Sunday, August 4, 2013

Beechcraft 58 Baron, PT-LKG: Four Die in Plane Crash in Jundiaí, São Paulo, Brazil

 
Avião cai ao lado da Rodovia Anhanguera 
Um avião bimotor caiu no início da tarde de hoje em Jundiaí, pouco depois de decolar. As quatro pessoas que estavam no avião morreram.


SAO PAULO – A small plane crashed near a major highway in Jundiai, a city in Brazil’s Sao Paulo state, killing the four people aboard, all members of the same family, the fire department said.

The victims of Saturday’s crash have been identified as Arnaldo Soares dos Santos Neto, the plane’s 50-year-old pilot; his wife, Kenia Maria Tubertino dos Santos, 49; and their children, Ana Luiza, 19; and Arnaldo, 14, police said.

The plane went down at kilometer 65 of highway SP-330, known as the Anhanguera and one of the main highways in Sao Paulo state.

The aircraft burst into flames when it hit the ground, burning the occupants.

The accident happened around 12:30 p.m. shortly after the small aircraft took off from the airport in Jundiai, located 55 kilometers (34 miles) from Sao Paulo.

Drivers slowed down on the highway to look at the burning aircraft wreckage, causing a nearly four-kilometer (2.5-mile) traffic jam, highway operator CCR AutoBan said.

Gunmen at Tripoli Airport prevent Qatar Airways plane landing

A Qatar Airways flight from Doha to Tripoli today was reported to have landed instead in Alexandria after an armed group forced air traffic control staff at Tripoli International Airport to deny it permission to land there.

“We tried to negotiate with the armed group but did not succeed,” an airport official said. The plane was then diverted to Egypt because of fears that there might be trouble awaiting it at Tripoli’s Mitiga airport or even at Misrata or Benghazi. There were, the source said, “a considerable number of Libyans on board”.

According to the source, the flight refuelled at Alexandria and then returned to Doha. It is not known if any passengers disembarked at Alexandria.

The incident comes a day after a group of men forced their way into the Qatar Airways office at the airport and ordered staff to leave. The group reportedly said that they intended to prevent Qatari passenger and cargo aircraft from landing in Libya, although they would not say why. According to sources at the airport, they also said that they intended to force the closure of the downtown Qatar Airways office in Tripoli Tower.

Yesterday’s incident was condemned by the Interior Ministry which said that the attackers represented “only themselves”. In a statement, it described it as a “shameful” act that would send the wrong message about Libya to the international community and foreign companies and so hinder economic development and reconstruction projects.

Two months ago, Qatar Airways suspended flights to and from Benghazi after militiamen forced non-Libyans arriving on a flight from Doha back onto the plane and prevented Libyans from boarding it for the return flight to the Qatari capital. According to a Benghazi Local Council member at the time, the militiamen accused Qatar of interfering in Libya’s internal affairs.

There have been periodic protests in Tripoli, Benghazi and elsewhere as well as on social media sites alleging Qatari interference in Libya. These tend to surface at times of crisis. In May, there were anti-Qatar demonstrations in Tripoli, Benghazi and other towns after armed groups besieging the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Justice in Tripoli in support of the Political Isolation Law. At the time the demonstrators accused Qatar of involvement in the sieges and of backing Libyan Salafists and the Muslim Brotherhood.

Qatar strongly denied that accusations and was backed by the Prime Minister, Ali Zeidan, who said that there was no evidence of Qatari interference.

Qatar Airways, which has been flying between Tripoli and Doha since 2003, reintroduced scheduled services between Doha and Tripoli in February last year following the revolution. Initially, the route was served three-times a week, via Alexandria, but due to demand the service went daily last August. Flights became non-stop in June.

It is a popular route with Libyans many of whom like to transit through Doha to other destinations in the Gulf and further east. Qatar Airways also flies cargo to Europe from Tripoli.

Source:  http://www.libyaherald.com

Spare parts keep Everts, and its cargo, en route to the Bush

Sam Harrel/News-Miner 
Everts' Bone Yard 
A Douglas DC-6 still bares its military markings as it sits in the bone yard next to Everts Air Alaska and Everts Air Cargo on Monday, July 22, 2013, at the south end of the west ramp of Fairbanks International Airport. The aircraft represent a parts supply to keep the Everts fleet of the radial engine aircraft aloft and flying across the state.


FAIRBANKS — Slow, laborious, loud and low-flying, and anything but sleek and modern looking, the quad-propelled DC-6 is a relic of the past. It is also one of the few aircraft that can fly into remote Alaska villages. While there are a small handful of these planes in use around the world, Fairbanks-based Everts Air Alaska, for all practical purposes, has a monopoly on usage and spare parts.

“We have the largest fleet of DC-6s operating in the world right now,” said Rob Everts, owner of Tatonduk Outfitters Limited, the parent corporation for Everts Air Alaska and Everts Air Cargo. “And each one of these airplanes has a story.”

With operations centered just west of Fairbanks International Airport’s main terminal, the setting outside the main building resembles something of an elephant’s graveyard. Dozens of old planes bearing faded military and commercial insignia in various states of dismantlement fill a large yard. These parts keep the Everts fleet aloft and flying across the state.

“It keeps Alaska operating in the Bush. Some places might not have developed to the point they are at today without these planes being able to haul this stuff,” said Everts.

“It’s pretty darn vital right now, but it hasn’t changed very much,” Everts continued. “It’s the same as it was 25 years ago. Air transportation is really important in this state. Until someone can figure out a more economical way to build roads — which doesn’t seem likely — people will have to rely on planes in outlying areas.”

Everts flies to Nome, Kotzebue, Unalakleet, Aniak, Bethel, Deadhorse, Barrow and King Salmon, among other villages. Planes have been retrofitted with tanks to carry diesel fuel to villages, while others operate as general cargo vehicles hauling pretty much anything — from furniture to generators, building materials to snowmachines, food to live animals.

“Occasionally we get dogs during Iditarod, moose meat or reindeer,” Everts said. “Whatever is willing to climb in or gets loaded in, we’ll haul it.”

So what to make of the old planes filling the “bone yard,” as Everts calls it? These planes exist only to be stripped of wheels, props, brakes, or other parts as needed, since replacement parts are no longer made for these 60-plus-year-old flying dinosaurs.

“Ever since the mid-’80s we’ve made it a mission around here to make sure stuff doesn’t get thrown away by somebody else. We’ve gone all over the world gathering up these parts so we can have this airplane running into the future. Some day, some of this stuff might be hard to come by,” Everts said.

The company owns parts planes in Arizona and New Mexico and monitors others in England, South America and North Africa’s desert.

“We know where every one of these planes in the world is located,” Everts said. “What parts are left, engines and propellers, we have a pretty good idea.”

“The majority will be scrapped once we use the parts off the airplane,” added Cliff Everts, a longtime Alaska pilot who founded the company in 1978. He started with Alaska Star Airlines in the 1940s and later flew for Fairbanks-based Wien Airlines. (Robert is his son.) The elder Everts pointed to the Arizona planes as an example. “Probably part them out and scrap them because it’s too costly to fly them out.”

By the looks of the Fairbanks bone yard, little has changed or been scrapped in years. Planes — including C-46s and C-119s — languish among seasonal grasses and weeds, lacking wings, propellers, engines, windshields, landing gear, doors or nose cones. Old cargo boxes are stacked under wings and planes. A glance inside several fuselages reveals hollowed out shells dripping with outdated wires, nylon straps, random parts and broken instrumentation.

