Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III (N327PA) and Cessna 172SP Skyhawk (N2459K) -- Accident occurred May 31, 2013 in Anthem, Arizona

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-181, registration: N327PA
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N2459K
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 31, 2013, at 1003 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-28-181, N327PA, while airborne at 900 feet above ground level (agl) collided with a Cessna 172S, N2459K, that was also operating at 900 feet agl, 3 miles west of Anthem, Arizona. Both certified flight instructors (CFI’s) occupying the Piper were fatally injured, the CFI and student pilot occupying the Cessna were also fatally injured. Both airplanes impacted desert terrain in the vicinity of the collision and were destroyed. The Piper was registered to Bird Acquisitions LLC and operated by TransPac Academy, the Cessna was registered to Westwind Leasing LLC and operated as a rental airplane. Both airplanes were operated as instructional flights under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and both airplanes had company flight plans. The Cessna departed Deer Valley Airport, Phoenix, AZ at 0917 and the Piper departed the same airport at 0930.

Radar data shows two targets operating VFR (visual flight rules) about 1 mile apart. The western target was operating at 2,500 msl and 106 knots ground speed, as recorded by the radar playback. The eastern target was operating at 2,600 feet msl and 92 knots as recorded by the radar playback. The western target was on a northerly heading and made a 180 degree right turn to a southerly heading. The eastern target was also on a northerly heading and made a left turn to a southwesterly heading. Both airplanes executed their turn simultaneously. Shortly after each target completed its turn the paths of both targets intersected.

The wreckages of both airplanes were in the immediate vicinity of the radar depicted target intersection. The Piper had impacted the flat desert terrain in a flat and upright attitude. All essential components of the airplane were at the accident site. The Cessna wreckage was located 468 feet southwest of the Piper wreckage. The Cessna impacted the desert terrain vertically, imbedding the engine and propeller into the ground and the wings were crushed accordion style from the leading edges aft. The entire Cessna wreckage was consumed by a post impact fire. The vertical stabilizer and left elevator of the Cessna was located 1,152 feet north of the wreckage.




 
Margie Long 


PHOENIX -- Two of four people killed when two small planes collided in midair and crashed in the northwest Valley last week have been identified as employees of a hot air balloon company.

Hot Air Expeditions announced that its president, Margie Long, and project manager, Carl Prince, were aboard a training flight that collided with a TransPac Aviation Academy plane on Friday. The planes crashed in the desert near Carefree Highway and New River Road.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of Margie Long and Carl Prince, but know that their spirits will continue to flourish throughout the company," officials said in a press release.

Prince, 43, was an FAA-certified fixed wing pilot and had been providing flight instruction to Long since August.

According to the company's statement, Long had a passion for all things aviation and her most beloved hobby was studying to obtain her pilot's license.

Company officials said Long had a passion for community involvement and was a proud representative of the Balloon Federation of America, the Arizona Business Travel Association, and multiple Arizona-based Convention & Visitors Bureaus, among other organizations. She was a finalist for the Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce, Small Business of the Year award in 2008, 2010 and 2011.

Both Long and Prince were founding members of the nonprofit organization USA Eye Foundation.

Long, 59, is survived by two daughters.

The two planes were from flight schools based at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport, which is located near Deer Valley Road and Seventh Avenue in Phoenix. The crash occurred about 15 miles northwest of the airport.

The other two victims were flight instructors for TransPac. Paul Brownell, 37, had been a top instructor since 2005. Basil Onuferko, 26, had just started with the company and was up with Brownell on a training flight before being scheduled to take his first student the following day.

Source:   http://www.azfamily.com

Opinion/Letter: Helicopters are too dangerous

Published on Wed Jun 05 2013

Opinion/Letter

Re: Helicopters grounded after ORNGE tragedy, June 1
 

It is time to end the use of helicopters in the ORNGE rescue service. The helicopter provides dramatic appeal but is simply too dangerous for practical daily use when any other alternative is available.

Flying at night may also have been a factor in the recent loss of four lives. The service should switch to fixed-wing aircraft and daylight flying only.

The government should build runways for those communities that don’t have them. Also, more medical training and equipment should be provided to remote communities.

