Monday, October 3, 2016

Gulfstream Aerospace G-V, Feritta Entertainment Holdings LLC, N625TF: Incident occurred October 02, 2016 at North Las Vegas Airport (KVGT), Clark County, Nevada

FERTITTA ENTERTAINMENT HOLDINGS LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N625TF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, WING COLLIDED WITH A HANGAR, NORTH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA.  

Date: 02-OCT-16
Time: 21:42:00Z
Regis#: N625TF
Aircraft Make: GULFSTREAM
Aircraft Model: GV
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: NORTH LAS VEGAS
State: Nevada

Ven's RV-7, N36HR: Incident occurred October 02, 2016 in Bridger, Carbon County, Montana

http://registry.faa.gov/N36HR

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, BRIDGER, MONTANA.  

Date: 02-OCT-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N36HR
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV7
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BRIDGER
State: Montana

Aerostar S60A, N64914: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

http://registry.faa.gov/N64914 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


N64914 AEROSTAR INTERNATIONAL S-60A HOT AIR BALLOON, ON LANDING, STRUCK POWERLINES, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO.


Date: 02-OCT-16

Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N64914
Aircraft Make: AEROSTAR INTERNATIONAL
Aircraft Model: S60A
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALBUQUERQUE
State: New Mexico 



In day two of the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, two balloons hit power lines Sunday morning. One of them caused a small explosion.

The "Outlander" alien balloon struck the power lines near Paseo del Norte and Jefferson.  It caused flames to light up on impact.  That crash knocked out power to about 1,200 customers.

Fortunately, once the balloon hit, it immediately cut off the power.  The flames only caused a hole in the balloon.  Allen Escobar saw the whole thing.  He said PNM crews had to cut the basket from the balloon to get the people down.

"I thought it was just going to go up in flames, but it didn't.  Thank God," Escobar said.

Not too far away, another balloon slumped over power lines near Montano and Renaissance.  Balloon Fiesta officials say one person was injured in that incident as that passenger was getting out of the gondola.

Story and video:  http://www.kob.com

Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, Aero Environmental Consulting LLC, N1528H: Accident occurred September 30, 2016 in Cloquet, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

AERO ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1528H

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA391
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 30, 2016 in Cloquet, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/26/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 177RG, registration: N1528H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during cruise flight, the airplane’s engine began making an unusual ticking sound and the oil pressure was low. The oil pressure continued to drop, and the engine began to “knock” louder until it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot attempted to glide to an airport, but the airplane had insufficient altitude and landed in a field short of the intended runway. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the No. 4 connecting rod had failed, and displayed signatures consistent with a lack of lubrication. The other connecting rods also exhibited signs of a lack of lubrication, and the oil pickup screen contained debris. 

The engine had sufficient oil in the sump, and examination of the components of the oil system failed to reveal any preimpact anomalies. The engine manufacturer recommended that engines be overhauled at least every 12 years due to possible deterioration of engine components and abnormal wear on soft metal bearing surfaces during engine start procedures. The accident engine had not been overhauled for 23 years; however, the investigation was unable to determine if or to what extent the damage to the engine was a result of the connecting rod failure or may have occurred before the failure. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A lack of lubrication in the engine for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information, which resulted in a failure of the No. 4 connecting rod and a subsequent total loss of engine power.

On September 30, 2016, about 1430 central daylight time, a Cessna 177RG, N1528H, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Cloquet, Minnesota. The pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained damage to the aft fuselage. The airplane was registered to Aero Environmental Consulting, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Cook Municipal Airport (CQM), Cook, Minnesota, about 1300 and was destined for the Field of Dreams Airport (04W), near Hinckley, Minnesota.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight he detected a slight ticking sound coming from the engine. He checked the oil pressure gauge and noted that the oil pressure indication was just below the green arc but still above the critical red line that indicated minimum oil pressure. The pilot elected to divert to the Cloquet/Carlton County Airport (COQ), Cloquet, Minnesota, in order to check the engine. As the airplane approached COQ, the engine noise became louder, and the oil pressure continued to drop. When the airplane was about 5 miles from COQ the oil pressure had dropped below the red line, and the engine was "knocking" loudly. About 3 miles from COQ, the engine stopped and the propeller did not windmill. The pilot attempted to glide the airplane to COQ, but had insufficient altitude and landed in a field short of the approach end of runway 17 at COQ. He reported that the landing was smooth, but on roll-out the airplane entered a roadside ditch resulting in damage to the airplane structure.

The airplane was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6D engine, serial number L-18530-51A. The engine was rated to produce 200 horsepower. An examination of the engine was conducted by National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration Investigators. The engine was removed from the airplane and a partial teardown examination completed. There was a fracture in the engine case above the no. 4 cylinder with a portion of the no. 4 connecting rod visible. There was also a crack in the accessory portion of the case behind the no. 4 cylinder. The engine contained about 5.5 quarts of oil. The rocker covers were removed and no anomalies were noted with regard to the rocker arms, valve springs, valve spring keepers, or push rod ends. The rear accessories and accessory case were removed and gear train continuity was confirmed. The no. 1, 3, and 4 cylinders were removed from the engine. The no.2 cylinder could not be fully removed due to damage to the cylinder skirt that prevented the piston from exiting the bottom of the cylinder. The no.4 connecting rod remained attached to the piston. The large end of the connecting rod had fractured adjacent to the rod cap bolt holes. Portions of the connecting rod and rod cap were found within the oil sump. The large end of the connecting rod exhibited discoloration consistent with heat distress. The no. 1 cylinder, piston, and connecting rod remained intact; however, the connecting rod could not be rotated on the crank shaft. The no.1 connecting rod bearing could be seen extruding from between the connecting rod and crankshaft cheek which indicated that failure of that bearing was imminent. The no.3 cylinder, piston, and connecting rod were intact. The no.2 cylinder, piston, and connecting rod were intact. The no.3 bearing was examined and showed signatures consistent with a lack of lubrication. The engine's oil pressure relief valve was disassembled and no anomalies were noted. The oil screen was plugged with debris, but the examination was unable to determine if the debris in the screen was secondary to the engine failure. The oil pump was disassembled and examined with no anomalies found. Examination of the remainder of the oil system did not reveal any anomalies.

