Sunday, February 3, 2019

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N1715J: Accident occurred November 14, 2018 in Presidio County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N1715J



Location: Presidio, TX
Accident Number: WPR19LA027
Date & Time: 11/14/2018, 1542 CST
Registration: N1715J
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 14, 2018, at 1542 central standard time, a Piper PA-28-140 N1715J, experienced a loss of engine power and the pilot initiated a forced landing to a dry riverbed near Presidio, Texas. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a personal cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Arlington, Texas, at an undetermined time and was destined for Presidio Lely International Airport (PRS).

The pilot reported that prior to departure, the airplane was fueled with an amount for an estimated 5 hours of flight time for the planned 3 hours and 40-minute cross-country flight from Arlington to Presidio.

About 6 miles from Presidio, the pilot reported that the engine experienced a loss of power. Unable to reach the airport, the pilot initiated a forced landing to a dry riverbed. During the approach, the airplane stalled about 20 ft above ground level and struck vegetation before touching down, coming to rest upright.

The airplane was recovered and moved to a secure storage facility for further examination.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N1715J
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPRS, 2940 ft msl
Observation Time: 2135 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 150°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Arlington, TX (GKY)
Destination: Presidio, TX (PRS)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.564167, -104.270000 (est)

Beech A36TC Bonanza, N361TC: Accident occurred December 06, 2018 at Los Banos Municipal Airport (KLSN), Merced County, California



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N361TC



Location: Los Banos, CA
Accident Number: WPR19LA039
Date & Time: 12/06/2018, 1230 PST
Registration: N361TC
Aircraft: Beech 36
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 6, 2018, at 1230 Pacific standard time, a Beech A36TC airplane, N361TC, collided with a fence following a loss of engine power while on approach for landing at Los Banos Municipal Airport (LSN), Los Banos, California. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the tail section. The airplane was privately owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Reid-Hillview Airport (RHV), San Jose, California at 1145.

According to the pilot, prior to departure from RHV he fueled the main fuel tanks and had 35 gallons of useable fuel on board. While en route, the pilot planned to practice flight maneuvers, and then practice landings at LSN. The pilot reported that he entered the downwind for runway 32, and as he made the left base turn, the engine began to sputter and lose power. The pilot turned toward the runway and tried to maintain clearance from trees located on the outside of the airport perimeter fence, however, the propeller and landing gear struck the fence. The airplane came to rest upright about 5 ft from the runway edge.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N361TC
Model/Series: 36 A36TC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCVH, 237 ft msl
Observation Time: 1235 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 28 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: San Jose, CA (RHV)
Destination: Los Banos, CA (LSN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.063889, -120.869722 (est)

Saturday, February 2, 2019

It’s time for Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (KMHT) to get creative

Closing the Deal
By Christopher Thompson 

This past week, officials from the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport reported yet another year of declining passenger traffic — the 13th consecutive year of fewer people choosing to fly out of Manchester.

As a traveler and someone who is passionate about Manchester and our great state, this really bothers me.

This is a complicated problem and has many root causes. I haven’t crunched all of the numbers, but there are a lot of factors that need to be considered.

It could be that fewer people are traveling, but I don’t think that’s the case. The airport did cite a decline in Southwest passengers as a major contributor.  Southwest is the largest airline at the airport.

One of the biggest challenges the airport has is that it is at the mercy of the airlines. If an airline decides to reduce flights out of Manchester, then the airport feels the impact of that decision in a big way.

But while that’s a challenge, I believe it’s also one of its biggest opportunities. After all, when was the last time a new airline chose to fly out of Manchester?

Nobody from the airport solicited me for advice and, aside from the convenience of flying out of Manchester, there’s nothing in it for me to try and help solve the problem. But I do feel the need to share some advice that I think could help the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport grow.

Bullish messaging

People in Greater Manchester have two main choices when it comes to flying. It’s Boston or Manchester. There are some limited options at other smaller airports, but generally speaking, there are only two choices.