Edward J. Farkas, Toronto 


Source:  http://www.thestar.com/opinion/letter

Sikorsky S-76A, C-GIMY, Accident occurred May 31, 2013 in Moosonee, Ontario -Canada

Drones over Georgia (with video)

 

 FT. BENNING, Ga. -- It looks like a hobbyist's model of a single engine Piper Cub, with a four-stroke engine and an eight-foot wingspan. But researchers at Georgia Tech have loaded its cockpit with an autopilot and no small measure of artificial intelligence. 

It puts this flying machine, taking off from a red clay runway at Ft. Benning, at the forefront of drone aircraft research. At its core is a two and a half pound robotic brain, which will give this drone, or unmanned ariel vehicle, the ability to coordinate decisionmaking with other airborne robots.

"In order to make the aircraft safer and more efficient, you want the aircraft to take on more of that cognitive role," said Charles Pippin, researcher at the Georgia Tech Research Institute. "Then if they have an issue or aren't able to come up with an answer on their own, then query the human and say what should I do with this case?"

It's that disconnect between drones and humans that gives drone warfare a coldblooded quality that has drawn its critics. But among GTRI researchers, it's about saving the human lives of aircraft operators - while making them more productive strategists.

"This allows you to perform autonomy," Pippin said, while dismissing a question about whether AI can be too intelligent: "That doesn't keep me awake at night."

Researchers expect their work over the skies of south Georgia to further transform ariel warfare - and to potentially make unmanned aircraft commonplace in civilian settings.

Story and Video:   http://www.11alive.com

Vintage war aircraft grounded due to insurance costs




RENO, Nev. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- An operations official with the The Collings Foundation's Wings of Freedom Tour says the Reno – Tahoe Airport Authority has forced them to cease flying their WWII Vintage Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, Consolidated B-24 Liberator and North American P-51 Mustang from the Reno - Stead Airport due to insurance concerns. 

The group was supposed to be in town from June 3 to June 5. Visitors could explore the aircraft inside and out, and experience a 30-minute flight. They were even able to the plane for various fee levels. The airplanes still can be displayed at the airport through June 5th, but cannot offer flights of any kind.

The Collings Foundation tells News 4 they have $15 million insurance on the bombers and $500,000 per passenger. They say airport officials told them they must up their passenger insurance to $1 million. The Collings Foundation tells News 4 they obtained the $1 million insurance as requested, and then were told they must get $5 million per passenger; they cannot afford $5 million per passenger. They tell News 4 they have never had to increase their insurance at any other airport in the past.

When reached for comment Reno – Tahoe Airport Authority President & CEO Krys Bart confirmed the warbirds have been grounded. Bart confirmed it was an insurance issue, but could not confirm the exact amount of insurance that was needed because she was not in her office and did not have the paperwork available. Bart said the insurance amount is determined by the airport’s insurance underwriter.

The Collings Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit educational foundation devoted to organizing "living history" events that allows people to learn more about their heritage and history through direct participation. The Collings Foundation says Wings of Freedom Tour is in its 24th year and visits an average of 110 cities in over 35 states annually.

Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.mynews4.com

Illegal camping, campfire patrols take to sky again

If you've spotted a small Cessna circling low over the city's forested areas in recent weeks, it's likely longtime pilot and Coconino County Sheriff's Office Deputy Steve Allen.

The deputy has resumed flying with officers from the Flagstaff Police Department as the agencies partner to spot transient camps and illegal fires within city limits and across the nearby forests.

The airplane is used as a resource for ground patrols.

Once a transient camp is spotted, the location is noted and officers can go out either on foot or in an all-wheel-drive vehicle to dismantle the site and talk to the residents, if there are any.

If a campfire is spotted, police are dispatched to the location. The officers then enforce the city's fire ban.

Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://azdailysun.com

Exclusive: Pilot Flying J investigation highlights plane deal -- Records say aircraft acquired by Michigan firm

Posted June 5, 2013 at 3:56 p.m. 
 
By Josh Flory, Knoxville News Sentinel


The legal drama surrounding Pilot Flying J involves a wide cast of characters — including one with wings.

An affidavit that led to a federal raid of the Knoxville-based truck-stop chain indicates that Pilot was forced to buy a private airplane after one of its customers discovered it was being shorted on fuel rebates.

That alleged transaction, which was described in secretly recorded conversations, could come under scrutiny as prosecutors seek to make a case against Pilot executives.

The federal investigation became public in April, when FBI and IRS agents raided Pilot’s Knoxville facilities.

Two employees have subsequently pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit fraud and have agreed to assist the government in making a case against other executives.