A review of the airplane's maintenance records showed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on January 27, 2016. On that same date, a 100-hour inspection of the engine was completed at a recording tachometer reading of 4,250.8 hours. The engine had accumulated 1,320.56 hours since it most recent overhaul at the time of the inspection. The records further indicated that the most recent overhaul was completed on April 26, 1993, and the engine was installed on the accident airplane on June 4, 1993. During the postaccident engine examination the recording tachometer read 4,278.4 hours, indicating that it had accumulated 27.6 hours since the annual/100-hour inspection. A subsequent maintenance entry indicated that the engine oil and filter were changed on April 19, 2016, at a recording tachometer reading of 4,259.22 hours.

Lycoming Service Instruction 1009AT stated: "Engine deterioration in the form of corrosion (rust) and the drying out and hardening of composition materials such as gaskets, seals, flexible hoses and fuel pump diaphragms can occur if an engine is out of service for an extended period of time. Due to the loss of a protective oil film after an extended period of inactivity, abnormal wear on soft metal bearing surfaces can occur during engine start. Therefore, all engines that do not accumulate the hourly period of time between overhauls specified in this publication are recommended to be overhauled in the twelfth year." The publication listed a recommended time between overhaul for the accident engine as 2,000 hours.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA391

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 30, 2016 in Cloquet, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA 177RG, registration: N1528H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 30, 2016, about 1445 central daylight time, a Cessna 177RG, N1528H, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Cloquet, Minnesota. The pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained damage to the aft fuselage. The airplane was registered to Aero Environmental Consulting, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Cook Municipal Airport (CQM), Cook, Minnesota, about 1310.

Aerostar RX8, N5161Y: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5161Y

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: CEN17CA013
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Albuquerque, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AEROSTAR RX-8, registration: N5161Y
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The hot air free balloon was participating in the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. According to the pilot, he was approaching a vacant field for landing after a one-hour flight. The pilot approached the field from about 8 feet above the ground and the envelope impacted an unnoticed power line during landing. The pilot deflated the envelope, but the wind pulled the envelope and basket into the lines, which resulted in arcing against the uprights and frame.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's improperly planned landing, which resulted in a strike with power lines.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, Christiansen Aviation Inc., N6219D: Incident occurred September 30, 2016 at South St. Paul Municipal Airport (KSGS), Dakota County, Minnesota

CHRISTIANSEN AVIATION INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6219D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, EXPERIENCED AN ELECTRICAL FIRE, SOUTH SAINT PAUL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, SOUTH SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA. 

Date: 30-SEP-16
Time: 19:12:00Z
Regis#: N6219D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SOUTH SAINT PAUL
State: Minnesota

JetBlue, Airbus A320-200, N506JB: Incident occurred October 01, 2016 in Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N506JB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Greensboro FSDO-39

JETBLUE AIRLINES FLIGHT JBU1348 AIRBUS A320 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE NEAR WILMINGTON, NC, 3-4 PERSONS ON BOARD SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT REAGAN NATIONAL AIRPORT, WASHINGTON, DC

Date: 01-OCT-16
Time: 01:18:00Z
Regis#: JBU1348
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: None
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: JBU-JetBlue Airways
Flight Number: JBU1348
City: WILMINGTON
State: North Carolina

Beech C17L, N15846: Incident occurred October 01, 2016 in Salina, Saline County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N15846

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR SALINA, KANSAS.  

Date: 01-OCT-16
Time: 14:40:00Z
Regis#: N15846
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 17
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SALINA
State: Kansas

Volairecraft 10A, N6666D: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 at Mandan Municipal Airport (Y19), Morton County, North Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N6666D

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA004 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Mandan, ND
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: VOLAIRCRAFT 10A, registration: N6666D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot stated that, while on final approach for landing, the airplane encountered turbulence on final approach that “pushed the plane down.” The airplane landed short of the runway, the student egressed, and the airplane subsequently caught fire and was destroyed. The student pilot reported that there were no mechanical problems before the accident; there were no witnesses. Visual examination of the wreckage revealed that the fuel/gascolator line had ruptured during impact, resulting in the postimpact fire. The local weather at the time of the accident included wind from 130° at 3 knots, and the smoke was observed billowing straight up from the fire; indicating calm to light wind at the time of the accident. It is likely that the student pilot failed to maintain a proper approach path during the landing approach, which resulted in the airplane impacting terrain short of the runway. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s failure to maintain the proper approach path on landing, which resulted in impact with terrain short of the runway. 

On October 2, 2016, about 1557 central daylight time, a Volaircraft 10A airplane, N6666D, registered to the student pilot, was destroyed by post impact fire after it landed short of runway 13 at the Mandan Municipal Airport (Y19), Mandan, North Dakota. The student pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight had originated from Y19.

According to local respondent authorities, the airplane landed short of the runway and skidded to a stop beside the paved runway surface. After the student pilot exited uninjured, the airplane caught fire and was destroyed. The student pilot did not report any mechanical problems prior to the event and there were no witnesses. On NTSB Form 6120, the student pilot stated that he encountered turbulence on final approach and pushed the airplane downward. He stated that a fuel line ruptured upon impact and sparks ignited, resulting in a post-impact fire. There were three distinct ground impressions in a grassy area just prior to the paved runway threshold. The impressions correlated with the fixed landing gear of the aircraft.Visual inspection of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed that the fuel/gascolator line had ruptured during the impact. 

The reported local weather at the time of the accident was: Wind 130 at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, temperature 22 C, dew point 13 C, altimeter 29.92. Soon after the accident when the aircraft was still on fire, a photo was taken of the accident scene by first responders. The photo shows billowing smoke going straight up from the fire. the photo is included in the public docket for this case file.


According to the FAA and the pilot's submitted NTSB Form 6120, the student pilot reported a total of 20 hours of total flight time, all of which were flown in the accident airplane.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA004
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Mandan, ND
Aircraft: VOLAIRCRAFT 10A, registration: N6666D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 2, 2016, about 1557 central daylight time, a Volaircraft 10A airplane, N6666D, registered to the pilot, was destroyed by post impact fire after it landed short of runway 13 at the Mandan Municipal Airport (Y19), Mandan, North Dakota. The student pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight had originated from Y19.

According to local respondent authorities, the airplane landed short of the runway and skidded to a stop beside the paved runway surface. After the pilot exited uninjured, the airplane caught fire and was destroyed. The pilot did not report any mechanical problems prior to the event and there were no witnesses.

MANDAN, N.D. - A 73-year-old Flasher man walked away from a plane crash in Mandan Sunday afternoon.