Despite the current state of affairs, every plane at some point flew to Fairbanks. Ex-military planes arrived from as far away as Japan and the Lower 48. Fire bombers came from France and Canada. Former United Airlines passenger planes were flown in as well.

A 2010 addition to the fleet was a DC-6 formerly owned by Howard Hughes. The reclusive tycoon customized the plane for personal use, but never really used it.

“It has 17 air hours on it,” quality manager Craig Halpin said. “It was virtually brand new.”

Like military fighter pilots, Everts gives each plane a name, then adds artwork to match. Hughes’ plane has been named “The Aviator.” One of the Japanese planes is painted “Maid in Japan,” with a geisha girl on the side. “Salmonella” features a detailed image of the big hook-nosed delicacy, dubbed so because “it’s hauled so much fish in its life,” Halpin added.

Everts’ nose artist, Ron Klemm, “tries to put something unique on each aircraft, kind of like the military did back when they used to do bombing missions. It’s kind of our fun, but it’s something you would only do with vintage airplanes, 1950s or older,” Halpin added. “You don’t see any (painted) DC-8s or 707s. Alaska Airlines has nose art, (but) that’s modern-day nose art; the Mickey Mouse plan, where they’ve made it a marketing tool. We do it give it a little more image. Around here, guys fall in love with their planes.”

The question is, then, how long will that love last? The Federal Aviation Administration has “life limits” that determine how long a plane is deemed safe to fly or an engine can remain serviceable. For now, Everts has enough planes and parts amassed “to carry us to 2025,” Rob Everts said. “That’s why we have gathered all these extra air frames. So, when a plane comes up on its airtime threshold, we can retire it and take another one out, get it spruced up and get it into service.”

Before the time comes when there is no choice but for all DC-6s to be grounded, Everts hopes a new solution for shuttling cargo and fuel across Alaska presents itself.

“There might be a time that it makes sense to park these planes,” he said, “but until they come up with another plane that can land on 4,000-foot gravel runway, these planes will be still needed.”

Glenn BurnSilver is a former News-Miner features editor who lives and works in Phoenix.

Story, Photos and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.newsminer.com

Preventing post-crash fires not as simple as Transportation Safety Board report suggests: Transport Canada

VANCOUVER - Changing the way aircraft are designed to save lives by limiting fires after plane crashes wouldn't be simple, nor would it be the most effective way to reduce aviation fatalities, a senior official with Transport Canada says.

Martin Eley was responding to a scathing report from the Transportation Safety Board that argued two pilots might still be alive if the federal government heeded recommendations that date back seven years. The safety board's report last week probed an October 2011 crash near Vancouver's airport, in which two pilots were killed and seven passengers were seriously injured when a turboprop plane slammed into a road while preparing for an emergency landing.

The board's report concluded the pilots could have survived the crash, but instead, a cockpit fire fuelled by arcing wires connected to the plane's battery left them with fatal burns. An investigator told a news conference that Transport Canada has repeatedly ignored recommendations first issued in 2006 to prevent or reduce the severity of post-crash fires, including introducing technology to disconnect aircraft batteries upon impact.

Eley, Transport Canada's director general of civil aviation, said it would take significant research to evaluate whether such changes would even work, as well as the co-operation of foreign regulators.

He said Transport Canada, as well the U.S.-based Federal Aviation Administration and regulators in Europe, have instead focused their resources on preventing crashes in the first place, identifying the issues most associated with fatal crashes and concentrating on those. For example, Eley said half of all aviation fatalities are linked to either the pilots' loss of aircraft control, controlled flight into terrain, or poor response to engine failure.

"Those areas contribute to the largest number of accidents, so the decision was made to focus on those things, which are clearly all about avoiding accidents, in preference to focusing on a particular piece that is not going to create the same impact in terms of the overall fatality numbers," Eley said in an interview.

"The authorities have realized there is a limit to how much rule-making you can do. ... If there is a lot of work to be done, let's work on the areas where there is the biggest benefit."

Eley said it would be difficult for Canada to unilaterally introduce new standards that differ from design specifications elsewhere in the world, and he argued that widespread change would be extremely slow, given that many aircraft remain in operation for decades before they are replaced.

While the issue of post-crash fires was highlighted in last week's report, the Transportation Safety Board has been calling for changes for years.

The board issued a report in 2006 that made a number of recommendations for new and existing aircraft, including the introduction of technology that would kill the battery after a crash, as well as the relocation of fuel tanks, changes to fuel systems and improved fire insulation.

The report also called for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to revive a proposed policy document prepared in 1990, which called for improvements to fuel systems to reduce dangerous spills during a crash. The document was withdrawn in 1999 after the agency concluded "the costs of the proposed change are not justified by the potential benefits."

Eley said if a similar cost-benefit analysis were conducted today, it would likely reach the same conclusion.

"A lot of things that are in there, that logic still exists," he said.

"The numbers may have changed, but I'm not sure the answer would change. We haven't done that analysis, because we don't believe the landscape has changed."

The Transportation Safety Board has compiled a summary of the federal government's responses to its 2006 recommendations, which the board has repeatedly labelled "unsatisfactory."

Those responses echo Eley's recent comments, suggesting it would take too many resources to properly study the recommendations and that any proposed changes would likely be too costly to justify.

The Federal Aviation Administration was silent on the safety board's recommendations until last year, according to the TSB's summary, when the U.S. regulator merely repeated the reasons it withdrew its own policy proposal in 1999.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration did not return a call seeking comment.

Olivia Chow, the federal transport critic for the Opposition NDP, said the debate about seven-year-old recommendations demonstrates a larger problem with the government — its unwillingness to listen to the advice of its own experts.

"It's the first duty of the government to keep Canadians safe, whether we travel by rail or by plane," Chow said in an interview following the release of the safety board report but before the recent comments from Transport Canada.

"Over and over again, experts' directives are ignored. The transport minister, Lisa Raitt, needs to immediately implement all of the TSB recommendations. That should be our top priority."

The accident near Vancouver's airport involved a Beechcraft King Air twin-engine plane operated by Northern Thunderbird Air. It left the airport on Oct. 27, 2011, but turned around after the pilots noticed an oil leak about 15 minutes into the flight.

The safety board concluded a series of problems and mistakes contributed to the crash, beginning when maintenance crews failed to properly secure an engine oil cap and ending when the pilot applied power to only one propeller immediately before the crash.

The two pilots in the cockpit — 26-year-old Matt Robic and 44-year-old Luc Fortin — were alive when they were pulled from the aircraft, but later died in hospital.

Six of the seven surviving passengers filed a lawsuit earlier this year against Northern Thunderbird Air, alleging the airline and the pilots were negligent.

While none of the passengers were burned by the subsequent fire, one of their lawyers, J.J. Camp, said the fire "heightened the stress and the emotional scars" they were left with.

Camp, whose firm has a long history overseeing cases involving aviation crashes, said the TSB's recommendations on post-impact fires should be a no-brainer for Transport Canada.

"If there are ways and means to prevent (fire-related fatalities) or at least contribute to preventing that, then those need to be found," said Camp.

"What the TSB did in 2006 was make what we in the air-crash industry believe were reasonable and sensible recommendations."

Camp acknowledged it would be difficult for Canada to introduce new design standards without other jurisdictions such as the U.S. and Europe on board — but he said it wouldn't be impossible.

