 7/25, which has a concrete surface, and is 3,800 feet long by 75 feet wide.

Fuel records from the 83D airport FBO showed the airplane received 60.33 gallons of fuel prior to the planned departure. Three other airplanes obtained fuel from the FBO prior to the accident airplane. Fuel test results showed no anomalies with the fuel provided by the FBO.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Initial ground impact was on the northbound lanes of Interstate 75 about 1,000 feet west of runway 25. The debris path was oriented on an approximate 230-degree magnetic heading. The main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and right engine, came to rest inverted about 150 feet from the initial impact point. Grass scorched by the postimpact fire extended to the north and around the main wreckage.

The fuselage was consumed by fire. The cockpit and instrument panel were destroyed and consumed by fire. The cockpit and cabin seat frames were found separated from their attach fittings. The nose landing gear remained attached and the retract/extend arm was in the retracted position. The empennage was partially consumed by fire. The empennage flight control surfaces remained attached to their respective fittings.

The right wing was partially consumed by fire. The aileron and flap were consumed by fire. The flap actuator was consumed by fire and a flap position could not be determined. The landing gear remained attached and was found in the retracted position. The engine remained attached to the firewall and was damaged by fire. The right propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft. The propeller blades contained leading edge gouging, s-type bending, and chordwise scratching.

The left wing was bent aft, twisted upright, and consumed by fire. The aileron was separated and partially consumed by fire. The flap was consumed by fire. The flap actuator was consumed by fire and a flap position could not be determined. The landing gear remained attached and found in the retracted position. The left engine was separated and came to rest in the debris path. The left propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft. The propeller blades contained leading edge gouging, s-type bending, and chordwise scratching.

Flight control continuity was confirmed to all flight control surfaces. No anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction of the airframe were observed.

PATHEOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was not performed on the pilot. The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) performed toxicology testing on the pilot's blood specimen. The tests for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol were negative. The following drugs were detected in the specimen: unspecified level of Amlodipine, unspecified level of Atenolol, and 5.6 percent Hemoglobin A1C. Amlodipine is a prescription medication that is a long-acting calcium channel blocker that is used to control high blood pressure and treat chronic angina. Atenolol is a beta blocker medication used to control high blood pressure or control heart rate. The use of Atenolol was not reported on his most recent medical certificate application.

The NTSB Medical Officer reviewed the medical records maintained by the FAA Aerospace Medical Certification Division, as well as records kept by the pilot's physicians. The following information was extracted from those records. The pilot had recurrent coronary artery disease with angioplasty procedures in 1999, 2000, 2003, and 2008. In January 2010, cardiovascular testing was normal with no evidence of disease progression since the angioplasty and stenting in 2008. The pilot had been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) had been recommended. The diagnosis was not reported to the FAA. The pilot reported he stopped using the CPAP device. The pilot was a type-2 diabetic who controlled his condition with oral medication.

Air traffic control communications were reviewed to determine if there were any relevant speech patterns that were consistent with a medical issue.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The engines were examined at Teledyne Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama, under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge. Postaccident examination of the engines revealed the engines could not be test run due to impact and fire damage, and a teardown inspection was completed. The teardown inspection showed no anomalies that would have prevented normal engine operation.

The left engine throttle and fuel control unit were bench tested, and the unit functioned with no anomalies. The left engine fuel pump could not be bench tested due to damage. The pump was disassembled and no anomalies were noted. The left engine fuel manifold valve was bench tested and no anomalies were noted.

The right engine throttle and fuel control unit was damaged due to impact and fire. The unit could not be bench tested due to damage. The right engine fuel pump could not be bench tested due to damage. The pump was disassembled and no anomalies were noted. The right engine fuel manifold valve was damaged by fire. The valve could not be bench tested. The valve was disassembled and no anomalies were noted.

The propellers were examined at McCauley, Wichita, Kansas, under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge. Examination of the propellers revealed the blade angles at the time of impact were in the low pitch operating range position. No anomalies were noted with the propellers.



A man is suing his late father’s company after a plane his father was piloting crashed, killing himself and three of his grandchildren.