The North Dakota Highway Patrol says Rodney Ritz tried to land on the north end of a runway at the Mandan Municipal Airport.

The plane ended up landing short of the runway and a wheel deflated.

The plane skidded on its belly along the runway and caught fire once it stopped.

Ritz was able to escape without any injuries.

Cessna 182K, Culp Farms Inc., N2508Q: Accident occurred September 30, 2016 in Rensselaer, Marion Township, Jasper County, Indiana

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

CULP FARMS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2508Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN16CA390
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 30, 2016 in Rensselaer, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N2508Q
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private rated pilot conducted a local pleasure flight and returned to a private grass airfield. He reported that he had poles located at the end of the runway, to help establish the runways' s center line and that there was a field of standing corn on the left side of the runway. He added that during the landing he was slightly left of the runway centerline and should have executed a go-around. The airplane's left wingtip impacted the corn and the airplane continued left into the corn, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. Examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the fuselage and wings.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's improper touchdown point during landing, which resulted in the left wing's subsequent impact with a cornfield.

Britten Norman BN-2A-26 Islander, New England Airlines Inc., N403WB: Incident occurred October 02, 2016 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island

NEW ENGLAND AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N403WB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boston FSDO-61

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE CONE STRUCK A DEER, WESTERLY, RHODE ISLAND.

Date: 02-OCT-16
Time: 23:05:00Z
Regis#: N403WB
Aircraft Make: BRITTEN NORMAN
Aircraft Model: BN2A
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WESTERLY
State: Rhode Island

Airborne Edge XT-912-L, N53AW: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 at Cameron Field (GA81), Fort Valley, Georgia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N53AW

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA004
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Fort Valley, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: AIRBORNE WINDSPORTS PTY LTD EDGE XT 912 L, registration: N53AW
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the flight instructor in the weight-shift-control aircraft, he made two low approaches and two go-arounds to runway 36. He reported that, during the third approach, he crossed the runway threshold and “rounded up” and that the left wing “flew up, and the right wing dropped precipitously, as if it stalled.” The aircraft swiftly yawed to the right and descended rapidly, and the pilot stated that he responded with a full control deflection. He added that the deflection leveled the aircraft just before impact with the turf and that the aircraft heading was about 35° to 50° right of the runway heading. The aircraft sustained substantial damage to both wings and the airframe.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Safety Inspector examined the aircraft wreckage and was unable to locate the right overcenter washout strut spilt ring. The split ring connects the washout strut and the leading edge of the right wing spar, which allows the pilot to manipulate the aircraft’s directional control. In postimpact photographs of the left side overcenter washout strut split ring, it appears to be partially attached, and the right side split ring was not located in the wreckage. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the aircraft’s right overcenter washout strut split ring, which resulted in the pilot’s inability to maintain lateral control of the aircraft and subsequent ground impact.

Rockwell International 114, N4743W: Incident occurred October 01, 2016 in Waco, McLennan County, Texas

TROJAN AIR INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4743W

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, WACO, TEXAS 

Date: 01-OCT-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N4743W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WACO
State: Texas

American Airlines, Airbus A321-200, N575UW: Incident occurred October 02, 2016 at Orlando International Airport (KMCO), Orange County, Florida

AMERICAN AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N575UW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT AAL1786 AIRBUS A321 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON FINAL TO RUNWAY, SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE UNDER THE WINDSCREEN, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE MINOR, ORLANDO, FLORIDA.

Date: 03-OCT-16
Time: 01:20:00Z
Regis#: AAL1786
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Aircraft Operator: AAL-American Airlines
Flight Number: AAL1786
City: ORLANDO
State: Florida

Piper PA-28 Cherokee, N5196L, registered to Tohijoco LLC and operated by Coyote Flight: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Clarendon, Donley County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Registered Owner: Tohijoco LLC


Operator: Coyote Flight


http://registry.faa.gov/N5196L

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA010 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Clarendon, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N5196L
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was conducting a cross-country personal flight. The student pilot reported that, while in cruise flight, the single-engine airplane lost power. He then performed a forced landing to a field, during which the wings and firewall were damaged. 

Examination of the engine revealed damage consistent with lubrication distress. Further, a cylinder piston pin was found broken, and metal was found in the oil pickup screen and in the oil filter, which had recently been changed. It is likely that the degraded piston pin was the source of the metal in the oil, which clogged the oil inlet screen and reduced the amount of oil available to the engine and resulted in the loss of engine power. A nonmechanic had performed preventative maintenance and changed the oil and oil filter shortly before the accident. He reported that he noticed the metal in the filter but did not consider it to be an indication of a problem.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of a cylinder piston pin, which resulted in an obstructed oil inlet screen, reduced the amount of oil available to the engine, and led to the subsequent loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the failure of the nonmechanic, who had recently changed the oil and oil filter, to recognize that metal in the filter was indicative of a problem.

On October 2, 2016, about 1520 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N5196L, was damaged during a forced landing near Clarendon, Texas. The student rated pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was to Tohijoco LLC and operated by Coyote Flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated under visual flight rules flight following. The cross-country flight departed the Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA), Amarillo, Texas, at 1405 and was en route to the Childress Municipal Airport (CDS), Childress, Texas.

The pilot reported to the responding FAA inspector that while in cruise flight the engine lost power and he performed a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane's wings and firewall were damaged.

The airplane was transported to the operator's facility for an examination. The engine was examined under the auspices of an Federal Aviation Administration inspector. The examination noted damage to the engine was consistent with lubrication distress. Further examination of the engine found the metal oil screen pickup fouled with metal. The source of the metal was from a broken piston pin.