Now, we all know what driving to Logan means.

It’s a complete nightmare.

It’s time for whomever Manchester uses for marketing to come up with some compelling and controversial campaigns to shed light on the main differences between flying out of Boston versus Manchester.

Think about how much fun you could have creating that campaign.

But this is needed more than anything. We can’t just sit around and watch passengers make the trek down I-93 for another year. It’s time to tell the real story.

Fix the pricing

I’m not an expert on how airlines come up with ticket prices, but I do know it usually makes no sense to the average person. Why could I buy a direct ticket to Chicago out of Logan for $250, but a flight out of Manchester was over $600? We need to press the airlines to bring their pricing in line so that people can justify the difference.

It doesn’t necessarily have to be cheaper. It just has to make sense. When I drive to Boston for a flight, it requires substantially more time, guaranteed aggravation and higher costs for gas and parking. Let’s figure out what the math is and help people understand it. We really need an airline to step up and help fix this problem.

Loyalty programs

Every airline has a loyalty program to encourage and reward travelers for their loyalty. Have you ever wondered why airports don’t do the same? If we really want to encourage people to fly out of Manchester, we need to give them more than just one reason.

So let’s come up with some ideas. Let’s get feedback from travelers. Let’s find out what we can do to entice people to be loyal to Manchester-Boston Regional Airport. I know there are ways to do it, and it would take more than a paragraph to share the ideas. But you get the point.

Let’s not sit around and watch the numbers continue to nosedive. Would a business allow 13 consecutive years of declines before it took drastic measures? We invest in programs to encourage people to “stay, work and play” in New Hampshire. Why not add “fly” to that slogan?

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.unionleader.com

Cirrus SR22, N111TT: Incident occurred January 29, 2019 in Burleigh County, North Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota

Landed in a field. 


Dakota Skies Aviation LLC


https://registry.faa.gov/N111TT


Date: 29-JAN-19

Time: 17:52:00Z
Regis#: N111TT
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: BISMARCK
State: NORTH DAKOTA







BISMARCK, North Dakota - Around noon on Tuesday, the Central Dakota Communications Center received notice of a Cirrus SR22 that made an emergency landing nine miles south of Bismarck near the McLean Bottoms Gun Range.


The pilot notified air traffic control that he was having an oil pressure issue.


The two people on board are safe.


Cirrus SR22 have parachutes that can be deployed allowing the plane to come down slower, however it was not deployed in this instance.


The Bismarck Rural Fire Department, Burleigh County Sheriff's Department, and Metro Area Ambulance are on scene.


According to the Burleigh County Sheriff's Department they are sending a snowmobile unit to the scene.


The registered owner of the plane is Dakota Skies Aviation LLC. The plane was certified airworthy in 2004.


The two people on board are safe.


The Bismarck Rural Fire Department, Burleigh County Sheriff's Department, and Metro Area Ambulance are on scene.


According to the Burleigh County Sheriff's Department they are sending a snowmobile unit to the scene.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kfyrtv.com

Beechcraft B24R Sierra, N6588R: Accident occurred January 03, 2019 in Edgewood, Santa Fe County, New Mexico

https://registry.faa.gov/N6588R

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA116

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 03, 2019 in Edgewood, NM
Aircraft: Beech 24, registration: N6588R

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Wiggins Airways, Embraer EMB-110: Incident occurred January 30, 2019 at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Flight 1361:  While taxiing slide into snowbank.


Date: 30-JAN-19
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: NA
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: E110
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: WIGGINS AIRWAYS
Flight Number: 1361
City: BUFFALO
State: NEW YORK

JetBlue, Airbus A321-200, N946JL: Incident occurred January 31, 2019 near Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

Flight B6-324: Struck by lightning after departure, returned and landed without incident.