"Yes, there should be co-ordination between the respective air regulators around the world, but somebody has to go first," said Camp.

"If Transport Canada wanted to make that change, they could, that's the short answer. .. Once one of these senior agencies move on this front, the industry has to move. Imagine the spectre of producing aircraft that wouldn't be certified in one of those jurisdictions. It is a huge red flag."


Source:   http://www.calgaryherald.com

Emergency Landing At Virgil I Grissom Municipal Airport (KBFR), Bedford, Indiana

(BEDFORD) - A Champaign, Illinois couple made an emergency landing Sunday afternoon at Virgil I Grissom Airport.

"The Cessna plane developed a leak in the seal prop and was throwing oil on the windshield making it difficult to see," says Airport Manager Ray Sexton. "They did a great job of landing the plane with no problem."

Sexton says the husband and wife couple from Illinois were flying back home from North Carolina.

Shawswick Volunteer Fire Department were notified the plane was making an emergency landing and went to the airport in case things went wrong.

"The plane had safely landed before we arrived," said Chief Bobby Brown.


Source:   http://www.wbiw.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, Zoot Helicopter I LLC, N25WH: Accident occurred July 27, 2013 in Thompson Falls, Montana

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA343
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 27, 2013 in Thompson Falls, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/27/2015
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N25WH
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The helicopter was flying northeast following a line of utility poles for the aerial survey flight. A surviving passenger, who occupied the left rear seat, reported that the helicopter began to rotate in a clockwise direction just before impact. A second surviving passenger, who occupied the left front seat, stated that the helicopter was flying straight and level before it began to spin. He added that, before impact, he heard the low rotor rpm warning horn. The helicopter impacted heavily forested terrain in a steep nose-down, right-bank attitude. At the time of the accident, the helicopter was about 200 lbs below its maximum gross weight. Wind was calculated to be between 2 and 16 knots from the southwest with maximum gusts of about 20 knots near the accident site, which would have resulted in a tailwind condition. Examination of the helicopter did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.


Video footage recorded by a passenger showed the helicopter traveling about 39 knots on a northeasterly heading and at an altitude of about 200 ft above ground level. The groundspeed then began to decay to about 30 knots over a period of about 30 seconds. The helicopter then yawed right, and the groundspeed dropped to 22.6 knots. The helicopter then appeared to develop an uncontrollable right spin, and the video ended with the helicopter crashing into the forest below. It is likely that the combination of the helicopter's high gross weight, the reduction in airspeed, and the tailwind condition led to a loss of tail rotor effectiveness, which resulted in the right yaw from which the pilot did not recover control.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain helicopter control while operating in conditions conducive to a loss of tail rotor effectiveness.

***This report was modified on April 16, 2015. Please see the docket for this accident to view the original report.*** 


HISTORY OF FLIGHT


On July 27, 2013, about 1255 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N25WH, was substantially damaged following a loss of control and subsequent impact with terrain near Thompson Falls, Montana. The helicopter was registered to Zoot Helicopter I LLC, of Bozeman, Montana, and operated by Rocky Mountain Rotors, of Belgrade, Montana. The certified commercial pilot received fatal injuries; one passenger sustained serious injuries, and a second passenger suffered minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the aerial survey flight, which was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Polson Airport (8S1), about 2 hours prior to the time of the accident. The intended destination was Thompson Falls.


According to the passenger who sustained minor injuries, the purpose of the flight was to photo document the condition of cross-country power lines and their supporting wooden structures. The passenger reported that the pilot occupied the right front seat, his associate, who was operating videotaping equipment, occupied the left front seat, and he occupied the left rear seat taking still photographs. The passenger stated that initially everything was going fine, and that they were about 50 feet from the power lines and about 50 feet above them. However, the helicopter started to rotate in a clockwise orientation, about 4 revolutions prior to impact with terrain. He described the impact attitude of the helicopter as being very steep, nose down, and banked to the right. There was no postcrash fire.


About 6 months after the accident, the left-front-seat passenger, who was assigned to operate the onboard video camera, was interviewed via telephone by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC). The passenger stated that prior to the start of the helicopter spinning it was flying straight and level, and the next thing he remembered was the helicopter impacting a tree. He further stated that prior to impact he heard the Low Rotor rpm warning horn, as he had heard several times [during the starting of the helicopter's engine]. The passenger further stated that prior to the start of the spin, he did not recall any adverse wind conditions.


An NTSB Vehicle Recorder Specialist was able to download recorded data from an onboard Sony Handycam HDR CX550 recorder; the unit was equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. The recorder captured the entire accident sequence. The specialist's review of the data revealed the following:


The helicopter was initially observed operating about 8.5 nautical miles west-southwest of Thompson Falls, Montana, along the Montana Secondary Highway 471. About 1248, the helicopter was circling over a power substation at a groundspeed between 40 to 50 knots, at an altitude of about 3,400 feet mean sea level (msl). About 1250, the helicopter departed the substation and began following a line of utility poles northeast bound. About 1251, the helicopter was observed in a left-hand circle around a group of utility poles near a creek at an altitude of 3,226 feet msl. At 1251:38, the helicopter departed back to the northeast and continued to follow utility poles at a speed of 42 knots at an altitude of 3,220 feet msl. The helicopter then entered two more circles to the left at 1252:12, at which time its speed varied between 30 to 40 knots. At 1254:26, the helicopter was re-established on a northeast heading along the utility line at an altitude of 3,162 feet msl and a groundspeed of 39 knots; by 1255:00, the helicopter's groundspeed had decayed to 30 knots. At 1255:02, the helicopter began to yaw to the right as its speed further decayed to 22.6 knots at 1255:04. The helicopter completed a 360-degree spin by 1255:06 and continued to spin to the right. The GPS track continued to deviate for the remainder of the recording, and the groundspeed fluctuated below 22.6 knots until the recorded data terminated. Just before impact, the pilot's feet are shown and the left pedal is deflected forward. The helicopter struck trees about 1255:13, then the recording ended.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION


The pilot, age 35, possessed a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. He also held a certified flight instructor certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. Additionally, the pilot held private pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land.


A review of the pilot's personal logbook, together with records provided by the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 135 aeromedical company that he was employed by, revealed that about 1 month prior to the accident the pilot had accumulated a total flying time of 3,299.5 hours, of which 376.9 hours were in the same make and model as the accident helicopter.


Records also revealed that the pilot had completed his most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight review in accordance with FAR 61.56 on July 24, 2013. The pilot's most recent second-class FAA airman medical certificate was issued on February 13, 2013, with no limitations noted.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION


The helicopter was a Robinson R44 II, serial number 10481, manufactured in 2004. The operator reported that the helicopter's maximum gross weight was 2,500 pounds, that it seated four, and that it would have weighed about 2,300 pounds at the time of the accident.


The helicopter was powered by a 245-horsepower Lycoming IO-540-AE1A5 engine. The last annual maintenance inspection was conducted on July 8, 2013, at a total airframe and engine time of 786.2 hours. The helicopter had a total of 799 hours at the time of the accident, as it had operated 13 hours since its last maintenance inspection.


The examination of the maintenance records also revealed that on December 27, 2012, at a total airframe time of 778.9 hours, "Fuel bladder tanks installed. Aircraft returned to service." Additionally, the entry noted that this work "Complied with Robinson Helicopter Company SB-78B, using Robinson Helicopter Kit KI-196-2, IAW kit instruction KI-196-2, Revision "B" dated 10 Jan 2011. Revised Weight and Balance."


