Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Daniel Field Airport (KDNL), Augusta, Georgia: Mayor Pro-Tem has heard no complaints about coyote shooting



AUGUSTA,Ga (WJBF) Augusta city leaders are not going to get in the way of getting rid of coyotes at two city connected facilities.

As we exclusively reported Monday coyotes are creating problems at the Augusta Municipal Golf course and it’s neighbor Daniel Field airport.

The Daniel Field airport commission approved bringing in hunters to shoot the animals.

We asked Augusta’s mayor Pro-Tem if she had any concerns.

“I don’t know all the details of that we don’t want any residents to be in danger so I don’t know what the process should be but I’m looking into that now,” said Mayor Pro-Tem Mary Davis.

“Are you getting any complaints?’

“I haven’t heard of any complaints but I do know we want to make sure everybody is safe,” said Davis.

Daniel Field will be shooting the coyotes in specific areas away from houses, traffic, and the golf course

And the shooting will take place early in the morning and in the evening.

http://wjbf.com

Yakovlev Yak-55M, N38YK: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 at New Jerusalem Airport (1Q4), Tracy, San Joaquin County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N38YK

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Tracy, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK, registration: N38YK
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the high-performance airplane reported that, on his third simulated forced landing, while turning left base to final in a slip, he realized that the airplane was too low and not aligned with the runway. He applied full throttle to go around. The airplane responded suddenly by changing attitude but continued to descend and impacted terrain and the airport perimeter fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. 

The pilot further reported that the slow airspeed coupled with the unexpected high torque from advancing the throttle during an uncoordinated left turn were factors in the accident. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s unstabilized approach and delayed application of full throttle for a go-around, which resulted in an uncontrolled descent.

McCarran International Airport (KLAS) delays flights due to heavy rainfall




LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — 

The Federal Aviation Administration reports that the weather and thunderstorms in the Las Vegas valley has delayed flights out of McCarran International Airport an average of 1 hour and 15 minutes. 

Arrivals are also being delayed by approximately one hour 30 minutes due to the weather.

Flight delay information can be found at fly.faa.gov. You can check the status of specific flights at McCarran.com.

The storms are causing flash flooding in the east part of the city, and several traffic accidents have resulted from the weather.

http://news3lv.com

3 Accused of Trafficking Marijuana by Plane from California to Connecticut




STRATFORD — The flights were high and loaded with marijuana. 

Now a federal grand jury in New Haven has indicted Donald Burns, 59, of Milford, the pilot and two alleged distributors Robert Capelli, 31, and Scott Bodnar, 38, of Ansonia with trafficking at least 2,200 pounds of marijuana by airplane.

Shortly after Burns landed his Piper-single engine aircraft June 29 at Sikorsky Memorial Airport in Stratford, law enforcement agents searched the plane and discovered a duffel bag containing 880 pounds of marijuana in vacuum sealed packages.

Authorities learned the marijuana was to be delivered to Capelli and Bodnar so they arranged for that to happen in Derby. The men were then arrested.

The Federal Aviation Administration began investigating Burns in 2016 after becoming aware that his plane was making frequent flights from Sikorsky to northern California with stops in Texas or Arkansas.

On June 28, 2017, they tracked a flight. The plane left northern California and stopped in Lubbock, Texas. The following day it flew from Lubbock to Arkansas and then West Virginia before landing at Sikorsky where it was searched and the marijuana found.

The three-count indictment alleges that from 2015 to June, 2017, the trio moved more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana from northern California to Connecticut.

The indictment charges the three with conspiring to possess and distribute 2,200 pounds of marijuana which carries a minimum 10-year prison term and a maximum of life upon conviction.

Additionally they are charged with one count of possession with intent to distribute 220 pounds of marijuana found aboard a U.S. registered aircraft and possession with the intent to distribute 220 pounds of marijuana. Both charges carry a mandatory five year prison term with a maximum of 40 years in prison.

Neither Tara Knight, who represents Bodnar or Audrey Felsen, Burns’ lawyer could be reached for comment Wednesday.

The aircraft is subject to government forfeiture.

The three have been released on bond. Bodnar’s bond was set at $250,000 and Burns’ at $300,000. No details were available for Capelli.

They are expected to plead not guilty to charges next week. Their case has been assigned to Senior U.S. District Judge Janet Bond Arterton who sits at the federal courthouse in New Haven.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Rahul Kale is prosecuting the case which was investigated the Federal Aviation Administration’s Law Enforcement Assistance program as well as Bridgeport, Derby and Stratford police.

http://www.ctpost.com




Three men accused of trafficking marijuana by airplane from California to Connecticut have been arrested on federal charges.