JetBlue Airways Corp


https://registry.faa.gov/N946JL


Date: 31-JAN-19
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N946JL
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321 231
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: JETBLUE AIRLINES
Flight Number: 324
City: LOS ANGELES
State: CALIFORNIA




LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – A JetBlue flight headed to New York was forced to reverse course and make an emergency landing after being struck by lightning just after takeoff from Los Angeles International Airport Thursday morning amid a thunderstorm which pummeled the Southland.

JetBlue Flight No. 324 bound for John F. Kennedy International Airport was forced to turn around and return to LAX after its crew reported the aircraft had been hit by lightning, the Federal Aviation Administration confirmed.

An LAX spokesperson told CBS2 that the plane — which had 153 people aboard and 36,000 pounds of fuel — safely landed a little after 11 a.m. There was no word of any injuries. According to FlightAware, the plane had taken off at 10:10 a.m. and was only airborne for about 55 minutes.

“No, it’s going to be an overweight landing, pretty much it, don’t know if we have any damage here,” the pilot radioed in to air traffic control in audio obtained by CBS2. “That’s our reason for going back.”

“Hopefully, lightning doesn’t strike twice,” he added.

JetBlue confirmed the incident in its own statement.

“Crews will inspect the aircraft and determine if it may continue on to New York or if customers will be accommodated on another aircraft,” JetBlue wrote.

The plane was still parked at LAX as of 2 p.m.

Meanwhile, a second passenger jet out of LAX was also struck by lightning Thursday morning. A Southwest Airlines flight from LAX to Portland was forced to make an emergency landing in Oakland. No injuries were reported in that incident as well.

Story and video: https://ktla.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, N484AB: Accident occurred January 08, 2019 near Garner Field Airport (KUVA), Uvalde, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N484AB

Location: Uvalde, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA065
Date & Time: 01/08/2019, 1000 CST
Registration: N484AB
Aircraft: Robinson R44
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 8, 2019, about 1000 central standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, experienced a hard landing during an autorotation following a loss of tail rotor effectiveness while maneuvering shortly after takeoff from Garner Field Airport, Uvalde, Texas. The flight instructor sustained minor injuries, the student pilot was not injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, all pre-takeoff checks were normal with no anomalies noted. Once the helicopter was through effective translational lift and about 40 knots airspeed, the collective was raised to increase the available power to takeoff power setting. Shortly thereafter, a loud pop/bang was heard with an uncommanded right yaw and severe vibrations. Due to the low altitude and airspeed, the flight instructor immediately initiated an autorotation. Upon touchdown, the helicopter titled forward with the main rotor blades about 6 inches from contacting the ground. The flight instructor applied aft cyclic to correct, and the main rotor blades contacted the tailboom.

Postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed the tailboom was partially separated, and the tail rotor driveshaft system was damaged. The helicopter was recovered to a helicopter maintenance facility. During the examination, the clutch lubricant was drained and an unusual amount of metallic debris was noted in the strainer. The clutch was removed and sent to Robinson Helicopter Company for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N484AB
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 0930 CST
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Uvalde, TX (UVA)
Destination: Uvalde, TX (UVA) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.210278, -99.743056 (est)

Beechcraft V35B Bonanza, N18493: Accident occurred January 30, 2019 at Modesto City-County Airport (KMOD), Stanislaus County, California

Doncam Consulting LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N18493








MODESTO (CBS13) – A small unmanned plane crashed at Modesto Airport Wednesday afternoon.

A pair of pilots were reportedly working on the electrical system of a Beechcraft V35B Bonanza, manipulating the propeller, but said it wouldn’t start. When the pilots walked away, the propeller suddenly engaged on its own and taxied away, hitting a car and a fence.

The pilots told police the plane took off at speeds around 40 miles per hour. The plane was moving toward the busy Mitchell Road after it clipped the parked car.

“If it was to get over that [grass] and get onto Mitchell, we would really have had a problem on our hands trying to stop that plane with nobody inside it,” said Sgt. Mark Phillips with the Modesto Police Department.