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION


An NTSB Meteorological Specialist reported that a review of the available weather in the area of where the accident occurred, included the following:


The National Weather Surface (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 1200 MDT depicted that a low pressure center was located at the central portion of Montana's border with Canada. A stationary front extended south-southeastward from the low pressure center into north-central Colorado. Another low pressure center was identified along the eastern portion of the Washington/Oregon border.


Many station models in the accident region depicted clear skies, with winds across the region generally 10 knots or less, with direction variable. Temperatures near the accident site were from the mid-70 degrees F to the mid-80 degrees F, with dew points ranging from about 30 degrees F to 60 degrees F.


A composite radar imagery mosaic at 1300 MDT of the accident region from the National Severe Storms Laboratory's National Mosaic and Q2 System did not identify any areas of reflectivity near the accident site.


An Automated Surface Observing System station (ASOS) named KMLP, was located near the Mullan Pass VOR in Mullan Pass, Idaho, about 8 nautical miles (nm) to the southwest of the accident site at an elevation of about 6,000 feet mean sea level (msl). At 1253 MDT, KMLP reported wind variable at 4 knots, visibility of 10 miles or greater, clear skies, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.17 inches of mercury.


U.S. Bureau of Land Management/USDA Forest Service Remote Automated Weather System (RAWS) station THAM8, was located about 10 miles to the east-northeast of the accident site at an elevation of about 2,426 feet msl. At 1302, THAM8 reported a temperature of 88 degrees F, a dew point temperature of 47.9 degrees F, relative humidity of 17 percent, and wind from 317 degrees at 7.8 knots with gusts to 17.4 knots. Feedback from the NWS Office in Missoula, Montana, regarding the THAM8 revealed that there was no reason to question wind speeds reported at 1302, and that they appeared to be consistent with the increasing westerly winds reported on the day of the accident at similarly sited (valley) stations.


The NTSB Specialist reported that a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulation was run to estimate wind conditions in the area of the accident site at 1300. WRF simulations of the wind identified sustained wind magnitudes of generally between 2-16 knots through the region, with the wind being from nearly the southwest at the accident site. Wind gust simulations yielded a maximum gust magnitude of close to 20 knots near the accident site.


An Area Forecast Discussion was issued at 0930 MDT by the NWS Forecast Office in Missoula for an area that included the accident location. In part, the discussion revealed that a trough moving through British Columbia would flatten the ridge in Idaho and western Montana, with an increase in winds expected during the afternoon as a westerly pressure gradient developed, with afternoon winds approaching 25 knots at times.


A Red Flag Warning was issued at 0402 by the NWS Forecast Office in Missoula for an area east of the accident location effective at 1200. The warning message advised of west winds of 15 to 20 miles-per-hour (mph) with gusts to 30 mph. The warning indicated that winds would begin to increase around mid-day, and peak in the late afternoon/early evening.


The accident pilot did not receive a DUAT, DUATS or Lockheed Martin Flight Services telephone weather briefing prior to the accident flight. It is not known if the pilot received preflight weather information from another source.


(Refer to the NTSB Group Chairman's Factual Meteorology Report, which is located in the docket for this report.)


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION


On July 28, 2013, representatives from the NTSB, the FAA, Robinson Helicopters, and Lycoming Motors examined the helicopter at the site of the accident. The examination revealed that the helicopter had impacted heavily forested terrain in a steep nose low, right bank attitude, at an elevation of 2,915 feet msl, and subsequently came to rest on its right side, on a measured magnetic heading of 178 degrees. The impact heading could not be determined. All components necessary for flight were accounted for at the accident site. The helicopter was recovered to a secured location for further examination.


On July 30, 2013, under the supervision of the IIC, an examination of the engine and airframe was conducted at the facilities of a local salvage company located in Belgrade, Montana. The results of the examination failed to reveal any anomalies, which would have precluded normal operation with the helicopter. (Refer to the Summary of Aircraft Examination report, which is located in the docket for this accident.)


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION


An autopsy of the pilot was performed at the Montana Division of Forensic Science, Missoula, Montana, on July 29, 2013. The cause of death was listed as "blunt force injuries."


Toxicological testing on the pilot was performed by the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute's (CAMI) Forensic Toxicology and Accident Research Center at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicological tests were negative for alcohol and drugs.


TESTS AND RESEARCH


Examination of Fuel Tanks


On August 29, 2013, under the supervision of an NTSB accident investigator, both the main and auxiliary fuel tanks, along with the instrument cluster, underwent functional testing at the facilities of Robinson Helicopter Company, Torrance, California. The results of the examination revealed the following:


Main Fuel Tank


The main fuel tank, which held a total of 30.5 US gallons, was visually examined. The aluminum skins were dented and/or creased, and the mounting holes were torn away at the edges. Portions of the mounting brackets remained attached to the tank. The tank was temporarily fitted to an exemplar airframe, ensuring proper angles. The instrument cluster was wired to the fuel quantity sending unit, and a warning light was wired to the Low Fuel Warning (LFW) sending unit. With power applied, the Main Fuel Tank Operating Indicator (MFI) read EMPTY, and the LFW light illuminated. Subsequent to 30 gallons of water poured into the tank, the MFI read FULL. When 9.5 gallons was drained, the MFI continued to read FULL. A light tap on the tank resulted in the MFI dropping to just below the 3/4 mark. When the MFI was observed at the 1/2 mark, 14.34 gallons of fuel had been drained, 14.55 gallons remained. When the MFI was at the 1/4 mark, 21.28 gallons had been drained, leaving 7.61 gallons remaining. After draining 24.46 gallons, the LFW light illuminated; 4.43 gallons of fuel remained. When the MFI was at the EMPTY mark and the flow of water stopped, 28.89 gallons had been drained, leaving about 1.11 gallons of unusable liquid in the tank.


Auxiliary Fuel Tank


A visual inspection of the tank, which had a capacity of 17.2 US gallons, revealed that the aluminum skins were dented, which reduced the capacity of the tank, and the mounting holes were torn away at the edges. The tank was temporarily fitted to an exemplar airframe, which insured proper angles. The instrument cluster was wired to a power source and the sending unit. When power was applied, the Auxiliary Fuel Tank Operating Indicator (AFI) read empty. Approximately 17 gallons of water was poured into the tank; the AFI needle read FULL. When the AFI was at the 1/2 mark, 8.80 gallons had been drained, with 8.2 gallons remaining. When the AFI was at the 1/4 mark, 12.91 gallons had been drained, with 4.09 gallons remaining. When the AFI was observed at the EMPTY mark and the flow of water halted, 17 gallons had been drained.


Both fuel quantity sending units, the Low Fuel Sending unit, and both indicators were observed to have functioned within factory specifications.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


The FAA Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, publication FAA-H-8030-21, Unanticipated Yaw/Loss of Tail Rotor Effectiveness (LTS), states in part that unanticipated yaw is the occurrence of an uncommanded yaw rate that does not subside of its own accord and, which, if not corrected, can result in the loss of helicopter control. This uncommanded yaw rate is referred to as a loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE) and occurs to the right in helicopters with counter-rotating main rotor and to the left in helicopters with a clockwise main rotor rotation. LTE is not related to an equipment or maintenance malfunction and may occur in all single-rotor helicopters at airspeeds less than 30 knots. It is the result of the tail rotor not providing adequate thrust to maintain directional control. The required tail rotor thrust is modified by the effects of the wind. The wind can cause an uncommanded yaw by changing tail rotor effective thrust.


FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 90-95, Unanticipated Right Yaw in Helicopters, dated February 26, 1995 states that the loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE) is a critical, low-speed aerodynamic flight characteristic which could result in an uncommanded rapid yaw rate which does not subside of its own accord and, if not corrected, could result in the loss of aircraft control. It also states, "LTE is not related to a maintenance malfunction and may occur in varying degrees in all single main rotor helicopters at airspeeds less than 30 knots."


Paragraph 6 of the AC covered conditions under which LTE may occur. It states:

"Any maneuver which requires the pilot to operate in a high-power, low-airspeed environment with a left crosswind or tailwind creates an environment where unanticipated right yaw may occur."

Paragraph 8 of the AC states:


"OTHER FACTORS...Low Indicated Airspeed. At airspeeds below translational lift, the tail rotor is required to produce nearly 100 percent of the directional control. If the required amount of tail rotor thrust is not available for any reason, the aircraft will yaw to the right."


Paragraph 9 of the AC states: "When maneuvering between hover and 30 knots: (1) Avoid tailwinds. If loss of translational lift occurs, it will result in an increased high power demand and an additional anti-torque requirement. (2) Avoid out of ground effect (OGE) hover and high power demand situations, such as low-speed downwind turns. (3) Be especially aware of wind direction and velocity when hovering in winds of about 8-12 knots (especially OGE). There are no strong indicators to the pilot of a reduction of translation lift. (4) Be aware that if considerable amount of left pedal is being maintained a sufficient amount of left pedal may not be available to counteract an unanticipated right yaw. (5) Be alert to changing aircraft flight and wind conditions which may be experienced when flying along ridge lines and around buildings. (6) Stay vigilant to power and wind conditions."


Robinson Helicopters Safety Notice SN-42, UNANTICIPATED YAW, issued May, 2013, states that a pilot's failure to apply proper pedal inputs in response to strong or gusty winds during hover or low-speed flight may result in an unanticipated yaw. Some pilots mistakenly attribute this yaw to loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE), implying that the tail rotor stalled or was unable to provide adequate thrust. Tail rotors on Robinson helicopters are designed to have more authority than many other helicopters and are unlikely to experience LTE. To avoid unanticipated yaw, pilots should be aware of conditions (a left crosswind, for example) that may require large or rapid pedal inputs. Practicing slow, steady-rate hovering pedal turns will help maintain proficiency in controlling yaw. Hover training with a qualified instructor in varying wind conditions may also be helpful.





http://registry.faa.gov/N25WH

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA343
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 27, 2013 in Thompson Falls, MT
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N25WH
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious,1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 27, 2013, about 1300 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N25WH, was substantially damaged following a loss of control and subsequent impact with terrain near Thompson Falls, Montana. The aircraft was registered to Zoot Helicopter I LLC, of Bozeman, Montana, and operated by Rocky Mountain Rotors, Belgrade, Montana. The certified commercial pilot received fatal injuries, one passenger sustained serious injuries, and the second passenger suffered minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the aerial survey flight, which was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Polson Airport (8S1), Polson, Montana, about 1100. The intended destination was the Thompson Falls Airport (THM).

According to the passenger who sustained minor injuries, the purpose of the flight was to photo document the condition of the cross-country power lines and their supporting wooden structures. The passenger reported that the pilot occupied the right front seat, his associate who was operating the video taping equipment occupied the left front, and he occupied the left rear seat taking still photographs. The passenger stated that everything was going fine, but then suddenly the helicopter started to rotate in a clockwise orientation, about 4 revolutions, prior to impact with terrain. He described the impact attitude of the helicopter as being very steep nose down and banked to the right. There was no post-crash fire.

Representatives from the National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration, Lycoming Motors, and Robinson Helicopters, examined the helicopter at the accident site the day following the event. The examination revealed that the helicopter impacted heavily forested terrain in a steep nose low, right bank attitude, and came to rest on its right side on a magnetic heading of 178 degrees. The cockpit and cabin areas were severely damaged, both main rotor blades were destroyed, and the transmission was displaced aft about 45 degrees. The engine was observed to have been only slightly damaged, as well as the helicopter's tail boom. Both tail rotor blades and the associated gear box were observed undamaged. All components necessary for flight were accounted for at the accident site.

The helicopter was recovered to a secured facility for further examination.



 
Todd Hanawault

BELGRADE - An emotion memorial service was held Saturday for the Bozeman pilot who was killed in late August.


Todd Hanawault died July  27 when the helicopter he was flying crashed near Thompson Falls. He worked for Summit Air Ambulance in Bozeman, although at the time of his death he was piloting a private helicopter.

Hanawault's friends, family and co-workers gathered to remember and celebrate his life at the Summit hanger at Bozeman Yellowstone Airport.

"Though Todd left us way too early, he lived life to the fullest, accomplished so much and touched so many hearts," his sister Heather Tipton.

"We love you Todd. Catch you on the other side," added his sister Heidi Hanawalt.

A "last call" from dispatch was performed at the end of the ceremony, and his helmet was then carried to a chopper outside. The helicopter then took off.

Related Articles:
Source:   http://www.kpax.com

Air Tractor Inc AT-301, N3655G: Accident occurred August 04, 2013 in Simmesport, Louisiana

PRO-AIR LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N3655G  

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA472
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, August 04, 2013 in Simmesport, LA
Aircraft: Air Tractor Inc AT-301, registration:
N3655G
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 4, 2013, about 0920 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc AT-301, N3655G, impacted terrain during an aerial application of a field near Simmesport, Louisiana. The airplane received substantial damage to a wing. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Pro-Air LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight that was not operating on a flight plan. The local flight originated at an unknown time.

----------------

 A Hamburg crop duster survived a crash Sunday morning at Simmesport.

Bryan Whitmore was crop dusting fields on the south side of Highway One, near Yellow Bayou Civil War Park, when the accident occurred. His plane, minus the engine, landed on the train tracks on the north side of the road.

Motorists along highway one stopped and were able to talk to the the pilot, He appeared to have broken a leg, and was transported by ambulance.

Avoyelles Parish Sheriff Doug Anderson, who lives in Simmesport, was at the scene. Anderson said that Whitmore had successfully crossed the high power lines and was making his turn back to the south field. Highway One and the Kansas City railroad track separate two fields. Whihtore's plane went down in the field on the north side after witnesses in nearby homes said engine stalled during his turn. The plane came was sideways when the left wing hit the field, then flipping the engine into the dirt.The engine stayed and the rest of the plane, with Whitmore, went through the narrow opening between two trees. It traveled about 40 feet or so before coming to a stop on the top of the train tracks. remov

Alfred Couvillon, with the Simmesport Fire Department, said the wreckage was removed quickly off of the tracks to allow train traffic to continue. A forklift operator from Fab-Tech in Hamburg was called in to to remove the wreckage.

The crop duster came from the Keith Whitmore field behind the Cotton Gin in Hamburg, Anderson said. He said a report would be sent to the
Federal Aviation Administration and possibly the Agriculture Department.

Source:   http://www.avoyellestoday.com


Cropduster, minus engine, comes to rest on rail track 
 
SIMMESPORT – A Hamburg crop duster survived a crash here Sunday morning.