Deirdre Daly, the United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut, said in a statement that a federal grand jury in New Haven returned a three-count indictment today charging Robert Capelli, 31, of Milford; Scott Bodnar, 38, of Ansonia, and Donald Burns, 59, of Milford.

Federal officials said the Federal Aviation Administration began investigating Burns’ Piper single-engine aircraft, which was making regular flights between Stratford and northern California, via the southwest United States, in 2016. 

Over a two-day span in June, Burns flew from northern California to Lubbock, Texas, then to Arkansas, West Virginia and Stratford, Connecticut, where he landed at Sikorsky Airport. When law enforcement searched the plane, they found around 400 kilograms of marijuana in vacuum-sealed packages in a duffle bag, federal officials said.

As the investigation continued, authorities said they determined the marijuana was intended for Cappelli and Bodnar and conducted a controlled delivery in Derby, where the two men were arrested.

The three are accused of trafficking more than 1,000 kilograms of marijuana from California to Connecticut between 2015 and June 2017.

They have all been charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 1,000 kilograms or more of marijuana. 

They were also charged with one count of possession with intent to distribute 100 kilograms or more of marijuana on board an aircraft registered in the U.S., and one count of possession with intent to distribute 100 kilograms or more of marijuana.

http://www.nbcconnecticut.com

Cessna 182Q Skylane, Garland Air LLC, N97878: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, Johnson County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Garland Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N97878

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA025 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, WY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N97878
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before taking off from the 1,200-ft-long grass/gravel private airstrip, he performed an engine run-up and set the flaps to 20 degrees. He applied full engine throttle and accelerated to 45 knots airspeed for rotation/takeoff. After applying back pressure to the yoke for takeoff, the airplane would not lift off the runway. The airplane "passed the point of no return," and the pilot continued the takeoff. The airplane impacted a metal post near the end of the runway, traveled down an embankment, impacted terrain, cartwheeled, and came to rest inverted. The pilot reported that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll. An engine test run revealed no anomalies that would have precluded the engine's ability to produce rated horsepower. Examination of the airframe revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted or 0° position. According to the supplemental type certificate pilot's checklist, the flaps should be set at 20° for a short field takeoff. The improper flap setting reduced the airplane’s lift and resulted in a longer takeoff roll.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to set the proper flap position before the short field takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with terrain.

On October 23, 2016, at 1010 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N97878, impacted terrain following a loss of control during takeoff from a private airstrip near Buffalo, Wyoming. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to Garland Air LLC, Buffalo, Wyoming, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

Prior to takeoff from the 1,200-foot grass/gravel private airstrip, the pilot reported that he performed an engine run-up and set the flaps to 20 degrees. He applied full engine throttle and advanced to 45 knots airspeed for rotation/takeoff. After applying back pressure to the yoke for takeoff, the airplane would not lift off the runway. The airplane "passed the point of no return" and the pilot kept waiting for the airplane to lift off the runway. Near the end of the left side of the runway, the airplane impacted a metal post, went down an embankment, impacted terrain, cartwheeled, and came to rest inverted. Witnesses to the accident assisted the pilot in exiting the airplane.

According to local authorities, the pilot stated that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the fuselage, both wings, and empennage were buckled and bent. The propeller assembly separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest in the debris field. The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and was crushed aft into the fuselage. The airplane was recovered for further examination.

On November 8, 2016, at the facilities of Beegles Aircraft Services, Greeley, Colorado, the airplane was examined under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC). Examination of the airframe revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted or 0-degree position, as confirmed by the flap actuator position. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to the flight control surfaces. Damage, consistent with the impact sequence, was noted on the following engine components: right rear wye pipe separated and missing, front induction balance tube, no. 2 cylinder rocker box cover, propeller governor, right front and rear engine mounts, muffler, lower alternator mount, and exhaust risers/collectors. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was confirmed on all six cylinders. Spark was produced at all upper sparkplug ignition leads. The propeller spinner displayed rotational type marks. One propeller blade exhibited rearward twisting and bent about 18 inches outboard of blade root, one blade exhibited rearward twisting and bent about 12 inches outboard of blade root, and one blade was twisted about 180 degrees and was loose in the propeller hub. The blade displayed leading edge and cambered surface gouging. The engine was removed and shipped to the manufacturer for a functional test.