Phillips said it was a good thing the plane hit the vehicle because it changed direction, diverting the plane from a hanger that was occupied at the time of the incident. Two structures were damaged by the plane, but no one was hurt in the crash.

The building belongs to DC Air, which is owned by Dan Costa of 5-11 Tactical. He was apparently inside at the time of the crash along with numerous other people.

The plane is registered to Doncam Consulting, LLC in Modesto, according to the FAA database. The FAA went to the scene to investigate the crash and wrapped up their investigation Wednesday afternoon. There is no official word on what caused the plane to take off.

The plane suffered extensive damage in the incident.

Heavy machinery was on its way to the airport to lift the damaged plane out.

Story and video: https://gooddaysacramento.cbslocal.com








Emergency responders are at the scene of a plane crash at the Modesto Airport. The plane, which was being prepped for a flight, was not airborne when it crashed, authorities said.

“At approximately 2:15 p.m. this afternoon, Modesto and Stanislaus Consolidated fire departments were dispatched to a report of a possible plane down here at Modesto City-County Airport, Modesto Fire Department Division Chief Mike Lillie said at the scene.

Nobody was inside the plane when it started rolling away in a southerly direction, Lillie said.

The small propeller plane rolled on the airport grounds until it hit a fence in the area of South Riverside Drive and Mitchell Road.

A small fuel leak was quickly contained.

Lillie said firefighters are working with Modesto Police to secure the scene and the airport.

Story and video: https://www.sacbee.com

Loss of Control on Ground: Experimental RoadRunner, N949TS; accident occurred January 29, 2019 at Truckee-Tahoe Airport (KTRK), Nevada County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N949TS


Location: Truckee, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA120
Date & Time: 01/29/2019, 1427 PST
Registration: N949TS
Aircraft: EMMET SMITH ROADRUNNER
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that, during the landing roll, the tailwheel equipped airplane began to ground loop left. He corrected with opposite rudder and aileron and regained control of the airplane, but the airplane started to veer right. The pilot added that while the airplane was veering right towards the edge of the runway, he assumed the snow on the adjacent field was compacted and would efficiently slow the airplane so he let the airplane exit the runway to the right but the snow was "softer than [he] anticipated" and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system located on the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind was from 020ยบ at 3 knots. The airplane landed on runway 20.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/01/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1434 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6379 hours (Total, this make and model), 1388 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 32 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: EMMET SMITH
Registration: N949TS
Model/Series: ROADRUNNER
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2018
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0818
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/13/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 63 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-B1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTRK, 5900 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2224 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 8000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Beckwourth, CA (O02)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Truckee, CA (TRK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1400 PST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Truckee-Tahoe (TRK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5904 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4654 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.320000, -120.139444 (est)

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N5082R: Incident occurred January 28, 2019 at Ardmore Municipal Airport (KADM), Carter County, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Struck a coyote on landing.


US Aviation Group LLC


https://registry.faa.gov/N5082R


Date: 28-JAN-19
Time: 02:20:00Z
Regis#: N5082R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172M
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ARDMORE
State: OKLAHOMA

Canadair CL-600-2A12 Challenger 601, N813WT: Accident occurred January 12, 2019 at Ox Ranch Airport (01TX), Uvalde, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


TW 601-C Investment LLC


https://registry.faa.gov/N813WT





Location: Uvalde, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA054
Date & Time: 01/12/2019, 1200 CST
Registration: N813WT
Aircraft: Canadair CL 600 2A12
Injuries: 9 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On January 12, 2019, about 1130 central standard time, a Canadair CL-600-2A12, N813WT, owned by a limited liability company and operated by an airline transport pilot, impacted terrain following a runway excursion at the Ox Ranch Airport (01TX), Uvalde, Texas. The captain, first officer flight attendant, and 6 passengers on board were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damaged. The airplane was operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 charter flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that originated at Addison, Texas, and was destined 01TX.