Bryan Whitmore was dusting fields on the south side of Highway One, near Yellow Bayou Civil War Park, when the accident occurred.

His plane, minus the engine, landed on the train tracks on the north side of the road.

Motorists stopped and were able to talk to the pilot, He appeared to have broken a leg, and was transported by ambulance.

Avoyelles Parish Sheriff Doug Anderson, who lives in Simmesport, said that Whitmore had successfully crossed the high power lines and was making his turn back to the south field. Highway One and the Kansas City railroad track separate two fields.

Whihtore’s plane went down in the field on the north side after witnesses in nearby homes said the engine stalled during his turn. The plane was sideways when the left wing hit the field, flipping the engine into the dirt.

The engine stayed and the rest of the plane, with Whitmore, went through the narrow opening between two trees. It traveled about 40 feet or so before coming to a stop on the top of the train tracks.

The cropduster came from the Keith Whitmore field in Hamburg, Anderson said.


http://acadiaparishtoday.com

Beech 58P Baron, N4004S: Accident occurred August 04, 2013 at Lehigh Valley International Airport (KABE), Allentown, Pennsylvania

A twin-engine private aircraft landed on its belly Sunday afternoon at Lehigh Valley International Airport after its landing gear failed to deploy, according to airport officials. 

One person was on board and was not injured, said airport Executive Director Charles R. Everett.

Fire and emergency crews about 4:30 p.m. Sunday responded to the crash. The plane, a white, six-seat 1976 Beech 58P, crashed on runway 31, one of two runways at the airport. Everett said the crash did not hamper airport operations.

The plane is owned by JSMGT LLC of Chemung County in the south-central part of New York state, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.

Everett said he did not have a flight plan for the plane and was unsure where the plane was coming from or heading to.

At least a dozen emergency vehicles were on the scene at the airport in Hanover Township, Lehigh County.


http://www.lehighvalleylive.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N4004S

http://www.mcall.com


Emergency crews respond to a crash Sunday afternoon on the runway at Lehigh Valley International Airport. 

Emergency personnel respond to reports of a plane crash at Lehigh Valley International Airport.

Beech A36 Bonanza, APS Aviation LLC, N1831W: Fatal accident occurred August 04, 2013 in Alma, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA13FA349
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 04, 2013 in Alma, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/10/2014
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N1831W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was flying the airplane on a cross-country flight to his home airport in day visual meteorological conditions. While in cruise flight at 5,000 feet mean sea level (msl), the airplane began descending and was lost from radar at 2,800 feet msl, 2 miles from the accident site. The pilot did not transmit any distress calls to air traffic control. Witnesses near the accident site heard the airplane with the engine operating then shortly thereafter heard the sound of impact. Examination of the accident site indicated that the airplane had flown through trees at a shallow angle and impacted the ground on a road. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no indications of preimpact anomalies; all observed damage was consistent with ground impact. Postmortem examination of the pilot indicated that the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The pilot’s toxicology testing revealed medications that were unlikely to have contributed to the accident. Testing for carbon monoxide could not be performed due to unsuitable samples. A postmortem examination and toxicology tests were not performed on the passenger. It could not be determined why the flight gradually descended from cruise altitude until impact with trees and the ground. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

Descent from cruise flight until impact with trees and the ground for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation and the pilot’s autopsy and toxicology tests did not provide any evidence of impairment or incapacitation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 4, 2013, about 1155 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36, N1831W, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain near Alma, Georgia. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (FHB), Fernandina Beach, Florida around 1115 with the intended destination of Gwinnett County Airport-Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia, where the airplane was based. 

A review of voice recordings provided by Jacksonville Air Traffic Control Tower (JAX) revealed no indication from the pilot of any anomalies. A radar hand-off was accomplished between JAX to Jacksonville Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZJX). The pilot contacted ZJK at 1127 and was issued the current altimeter setting. Then, at 1151, while en route at 5,000 feet mean sea level (msl), the airplane lost radar contact and the radar controller attempted to contact the pilot; however, no response was recorded or noted. A review of radar data indicated that the radar target began to descend from about 5,000 feet msl starting at 1150:52. The next radar targets were recorded at 4,900 feet msl at 1151:04, then 3,900 feet msl at 1151:16, and the last radar target was at 2,800 feet msl at 1151:28. The wreckage was located about 2 miles to the northwest of the last radar return.

Witnesses reported hearing a "low flying" airplane and soon after, the sound of impact. One witness went to the scene and notified the Sheriff's Department. The other witness stated that when he first heard the airplane it sounded like the engine was sputtering but it then straightened out.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He held a third-class medical certificate, which was issued on January 13, 2012 and had a restriction of "must wear corrective lenses." At the pilot's most recent medical examination he had reported 601 total flight hours and 40 of those flight hours were in the 6 months preceding the medical application.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate in 1973 and was registered to APS Aviation LLC on March 18, 2010. It was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-550-B(4) series, serial number 249169-R, 300-hp engine. It was also equipped with a McCauley propeller. The airplane's most recent annual inspection could not be documented due to the inability to locate the records at the time of this writing. A flight log form found at the accident site noted "Annual," dated July 8, 2013, at the tach time of 2764.9 hours. 

The most recent recorded fueling was accomplished on August 4, 2013 at FHB. The airplane had been fueled with a total of 20 gallons of fuel; 10 gallons of fuel in each main fuel tank.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1153 recorded weather observation at AMG, which was about 8 nautical miles to the southeast of the accident location, included wind from 290 degrees at 5 knots, 8 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 3,200 feet above ground level (agl) and 4,600 feet agl, temperature 31 degrees C, dew point 23 degrees C, and barometric altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS

A review of voice recordings provided by Jacksonville Air Traffic Control Tower (JAX) revealed no indication from the airplane of any anomalies. A radar hand-off was accomplished between JAX to Jacksonville ARTCC (ZJX). The accident flight contacted ZJK at 1127 and was issued the current altimeter setting. Then, at 1151, while en route at 5,000 feet mean sea level, the radar data tag for the accident airplane went into to a coast mode. The radar controller attempted to contact the accident flight; however, no response was recorded or noted. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted 60-foot-tall trees beyond an open field and then descended until it impacted the ground at a wings-level, nose down attitude. The accident flight path was oriented on a 304 degree heading and the debris path began at the initial tree strike and continued about 650 feet in length. 

Nose Section

The engine was separated from the engine mounts and located about 50 feet forward of the main wreckage. The engine cowling was separated from the engine and located along the debris path. The nose gear was impact separated from the keel structure of the airplane and located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. The propeller and spinner remained attached to the propeller flange. The propeller blades exhibited S-bending. There were several pieces of smoothly-cut tree branches located along the debris path. The branches exhibited paint transfers along the faces of the cuts similar in color to the propeller blades. The cuts were about 45 degree angles to the plain of the branch. 

The engine remained attached to the firewall through wires but was separated from all of the engine mounts. All six cylinders remained attached to the crankcase. The No. 5 cylinder was impact damaged. Both magnetos were separated from the engine. The left magneto remained attached through the ignition harness and the right magneto was located along the debris field. The starter was separated from the engine and was located along the debris field. In addition, the alternator was impact fractured and several pieces were scattered throughout the debris field. 