The airplane deal allegedly involved Western Express, a Nashville trucking company that bought fuel from Pilot and discovered it had not been getting the full rebate it was due.

According to a transcript included in the government’s affidavit, John Freeman, Pilot’s vice president of sales, described how he offered to cut the company a check, but a Western official instead suggested that Pilot buy an airplane from him.

“It was so broke, the (expletive) wasn’t airworthy, so we had to sell it in Nashville,” Freeman added.

Public records provide details about a transaction that appears to match that chain of events.

According to FlightAware.com, Pilot Travel Centers in 2009 acquired a 10-seat Falcon 20 from a company called Air 1 Inc.

Air 1 had the same address as Western Express, according to state records.

Paul Wieck, the president of Western Express, said the company’s former majority owner was the one involved in the deal, but he has since died.

The records from FlightAware indicate that Pilot sold the aircraft to a Michigan company called Royal Air Freight Inc., in 2010.

A Royal Air spokeswoman said the company “wouldn’t have a comment.”

Eric Eckardt, of Florida-based Flight Source International, said his firm brokered the deal.

“That aircraft was sold to one of our clients up in (the) Detroit area,” he said.

Asked why the company bought or sold the aircraft, a Pilot spokeswoman declined to comment.

The plane transaction could be significant as prosecutors try to make the case that top Pilot executives were aware that customers were being defrauded.

The affidavit, for example, highlights a Nov. 20, 2012, diesel sales meeting at which Pilot CEO Jimmy Haslam and president Mark Hazelwood allegedly were in attendance.

According to the affidavit, Hazelwood was making a presentation to the group when someone interrupted with a reference to Freeman’s “old deal with Western.”

Hazelwood responded by saying, “We’re going to introduce him to a guy by the name of Manuel.”

The government’s affidavit alleges that “Manuel” was a shorthand reference for reducing the rebate amount due to a customer without the customer’s knowledge, a process which the affidavit said was also known as a “manual rebate.”

Mark Pickrell, a Nashville attorney whose firm does fraud and internal investigation work, said a key fact would be whether the plane was sold at its market value.

Pickrell said the plane deal “could have been an entirely appropriate transaction”, but added later that “Any time people do things in a hard way when there’s an easy way, like cutting a check, you have to wonder if something strange is going on.”

In a transcript from the affidavit, Freeman allegedly told an FBI source that it “cost us a million bucks” to resolve the Western Express issue, although he also said that “we made $6 million on the guy.”

Pickrell said prosecutors could potentially use the plane deal to try to link top executives of the company to knowledge of fraud, adding that “when you talk about private planes, you’re talking about, normally, very senior decision-makers that are involved in those decisions.”

On the other hand, he indicated there’s always a danger in linking fraudulent activity to top decision-makers.

“Within a large organization, as you go up the hierarchy, the amount of knowledge actually underlying a decision becomes less and less and less,” he said.

Haslam has denied knowledge of fraud at the company. Attorneys for Hazelwood and Freeman could not be reached for comment.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, there are four planes currently registered to Pilot Corp. — a pair of Falcon 50s made by Dassault Falcon, and two Learjets.

In addition to the government’s criminal investigation, Pilot has been hit with a wave of civil suits based on the federal allegations.


Story and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.knoxnews.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N681P

http://registry.faa.gov/N715CB

http://registry.faa.gov/N81FJ

http://registry.faa.gov/N865PC

Screening Set For Documentary About Sole Survivors Of Plane Crashes: Lexington, Kentucky

 
Jeff Garris, right, of the Lexington Fire Department, and Louis McClain, left, of the Frankfort Fire Department, look over wreckage of Comair Flight 5191 at Blue Grass Airport in Lexington, Kentucky, Tuesday, August 29, 2006. The flight crashed on takeoff August 27 after using a runway that was too short, killing 49 people.
Associated Press file/Ed Reinke / AP





Published: June 4, 2013

By Rich Copley — Herald Leader


Sole Survivor, a documentary film that includes Jim Polehinke, the co-pilot and lone survivor of the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington, will be screened July 18 at the Kentucky Theatre.

The film marks the first time Polehinke and his wife, Ida, have spoken publicly about the crash, which killed 49 people at Blue Grass Airport on Aug. 27, 2006. For the documentary, filmmaker Ky Dickens focused on Polehinke and three other sole survivors of airline crashes.

There are only 14 known sole survivors of commercial airline crashes in the world. The film seeks to illuminate that experience of those people who, for the most part, have not discussed their experiences publicly.