A representative for the airport reported that the airplane on landing hit hard and the tire either popped or the landing gear tore off. About two-thirds of the way down runway 35, the airplane slid off the right side of the runway. The airplane proceeded through a ditch and struck a perimeter fence before coming to a stop. The right main and nose landing gear were collapsed and damaged. There was also damage to the right wing, right inboard flap, nose of the airplane, and the vertical stabilizer.

At 1155, the weather conditions at Garner Field Airport (UVA), Uvalde, Texas, 24 nautical miles southeast of 01TX was wind 340°at 12 kts., visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 63°F, dew point 43°F and altimeter 30.17 inches of Mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Canadair
Registration: N813WT
Model/Series: CL 600 2A12 601
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Tw 601-C Investment Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: UVA, 942 ft msl
Observation Time: 1155 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 6 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 9 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.461389, -100.114167 (est)

Piper PA-28-151 Warrior, operated as a rental by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N37RV: Fatal accident occurred January 28, 2019 in Oceanside, San Diego County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California
Piper Aircraft Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N37RV


Location: Oceanside, CA
Accident Number: WPR19FA075
Date & Time: 01/28/2019, 2052 PST
Registration: N37RV
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 28, 2019, about 2052 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-28-151, N37RV, collided with a hillside during the initial climb from the Bob Maxwell Memorial Airfield (OKB), Oceanside, California. The certificated commercial pilot was seriously injured, and a pilot-rated (private pilot) passenger was fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated as a rental by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan had been filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident, and the destination was unknown.

According to a witness, located in the riverbed near the departure end of runway 24; he saw the airplane takeoff, and continued to watch the airplane because it appeared lower than normal. He also noted that it was left of centerline. As the airplane passed over his location, he lost sight of it due to the tree line; however, he heard a loud impact that he likened to a car crash. He was not able to see the hillside as it was covered in a low fog layer. He called 911 at 2100.

Oceanside Police Department responded the night of the accident and searched for wreckage. Due to inclement weather, they were not able to find the wreckage. The following morning about 0715, the police department received a 911 call that reported wreckage was spotted on a hillside above state highway CA-76. The police department responded to the accident site and located the wreckage; the pilot was airlifted to a nearby hospital.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) responded to the accident site. The entire airplane came to rest on the Rosicrucian Fellowship property, just below the ridgeline of a 210-foot hill. A visual examination revealed no obvious discrepancies with the wreckage. The airplane came to rest on a magnetic heading of 110°.

The airplane was recovered and moved to a secure location for a future examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N37RV
Model/Series: PA28 151
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOKB
Observation Time: 0452 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 40°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Oceanside, CA
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 33.210556, -117.369167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Raymond Allen Petty, Jr.



Investigators say the Yorba Linda man killed in a plane crash Monday night in Oceanside was piloting the plane, but his mother and sister tell NBC 7 he wasn't the one behind the controls.

Raymond Allen Petty, Jr., 58, was inside a Piper PA-28-151 Warrior -- a plane with dual controls designed for flight training -- when the aircraft took off from Oceanside Municipal Airport just before 9 p.m. 

However, it wasn't until Tuesday morning at around 7:14 a.m. that someone passing through the area noticed the wreckage on the hillside and contacted Oceanside police, OPD spokesperson Tom Bussey said.

The plane crashed into a hillside less than a mile away from the airport, approximately 10 to 20 feet from the top of a ridge along State Route 76 near Canyon Drive. 

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are looking into what may have caused the crash. The airport manager told NBC 7 Wednesday that thick fog created less than a mile of visibility at the time the plane departed. 

Petty's mother Betty and twin sister Brenda told NBC 7 Petty was a licensed pilot but wasn't certified to fly in those weather conditions. Petty was found in the left seat, the seat typically reserved for whoever is piloting the plane, but his family says he let his pilot registration lapse.

The man who survived the crash, who the Pettys only identified as Luke, is the more experienced and credentialed pilot, according to the family.

"Because he is certified to take off in that kind of weather, he probably had control," Brenda said.