During the examination, it was discovered that the engine's oil and oil filter had recently been changed. The oil filter, which had been removed, was examined and metal was found in the filter. A non-mechanic rated person performed preventative maintenance, changed the oil and oil filter prior to the accident. During the oil change, he noticed the metal, but did not consider this to be an indication of a problem.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA010
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Clarendon, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N5196L
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 2, 2016, about 1520 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N5196L, was damaged during a forced landing near Clarendon, Texas. The student pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by Coyote Flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated under visual flight rules flight following. The cross country flight departed the Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA), Amarillo, Texas, at 1405 and was en route to the Childress Municipal Airport (CDS), Childress, Texas.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight the engine stopped producing power and he performed a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane's wings and firewall were damaged.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Cessna R172K Hawk XP, N736LZ: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Rosamond, Kern County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms  

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N736LZ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: WPR17CA001
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Rosamond, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA R172K, registration: N736LZ
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot/owner and three non-pilot acquaintances decided to use the airplane to fly to another airport for lunch. The pilot had owned and operated the airplane about 10 years, and reported a total time of about 550 hours in that make and model. His normal procedures included hangaring the airplane, and using a yoke-mounted iPad "mini" for in-flight information. The outbound flight was uneventful. After landing, the pilot installed the flight control lock in the pilot-side yoke shaft. After lunch, the four persons returned to the airplane for the return trip. The pilot reported that the preflight inspection and taxi out to the run-up area were normal, but during the before-takeoff check process there, he noticed that the two fuel tank gauges indicated different quantities from one another, which was unusual for the high wing airplane. The pilot decided to interrupt the before-takeoff check process, shut down the engine, and physically "stick" the tanks to accurately determine the total fuel quantity. After the pilot measured the fuel quantities, which he determined were satisfactory, he re-boarded the airplane, re-started the engine, and taxied from the run-up area onto the runway for departure. The airplane lifted off about half-way down the 3,600 foot runway, but when it was at an altitude of about 20 feet above the ground, it stopped climbing. The pilot "immediately recognized something was wrong," aborted the departure, and the airplane landed on the remaining runway. The pilot was unable to stop the airplane on the runway, and it sustained substantial damage to the fuselage as a result. None of the occupants were injured. After the accident, the pilot determined that he had left the control lock in for the takeoff. The pilot reported that he normally used the airplane manufacturer's checklists on all his flights, including this one, but the evidence in this event contradicts that account. The manufacturer's checklists explicitly specified that the flight controls be checked for freedom of travel during two separate pre-departure phases; the walk-around preflight inspection, and the before-takeoff operational checks. For undetermined reasons, the pilot omitted those items from both of those phases, and deprived himself of two opportunities to detect the presence of the control lock. Investigation revealed that the manufacturer-issued control lock had been installed backwards by the pilot, which prevented it from accomplishing one of its primary design functions, that of inhibiting pilot access to the ignition switch. Further investigation revealed that the pilot rarely used the control lock due to the fact that he hangared his airplane, and that he was unaware that he had installed it backwards. The yoke-mounted iPad limited the pilot's view of the installed control lock, which reduced the potential for visual detection. The pilot reported that the winds were "light," which reduced the likelihood of the need for flight control inputs on the ground during taxi, and thus deprived the pilot of another opportunity for detection of the locked controls. Finally, after his impromptu physical check of the fuel quantity, the pilot did not re-commence the interrupted before-takeoff checklist from the beginning, and thus missed another opportunity to detect the locked flight controls.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper use of the control lock, combined with his incomplete execution of two pre-departure procedures, which resulted in a takeoff with the control lock installed.

Mooney M20R Ovation, N79339: Incident occurred October 02, 2016 in Robstown, Nueces County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N79339

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, SUSTAINED BIRDSTRIKES TO THE WING LEADING EDGE, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, ROBSTOWN, TEXAS 

Date: 02-OCT-16
Time: 18:50:00Z
Regis#: N79339
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: ROBSTOWN
State: Texas

Piper PA-31P-350 Mojave, N9231Y LLC, N9231Y: Incident occurred September 30, 2016 at Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

N9231Y LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9231Y

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY INTO THE ROCKS, DEER VALLEY, PHOENIX, ARIZONA.  

Date: 30-SEP-16
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N9231Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA31P
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PHOENIX
State: Arizona

Canadian pilots no longer have to fly real aircraft to keep valid licenses

Canadian pilots are no longer obligated to fly an aircraft or helicopter in order to maintain a valid license after Ottawa changed the rules to require only flight-simulator testing, a move aviation experts say threatens public safety.

The sweeping rule change puts Canada at odds with the United States and European Union, which still compel pilots to meet stringent standards to keep their licenses valid, including a requirement to actually fly a plane.

Until now, Canadian airline pilots could not legally fly an aircraft unless they acted as a captain or co-pilot within the previous five years or completed a flight review with an instructor and met other licensing standards. Private pilots also had to meet similar requirements including takeoff and landings within a set period.

The Canadian Federal Pilots Association, which represents all federal aviation inspectors, called the rule change “reckless.”

The association said it will dilute pilot-training skills and put the flying public at risk.

“It affects all pilots and assures all pilots can maintain pilot currency and never fly an airplane or helicopter again,” said Greg McConnell, CFPA national chair. “If you had a heart issue, would you go and see a heart surgeon that hadn’t operated in five years? There are real safety concerns here.”

Mr. McConnell said flight-simulator tests are part of the licensing requirement for pilots but should not be the only qualifier to keep their licenses valid and current.

“I have flown many simulators. I never felt I was going to die in a simulator, but in a real airplane, you know that is a possibility,” he said. “There is so much stuff that gets missed when you are not actually manipulating the controls of an airplane. … There is a whole host of skills you don’t exercise in a simulator.”

Transport Minister Marc Garneau did not appear to know about the rule change, signed off on by Transport Canada on Aug. 23, when approached by The Globe on Friday, but said he was confident his department would not do anything to jeopardize air safety.

“I am sure it has been done based on a serious look at what is important for our pilots to do,” he said.

Transport Canada issued a statement to The Globe saying the move will make pilot training more “cost effective and efficient” and will “also reduce greenhouse gas emissions.” It argued public safety was not at risk.

“Simulators offer pilots a realistic environment that accurately replicates the cockpit and electronic equipment and provides flight and ground-handling capabilities identical to those in an aircraft,” the statement said.

Mr. McConnell said Transport Canada made the rule change with “zero consultation” from the industry, largely to save money and protect the department from violating the rules established to ensure safety in air travel.

Many of Transport Canada’s aviation inspectors, who are licensed pilots, are not able to keep their licenses current because Conservative spending cuts imposed in 2011 curtailed their ability to fly government aircraft. He believes the department changed the rules to ensure federal aviation inspectors maintain the proper credentials.

A CFPA survey of licensed aviation inspectors, conducted in April, found that about half have not been assigned flight training for more than a year and one in 10 has not been assigned to flight training for up to 10 years or more.

“With the stroke of a pen, Transport Canada has devised a work-around so their own pilots comply with Canadian Aviation Regulations,” Mr. McConnell said. “Aviation inspectors who are pilots are becoming like traffic cops without a driver’s license. This situation undermines public safety and inspectors’ credibility with the industry they are supposed to oversee.”