A review of the maintenance records showed the most recent annual inspection was completed on February 15, 2016. On July 9, 2016, a high-left canard was installed in accordance with supplemental type certificate (STC) SA485SW. The STC SA485SW pilot checklist indicated the flaps should be set to 20 degrees extended for short field takeoffs. In addition, a Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) IO-550D-13B engine, and a McCauley propeller were installed in accordance with STC SA3825SW. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 44.7 hours since factory remanufacture. 

The airplane was equipped with a JPI engine data monitoring (EDM-700) unit. The unit was downloaded at a local Greeley, Colorado, avionics facility. The EDM-700 unit data contained several "flights" of data. The accident flight data was captured on the unit. The accident flight data parameters were consistent with other previous flight data parameters. 


On January 10 and 11, 2017, at the facilities of CMI, Mobile, Alabama, the engine was examined and a functional test of the engine was performed under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. After replacing some components that were damaged in the accident, the engine was placed in a test cell for a functional test. The engine was test run for 30 minutes at various power settings with no anomalies noted that would have precluded the engine's ability to produce rated horsepower. 

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA025
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, WY
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N97878
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 23, 2016, at 1010 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N97878, impacted terrain following a loss of control during takeoff from a private airstrip near Buffalo, Wyoming. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to Garland Air LLC, Buffalo, Wyoming, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to local authorities who spoke with the pilot, the pilot reported that during takeoff from the private grass/turf airstrip, which was about 1,200 feet in length, the airplane veered to the left at the departure end of the runway. The pilot attempted to correct to the right, but the airplane impacted a metal post, went down an embankment, and impacted terrain. The airplane came to rest inverted and the pilot exited the airplane. The pilot stated that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the fuselage, both wings, and empennage were buckled and bent. The engine crankshaft fractured near the propeller hub, and the propeller assembly came to rest in the debris field. The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and was crushed aft into the fuselage.

Flight for Life Colorado to receive ‘Spreading Wings’ award

Flight for Life Colorado Program Director Kathleen Mayer, center, welcomes Littleton resident Gretchen Crist and her daughter, 10-year-old Hayden Crist, during a public meet-and-greet July 15 at Centennial Airport. Crew members, as well as their King Air 200 and AS 350 helicopter, were on hand for a Wings Over the Rockies media event naming Flight for Life—the nation’s first civilian, hospital-based emergency medical helicopter service—as the recipient of the prestigious Spreading Wings Award. The award will be presented by Wings Over the Rockies at a gala event Nov. 11. 



It’s true.

Superheroes really can fly.

However, Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum realizes not all use a magic cape to save lives.

Some superheroes, like Flight for Life Colorado, state-of-the-art flying ambulances.

As Flight for Life Colorado celebrates its 45th anniversary, this year, Wings Over the Rockies has named the hospital-based air ambulance organization as their 2017 Spreading Wings honoree.

The announcement came during a media event at Centennial Airport, July 15, where guests could climb aboard Flight for Life aircraft, as well as meet crew members.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be this year’s honoree,” said Flight for Life Program Director, Kathleen Mayer. “I looked up some of the past honorees at this event: Gene Cernan, Buzz Aldrin, Steve Fossett, Chuck Yeager, the Tuskegee Airmen, and the American Fighter Aces, just to name a few. We are in some pretty elite company and we do not take that for granted.”

Founded in 1972 by Vietnam veterans hoping to bring medevac services to the civilian world, Flight for Life Colorado is the nation’s first air ambulance service dedicated to critical care transport.

Each year, Wings Over the Rockies hosts its annual Spreading Wings gala to honor a significant aviation or space industry contributor, and this year is no different, said Benjamin Theune, director of marketing for Wings Over the Rockies.

“It’s really a way for us to show case the organization, inspire kids and show others how a particular organization or individual is connected to the aviation and aerospace community,” Theune added.

Known for the iconic bright orange paint scheme on their aircraft and ambulances, Flight for Life Colorado has transported more than 125,000 patients from the eastern plains, from the summit of Longs Peak, from the surrounding 10 states, Mexico and Canada.

“It is a program with significant reach,” said Mayer.

The Spreading Wings Award will be presented to Flight for Life Colorado at a gala event, open to the public, Saturday, November 11 at Wings Over the Rockies’ historic Hangar No. 1.

Wings chose November 11, Veterans Day, in honor of Flight for Life’s deep military roots.