The lawsuit filed in Cook County Circuit Court says Moshe Menora was acting in the scope of his job as president of Tri-United Development Inc. when he was piloting an aircraft on a flight from Mackinac County Airport in Michigan to Chicago Executive Airport in Wheeling when it crashed during take-off.

The lawsuit also names Yehudis Esther Israel and Robert Blatt, co-independent executors of Moshe Menora’s, estate as defendants.

The Beech 58 twin-engine plane tried to take off twice on July 13, 2010, at the Mackinac County Airport, but Menora aborted both attempts, according to a report by the National Transportation Safety Board.

On the third try, the airplane became airborne, but the left wing hit a lane on Interstate Highway 75 about 1,000 feet from the end of the runway, the report said. When the airplane crossed the highway, it crashed and caught fire, the report said.

The crash killed Menora, 73, and his granddaughters Sara Klein, 17, Rebecca Menora, 16, and Rachel Menora, 14. Yossi Menora, 13 at the time, survived. The five were returning from a day trip to Mackinac Island, relatives said.

Plaintiff Shalom Menora has lost “love, support, guidance, affection, comfort, companionship and society” as a result of the death of his daughters Rachel and Rebecca Menora, the lawsuit says.

Menora is seeking more than $50,000 in damages.


Related:   http://skokie.suntimes.com

Minnesota - State uses biology, airplanes to thwart gypsy moth mating

 
 Read to fly . . .
The ground crew loads some of the pheromone flakes into the applicator plane during the week-long gypsy moth spraying by Minnesota Department of Agriculture. The flakes are distributed in the treatment block and disrupt the male gypsy moth’s ability to locate the female gypsy moths.
 Contributed Photo

The bright yellow planes flying over Carlton County this week are obvious. What isn't so easy to discern is their mission: Like barely visible confetti, the planes and their pilots were dropping tiny green flakes of a manmade pheromone designed to prevent the creation of any future generations of gypsy moths. 

It was hard to miss the bright yellow planes swooping through the skies of Carlton County this week, flying low, loud engines making them even more noticeable. What wasn’t immediately obvious was their mission: Like barely visible confetti, the planes and their pilots were dropping tiny green flakes of a manmade pheromone designed to prevent the creation of any future generations of gypsy moths.

With the exception of Jay Cooke Park, it is the first time the Minnesota Department of Agriculture has sprayed for gypsy moths – a non-native, leaf-eating insect – in Carlton County. Lucy Hunt, the MDA entomologist who’s been in charge of the state’s gypsy moth program since 2007, said the eastern side of the state has been the front lines in the battle to postpone the invasion for the past few years.

Read more here:   http://www.pinejournal.com

No Canadians in deadly Mauritania crash: Aircraft hired by Toronto-based mining firm crashes in West Africa

The military plane, chartered by Canadian mining company Kinross Gold, crashed shortly after takeoff in Mauritania.

All seven people aboard a military plane chartered by the Toronto-based mining firm Kinross Gold Corp. were killed when the plane crashed in Mauritania today.

There were no Canadians aboard.

The plane caught fire shortly after takeoff Thursday morning from an airstrip in Nouakchott, capital of the West African nation. It had attempted to return to the runway but fell short.

A statement from the mining company said the deceased included:

    The two pilots.
    Two Mauritanian customs officials.
    Three contract security personnel.

"Kinross extends its sincere condolences to the families of the victims," said the company.

The names of the victims have not been released. However, no Kinross personnel or gold were aboard, the company said.

The Russian-made YAK-12 had been chartered to carry gold from its Tasiast mine, about 200 kilometres north of Nouakchott. 

http://www.cbc.ca

Plastic found in search for missing helicopter

A villager in Papua New Guinea this morning provided searchers with their first lead in finding the helicopter and three crew members - two Australian and one New Zealander - missing since last week.

 Australians Russell Aitken, 42, and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer Emmett Fynn, 36, were on board a Bell 206 helicopter that went missing near Mount Hagen in the PNG highlands on Thursday. New Zealander Antony Annan, 49, was also on board.