The Transportation Safety Board has raised concerns about aviation inspector training, most recently in its investigation report on the crash of an Ornge medical evacuation helicopter in Northern Ontario.

Source:  http://www.theglobeandmail.com

House Hunting By Plane Taking Off In San Francisco Bay Area Luxury Real Estate Market: Michael Repka, CEO and General Counsel of DeLeon Realty (with video)

ATHERTON (KPIX 5) — The high-priced, luxury Bay Area real estate market is soaring for some Bay Area realtors… literally.

They give many of their foreign buyers an aerial view of their most exclusive properties, from 2,500 feet above the ground in a Cirrus SR20 plane.

Michael Repka, CEO and General Counsel of DeLeon Realty, says the view from above is a valuable tool, especially for buyers who live abroad.

“They don’t know if they want to be in L.A. or the San Francisco Bay Area, or elsewhere — we really are selling the area, not just the home,” he says.

DeLeon Realty bought a brand new, half-million dollar plane to cater to big spenders mostly from China, India and Dubai. It’s the first Bay Area real estate company to do so.

House hunting by plane has taken off particularly in Asia in the last few years. Here in the Bay Area, business has been so big, CEO Michael Repka uses the plane almost weekly.

He’s even getting his pilot’s license.

“It will make it even more intimate experience for our clients because I’ll be able to do the narration with them while I’m flying the plane at the same time,” he says.

On KPIX 5’s tour over the posh mansions on the Peninsula, we spotted endless tennis courts, glitzy pools and vineyards.

One of the highlights was seeing Bay Area landmarks. Flying toward the San Francisco skyline gives a picture perfect view of Bay Bridge.

San Francisco luxury realtor and Bravo’s Million Dollar Listing star Justin Fichelson recently added helicopter tours to his complimentary services.

“Especially with luxury real estate there is no end to what you can do,” says Fichelson. “You constantly want to be innovative and creative in new services, especially because it’s a competitive industry.”

For example, a 23,000-square foot Atherton Avenue home sits on 2.5 acres is for sale for $39 million. Prospective buyers Ed Baalbaki and Susan Dahi from Hillsborough are looking for a grand estate with privacy. They’re taking the full tour so they can see it from all vantage points.

“By being in the air you get to see pretty much everything around you which normally you don’t get to see it when you just walk into a house like this and you don’t know. So I think it was a big, big help to do that,” says Baalbaki.

“We want to make sure that the location of the house, that it’s in a good location, considering how close we are to El Camino or the freeway and also how the neighboring houses, if they are well taken care of” adds Dahi.

The home boasts a theater room, a high-end wine cellar, pools, a guest house, state-of-the-art kitchens, and a walk-in closet that’s bigger than some studio apartments.

So how does it look from the air?

“You suddenly see a whole other world,” says Fichelson. “Everyone has these big lots and backyards that you just can’t see from the street. Frankly, on Atherton Avenue a lot of the houses you can’t even see from the street so seeing it from the air it really puts it into perspective.”

It also saves time, when it comes to narrowing down where clients will drop their cash.

Baalbaki agrees.

“I think that’s probably the best way to put it. You want to see 10 homes and sometimes you just waste your time driving all the way there and you really didn’t like the area. Versus in a helicopter you can see it in a few minutes.”

Story and video:  http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, Hageland Aviation Services dba Ravn Connect, N208SD: Fatal accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Togiak, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Pratt & Whitney Canada; Montreal, MB
Hageland Aviation Services, Inc.; Anchorage, Alaska
Hartzell Propellers; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N208SD

NTSB Identification: ANC17FA001
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Togiak, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration: N208SD
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 2, 2016, about 1154 Alaska daylight time, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B Grand Caravan airplane, N208SD, sustained substantial damage after impacting steep, mountainous, rocky terrain about 12 miles northwest of Togiak, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as flight 3153 by Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., dba Ravn Connect, Anchorage, Alaska, as a scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 and visual flight rules (VFR). All three people on board (two commercial pilots and one passenger) sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the Togiak Airport, Togiak, and company flight following procedures were in effect. Flight 3153 departed Quinhagak, Alaska, at 1133, destined for Togiak.

Earlier, flight 3153 had originated in Bethel, Alaska; made scheduled stops in Togiak and Quinhagak; and was scheduled to return to Togiak before returning to Bethel, the intended final destination for the day. 

According to the director of operations for Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., about 1214, he received a notification from the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) that it received a signal from a 406 megahertz (MHz) Emergency Location Transmitter (ELT), which activated about 1208 and was registered to N208SD. After accessing the aircraft location data provided by an on-board flight tracking system and discovering the aircraft had been stationary for about 20 minutes, the Hageland director of operations contacted the Hageland Operational Control Center (OCC) in Palmer, Alaska, to verify the information. At that time, the operator initiated a company search for the airplane.

At 1326, the Alaska State Troopers (AST) were notified by the RCC personnel of an ELT activation near the village of Togiak, within the confines of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. 

Shortly before 1430, an AST helicopter was dispatched from Dillingham, Alaska, about 67 miles east of Togiak, to the coordinates associated with the ELT signal, but poor weather conditions kept the searchers from locating the accident airplane until about 1630. Alaska State Troopers were able to access the scene on foot shortly before 1730 and subsequently confirmed there were no survivors. 

On October 3, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with another NTSB investigator and two Alaska State Troopers reached the accident site. The airplane's fragmented wreckage was located on the southeast side of a steep, loose rock-covered mountainside, adjacent to the Quigmy River, about 12 miles northwest of Togiak. 

An area believed to be the initial impact point was discovered on the northwest side of a mountain ridgeline at the 2,300-foot level. The initial impact point was located north of and about 200 feet below the 2,500-foot mountain summit. The initial impact point contained fragmented portions of fuselage and two severed propeller blades. From the initial impact point, the wreckage path extended southeast to the main wreckage, which was located downslope on the southeast side of the ridgeline at the 1,550-foot level. The outboard portion of the left wing had separated and was located about 200 feet further downslope below the main wreckage site. A postcrash fire incinerated a large portion of the fuselage and right wing.