“Just like Wings Over the Rockies, Flight for Life is tremendously proud of its past,” Mayer concluded. “We unpack it regularly, and look at it and learn from it, but we are also very excited about our future and bringing our level of life-saving care even more patients.”

http://www.villagerpublishing.com

Cessna P206 Super Skylane, N2608X: Incident occurred July 19, 2017 in Shirley, Suffolk County, New York



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N2608X

Aircraft force landed on a highway.

Date: 19-JUL-17
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N2608X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SHIRLEY
State: NEW YORK















YAPHANK, Long Island (WABC) -- A small plane made an emergency landing in the median of a highway on Long Island Wednesday.

The Cessna, registered to a Northport man, touched down on Sunrise Highway in Yaphank near exit 57S around 1 p.m.

The pilot was the only person on board, and no injuries were reported.

Authorities say the C206 took off from Brookhaven Airport in Shirley and was heading to Eagles Nest Airport in West Creek, New Jersey, when it suffered some sort of mechanical failure.

The pilot, Jim O'Donnell, said he had no choice but to land on the highway, avoiding stunned motorists who were no doubt avoiding him.

"It wasn't good, but here I am," he said in an exclusive interview with reporter NJ Burkett. "No bent metal."

He is being praised for the landing, which including flying over a highway sign and under an overpass.

"From what we understand, from the preliminary information, is he came in over the street sign that stretches across the westbound Sunrise Highway and was able to land in between that and the overpass," Suffolk County police Chief of Department Stuart Cameron said. "And he came in under the overpass. He kind of threaded the needle there, and it looks like he did a pretty nice job under the circumstances. He didn't hit any cars, and no one got hurt."

The plane was towed down the highway to Brookhaven Airport.

http://abc7ny.com

Aeronca 11AC, N9410E: Accident occurred October 22, 2016 at Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (KGIF), Polk County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N9410E

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA043
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 22, 2016 in Winter Haven, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N9410E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in crosswind conditions, the airplane encountered a wind gust, the tail swung to the right, and the airplane veered off the runway to the left. During the runway excursion, the right main landing gear impacted an airport sign and collapsed.

The right wing lift strut sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system at the airport near the time of the accident reported the wind direction at 330 degrees true at 7 knots. The pilot reported that he landed on runway 5.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Weatherly 620B, N9017K, Headwaters Flying Service LLC: Incident occurred July 18, 2017 in Belgrade, Gallatin County, Montana

Headwaters Flying Service LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9017K










BOZEMAN, Mont. - The Gallatin County sheriff's office is investigating after shots were fired at a crop dusting airplane as it applied fungicide to a wheat field near Belgrade. 

Headwaters Flying Service owner Cody Folkvord says his plane was hit twice Tuesday morning by shots fired from the ground. The pilot, Robert Nicholson, was not injured and was able to land safely.

Nicholson says one shot in the aircraft's left wing and the other hit its right wing, at most about 18 inches from the cockpit. He tells NBC Montana he knew right away that was he heard was a gunshot.

"I was in a little bit of shock and disbelief. It's something you hear about but not something you expect to happen in a rural community. There are a lot of people out there who don't understand that what we do is take care of crops around here. We take care of the farmland," Nicholson said.

The Gallatin County Sheriff's office tells NBC Montana their office has received threats in the past from people complaining about crop duster planes. They say the person responsible may face attempted homicide and assault with a weapon charges.

Because shooting a plane is a federal offense, the FAA is also involved in this investigation.

Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff's office.

http://www.nbcmontana.com




The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office and FBI are investigating after a crop dusting plane was reportedly shot repeatedly while working near Belgrade Tuesday morning.

The plane, said Headwaters Flying Service owner Cody Folkvord, was putting fungicide on a wheat crop northeast of the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport at about 8 a.m. Tuesday when it was hit twice by shots fired from the ground.

One bullet, Folkvord said, penetrated the aircraft’s left wing and another its right wing — the second bullet striking “a foot-and-a-half, at most” from the cockpit.

The pilot was uninjured and able to make a landing in Three Forks, he said, after doing a flyby at the Bozeman control tower to make sure the plane wasn’t leaking fuel or oil. Had the pilot been incapacitated or a vital part of the aircraft damaged, he said, the plane could have crashed into homes in the area.

“I want to find the person who did this,” Folkvord said.

“All we’re trying to do is make a living, and keep these farmers in business as well,” he said.

