Friday, September 10, 2021

Embraer ERJ 170-100 SE, N641RW Incident occurred September 08, 2021 at Duluth International Airport (KDLH), St. Louis County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft struck a bird, landed and post flight inspection revealed damage to fuselage. 


Date: 08-SEP-21
Time: 02:33:00Z
Regis#: N641RW
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: ERJ170
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: RPA3541
City: DULUTH
State: MINNESOTA

Socata TBM-700C, N700DQ: Incident occurred September 05, 2021 at Magee Municipal Airport (17M), Simpson County, Mississippi

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aircraft landed short of the runway and struck a runway light. 

Martin Aviation LLC


Date: 05-SEP-21
Time: 12:45:00Z
Regis#: N700DQ
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TBM700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MAGEE

Cessna 172E, N3965S: Accident occurred September 02, 2021 Enterprise Municipal Airport (8S4), Wallowa County, Oregon

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho


Location: Enterprise, OR
Accident Number: WPR21LA337
Date & Time: September 2, 2021, 11:30 Local
Registration: N3965S
Aircraft: Cessna 172E
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On September 2, 2021, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172E airplane, N3965S, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Enterprise Airport, Enterprise, Oregon.The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated that that just prior to lifting the nose for takeoff, he and his passenger heard a noise and felt a bump that was different from the normal sounds made when taking off from a grass strip. After departing the airport, they visually checked the main landing gear which appeared normal. The flight to the destination airport was uneventful. The pilot reported the landing was normal, however, when the nose wheel touched down the airplane immediately veered to the left and nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, vertical stabilizer, and the rudder. Postaccident examination revealed the upper torque link for the nose wheel was fractured.

The airplane was relocated to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3965S
Model/Series: 172E 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJSY,4121 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Dug Bar, OR (OR8)
Destination: Enterprise, OR (8S4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 45.424547,-117.26465 

Bell 206L-3 LongRanger III, N6516K: Accident occurred September 08, 2021 in Tillamook, Oregon




This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Wilbur-Ellis Company Inc


Location: Tillamook, OR
Accident Number: WPR21LA338
Date & Time: September 8, 2021, 10:53 Local 
Registration: N6516K
Aircraft: Bell 206L-3
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N6516K
Model/Series: 206L-3 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural aircraft (137)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMK,37 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C /13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 45.36571,-123.64671 (est)

Enstrom F-28C, N51789: Accident occurred September 08, 2021 in Toughkenamon, , Chester County

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Location: Toughkenamon, PA
Accident Number: ERA21LA357
Date & Time: September 8, 2021, 16:48 Local 
Registration: N51789
Aircraft: Enstrom F28
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Enstrom 
Registration: N51789
Model/Series: F28 C
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: MQS,660 ft msl 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Toughkenamon, PA 
Destination: Toughkenamon, PA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.830512,-75.769754 (est)

Cessna 402C, N88833: Accident occurred September 09, 2021 at Provincetown Municipal Airport (KPVC), Barnstable County, Massachusetts

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Cape Air; Hyannis, Massachusetts 
APA - Union; Bar Harbor, Maine

Hyannis Air Service Inc operating as Cape Air


Location: Provincetown, MA
Accident Number: ERA21FA354
Date & Time: September 9, 2021, 16:00 Local 
Registration: N88833
Aircraft: Cessna 402C
Injuries: 7 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Scheduled

On September 9, 2021, about 1527 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 402, N88833, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Provincetown, Massachusetts. The pilot and the six passengers were seriously injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a scheduled passenger flight.

The flight was being operated by Cape Air (flight 2072) and was on an instrument flight rules flight plan from Boston-Logan International Airport (BOS), Boston, Massachusetts to Provincetown Municipal Airport (PVC), Provincetown, Massachusetts. The flight departed BOS about 1504. 

The pilot was cleared by air traffic control for the ILS RWY 7 instrument approach procedure into PVC. Another Cape Air pilot was holding short of runway 25, waiting for the accident airplane to land. He said the captain of accident airplane contacted him over the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency to ask if the airport lights were on. The pilot holding short responded that the lights were on, that the visibility had improved, and that the rain was subsiding.