Polehinke is the only pilot among the survivors, and the film addresses him living with the knowledge that a National Transportation Safety Board's investigation determined that the crash was caused by pilot error.

"First of all, he would have rather died," Ida Polehinke said in a film clip that was provided last fall to WKYT (Channel 27). In a transcribed quote posted on WKYT.com, she said, "His conviction as a pilot was so great that he would have rather gone down with the ship. And that is how he felt. His heart was always with the passengers and never ever with himself. It is such an emotional cross that he bears that no one really sees but me. I wish we could convey that. And he would have given anything to have gone with all of them rather than sitting here today doing this."

The Polehinkes are featured prominently in promotion for the film, particularly a photo of the former pilot in his wheelchair, watching an airplane take off. Polehinke lost the use of both legs in the crash, and one leg was amputated below the knee. Dickens said Polehinke was the only person in the film with a significant disability as a result of a crash.

The film recounts that Polehinke keeps under his wheelchair a page from the Herald-Leader with photos and profiles of all the victims of the crash.

Sole Survivor has screened in Minneapolis and near Detroit, the sites of other crashes profiled in the film.

Dickens and film producers will attend the Lexington screening and will take questions after the film. According to the film's Facebook page, proceeds from the screening will be donated to "various foundations to support the visions and philanthropy of 5191 victims' families."

IF YOU GO

'Sole Survivor'


What: Documentary about sole survivors of commercial airline crashes that includes Jim Polehinke, a pilot in the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington in 2006

When: 7 p.m. July 18

Where: Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main St.

Tickets: $9, available in advance at Brownpapertickets.com/event/392506.

Learn more: Solesurvivorfilm.com
 

Source:  http://www.kentucky.com

NTSB Identification: DCA06MA064.

The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Scheduled 14 CFR operation of COMAIR INC
Accident occurred Sunday, August 27, 2006 in Lexington, KY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/27/2007
Aircraft: Bombardier, Inc. CRJ-100, registration: N431CA
Injuries: 49 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Safety Board's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/publictn/A_Acc1.htm. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-07/05.

On August 27, 2006, about 0606:35 eastern daylight time, Comair flight 5191, a Bombardier CL-600-2B19, N431CA, crashed during takeoff from Blue Grass Airport, Lexington, Kentucky. The flight crew was instructed to take off from runway 22 but instead lined up the airplane on runway 26 and began the takeoff roll. The airplane ran off the end of the runway and impacted the airport perimeter fence, trees, and terrain. The captain, flight attendant, and 47 passengers were killed, and the first officer received serious injuries. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and was en route to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
the flight crewmembers's failure to use available cues and aids to identify the airplane's location on the airport surface during taxi and their failure to cross-check and verify that the airplane was on the correct runway before takeoff. Contributing to the accident were the flight crew's nonpertinent conversation during taxi, which resulted in a loss of positional awareness, and the Federal Aviation Administration's failure to require that all runway crossings be authorized only by specific air traffic control clearances.


Full Narrative:  http://www.ntsb.gov

Diamond DA20 Katana - Spin

 
Published on June 4, 2013 

Smith Cub N945SP: Accident occurred June 4, 2013 in Lake Chesdin, Virginia

NBC12.com - Richmond, VA News 

CHESTERFIELD, VA (WWBT) - The plane that crashed into Lake Chesdin is out of the water, after a six-hour process. The two pilots who were riding in it, are saying prayers of thanks. 

"It's been an extremely tedious process getting this plane right-side up, and back on shore," said R.L. Dunn, who used his crane to get the plane ashore.

Dunn lives right off the lake, and is also friends with the pilots who flipped the pontoon plane, Frank Isbell and Doug Smith. Dunn rushed outside after they crashed.

"Luckily, they walked away from it…could have been worse," said Dunn.

Isbell is a veteran pilot of 37 years, but says mistakes can still happen. Isbell was trying to avoid a boat, and forgot to take up the landing gear. When the $100,000 plane hit the water, it overturned head-first.

"We got there, and it was upside down, barely sticking out of the water," said Dunn.

Both men stayed calmed, and unstrapped themselves from the plane's seat. The made it safely to the surface of the water.

"The Lord was with them. They got out. And luckily, (Isbell's) cell phone still worked, and he called for help," continued Dunn.

Officials spilled less than 15 gallons of fuel into the water, which was contained by orange booms.