“If it wasn’t for us,” he said, “the wheat crop wouldn’t survive and the farmers wouldn’t survive.”

Gallatin County Undersheriff Dan Springer said Wednesday that the department had taken a report for the incident and referred it to its detective’s division. An FBI spokeswoman said Wednesday afternoon that the agency is also involved in the investigation.

http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com

Aircraft maker Mooney moving from Chino Airport (KCNO) to Texas, settlement in works with Threshold Aviation

CHINO >> Mooney International, an aircraft manufacturing company at Chino Airport, is moving to Texas.

That move has led to settlement talks between Mooney and another airport tenant, Threshold Aviation jet aircraft maintenance.

“Both public and private organizations invested time and effort, which was based on the promises that Mooney made, and to see them leave without the promised milestone (of staying for the 10-year lease), is disappointing,” said Mark DiLullo, CEO of Threshold.

In 2015, Mooney increased its facility to more than 153,000 square feet. At the time, Mooney employed about 80 people, and announced plans to increase to 150 employees. Mooney officials said at the time they chose to locate research and development at Chino Airport to better serve customer expansion in the United States and into China, executives said. 

To get the additional space, Threshold Aviation, a neighboring business jet maintenance, sales and terminal business company at the airport, agreed to give up about 58,000 square feet of its own leased space, DiLullo said.

DiLullo said the move meant a sacrifice of existing clients and employment because of the loss of the space. Threshold also made improvements to the space, which Mooney ultimately removed for its own operation, DiLullo said.

Threshold was expecting Mooney to stay for its full lease period because the manufacturer had contracted Threshold to provide certain mechanical services, according to DiLullo.

“In simple terms, we’re very disappointed that we’re going to be forced to make a settlement with them to reclaim what we were expecting,” said DiLullo, who said the gross expense incurred by his company was about $3 million.

Mooney, which is headquartered in Kerrville, Texas, will still honor and pay its lease at the airport until 2025, said Felisa Cardona, a spokeswoman for San Bernardino County, which owns and operates Chino Airport. Mooney was able to find a subtenant who has been there for the past 90 days, and has assumed financial obligation to pay the lease, Cardona said.

The subtenant, SoCal MRO, LLC, could not immediately be reached for comment. Representatives for Mooney did not immediately return calls for comment.

“It’s our understanding that they’re consolidating their operation in Texas,” Cardona said. “They’re moving their (research and development) operation over there.”

County officials, Cardona said, do not know when the company will vacate its tenancy. Mooney began operations at Chino Airport in 2013 and leased expanded space there in 2015. James Jenkins, director of airports for San Bernardino County, said the return on investment for new aircraft it was developing at Chino Airport was reportedly difficult to balance because of the difficulties of introducing new small aircraft.

“The Department of Airports was pleased and excited to have Mooney as a tenant during the past 4 years,” Jenkins said by email. “We have been cautiously optimistic regarding the (research and development) program at Chino. The small aircraft market (aircraft 12,500 pounds or less) is a very competitive environment.”

Mooney’s Chino operation opened the same year that the company became a subsidiary after being acquired by Soaring America Corporation, with its parent company, Meijing Group, based in Cheng Zhou, China.

Jenkins said the expansion would bring an additional revenue stream of about $440,000 a year as a result of Mooney’s leasing of the hangar and office property. Jenkins said Mooney’s leasing of space at Chino Airport would help attract other business.

Chino Airport is fully leased by tenants, which include a restaurant, two aviation museums, three avionics repair and installation business, a paint shop, two aircraft interior shops, a host of airframe and powerplant repair business and aircraft charter and management businesses, Cardona said.

http://www.sbsun.com

Where is the Mars?




So the big question on my mind while the province is going up in flames is, where is the Martin Mars?

I am aware that a few years ago that Forestry did not renew the contract with Coulson Air Tankers for the Mars. Considering our present state, that would appear to have been a disastrous decision. It may be old, but still drops enough liquid to put out infernos that smaller aircraft can't dowse.

They should put new turbo props on that old puppy and get it back into service, fast!