The pilot holding short first saw the accident airplane after it had landed and was about halfway down the 3,502-ft-long runway. As the airplane got closer to his position, he could tell that it was traveling “a little faster than it should be.” The pilot could not estimate the airplane’s speed, but it was traveling faster than he would have expected, and he knew it would not have room to stop on the remaining runway. The airplane then took off and entered a slow climb. The pilot holding short said the attitude of the airplane appeared normal, but it was climbing slower than he thought it should. The airplane cleared the localizer antennas at the far end of the runway, then the perimeter fence, before it struck trees. The airplane disappeared into the trees, and he then saw a ball of flames.

A preliminary review of airport surveillance video revealed it was raining heavily at the time the accident airplane landed. As the airplane touched down on the runway, a splash of water was observed. During the landing rollout, as the airplane passed the airport’s windsock, the windsock’s movement was consistent with the airplane landing with a tailwind. The airplane then began to climb as it neared the end of the runway. The airplane entered a shallow climb and collided with trees. The airplane disappeared into the trees and shortly after a large fireball was observed.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest upright approximately 200 ft from its initial contact with the trees. A postimpact fire consumed portions of the left and right wings. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site.  The airplane was retained for further examination.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multiengine land. He also held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. In addition, the pilot held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for single and multiengine airplanes, and instrument airplane. His most-recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on April 2, 2021. The pilot reported a total of 17,617 flight hours, of which, 10,000 hours were in the Cessna 402.

The weather conditions reported at PVC at 1537 included wind from 210 degrees at 10 knots, visibility 3 miles in heavy rain and mist, few clouds at 200 ft, an overcast ceiling at 500 ft, temperature 21 degrees C, dewpoint 21 degrees C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 29.79 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N88833
Model/Series: 402C 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135), Fractional ownership
Operator Designator Code: HYIA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PVC,8 ft msl 
Observation Time: 15:37 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C /21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 200 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 500 ft AGL
Visibility: 3 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Boston, MA (BOS)
Destination: Provincetown, MA 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 6 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 7 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 42.075993,-70.211744 






PROVINCETOWN, Massachusetts  — “It’s been a tough four days,” said Cape Air founder and CEO Dan Wolf on Monday afternoon. “This is incredibly hard.”

He had just conducted a Zoom meeting for all of his employees to talk about the accident that had happened on Thursday, September 9, when Cape Air Flight 2072 from Boston attempted to land in Provincetown in a rainstorm and ended up in the woods off Race Point Road in flames.

No one was killed. The plane, one of Cape Air’s vintage Cessna 402Cs, was carrying six passengers along with the pilot, Pieter Dijkstra, 51, of Appleton, Maine. All seven escaped from the burning plane and were taken to Cape Cod Hospital. Dijkstra, along with three or four of the passengers, according to unconfirmed reports, were moved to the burn unit at Mass. General Hospital in Boston. Only one of the passengers has been identified: Autumn Kerr of Sylvania, Ohio, who was interviewed on television outside Cape Cod Hospital on the night of the accident. She said her traveling companion, whom she did not name, was still inside. Kerr suffered second-degree burns, the Cape Cod Times reported. The conditions of the pilot and the other passengers are not known.

The plane had taken off at 7:11 a.m. on September 9 from Knox County Regional Airport in Owls Head, Maine and landed at Logan Airport in Boston at 8:12 a.m., according to online flight data. It left Logan for the 25-to-30 minute trip to Provincetown at 3:04 p.m. The plane was scheduled to return to Boston and then to Knox County Regional Airport that night. The pilot’s name was reported by the Courier-Gazette in Knox County where he lives, not by Cape Air or any of the officials on Cape Cod.

Wolf would not speculate on the cause of the accident, citing an ongoing investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division. But he outlined what was known about the circumstances.

“It was about 3:30 p.m.,” said Wolf. “The pilot made the normal approach to Runway 7. He tried to abort the landing and impacted the trees at the far end of the runway. We don’t know why. It was not great weather that day — there was moderate to heavy rain. But we can’t say that weather was a contributing factor.”