The airplane was equipped with a Spidertracks flight tracking system, which provides real-time aircraft flight tracking data. The flight tracking information is transmitted via Iridium satellites to an internet-based storage location at 6-minute intervals. According to the Spidertracks data, the airplane's last known location was reported at 1153, about 19 nautical miles northwest of the Togiak Airport, at an altitude of 1,043 feet, traveling at 144 knots across the ground, on a heading of 140 degrees.

At 1156, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Togiak Airport (the closest weather reporting facility) reported, in part: wind calm; visibility 7 statute miles; light rain; sky condition, scattered clouds at 3,900 feet, overcast at 4,700 feet; temperature 45 degrees F, dewpoint 43 degrees F; altimeter, 29.88 inHg.

A detailed wreckage examination is pending. 

The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney PT6 series engine.
       




BETHEL – The Ravn Connect plane that crashed Oct. 2 was on an unusual route over the mountains between the Southwestern Alaska villages of Quinhagak and Togiak — a connection that only exists because of a U.S. Postal Service program that subsidizes the cost of air freight in rural Alaska.

It's a route that other air carriers didn't want. Yute Air, with smaller planes, considered it too risky. Grant Aviation, which flew it about a year before Ravn took over, says it didn't pay off.

Operators of stores that benefit from the postal subsidy say the routing doesn't work for them, either. Often, planes cannot fly over the mountains at all because of weather, which, in Quinhagak, means the shelves at the village store go empty.

The Postal Service designated Togiak as a hub for Quinhagak's goods in April 2014 to save money.

"That's something that the Post Office created," said Susan Hoshaw, director of cargo services for Everts Air Cargo. Once Togiak became a hub, Everts began transporting freight there twice a week direct from Anchorage in its big, Douglas DC-8s, she said. From there, Ravn picks up the goods for the rest of the journey to Quinhagak as part of the Alaska bypass mail program.

Before the federal agency acted, there was no regular commercial traffic between the two communities, according to air carriers. And there still aren't regularly scheduled passenger flights, though passengers can travel on the same small planes with the cargo.

The bypass mail isn't mail at all but rather bulk shipments – mainly groceries – going to rural villages and, as the name implies, bypassing the regular U.S. mail delivery system.

It's an expensive and controversial subsidy that dates to the 1970s, which supporters defend as the Alaska equivalent of government-funded highways. The lucrative bypass program, mandated by Congress, not only brings goods to Bush villages, it also keeps fares lower for passengers who otherwise often have no other way in or out.

So far this year, the service says it has delivered more than 83 million pounds of bypass mail across Alaska – and has lost almost $81 million doing so.

"Transporting mail to customers and post offices in remote areas of Alaska is a part of the Postal Service's universal service obligation," John Friess, a Denver-based spokesman for the agency, said in an emailed response to questions.

The route at issue is over the Ahklun Mountains, a far western range with small glaciers that are rapidly disappearing.

On Sunday, a Cessna 208B Caravan slammed into a nearly 2,500-foot peak near a GCI cell tower on what's known locally as Caribou Ridge, killing the two pilots and sole passenger on the flight from Quinhagak to Togiak.

The Ravn plane was operating under visual flight rules. When Alaska State Troopers arrived at the crash site later on Sunday, it was initially so foggy that they couldn't see the crumpled and charred fuselage.

Ravn officials have not answered questions about the purpose of the flight or the routing.

No mail was on the flight, according to the service. The plane was heading to Togiak to pick up store goods for a return trip to Quinhagak, according to Warren Jones, president of Qanirtuuq Inc., the village corporation that owns the Quinhagak store.

Back in 2014, the community of Quinhagak was caught unaware when the service decided to switch its freight hub, he said. Residents petitioned the service to keep it in Bethel, Jones said. Bethel still serves as the freight staging area for numerous other Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta villages.

"The move has cost us thousands of dollars because when the weather is bad, we don't get groceries," Jones said recently. "Our shelves are empty. We don't sell any of it."

Sometimes goods sit so long they run past their expiration date. Frozen chicken wings may arrive in what looks like a thawed-then-refrozen block, Jones said.

The service sent a representative to Quinhagak for a community meeting, but stuck with Togiak.

"All of a sudden we went from having three air carriers competing in hauling all the bypass mail from Bethel to Quinhagak to having one out of Togiak," said Dan Knesek, Yute Air's operations director.

After the community meeting, the service looked into the delivery concerns and made recommendations about product-ordering cycles, Friess said.

The Alaska Commercial Co., which runs the Togiak store, says the arrangement doesn't benefit its operation either.

Before, planes flew first to Dillingham, then went to Togiak. Dillingham, the hub for Bristol Bay, gets much more air traffic than Togiak, a village of about 800 people, so goods were assured of at least making it there, said Walt Pickett, AC's vice president of operations. It was a convenient staging area for the short flight to Togiak.

"We had absolutely nothing to do with it," he said of the change. "We didn't solicit it with the Post Office. We didn't solicit it with the Department of Transportation."

'A rough route'

While Togiak is in the Bristol Bay region, Bethel and Quinhagak are tightly connected Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta communities. The route between them is over low tundra. There are multiple passenger flights a day. Quinhagak still gets regular mail through Bethel. Alaska Native organizations based in Bethel serve Quinhagak.

"To get to Quinhagak is just always a challenge for us because it's on the Bethel side of the world," said Susanna Henry, the Dillingham-based manager of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. "We nearly always have to charter or go through Anchorage."

Quinhagak and Togiak are only about 72 miles apart, but the route is challenging.

"If you ever flew between these mountains there are some areas where the plane starts hitting every turbulence," Jones said. Look out the windows and "there are mountains on both sides."

Yute Air, with its six-passenger Cessna 207s compared to Ravn's bigger nine-passenger 208s, decided not to compete for postal business to Quinhagak.

"For us flying the 207s, we didn't want to do the route for safety reasons," Knesek said. The weather can turn marginal fast. "It's a rough route."

Plus, the route didn't attract passengers, he said.

Grant Aviation originally flew bypass mail between Togiak and Quinhagak but the company says the route wasn't profitable.

"All the passenger flow to Quinhagak comes from Bethel," said Bruce McGlasson, one of Grant Aviation's owners. "The Togiak-to-Quinhagak route was so inefficient that we just couldn't afford to fly it."

Ravn doesn't list Togiak as one of its destinations on its website. If someone from the Bethel region wants to go there, a reservation agent said Ravn puts the person on a list and calls when the next mail plane is headed that way.