Don Leyland

https://www.castanet.net/news/Letters

AMD CH601 XLi, N601PH, Scott Lee Wilcox dba Edge Fitness & Martial Arts: Fatal accident occurred July 19, 2017 near Bradford County Airport (N27), Towanda, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Continental; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Scott Lee Wilcox dba Edge Fitness & Martial Arts: http://registry.faa.gov/N601PH

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA248
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 19, 2017 in Towanda, PA
Aircraft: AIRCRAFT MFG & DVLPMT CO CH601XLi SLSA, registration: N601PH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2017, at 1130 eastern daylight time, an Aircraft Manufacturing & Design (AMD) CH601XLi, special light sport airplane (S-LSA), N601PH, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Bradford County Airport (N27), Towanda, Pennsylvania. The student pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane was fatally injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

Several witnesses at N27 reported that the pilot departed the traffic pattern for a local flight of about 15 minutes before returning to the airport to perform touch-and-go landings on runway 23. After the second touch-and-go landing and during initial climb, the engine appeared to be producing partial power; one witness stated, "It was clearly behind the power curve." The airplane climbed and seemed to "mush" through the air and the nose dipped three times. The airplane made a shallow turn to the right, then approximately 2 miles southwest of the airport, it made a left turn crosswind. Shortly afterwards, the pilot made a radio call and declared an emergency, stating that he was attempting to make it back to the airport. The airplane made a second left turn towards the airport, then the left wing quickly dropped and the airplane descended at a steep angle and struck trees and steep terrain. Witnesses saw the ballistic parachute rocket deploy as the airplane descended behind the trees, followed shortly by black smoke.

Two days before the accident flight, the pilot/owner fueled the airplane with 18.79 gallons of 100 LL aviation fuel. The airplane held a total of 30 gallons of fuel between two wing tanks; 28 gallons of which are usable. The pilot then departed N27 for a 20-minute local solo flight, then returned for landing. The airplane was not flown again until the day of the accident.

The pilot held a student pilot certificate. His pilot logbook was not initially recovered, however, between September 20, 2016 and April 14, 2017, his flight instructor's records showed the pilot received 21.2 hours of dual instruction and an additional .3 hours of solo flight including a 90-day solo endorsement which was accomplished on April 14, 2017.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the airplane was issued a special airworthiness certificate on July 18, 2007. The airplane was an all-metal, side-by-side, two-seat, fixed landing gear airplane, with a Continental O-200, 100-horsepower engine and a Sensenich two blade wood propeller. It was produced by AMD as a S-LSA airplane per ASTM standards. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent condition inspection was performed on September 16, 2016 at 264.7 total airframe hours.

At 1553, the weather conditions reported at Elmira/Corning Regional Airport (ELM), which was located at 954 ft elevation, 32 miles northwest N27, included clear sky, wind from 230° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 28°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting was 30.07 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage revealed that the airplane struck steep wooded terrain at an inverted position about 1 1/2 miles from the departure end of runway 23.

The forward fuselage, cockpit and instrumentation were consumed by postimpact fire. Both wings were separated from the fuselage, but found in the immediate vicinity of the accident site. The empennage was wrapped around a tree. The ballistic parachute system was partially deployed, and the parachute was found midway up a 75-ft. tall tree about 50 ft from the wreckage.

Control continuity was established from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces through several breaks and cuts that were consistent with impact and overload separations in addition to rescue personnel cutting tools.

Continuity of the fuel system could not be confirmed. Both fuel tanks were breeched; the right fuel tank exhibited thermal damage, and the left fuel tank was heavily impact damaged. The fuel selector valve and fuel lines were damaged by impact forces and the postimpact fire; the setting could not be determined.

The engine was attached to all its mounts and found in an upside-down position. It exhibited postimpact fire and impact damage, but remained largely intact. All cylinders remained attached to the crankcase. The rocker box covers were removed and no anomalies were noted with the valve springs and rocker arms. The engine could not be rotated by hand by the propeller hub or through the accessory section. The accessories were removed and the engine crankcase was opened to expose the crankshaft, camshaft and valvetrain. One of the camshaft lobes was impinged against the crankshaft, preventing full rotation. All the pistons showed normal wear. During examination of the engine, several ounces of oil drained from the engine and all internal engine components appeared lubricated.

The left and right magnetos were fire damaged and did not produce sparks at the leads, when rotated. The left magneto showed signed of internal damage, and was retained for further examination. The top spark plugs and all associated leads and connections were found in place. The top spark plugs were covered in oil but showed signs of normal wear. The bottom spark plugs showed signs of normal wear.

The carburetor was removed for examination. It was thermally damaged and displayed no signs of mechanical damage; all parts were intact and moved freely. The fuel pump was damaged and significantly deformed.