Operator of the aircraft Hevilift said in a statement that the villager was searching the waterways and rivers when he found some pieces of plastic that were clearly from a “fly away kit” that is usually kept in the boot of the helicopters operated by Hevilift. It is a plastic container that holds items such as oil, rags and grease guns.

“It is obvious that it is part of the missing helicopter as it is consistent with the size and shape of the container we use for the kit and it has what we believe to be the outline of an 'H' in blue paint. We paint the helicopter registration number, in this case HCY, on each container,” said Mr Ian McBeath, Eastern Region, Hevilift (PNG).

When the villager found the piece he returned to Umasia Village on the Purari River, about 12 kilometres from where he found it. When search headquarters got the news about noon local time, an aircraft was sent to pick up the villager and have him show searchers where the debris was located.

When that position was determined, searching began upstream. Another villager then flagged down the search helicopter, about half a mile upstream, and provided a second piece of the same plastic container.

“The search effort was rapidly redeployed following this development,” said Mr McBeath.

“Regrettably these broken pieces of container would most likely indicate that there has been a hard landing and the aircraft has broken up.

“Finding these pieces means the search area has narrowed significantly. However, we still have a large section of countryside to cover.

"We have been advised that there was very heavy rain in the area last night and this has most likely flushed these items out of the bush and into one of the dozens of rivulets that run into the Gipi Creek which runs into the Purari River.

“We now know that the area where we have been searching was the correct one and we can concentrate the ground search teams upstream of the location of where the debris was found, which is five miles [eight kilometres] from Bawata,” Mr McBeath said.

Flight 759 documentary showing

Monday, July 9, marked the 30 year anniversary of crash Pan Am flight 759 into a Kenner neighborhood. 153 people were killed in the accident, 145 people on the plane and eight on the ground according to the National Transportation Safety Board's report on the crash.

Seven people killed in the accident were from the local area—Louis and Willie Mae Ledet, Armond and Cecile Dupre, Ronald and Gwendolyn Gonzales all from Houma and Susan Savoie from Cut Off.

At noon on Saturday, July 14, the Terrebonne Parish Main Library, at 151 Library Drive in Houma, will show a documentary about this event. New Orleans filmmaker Royd Anderson directed and produced the film called “Pan Am Flight 759.” It is free and open to the public.

http://www.houmatoday.com

Mikoyan Gurevich Mig 21MF, N9307: Accident occurred July 12, 2012 in Minneapolis, Minnesota

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA452     
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 12, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: MIKOYAN GUREVICH MIG 21MF, registration: N9307
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot established an appropriate speed during the approach and landed about 300 feet down the 5,000-foot-long runway. Within seconds of touching down, the pilot brought the throttle control to idle and deployed the drag chute. However, when the chute deployed, it did not fully inflate and then separated from the airplane. The pilot was not immediately aware the drag chute had failed and continued to try to deploy the chute. The pilot said that he used maximum braking to slow the airplane but was unable to stop the airplane on the runway. The pilot swerved to the left to avoid crossing a state highway, and the airplane struck a berm and a fence before it stopped. The pilot said that he had successfully tested the drag chute in preparation for this particular landing and had no previous problems deploying the chute before the accident. A review of performance data revealed that the pilot had sufficient runway length to land without use of the drag chute had he applied the wheel brakes immediately upon landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's delayed application of wheel brakes to slow the airplane down on landing and the airplane’s failed drag chute, which resulted in a runway overrun.

On June 12, 2012, at 0958 central daylight time, a Mikoyan Gurevich Mig 21MF, was substantially damaged when it over ran the runway while landing at Flying Cloud Airport (FCM), Minneapolis, Minnesota. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed from Ann Arbor Municipal Airport (ARB), Ann Arbor, Michigan, about 0630. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated the airplane was going to be part of an exhibition being held at Flying Cloud airport that weekend. On final approach to runway 10R, he established a speed of 165 knots and landed approximately 300 feet down the 5,000-foot-long runway. Upon landing, the pilot brought the throttle to idle and deployed the drag chute. Since there was a delay in slowing the airplane down before the chute opened, the pilot said he initiated maximum braking. When the airplane did not slow down, he thought that he did not hit the button that deployed the chute hard enough and tried several more times before he realized he "had no chute." When the pilot knew that the airplane would go off the runway, he maneuvered it to the left and onto the grassy area adjacent to the runway to avoid crossing a state highway. The airplane struck a berm and a chain link fence before it came to rest upright. The left main landing gear collapsed and the right wing and fuselage were substantially damaged. The nose cone of the airplane and the left wing were also damaged.