Quicker to Togiak

Flight 3153 originated in Bethel, then flew to Quinhagak to pick up Louie John, a Bristol Bay fisherman from Manokotak near Dillingham. The afternoon of Oct. 2, it took off for Togiak. Besides John, Ravn pilots Timothy Cline, 43 of Homer, and Drew Welty, 29 of Anchorage, were killed in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board expects to release a preliminary report on the crash Tuesday.

While Togiak is a bypass mail hub, Quinhagak is the only Bush village served out of it, according to the service. Shippers must send at least 1,000 pounds to get the discounted postal rate of about $375 for that size load. The service, not the shippers or the retailers, then must pay the air carriers.

The savings come because agency was able to delete the Dillingham leg on the way to Togiak. That eliminates the expense of a separate small plane trip between Dillingham and Togiak.

"Togiak mail is now transported from the acceptance point in Anchorage directly to Togiak on more efficient mainline equipment rather than Bush aircraft which reduces transportation costs for the Postal Service," Friess said in an emailed response to questions.

Togiak alone, with about 800 people, didn't have enough goods to support the cargo flight, according to air carriers. But with goods for the village of Quinhagak and its 700 residents on the same plane from Anchorage, the arrangement penciled out.

Goodnews Bay is much closer to Togiak, but it's smaller and didn't have enough cargo, Knesek of Yute Air said.

Friess couldn't provide information on how much is saved by the routing.

Back in 2010 when the change was being proposed, the service projected it would save almost $800,000 a year.

Source:   https://www.adn.com Flight #3153 Operated by Hageland Aviation Services d.b.a. Ravn Connect: https://www.flyravn.com

ICECAP LLC TRUSTEE:  http://registry.faa.gov/N208SD


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


N208SD HAGLAND AVIATION FLIGHT HAG8SD CESSNA 208B AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO TERRAIN, THE 3 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE FATALLY INJURED, 12 MILES FROM TOGIAK, ALASKA


Date: 02-OCT-16

Time: 21:53:00Z
Regis#: N208SD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 208
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Substantial
Activity: On Demand
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: HAG-Hageland Aviation Services
City: TOGIAK
State: Alaska

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) – Alaska authorities have released the names of two pilots who died in a weekend crash of a commercial flight in southwest Alaska.

Alaska State Troopers say 43-year-old Timothy Cline of Homer and 29-year-old Drew Welty of Anchorage were killed Sunday in the crash of a Cessna 208B operated by Hageland Aviation.

Also killed in the crash was 49-year-old passenger Louie John of Manokotak. The men were the only three on board the aircraft.

The Cessna was on 70-mile flight to Togiak from Quinhagak when it crashed on a mountainside 12 miles northwest of Togiak.


The crash site has been described by troopers as steep and challenging.



Alaska State Troopers have identified the passenger killed in Sunday's crash of a Ravn Connect flight near Togiak.


Manokotak resident Louie John, 49, was killed when the Hageland Aviation Cessna 208B en route from Quinhagak to Togiak slammed into a mountainous area northwest of Togiak between 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The pilot and a co-pilot also died in the crash.


Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said Wednesday that all three bodies have been recovered from the aircraft, which National Transportation Safety Board investigators said was "highly fragmented" in the crash. Although troopers believe that relatives of the pilot and co-pilot have been notified by Ravn, troopers haven't been able to contact them directly because they may be en route to Alaska.


"We haven't verified that any law enforcement has done the next-of-kin notification," Peters said. "We're still trying to track them down so we can make sure that they know."


Ravn issued a statement Tuesday afternoon offering condolences to the families of those killed in the crash of Flight 3153. The company said its priorities since the crash have included working with "family and friends involved," as well as agencies investigating the crash.


"While Alaska is the largest state in the union, it still has the connectedness and heart of a small community, so these losses are far-reaching and felt deeply," Ravn Group chair and CEO Bob Hajdukovich said in the statement.


Ravn officials weren't immediately available Wednesday morning to say whether the company had notified the pilot and co-pilot's next of kin.








ANCHORAGE – Updated at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 5

Alaska State Troopers have identified one of the victims in Sunday’s fatal plane crash near Togiak. Louie John, 49, of Manokotak was identified as the only passenger, according to an online dispatch sent Wednesday.


“The names of the pilot and copilot will be released when verification of next of kin notification has occurred,” troopers wrote.


Update: 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 4


Alaska State Troopers say the bodies of two pilots and a passenger killed in a plane crash near Togiak have been recovered from the crash site. Their bodies were in transit to the State Medical Examiner’s office in Anchorage Tuesday.


“On behalf of the employees of Ravn Alaska I would like to offer heartfelt condolences to the communities, friends and families for those aboard flight #3153,” Ravn Air Group CEO Bob Hajdukovich said in a statement Tuesday.


The names of the deceased are being withheld until their families can be notified, troopers said. AST spokeswoman Megan Peters said Tuesday that they were still working to speak with their families.


Johnson said the plane, a Cessna 208 operated by Hageland Aviation Services, was reported missing Sunday afternoon.


“Ravn Connect — which is Hageland Aviation Services doing business as Ravn Connect — contacted us about 1:30 this afternoon indicating they had lost contact with one of their flights in between Quinhagak and Togiak,” Johnson said in a phone interview.


Troopers from Dillingham found the wreckage of the plane about 12 miles northwest of Togiak in steep, mountainous terrain, Johnson explained, adding that troopers were on the ground there before 6:45 p.m.


Johnson said two NTSB investigators were headed to the scene. They arrived Monday and “were blessed” with good weather for their investigation. He also noted the crash site was located near a cell tower, allowing investigators to communicate from the scene.


Images from the crash site show the wreckage scattered across a steep mountain side. Peters said troopers were unable to land immediately near the site, forced instead to land a helicopter roughly a half mile away and hike in to the wreckage. She said a helicopter with hoisting capabilities was chartered out of King Salmon to remove the bodies from the site.


“During the last 48 hours, our priorities have been to work with the family and friends involved as well as state and federal agencies in the recovery of the aircraft,” Jim Hickerson, President of Hageland Aviation, said in a statement Tuesday of the recovery efforts.


Another Ravn Connect flight utilizing a Hageland Aviation Services plane crashed in midair with another plane on Aug. 31. There were no survivors.


“This is the second accident for this operator, but you have to understand, we look at each one of these events on a case by case basis,” Johnson said of the two crashes. “That’s exactly what we’re doing in this case. It’s way to early to see if there’s any similarities between this accident and the other accidents that have happened with Hageland or Ravn Connect.”