Officials tested other areas of the lake, and say the water is safe.

The owner of the plane is responsible for paying for all of this clean-up. Isbell says he has insurance to cover most of it.

It is legal for a pontoon plane to land on Lake Chesdin, but the Richmond-Office FAA is still investigating the incident.




 Posted on: 9:09 pm, June 4, 2013, by Nick Dutton and Jon Burkett, updated on: 06:49am, June 5, 2013  

CHESTERFIELD, Va. (WTVR) — No one was injured after a pontoon plane crashed on Lake Chesdin in Chesterfield County Tuesday evening.

Two fishermen told CBS 6 News’ Jon Burkett that it was a frightening few seconds as they watched what happened. The pair said the plane was coming in to land just before 5:30 p.m. when the aircraft started to hit the water the plane flipped.

The fishermen said they wasted no time rushing to help the pilot, later identified by state police as 51-year-old Frank Isbell, and his passenger.

“We are ok,” said the pilot as he and his passenger floated in, one sitting on the belly side of the pontoon plane, the other hanging onto the side.

The Smith Cub fixed winged single-engine plane  was towed by good Samaritans to a nearby floating dock with a crane.  There the crane’s owner very carefully helped lift the plane out of the water.  The operation carefully calibrated the weight and size of the craft, as the plane’s wing span was about 36 feet.

The pilot and his passenger had spent most of the day at Lake Chesdin, practicing water landings and take-offs. On the 13th landing try, the plane flipped.

Johnny Mazza is good friends with what he says is an experienced pilot.  The information he gathered suggested the landing gear was down on the plane when it should’ve been up.

At sunset, police and fire crews got to the scene.  The pilot had already alerted the FAA, and Chesterfield Police alerted state troopers.

State police said the pilot failed to put the wheels of the plane up before landing and that as the plane touched down, the aircraft overturned nose first into the water.

No fuel was spilled when the plane was submerged, but hazmat crews were on standby in case any fuel is spilled when the plane was righted.

The crash remains under investigation by state police and the Federal Aviation Administration.


Story and Video:   http://wtvr.com

Local residents use crane to haul downed plane out of Lake Chesdin: http://progress-index.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N945SP

Stinson 108, N97592: Accident occurred June 4, 2013 in Elkton, Kentucky


http://registry.faa.gov/N97592

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA269 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 04, 2013 in Elkton, KY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/11/2013
Aircraft: STINSON 108, registration: N97592
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Following an uneventful full-stop landing, taxi back, and takeoff, the pilot continued around the airport traffic pattern and approached the runway for a second time, intending to perform a touch-and-go landing. The airplane subsequently touched down about one-third down the length of the runway. The pilot then increased engine power to full, and the airplane began to climb. As the airplane climbed, the pilot noted that the climb rate seemed to be slower than it was previously even though the engine appeared to be operating normally. The pilot continued the takeoff, but he then realized that the airplane would not be able to clear the trees, so he decided to land the airplane in a nearby field. During the landing, the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to serious carburetor icing at glide power settings. The pilot did not recall using carburetor heat during the approach to landing, and a postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the carburetor heat control was in the "off" position. Therefore, it is likely that the airplane's carburetor accumulated ice during the approach to landing, which resulted in the observed partial loss of engine power during the subsequent climb. The application of carburetor heat during the approach could have prevented any initial accumulation of carburetor ice, and application subsequent to that point may have melted any previously accumulated ice and restored engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to use carburetor heat during the approach to landing, which resulted in carburetor icing and a partial loss of engine power during a subsequent initial climb.

On June 4, 2013, about 1700 central daylight time, a Stinson 108, N97592, was substantially damaged during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Standard Field (5KY4), Elkton, Kentucky. The commercial pilot and passenger incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was destined for Russellville-Logan County Airport (4M7), Russellville, Kentucky. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to practice takeoffs and landings on the turf runway at 5KY4. Following an uneventful departure from 4M7 and full-stop landing at 5KY4, he taxied back, took off from runway 31, and entered the airport traffic pattern. During the next landing, the airplane touched down about one-third down the runway. Intending to perform a touch-and-go landing, the pilot increased engine power to full and the airplane began to climb back into the air.