The oil filter was opened. The internal paper filter was damaged by heat and was heavily carbonized. No metal or ferrous material was found internally. The oil filter screen was clear and free from obstructions.

One of the two wooden propeller blades was found 25 ft from the main wreckage. The other blade was not recovered. The central blade hub was exposed to significant heat and was heavily charred.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility and retained.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by emaileyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Lt. Col. (ret.) Scott Lee Wilcox, age 53, of Sugar Run, Pa., tragically passed away in an aircraft accident on July 19, 2017 in Monroe Township, Bradford County. 

Lt. Col. (ret.) Scott Lee Wilcox was born in Towanda, Pa., July 3, 1964. The son of the late Donald Wilcox and Henrietta Price of Towanda, Scott was delivered by Doc Pete. He attended school in Wyalusing where he graduated from Wyalusing Area High School in 1982. He received his B.A. degree in geography, graduating cum laude from Bloomsburg University in 1986.

Scott married Marion Bouika Wilcox in 1989. They had a daughter, Haley, in 1996. They later divorced and remained good friends.

Scott joined the United States Air Force in 1988 as a Special Investigative Officer. While in the Air Force, he received a master's degree in human resources management in 1994 from Webster University and another that same year in international relations. He also graduated from the prestigious program of Human Resources Management at Cornell University in 1998.

Scott served most of his Air Force career as a special agent. He was appointed to high ranking commissions such as Chief of Performance Management Division, Air Cargo Section, Plans and Programs, and Counterintelligence. Several assignments included worldwide counterintelligence and anti-terrorism missions, as well as Commander of the Air Force Office of Special Investigations Antiterrorism Team. He also served as the Program Director and visiting lecturer at Cornell University. During his tenure, the Cornell University AFROTC leadership development program was ranked number one in the nation. Scott was the Lead Defensive Tactics instructor for the United States (OSI) Antiterrorism Team. In 2008, Scott was appointed Chief of Investigative Division, Office of Military Commissions, Office of Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon. He served in that role until his retirement from the Air Force in 2011.

Scott married Jennifer Hoffman Wilcox on March 4, 2006. He was father to Alyssa and Alec Alaniz, and they had a daughter, Mia, in 2006.

Scott loved martial arts and was continually involved in martial arts instruction for over 30 years. He had black belts in multiple styles of karate and was a certified Krav Maga military and law enforcement instructor for the USA. Scott was the owner of EDGE Fitness and Martial Arts where he spent his time teaching friends and neighbors of the Bradford County community many different types of martial arts. He was also a mentor, coach and friend to his students and co-workers.

In 2011, Scott opened the EDGE Security Solutions which provided a variety of defense training, handgun training, and self-defense for businesses and individuals. He remained in that capacity until his passing.

Scott was a proud member of the NRA, Victory Church, Towanda Masonic Lodge, Endless Mountains Heritage Region, Life Center Board, and Towanda Gun Club. He enjoyed living life to the fullest with hobbies including hunting, skiing, scuba diving, and traveling.

Scott had a passion for flying and spent much of his free time piloting his plane. He enjoyed taking flights around Bradford County and waving to family, friends, and neighbors while flying by. He was doing exactly what he loved at the time of his passing on July 19, 2017.

Scott was preceded in death by his father, Donald Albert Wilcox on May 5, 1992, and Chieko and Martin Doherty. He is survived by his mother and step-father, Henrietta and Mark Honchell; his wife, Jennifer; four children, Haley, Mia, Alyssa and Alec; sisters, Kim (Wayne) Miller and Yvonne (Corey) Sickler; nieces, Shanna (Keith) Anderson, Andrea, Jennifer, Joyce, June, and Emilee; nephews, Clayton, Mitchell, Tyler and Ryan; and several great nieces and nephews.

A celebration of life will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the Victory Church in Troy, Pa., with Pastor Josh Payne of the church officiating. Military rites will be held at the church preceding the celebration of life and will be conducted by the members of Air Force Military Honor Guard and the members of the Wyalusing American Legion Post No. 534 as well as Masonic Services conducted by the members of the Union Wyalusing Lodge No. 108 F&AM Masonic Lodge in Towanda, Pa. Family and friends may call from 1 p.m. until the time of the services on Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the church.

The family asks that in lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Scott's name to the Wilmot Volunteer Fire Co., 58 River View Road, Sugar Run, PA 18846 or to the Wyalusing Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 68, Wyalusing, PA 18853.