Several Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors were at the airport and witnessed the accident. According to one inspector, when the airplane was approximately halfway down the runway, the drag chute deployed. Before the chute fully opened, it departed the airplane and landed on the runway. The airplane continued down the runway at a high rate of speed before it veered left near the east end of the runway. The inspector said it looked like the airplane went up on its nose and then landed back down on its belly before it came to a rest near the edge of a highway.

The pilot said he tested the drag chute approximately three weeks before the accident in preparation for this particular flight and there were no malfunctions of the system. He also said that he had successfully deployed the drag chute about 6 or 7 times prior to this accident without incident.

A review of performance data for the airplane revealed the pilot had sufficient runway length to land without the drag chute.

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA452 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 12, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: MIKOYAN GUREVICH MIG 21MF, registration: N9307
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

 

On July 12, 2012, at 0958, a Mikoyan Gurevich Mig 21MF, was substantially damaged when it ran off the runway while attempting to land on Runway 10R at Flying Cloud Airport (FCM), Minneapolis, Minnesota. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed from Ann Arbor Municipal Airport (ARB), Ann Arbor, Michigan, about 0630. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot was flying to Flying Cloud Airport so the Mig 21 could be part of an exhibition that was being held there that weekend. He said the en route portion of the flight was uneventful. Prior to landing, he made several low passes over the runway to burn off fuel. As the pilot turned onto final approach, he established an approach speed of 165 knots and landed approximately 300 feet down the 5,000-foot-long runway. Approximately 3-4 seconds after touching down, the pilot deployed the drag chute. As the chute deployed, it snapped off the back of the airplane. The pilot then used the anti-skid braking system to slow the airplane, but it did not decelerate as he expected. When he realized that he was going to go off the runway, the pilot maneuvered the airplane onto the grassy area adjacent to the runway to avoid crossing a state highway. The airplane struck a berm and a chain link fence before coming to a stop upright.

Several Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors were at the airport and witnessed the accident. According to one inspector, the airplane landed on runway 10R. When it was approximately halfway down the runway, the drag chute deployed. Before the chute fully opened, it departed the airplane and landed on the runway. The airplane continued down the runway at a high rate of speed before it veered left near the east end of the runway. The inspector said it looked like the airplane went up on its nose and then landed back down on its belly before it came to a rest near the edge of Highway 212.

The pilot said he tested the drag chute approximately three weeks before the accident in preparation for this particular flight and there were no malfunctions of the system. He also said that he had successfully deployed the drag chute about 6 or 7 times prior to this accident.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot rating for airplane single-engine land and sea, and multi-engine. He is also type-rated in an A-320, B-737, and DC-B26. The pilot's last FAA First Class medical was issued on March 26, 2012. At that time, he reported a total of 21,000 total flight hours.


 


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 9307        Make/Model: EXP       Description: MIG 21MF 
  Date: 07/12/2012     Time: 1458

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: EDEN PRAIRIE   State: MN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY, THROUGH A FENCE AND INTO THE 
  GRASS, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: MINNEAPOLIS, MN  (GL15)               Entry date: 07/13/2012 
 
 
 A plane crashed at Flying Cloud Airport around 10 a.m. Thursday, July 12. 
(Photo courtesy of John Hoffacker) 


A plane arriving for a weekend air show at Eden Prairie's Flying Cloud Airport has reportedly crashed.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a MiG 21 warbird arrived at the airport about 10 a.m. Thursday, July 12. It slid off the end of a runway and crashed through a fence.