During the climb, the pilot reported that the engine sounded normal and smooth, but that the climb rate seemed to be slower than it was previously. With about one-third of the runway remaining, the pilot confirmed the throttle position and the flap setting, and upon reaching the end of the runway, the pilot realized that "something was wrong." The pilot thought that the airplane might be able to climb above a line of trees located about 1,500 feet beyond the departure end of the runway, and he attempted to increase the climb rate by increasing the pitch angle. At an altitude of about 60 to 80 feet, and upon realizing that the airplane would not be able to clear the trees, the pilot turned the airplane left toward a field, and decreased the pitch angle.

The airplane descended and the pilot attempted to land the airplane in the soft ground of a corn field, however during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe. When speculating about the partial loss of power during the climb, the pilot stated that the engine sounded normal throughout the climb, and did not exhibit a loss of rpm. He also stated that during the approach to landing that immediately preceded the accident takeoff, he did not recall utilizing the carburetor heat, and that carburetor icing was one possible explanation for the loss of power.

The weather conditions reported at Outlaw Field (CKV), Clarksville, Tennessee, located about 16 nautical miles southwest of the accident site, at 1653, included calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility, clear skies below 12,000 feet, a temperature of 27 degrees C, a dew point of 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.99 inches of mercury. According to a carburetor icing probability chart published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the temperature and dew point conditions were conducive to the formation of serious carburetor icing at glide engine power settings.

Standard Field was comprised of a single turf runway that was 2,930 feet long by 75 feet wide at an elevation of 665 feet.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in April 2011. The pilot reported 1,033 total hours of flight experience, 3 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

An FAA inspector examined the wreckage following the accident. According to the inspector, the engine remained intact with no noted breaches of the engine case. Continuity of the valvetrain was confirmed through limited rotation of the propeller. Four of the spark plugs were examined, and each exhibited normal wear with some residual carbon buildup. The gascolator to carburetor fuel hose contained fuel that was absent of contamination, and the carburetor fuel screen was absent of debris. All of the carburetor controls remained attached and functional. The carburetor heat control was found in the "off" position and functioned normally when actuated. No evidence of any pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures of the engine was noted.

The inspector also examined the airframe and noted that the primary and secondary flight controls operated normally, and that both wing fuel tanks contained adequate fuel.

According to the manufacturer's published operating limitations, during landing, the carburetor heat control should be placed fully on if possible icing conditions exist. Given the weather conditions at the time of the accident, the published takeoff distance and climb to an altitude of 50 feet, assuming the airplane was loaded to maximum gross weight, with the wing flaps retracted, and utilizing a hard-surface runway, was about 1,800 feet.

According to the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, carburetor ice occurs due to the effect of fuel vaporization and the decrease in air pressure in the carburetor's venturi, which can cause a sharp temperature decrease in the carburetor. If water vapor in the air condenses when the carburetor temperature is at or below freezing, ice may form on the internal surfaces of the carburetor, including the throttle valve. This then restricts the flow of the fuel/air mixture and reduces engine power. Generally, the first indication of carburetor icing in an airplane with a fixed-pitch propeller is a decrease in engine rpm, which may be followed by engine roughness. Under certain conditions, carburetor ice can build unnoticed until power is added.

The handbook further described that carburetor heat is an anti-icing system that preheats the air before it reaches the carburetor, and is intended to keep the fuel/air mixture above the freezing temperature to prevent the formation of carburetor ice. Carburetor heat can be used to melt ice that has already formed in the carburetor if the accumulation is not too great, but using carburetor heat as a preventative measure is the better option.



 NTSB Identification: ERA13LA269
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 04, 2013 in Elkton, KY
Aircraft: STINSON 108, registration: N97592
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 4, 2013, about 1700 central daylight time, a Stinson 108, N97592, was substantially damaged during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Standard Field (5KY4), Elkton, Kentucky. The commercial pilot and passenger incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was destined for Russellville-Logan County Airport (4M7), Russellville, Kentucky. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to practice takeoffs and landings on the turf runway at 5KY4. Following an uneventful departure from 4M7 and first landing at 5KY4, he taxied back, took off, and entered the traffic pattern. During the next landing, the airplane touched down about one-third down the runway. Intending to perform a touch-and-go landing, the pilot increased engine power to full and the airplane began to climb back into the air.

During the climb, the pilot reported that the engine sounded normal and smooth, but that the climb rate seemed to be slower than it was previously. With about one-third of the runway remaining, the pilot confirmed the throttle position and the flap setting, and upon reaching the end of the runway, the pilot realized that “something was wrong.” The pilot thought that the airplane might be able to climb above a line of trees located about 1,500 feet beyond the departure end of the runway, and he attempted to increase the climb rate by increasing the pitch angle. At an altitude of about 60 to 80 feet, and upon realizing that the airplane would not be able to clear the trees, the pilot turned the airplane left toward a field, and decreased the pitch angle.