Right Wing

Sections of the right wing, right flap, and right aileron were scattered along the debris path. The inboard section of the right wing was located underneath the fuselage. The entire right wing exhibited impact crush damage. The flaps were impact separated at their respective attach points. Cable continuity was confirmed from the flap motor located near the cabin area to the actuators; however, they exhibited numerous tensile overload fractures. The aileron was separated from the wing and the aileron cables exhibited tensile overload at all fracture points; however, cable continuity was confirmed from the base of the control column to the associated fracture points out to the aileron. The right wing's main fuel tank fuel cap remained attached, was seated correctly, and locked in position in the forward right wing section located along the debris path. The right main landing gear was separated and discovered about 15 feet forward of the main wreckage. The right flap actuator was measured and corresponded to the flaps retracted position. 

Empennage

The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer. Cable continuity was confirmed from the base of the rudder pedals to the rudder through several cable fractures. All separations exhibited tensile overload signatures. All flight control surfaces associated with the tail section remained attached to their respective attach points; however, the empennage was separated from the fuselage. The left and right elevator counter weights were impact separated from the elevator and located along the debris path. Elevator cable continuity was confirmed from the base of the control column to the elevator bellcrank although numerous tensile overload fractures were present along the entire span. Both elevator trims were measured and correlated to a nose down trim position. 

Left Wing

The left wing was found inverted and separated from the fuselage at the wing root. The wing exhibited extensive crush and impact damage along the entire span. The fuel tanks were breached, devoid of fuel, and the fuel caps remained secured and seated. The flaps remained attached at their respective attach points at the flap bell crank. Flap control continuity was confirmed for the flaps although the drive cable was separated from the flap motor assembly in tensile overload. The aileron was separated and cable continuity was confirmed from the base of the control column to the associated fracture points out to the aileron attach point. The aileron cable exhibited tensile overload at all fracture points. The landing gear actuator was discovered in the retracted position. The left main landing gear remained in the up and locked position. The left flap actuator was measured and corresponded to the flaps retracted position. 

Cockpit

The cockpit exhibited extensive impact and crush damage. A Garmin 696 handheld global positioning system was located, which was removed and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for download. The engine controls were separated from the cockpit and located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. The throttle lever and the propeller lever were in the mid-range position. The mixture was in the full forward position. Due to extensive damage, the levers were impact separated from their associated control cables. The tachometer indicated a time of 2778.16 hours. The vertical speed indicator needle was in the 400 feet per minute down position. The aileron balance cable was intact from the left bellcrank to the right bellcrank where it exhibited overload failure at the right aileron. The transponder was examined and the setting of the transponder could not be determined. 

Fuselage 

The fuselage came to rest about 600 feet from the initial tree impact point. It came to rest on the left side. The main cabin door was separated from the fuselage. The main cabin door latch was in the closed position. In addition, both the forward and aft utility doors were in the latched and closed position; however, both were impact separated from the fuselage. The pilot and co-pilot seats were impact separated from the cabin and located forward of the main wreckage. The aft seats remained attached to the cabin floor. 

The fuel selector was located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. The fuel selector was located in the left main fuel tank detent. All of fuel fittings that attached to the fuel selector were finger tight. An odor similar to aviation fuel was noted when the fuel selector was disassembled. Residual liquid that was similar in odor to aviation fuel was noted in the fuel strainer with no debris noted in the fuel. Residual fuel was also noted in the fuel boost pump when it was disassembled. The fuel boost pump was in the "OFF" position. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Division of Forensic Sciences, on August 7, 2013. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple blunt force injuries" and the manner of death was "accident."

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated no ethanol was detected in the muscle or liver. Atorvastatin and Doxazosin were detected in the muscle and liver. Azacyclonol, Fexofenadine, and Ibuprofen were detected in the liver. In addition, testing for carbon monoxide and cyanide was not performed due to the lack of a suitable sample. 

A review of the toxicology report by the NTSB Medical Officer revealed that the noted medications would not be impairing or incapacitating to the pilot.

No postmortem examination or toxicology tests were performed on the passenger. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH 

Engine Examination

The engine was examined at the manufacturing facility in Mobile, Alabama, on September 10-11, 2013. The oil filter and fuel filter were void of any debris. The spark plugs were removed, all exhibited normal wear, and were light gray in color. The starter adaptor, induction system, exhaust system, oil cooler, manifold valve, throttle body, oil sump, oil suction screen, and cylinders were removed, disassembled, and examined with no anomalies noted. In addition, the camshaft and crankshaft were removed and examined. Overall, examination revealed that there were no abnormalities with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Portable Global Positioning System

A Garmin 696 portable global positioning system was located in the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for download. The data downloaded was for dates prior to the accident date and did not reveal any pertinent information regarding the accident flight.



http://registry.faa.gov/N1831W

NTSB Identification: ERA13FA349 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 04, 2013 in Alma, GA
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N1831W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 4, 2013, about 1155 eastern daylight time, a Beechcraft A36, N1831W, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain near Alma, Georgia. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (FHB), Fernandina Beach, Florida, around 1115, with the intended destination of Gwinnett County Airport-Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia.

Witnesses reported hearing a “low flying” airplane and soon after, the sound of impact. Two witnesses reported that the airplane engine was “sputtering” or “skipping.”

The airplane initially impacted the tops of trees approximately 60 feet above ground level (agl) and then descended until it impacted the ground. The accident flight path was oriented on a 304 degree heading and the debris path began about 600 feet prior to where the main wreckage came to rest. The wreckage path from the initial tree strike to the farthest piece of wreckage was about 650 feet long.

There was no evidence of a fire. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. Control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces through several tensile overload fractures. Both wings exhibited impact crush damage. Sections of the right wing, right flap, and right aileron were scattered along the debris path up to the main wreckage. The outboard section of the right wing was located underneath the fuselage. The left wing was found inverted and separated from the fuselage at the wing root. The left horizontal stabilizer, right horizontal stabilizer, left elevator, right elevator, vertical stabilizer, and rudder remained attached to the tail section. The tail section was separated from the fuselage. The engine remained attached to the firewall with wires and cables but was separated from all of the engine mounts and was located about 50 feet forward of the main wreckage. The propeller remained attached to the propeller flange and the spinner remained attached. The propeller blades exhibited S-bending.

A Garmin 696 handheld GPS was located, was removed, and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for download. In addition, the engine and propeller were retained for further examination.



 




 
Dr. Sid Shah


 
Professor Shama Gamkhar



A Rockdale doctor and his wife were killed in a single-engine plane crash in southeast Georgia as they were flying back from Florida on Sunday.

Dr. Sid Shah, 58, and his wife Shama Gamkhar, 55, of Tucker were headed from Fernandina Beach, Fla. to Lawrenceville when the Hawker Beechcraft A36 single-engine aircraft he was piloting suddenly went down about 14 miles from the town of Alma, Georgia. Shaw and his wife were the only ones in the six-passenger plane, which was registered to APS Aviation, LLC out of Jonesboro, Clayton County.

Bacon County Deputy Coroner Roy Crosby said a passerby discovered the crash and notified emergency medical personel just before noon. He said there was no fire at the crash site.

The weather was good that day, said Crosby. "He was on an instrument flight plan with Jacksonville Center. They lost him at 5,000 feet," said Crosby. "He just came down in the treetops at a high rate of speed."

National Transportation Safety Board investigators are on the scene investigating the crash. An autopsy will be performed on Dr. Shaw's body.