Wolf’s description of the aborted landing attempt appeared to corroborate what passenger Kerr told WCVB-TV in the interview: “We were obviously not going to land and picked back up,” she said. “All of a sudden, we just hit the ground in the trees and burst into flames in the front, and then the right side burst into flames.”

Robert Katz, a corporate pilot and flight instructor in Dallas, Texas with a keen interest in airline safety, believes that the weather conditions at the time of the accident probably were a factor, along with possible poor judgment on the part of the pilot. Studying records of the weather conditions at Provincetown Municipal Airport on the afternoon of September 9, Katz said he believed that the pilot was attempting to land with a tailwind, rather than into the wind, which would have been the normal procedure.

The ceiling at the time of the flight — that is, the height of the lowest clouds — was only 200 feet, said Katz. So the pilot would have been flying entirely by instruments until he was very close to the airport.

Katz also cited the length of the Provincetown runway as a factor.

“Of all the airports Cape Air flies to, Provincetown is probably the most challenging because of the length of the runway,” he said. “It’s only 3,500 feet long — the shortest in the region.”

Katz said he thinks the pilot may have realized too late that, because of the tailwind and the runway length, he had too little runway left as he was about to touch down and decided to abort the landing and pull up.

Another factor could have been the moderate to heavy rain at the time. The Cessna 402C does not have the ability to reverse its propeller thrust to aid in slowing the plane on landing. So it must rely entirely on the brakes. In very wet conditions, braking becomes much more difficult, said Katz.

Wolf said he did not think the length of the Provincetown runway was a problem. “From a safety standpoint,” he said, “the current runway is more than adequate. It’s not a short runway for the equipment we use.”

He suggested that lengthening the runway could have undesirable effects on the Outer Cape community. “The main reason you would want a longer runway is to serve bigger aircraft,” he said. “One of the conversations we’ve had over the years in Provincetown is why we don’t have more direct service to New York. Well, be careful what you ask for. There are all kinds of community issues around that.”

The plane involved in last week’s accident was built in 1980. Cape Air is in the process of replacing its aging fleet of Cessnas with the Tecnam P2012 Traveller. The airline has purchased 25 of the new planes thus far and has options to buy 85 more. Wolf is also hoping to acquire all-electric planes when they become available.

“The reason we’re doing a fleet replacement is economic, not for safety,” he said. “The Tecnam will be much more efficient to operate.”

The WCVB-TV interview with Kerr suggested that pilot Dijkstra had acted heroically in helping her out of the burning plane. She said she was trapped in her seat, unable to undo her safety belt. “I ripped the seat out and turned it around to use it like a shield from the flames,” she said. The pilot, who had escaped from the plane, returned to help her, she said: “I think that, because we were the last, he came back and unbuckled it. He looked pretty injured because I saw him on the gurney when I went to my ambulance.”

It will likely be at least three months before the FAA and NTSB issue their official report on the cause of the accident.

Cessna A185F Skywagon 185, N4924E: Incident occurred September 08, 2021 and Accident occurred October 07, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

September 08, 2021:  Aircraft landed and veered off runway into the grass. 

NorthStar E & C LLC


Date: 08-SEP-21
Time: 18:32:00Z
Regis#: N4924E
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: A185
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: San Antonio, Texas 
Accident Number: GAA17CA013
Date & Time: October 7, 2016, 13:30 Local
Registration: N4924E
Aircraft: Cessna A185 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, while landing at a tower controlled airport, he performed a wheel landing and as the tail settled to the runway, in a "fraction of a second" the airplane was "sideways on the runway." He further reported that the airplane skidded off the runway to the right, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the right wing impacted the terrain.

The right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system at the accident airport, about two minutes before the accident, recorded the wind at 360 degrees true at 11 knots. In addition, a wind shift and frontal passage was recorded about 3 minutes before the accident. The pilot reported that he landed on runway 12 left.

The pilot submitted an additional statement, which in part stated: "1) Tower assigned a runway with a known quartering tail wind, up to 18 knots. 2) As pilot in command, I did not process the wind call out prior to landing."