The airplane descended and the pilot attempted to land the airplane in the soft ground of a corn field, however during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe.

An examination of the wreckage was scheduled for a later date.



WKU alumnus Maj. Gen. Jerry D. Humble



Kentucky State Police Post 2 responded to a report of a plane crash yesterday in Todd County at approximately 5:00 p.m. 

The plane, a 1946 Stinson 108, was piloted by Todd County Circuit Court Judge Tyler Gill, who was treated and released Tuesday night at Gateway Medical Center in Clarksville, Tenn.

WKU alumnus Maj. Gen. Jerry D. Humble, was a passenger on the plane, sustained no injuries, but was still treated and released at Gateway.

According to Jerry Humble’s wife Margaret, also a WKU graduate, there was an “undetermined loss of power” on the plane’s third takeoff that caused the plane to crash in a cornfield in Elkton.

Margaret said both men were treated and released last night from Gateway Medical Center.

“Both are okay, they’re sore and a little banged up,” Humble said. “They were released last night from their respective emergency rooms and they’re just fine.”

Jerry Humble retired as a two-star general in the United States Marine Corps in 2003.

A WKU graduate of 1969, Humble was inducted into the Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2004 and serves on the W-club board of directors. In 1996, he was recognized by the National Sigma Chi fraternity headquarters as a significant Sigma Chi member at WKU.



ELKTON, KY (WSMV) - A Kentucky judge was injured when a small plane crashed soon after takeoff from a Todd County airport Tuesday afternoon. 

 The crash was reported before 5 p.m. in the area of Davis Mill Road in Elkton, which is near the Standard Field Airport.

Todd County Emergency Management Director Tim Pulley said the plane didn't have enough power to ascend after takeoff, and it crashed into a nearby field, ending up on its roof.

Two people were on board, including Circuit Court Judge Tyler Gill, according to Pulley.

Gill was injured, but the other person on board - whose identity has not been released - was uninjured.

Gill was transported to Gateway Medical Center with neck pain.

No other information has been released.

Kentucky State Police and the Todd County Sheriff's Department are investigating.

Alaska Air to serve Fairbanks mostly with turboprop aircraft

Posted: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 5:14 pm
Updated: 7:26 pm, Tue Jun 4, 2013.

By Matt Buxton


FAIRBANKS — Alaska Airlines announced Tuesday that three Bombardier Q400 turboprop planes will mostly replace the Boeing 737 jets that now fly between Fairbanks and Anchorage.

The Q400s, the first propeller planes to be operated under the Alaska Airlines name in Alaska, will increase the number of flights between the state's two biggest cities and allow the 737s to be rerouted to new service between Anchorage and the Lower 48.

Alaska Airlines Regional Vice President Marilyn Romano said passengers won't notice much of a difference when the company switches to the turboprop aircraft in March 2014.

"These planes are really advanced and I think passengers are going to have a very nice travel experience," she said. "Horizon has a lot of these routes in the Lower 48. I've personally have flown on them numerous times."

The Q400s will seat 76 people and have a travel time that's nearly the same as the jet. They'll be operated by 60 Horizon Air employees who will be based out of Anchorage but will be booked and marketed under Alaska Airlines.

The turboprop planes will have outdoor boarding and will be able to be boarded at both the front and rear of the plane.

Fairbanks flyers will still have jet service on the route to Seattle, the seasonal flight to Portland, and on one 737-400 combination cargo and passenger jet flying between Anchorage and Fairbanks.

Romano said the Q400s will cheaper to operate than 737s and offer the airline better flexibility to fill schedule gaps and better cope with lower demand periods.

With flights nine months out, Romano said she couldn't comment on fares but said "our goal by doing this will be to ultimately look at lowering fares in Alaska."

The Q400s will also replace the 737 that flies to Kodiak from Anchorage twice daily seasonally from October through April.

The freed-up 737s will be used for new non-stop routes between Anchorage and Las Vegas and between Anchorage and Phoenix starting in December.

Era Alaska, which currently offers flights on turboprop planes between Anchorage and Fairbanks, did not have a comment on the announcement late Tuesday afternoon.

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