Arrangements were entrusted with Sheldon Funeral Homes, 155 Church St., Wyalusing, PA 18853. Online condolences may be made at www.sheldonfuneralhomes.com.





The identify of a pilot killed when a small airplane crashed near Towanda on Wednesday hasn't been released yet, but federal investigators on Thursday afternoon provided some information about the accident.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported Wednesday that a Zodiac Lite sport aircraft crashed around 11:30 a.m. in a wooded area approximately two miles east of the Bradford County Airport.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board briefed reporters Thursday afternoon on some of their early findings.

While the identity of the pilot hasn't been released, the plane was on a local flight and had been in the air for about a minute when it crashed, investigators said.

They are looking at the weather conditions at the time of the crash, the mechanical condition of the airplane, and the pilot. 

Investigators are talking to several witnesses who saw the crash, and are seeking any other witnesses or anyone who might have taken photos.

Anyone who has information about the accident can email witness@ntsb.gov.

FAA leads probe into fatal plane crash near Towanda

It could take up to two years before the National Transportation Safety Board issues a final report, but a preliminary report will be released within a week to 10 days, investigators said.


In the meantime, an autopsy on the pilot is scheduled for Friday morning. The Bradford County Coroner's Office will issue a news release regarding the victim after the autopsy is completed.











3:30 P.M. UPDATE:

TOWANDA, Pa. (WBNG) -- Bradford County Officials say the pilot of a small plane that crashed near the airport in Towanda has not yet been identified.

Authorities said only one person was on the plane when it crashed near the Bradford County Airport around 11:45 a.m. Wednesday. 

The Bradford County Coroner confirmed the pilot died, but it is not known whether it was a man or a woman. 

"The individual has not been positively identified at this point," said Coroner Thomas M. Carman. "We do have an idea of who the probable pilot was, however until such time as we can properly and positively identified."

Officials updated the media at a 3:30 p.m. news conference.

"We do not know the exact flight pattern. Everything is still under investigation in that regard. TSB will be joining us at a later time to investigate that aspect of it," Carman said.

"The difficulty was the hillside. It was very steep. Filled with pines which made it very slippery.  We were able to get an ATV partial up to it. From there it was all on foot," explained Monroe Hose Company Chief Howard Fowler.


http://www.wbng.com




BRADFORD COUNTY, Pa. - UPDATE (2:45 p.m.): A statement released by the Federal Aviation Administration says that the plane involved in this morning's crash was a Zodiac  aircraft.

The statement says that the plane crashed in a wooded area approximately two miles east of Bradford County Airport.

The FAA, along with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), will continue to investigate the crash and try to determine the probable cause. 

UPDATE (1:15 p.m.): 18 News has learned that, according to an eyewitness, a loud noise was heard before the plane crashed into the tree line after takeoff from the Bradford County airport around 11:40 a.m. this morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration, along with the Pennsylvania State Police at Towanda, and Bradford County emergency management are at the scene, which is described as 'active'. 

The Bradford County coroner has confirmed that at least one person has died following a small plane crash near the Bradford County airport. 

First reports of the accident came in around 11:45 this morning. 

http://www.mytwintiers.com






The pilot of a single-engine plane was killed Wednesday in a crash near the Bradford County Airport, authorities said.

The Bradford County Coroner's Office confirmed the plane's sole occupant is dead.

Coroner Thomas Carman said officials have a tentative identity of the victim, but won't release the name until his identity is confirmed. 

The Federal Aviation Administration, which is leading the investigation, released the following statement:

"A Zodiac aircraft crashed in a wooded area approximately two miles east of Bradford County Airport in Towanda, Pa., at about 11:30 a.m. today," the statement from FAA spokesman Jim Peters said. "Check with local authorities for information about the pilot. The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident."

The FAA defines a light sport aircraft as a simple-to-operate, easy-to-fly aircraft with a single reciprocating engine, unpressurized cabin, fixed landing gear, one- or two-person occupancy and maximum flight speed of 138 mph. 

Pennsylvania state police at Towanda said they would not provide any information about the crash.

Emergency officials on the scene say they don't know if the plane was taking off or landing at the airport when the crash occurred, according to our broadcast news partner, WENY-TV.

Woodside Road, which runs behind the airport, was closed to traffic Wednesday afternoon.

The Bradford County Airport is just south of Towanda in central Bradford County.

The airport is operated by the Bradford County Airport Authority, with members appointed by the county commissioners.

http://www.stargazette.com