The pilot was treated at the scene for minor injuries, said Patrick Hogan, spokesman for the Metropolitan Airports Commission.

The plane also received minor damage, Hogan said.

The airport remained closed just before noon because the plane's parachute -- which is deployed when the craft lands -- was lying on the airfield, Hogan said. The plane and the parachute cannot be moved until the FAA inspects and approves the scene.

The cause of the crash will be determined by the FAA, Hogan said.

According to FAA records, the fixed-wing single engine craft is owned by a Michigan man. It was built in 1975 and is listed as an exhibition plane. A warbird is a vintage military aircraft.

The plane was reportedly on site for an aviation expo at the airport. The annual Air Expo, sponsored by Wings of the North, is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday.

The expo will not be affected by the crash, Hogan said.

Source:  http://www.twincities.com


 
A pilot tried to land a MIG-21 at Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie, Thursday, but the plane went off the runway. The pilot was not hurt in the accident. 
 Photo: David Joles, Star Tribune


EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) - The pilot of a vintage Russian fighter jet is OK after crash landing his plane at the airport in Eden Prairie.

 City officials say the pilot was going too fast during a landing at the Flying Cloud Airport Thursday and deployed the plane's parachute.

 Spokeswoman Katie Beal says the parachute collapsed and the MiG 21 jet ran off the end of the runway, crashed through a chain-link fence and came to rest on Flying Cloud Dr.   Beal says the pilot wasn't seriously injured and was treated at the scene. Federal aviation officials will investigate. 

Beal says the pilot was coming in for the 2012 Air Expo at Flying Cloud Airport this weekend. 



EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (WCCO) — A pilot suffered minor injuries Thursday morning when his fighter jet overshot the runway at Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie, and ended up near Flying Cloud Drive. 

 The Federal Aviation Administration reported a privately-owned Russian MiG fighter jet was attempting a landing at the airport, but overshot the runway. Crews said that the plane slid through the fence at the airport.

Pat Hogan, spokesman for the Metropolitan Airports Commission, says the pilot was flying in for this weekend’s AirExpo event.

“The aircraft landed, but continued to roll past the runway, and ended up stopping on Flying Cloud Drive,” Hogan said.

He says the airport remains closed because the MiG lands with the assistance of a parachute, and that parachute is still on the airfield.  Hogan says the FAA is on scene to investigate.

The pilot was treated for minor injuries.  No other injuries were reported. 

Source:  http://minnesota.cbslocal.com

  Russian MiG Fighter Jet Crashes through Fence at Flying Cloud Airport

A Russian Mig fighter jet crashed as it was landing at Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie around 10 a.m. Thursday. The aircraft, which uses a parachute upon landing to slow down, did not stop on the runway. 

 According to MSP spokesman Patrick Hogan the jet crashed through a fence, and ended up on Flying Cloud Drive. The pilot suffered minor injuries in the crash, and was treated at the scene.

 No one else was injured in this crash. According to Eden Prairie authorities, Southbound Flying Cloud Drive is closed between Pioneer Trail and Charlson Road until further notice. Hogan says the aircraft is in town for the Air Expo this weekend. The FAA is at the scene investigating this incident.

Source:   http://kaaltv.com


A vintage Russian jet crashed Thursday morning outside Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie while arriving for this weekend's annual air show.

The pilot, who hasn't been identified, was landing his MiG-21 around 10 a.m. at the airport for the Wings of the North AirExpo when the plane ran off the runway, crashing on Flying Cloud Drive near the intersection of Pioneer Trail.

Airport spokesman Pat Hogan said the jet's parachute, which helps slow the aircraft, was deployed. But for some reason it didn't stop, rolling off the runway and crashing with the nose of the plane coming to rest in a roadside ditch.

The jet is a 1975 model registered to a Michigan man, Minnesota Public Radio reported.
Police spokeswoman Katie Beal said the pilot was the only one on board the plane and suffered minor injuries, but wasn't taken to a hospital.

There was no fire, Hogan said, adding that the plane was "still in one piece."

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration, Eden Prairie police and fire responded to the scene and will investigate the cause of the crash.