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Chart Supplement, within the final approach path, a wind sock was located to the left of the runway. The flight was flown under day visual meteorological conditions, the airplane entered the pattern on a left downwind, and would have likely been visible to the pilot. However, the pilot reported that he did not observe the wind sock.

According to an Air Traffic Control transcript of tower and ground communications, the accident occurred about 3 minutes and 8 seconds after the accident airplane's initial contact with the tower, when the accident airplane reported, 3 miles east inbound. The tower responded to the initial call with, wind 010 at 18, cleared to land 12 left. 

About 40 seconds later, a ground controller held a taxiing jet stating in part: "hold out right there, we're not sure what we're going to be doing with the airport right now, [wind] 360 at 16, that's a pretty strong tailwind for you guys."

About 30 seconds later, tower directed the accident airplane to enter left downwind for 12 left and provided the landing clearance a second time for runway 12 left.

About 20 seconds later, a second airplane reported inbound and 8 seconds later was directed by tower to enter left downwind for 12 left. The airplane subsequently repeated the instruction and the tower reported wind 360 at 15.

About 25 seconds later, the second airplane requested to land runway 30 right instead of runway 12 left. The tower subsequently directed this second airplane to enter a left downwind for runway 30 left, while the accident airplane continued and landed on runway 12 left.

According to 14 CFR Part 91.3 titled, "Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command," sub bullet (a) states, "The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft."

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to recognize the tailwind condition and maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Tailwind - Decision related to condition
Environmental issues Variable wind - Effect on operation
Personnel issues Expectation/assumption - Pilot
Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - ATC personnel

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Other weather encounter
Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Commercial; Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: December 1, 2013
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: August 17, 2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 4500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4000 hours (Total, this make and model), 4500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4924E
Model/Series: A185 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18503909
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 4, 2015 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3525 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2442 Hrs as of last inspection 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-D
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 300 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSAT,809 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 18:28 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 11000 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 360° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: HOUSTON, TX (CXO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: San Antonio, TX (SAT)
Type of Clearance: VFR flight following
Departure Time: 12:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: SAN ANTONIO INTL SAT 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 809 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12L IFR 
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5519 ft / 100 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop; Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.537776,-98.474166(est)

Preventing Similar Accidents

Manage Risk: Good Decision-making and Risk Management Practices are Critical

Although few pilots knowingly accept severe risks, accidents can also result when several risks of marginal severity are not identified or are ineffectively managed by the pilot and compound into a dangerous situation. Accidents also result when the pilot does not accurately perceive situations that involve high levels of risk. Ineffective risk management or poor aeronautical decision-making can be associated with almost any type of fatal general aviation accident.

By identifying personal attitudes that are hazardous to safe flying, applying behavior modification techniques, recognizing and coping with stress, and effectively using all resources, pilots can substantially improve the safety of each flight. Remember that effective risk management takes practice. It is a decision-making process by which pilots can systematically identify hazards, assess the degree of risk, and determine the best course of action. Pilots should plan ahead with flight diversion or cancellation alternatives and not be afraid to change their plans; it can sometimes be the difference between arriving safely late or not arriving at all.

See http://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/documents/SA_023.pdf for additional resources.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs). 

Cessna A185F, N185BB: Accident occurred September 08, 2021 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KAWO), Washington

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Higher Power Aviation Inc


Location: Arlington, WA
Accident Number: WPR21LA339
Date & Time: September 8, 2021, 11:30 Local 
Registration: N185BB
Aircraft: Cessna A185F 
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On September 8, 2021, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna A185F, N185BB, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Arlington, Washington. The flight instructor, pilot rated student and passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional.

The flight instructor of a tailwheel airplane reported that, after the pilot rated student performed several landings, he assumed control of the airplane to demonstrate a wheel landing. During the landing roll to runway 16, as the tailwheel touched down, the airplane veered to the right. While attempting to correct with brake and rudder, the airplane exited the right side of the runway and ground looped to the right. The left wing and horizontal stabilizer struck the surface.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left wing, left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were substantially damaged. The tailwheel fitting spring attachment was partially fractured. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N185BB
Model/Series: A185F 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAWO,137 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 9500 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Arlington, WA
Destination: Arlington, WA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 48.16075,-122.15902