Johnson touched on other crashes involving Hageland Aviation Services, after which emergency recommendations were made for an audit of their operations, as well as the Federal Aviation Administration in Alaska. He said, “to their credit,” immediately following the recommendations, Hageland and Ravn Alaska installed a state-of-the-art operation control center in Palmer.


“It’s one that Alaska has never seen the likes of,” he said of the tower.


He said the process of investigating the recent crash was in the early stages and that it would take time to determine the cause of Sunday’s crash. He said once the NTSB’s on-scene investigation concluded, the wreckage would be moved to Dillingham or Anchorage for further examination.


Quinhagak is roughly 70 miles from Togiak by air.


Source:   http://www.ktva.com


ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - WEDNESDAY MORNING UPDATE:

The passenger killed in a small plane crash near Togiak on Sunday has been identified as 49-year-old Louie John from Manokotak.

The two pilots on board the Cessna have not yet been publicly identified pending notification of their family members, troopers say.

MONDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE:
Investigators arrived today at the steep, rocky site where a Cessna 208 crashed Sunday in Western Alaska, killing all three people on board.

The crash is the second fatal accident this year for Hageland Aviation, doing business as Ravn Connect, following a deadly mid-air collision Aug. 31 near Russian Mission. The operator, along with parent company HoTH Inc., was the subject of an urgent safety recommendation by the National Transportation Safety Board surrounding a series of accidents between late 2012 and 2014.

At that time, the NTSB called on the Federal Aviation Administration to audit HoTH Inc. – a collection that represents the busiest commuter airline in Alaska and included Hageland, Frontier Flying Services and Era Aviation and does business as Ravn Alaska, Ravn Connect and Corvus Airlines. Safety investigators had found shortcomings in the implementation of operator’s risk assessment program, such as flights being approved without proper safeguards, as well as flaws in how the FAA handled oversight of the carriers.

[NTSB issues ‘urgent safety recommendation’ to improve oversight of Alaska operators]

“I have to say, since that time, Hageland and Ravn have installed a state-of-the-art control center in Palmer,” said NTSB Alaska region chief Clint Johnson. “It's one Alaska has never seen the likes of.”

HoTH Inc. and affiliated air carriers reported no flight accidents from the time the NTSB published its recommendation until the August mid-air collision with a Renfro’s Alaska Adventure Super Cub, according to a review of NTSB records.

“I believe after the audit came out, and the inspection came, the company took some very unusual steps and made some remarkable tools to reverse the trend,” said Harry Kieling, of the Alaska Aviation Safety Foundation.

The investigation into the Monday crash, meantime, is just beginning.

“We look at each one of these events on a case-by-case basis, and that's exactly what we're doing in this case,” Johnson said. “(It’s) way too early to see if there are any similarities between this accident and the other accident that happened with Hageland or Ravn Connect.”

ORIGINAL STORY

Three people are dead following a small plane crash near Togiak on Sunday afternoon, Alaska State Troopers say.

The Cessna 208 was travelling from Quinhagak to Togiak carrying three people on board, two of which were Hageland Aviation pilots, troopers wrote in a dispatch posted online.

Troopers in Dillingham were notified at around 1:26 p.m. yesterday that the plane’s emergency locator beacon had been activated. A trooper helicopter responded and successfully located the crash site about 12 miles West of Togiak. No survivors were located, troopers said.

“The National Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration have been notified and will be responding to the crash site to assist in the investigation already being conducted by the Alaska State Troopers,” troopers wrote.

According to NTSB regional chief Clint Johnson, two NTSB investigators will travel to Dillingham at daybreak on Monday. Troopers will the transport the investigators to the crash site which is located on very steep rough terrain that is only accessible by helicopter, Johnson said.

The aircraft was operated by Hageland Aviation Services doing business as Ravn Connect flight #3153, the airliner confirmed on Sunday.

As of Monday morning, authorities have not yet publicly identified the victims pending notification of family members. Efforts to recover the bodies and the wreckage will begin on Monday. Troopers say the investigation is ongoing.

Togiak is a village in Western Alaska about 130 miles south of Bethel.

Another Cessna 208 operated by Ravn was involved in a fatal mid-air collision with a Super Cub last month.

Source:   http://www.ktuu.com

Update 8:30 a.m. Monday:  National Transportation Safety Board investigators hoped Monday to reach the site of a plane crash near Togiak that killed three people Sunday afternoon.

Clint Johnson, the NTSB's Alaska chief, said two investigators – Shaun Williams and Noreen Price — reached Dillingham Sunday evening and consulted with Alaska State Troopers. They planned to fly to Togiak via helicopter Monday morning, using the village as a base of operations from which to visit the crashed Cessna 208B.


Troopers were able to initially reach the scene Sunday in steep terrain, Johnson said, by landing nearby then hiking to the site.


"They made it in via helicopter — they were contending with less-than-stellar weather conditions," Johnson said. "All we know at this point is that the wreckage is highly fragmented."


Investigators based in Washington, D.C., are collecting radar and radio data from the fatal flight, including Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast or ADS-B tracking information being transmitted by the aircraft.


Original story:  All three people aboard a Ravn Connect flight died Sunday afternoon when the aircraft they were traveling in crashed northwest of Togiak, Alaska State Troopers reported.


The Hageland Aviation Cessna 208B, operating as Ravn Connect, was carrying a pilot, a co-pilot and one passenger from Quinhagak to Togiak. Ground controllers from Hageland lost contact with the flight between 1 and 1:30 p.m., said NTSB Alaska Chief Clint Johnson.


An emergency locator transmitter was activated aboard the Cessna just before 1:30 p.m., troopers said.


Troopers reached the crash site — which Johnson said was located in "steep terrain" about 12 miles northwest of the village of Togiak in Southwest Alaska — later Sunday.


"No survivors were located," troopers said in an online dispatch.


Federal investigators with the NTSB will travel to the scene early Monday morning, Johnson said.


A statement from Ravn Alaska Sunday evening confirmed that there were two pilots and a passenger aboard the plane. The victims of the crash were not immediately identified Sunday pending notification of their families.


Just over a month ago, another Hageland flight carrying three people collided in midair near Russian Mission with a plane operated by Renfro's Alaskan Adventures. Five people were killed in that crash, which is still being investigated.


Source:   http://www.adn.com