Dr. Shah came to Rockdale Medical Center's Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center in 2007 as the Medical Director. While at Rockdale Medical Center, Dr. Shah worked with patients to treat and cure long-term chronic wounds. During the course of his work at the center, he was able to prevent amputation of legs and feet due to wounds and infection in close to 500 patients.

Deborah Armstrong, CEO of Rockdale Medical Center, said, "The Rockdale Medical Center family is deeply saddened to learn of the tragic loss of Dr. Sid Shah and his wife, Shama Gamkhar.

"Dr. Shah was an extraordinary physician and was well-respected by his peers, his staff and his patients. He was an integral member of the Rockdale Medical Center medical staff. "

When asked to describe Dr. Shah in one word, Armstrong said, "The word would be 'beloved.' He was loved by his staff, his patients and his colleagues."

Dr. Shah's wife Shama Gamkhar was also beloved as an Associate Professor in Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs. Gamkhar was an expert in environmental economic policy and a teacher of public finance and financial management.

"We have lost a beloved colleague, devoted teacher and wonderful friend, whose memory and example we will carry with us," said Robert Hutchings, Dean of the LBJ School. "Our hearts go out to Shama and Sid's family and friends."

Gamkhar joined the LBJ School in 1996 as an Assistant Professor and more recently served as graduate adviser for the Master of Public Affairs degree program.

A memorial page for Gamkhar was set up here: http://www.utexas.edu

ALMA, Georgia — Bacon County Coroner Vic Peacock says a man and woman from the metro Atlanta area have been killed in a small plane crash.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen says a Hawker Beechcraft A36 went down Sunday afternoon near Alma — which is about 70 miles northwest of Brunswick.

Peacock says 58-year-old Sid Shah, of Tucker, and Shama Gamkhar were killed in the crash. Authorities were unsure of the woman's age, and Peacock says investigators believe Shah and Gamkhar were husband and wife.

Bergen says the plane was flying from Fernandina Beach, Florida to Lawrenceville, Georgia when the crash happened.

Peacock says the plane landed in a rural area and crashed into a cluster of trees.

Authorities are investigating the cause of the crash.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N58437: Accident occurred August 04, 2013 in Stanwood, Washington

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA359
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 04, 2013 in Stanwood, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/13/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N58437
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that, as he approached the destination airport, he maneuvered the airplane to enter a standard traffic pattern. When on final approach, he fully extended the wing flaps while reducing the engine power. He then temporarily added power to attain adequate clearance from trees located before the runway. During the descent, the stall warning horn intermittently sounded and then continuously sounded. The airplane stalled and, upon touchdown, it bounced hard on the runway surface. The pilot chose to abort the landing and then applied full power. As the engine power increased, the pilot was not able to keep the nose down before the airplane again stalled. The airplane bounced hard and rolled onto its side. The pilot stated that the accident could have been prevented if he had executed a better short-field landing procedure to eliminate the airplane bouncing upon touchdown. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s unstabilized approach and his subsequent failure to maintain airspeed during the aborted landing, which resulted in a stall and the airplane bouncing hard on the runway. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 04, 2013, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N58437, collided with terrain shortly after the pilot aborted the landing at Camano Island Airfield, Stanwood, Washington. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight departed from Boeing Field/King County International Airport, Seattle, Washington about 1100 with a planned destination of Stanwood. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the pilot had filed a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan.

Several witnesses observed the accident sequence. They stated that the airplane was landing on runway 16, which slopes upward at the first section. The airplane touched down hard after the mid-field area and bounced. The pilot then appeared to add full engine power in an attempt to abort the landing. The airplane climbed about 40 to 50 feet and stalled, descending into terrain. 

The pilot stated that as he approached the vicinity of the airport, he observed the windsock indicating a light crosswind for runway 16. He maneuvered the airplane in a standard right-traffic pattern and when on final approach, he extended the flaps fully down while reducing the engine power. In an effort to ensure adequate clearance from trees located at the north end of the runway, he temporarily added power. While descending to the runway, the stall warning would intermittently sound and then there was a continuous stall horn. The airplane stalled and bounced hard on the runway surface. The pilot opted to abort the landing and applied full power. The engine hesitated and he began to retract the flaps. Subsequently the airplane lurched airborne as the engine power increased and the pilot was not able to maneuver the nose down before the airplane again stalled. The airplane bounced hard and rolled onto its side. 

In the section titled "RECOMMENDATION" in the NTSB Pilot/Operator Report, form 6120.1/2, the pilot stated that the accident could have been prevented if he had executed a better short-field landing procedure to eliminate the airplane bouncing upon touchdown. He thought that because the airplane was loaded with a forward center of gravity, that a short-field landing was inadvisable because of the increased chance of a power-on stall during a go-around. He noted that he hadn't practiced short-field landings in over 10 months and should have considered a different destination.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot was certified to operate the accident airplane in accordance with existing Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs). A review of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airman and Medical Records database disclosed that the pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument flight. The pilot's third-class medical certificate was issued in April 2009, with no limitations. 

The pilot's self-reported flight time indicated he had amassed 270 hours total flight experience, with 100 hours accumulated in Cessna 182 airplanes. The pilot reported that during the preceding 90 days, 30 days, and 24 hours, he had flown in the capacity of pilot-in-command approximately 46, 15, and 0 hours, respectively. 

The pilot stated that he had purchased the airplane about one year before the accident. He recalled that he had been to the airport on past flights.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Camano Island Airfield was a FAR Part 139 certificated facility that had one hard-surfaced asphalt runway (runway 16/34). The runway was 1,750 feet long and 24 feet wide. According to the FAA Airport Facility Directory, the first 1,049 feet of runway 16 has a 3 percent uphill slope to the south and student landings were not recommended unless accompanied by the flight instructor.


http://registry.faa.gov/N58437

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA359 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 04, 2013 in Stanwood, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N58437
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 04, 2013, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N58437, collided with terrain shortly after the pilot aborted the landing at Camano Island Airfield, Stanwood, Washington. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight departed from Boeing Field/King County International Airport, Seattle, Washington, about 1100 with a planned destination of Stanwood. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the pilot had filed a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan.

Several witnesses observed the accident sequence. They stated that the airplane was landing on runway 16, which slopes upward at its northern end. The airplane touched down hard after the mid-field area and bounced. The pilot then appeared to add full engine power in an attempt to abort the landing. The airplane climbed about 40 to 50 feet and stalled, descending into terrain.




 

CAMANO ISLAND, Wash. -- A small plane crashed on Camano Island Sunday morning, seriously injuring a husband and wife on board. 

The Cessna 182 went down while attempting to land at Camano Island Air Park around 11:30 a.m., said Allen Kenitzer with the FAA.

The man on board was taken by ambulance to a local hospital while the woman had to be airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, said Levon Yengoyan, assistant chief of the Camano Island Fire Department.

Yengoyan didn't give the extent of the injuries but said both patients were stable.

Dave Withstanley saw the crash happen and told KOMO News it was a classic stall situation where the plane didn't have enough air speed to maintain flight. He said the pilot gave the plane more power and nearly pulled out of the nosedive but slammed into the ground.

"He hit the ground level but really hard and then it tumbled over and broke the tail off; broke the engine off," Withstandley said.

He and about four or five others at the field ran to the wreckage and pulled the couple from the plane.

One of those running to the rescue was Steve Knopp, who owns the air field. Knopp said both inside were conscious but he had to keep talking to the man to keep him from blacking out. The woman complained of broken ribs and difficulty breathing.

The NTSB will investigate the crash.


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