Investigators with local fire and law enforcement agencies who first responded to the crash identified Petty as the pilot, but NTSB investigators have yet to make that determination.

By most accounts, the takeoff from the Oceanside Airport is a straight shot, but the Cherokee Warrior banked left and into the side of the ridge.

When Petty's family heard that detail for the first time, they were shocked.

"Did my brother have a heart attack or something?" Brenda wondered. "Was somebody incoherent because of some medical issue? I don't know. They have flown out of there many many times."

The plane was being stored in a hangar at Hawthorne Municipal Airport near LAX. That's where Brenda believes the two men were heading before the crash.

"I'm just numb. I don't know how else to explain it," Betty said.

Brenda says she hasn't shared what she knows with NTSB investigators yet.

"They took off last night and were making a left turn," NTSB investigator Tealeye Cornejo said Tuesday. "A witness heard what sounded like an airplane crashing."

When firefighters and emergency personnel made their way to the site of the crash, they found Petty dead and Luke suffering from major injuries including broken bones and cuts to his face, Bussey said.

Cornejo says it was a high-energy takeoff, and the plane was traveling at a faster airspeed to get off the ground but may have failed to get above the cliff.

Luke told rescue crews the plane crashed over five hours before they were found, but the FAA confirmed he was trapped in the wreck for much longer.

He was taken to Scripps La Jolla Hospital by Mercy Air, fire officials said, and he remains hospitalized.

A former classmate of Petty said he graduated from Esperanza High School.

The plane is registered to two co-owners out of Vista. One of the owners confirmed to NBC 7 his plane was involved in the crash but didn't reveal any further details.

The NTSB said the plane will be removed from the crash site in the next few days.

Story and video: https://www.nbcsandiego.com



SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) — Authorities on Wednesday identified the man who died in an Oceanside plane crash earlier this week.

The victim who was the pilot of the plane has been identified as 58-year-old Raymond Allen Petty Jr. of Yorba Linda.

Petty was found dead on Tuesday morning after a plane crash that occurred the night before.

Dispatchers received a call shortly before 7:15 a.m., Tuesday from a woman reporting she saw the wreckage of a plane on a hillside near SR-76 and Canyon Drive, Oceanside police spokesman Tom Bussey said.

According to Oceanside police Petty was already dead upon their arrival and the passenger who survived had been waiting for over ten hours to be rescued.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration,say Petty and the other passenger took off in a single-engine plane from Oceanside Airport on Monday night and crashed shortly after for unknown reasons into a nearby hill.

The survivor, whose name was withheld, was admitted to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla for treatment of severe injuries. His current condition is not known.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are continuing their investigation into the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbs8.com



OCEANSIDE (NEWS 8) – A pilot was killed and a passenger seriously injured when a single-engine plane crashed into a hillside near state Route 76 late Monday night in Oceanside.

Dispatchers received a call shortly before 7:15 a.m., Tuesday from a woman reporting she saw the wreckage of a plane on a hillside near SR-76 and Canyon Drive, Oceanside police spokesman Tom Bussey said.

According to Oceanside police the pilot was already dead upon their arrival and the passenger who survived had been waiting for over ten hours to be rescued.

The passenger was extricated and transported by air ambulance to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla for treatment of serious injuries, Bussey said.

The crash happened around two miles west of the Oceanside Municipal Airport.

Frank Lanza lives in a neighborhood close to the crash site. “I didn’t hear anything. It’s terrible. I mean, another ten feet and he would have made it.”

Lanza and other area residents told News 8 the conditions at the time made it very difficult to see. “[It was] very foggy. I could not see out much past my street. I could not see anything. It was solid white,” said Lanza.

Investigators were working to determine whether the plane was taking off or attempting to land at the time it went down.

Jared Foti is the assistant manager at the Oceanside Municipal Airport. He told News 8 he does not know either of the two men onboard the aircraft. According to Foti, the airport is an uncontrolled airport – meaning there are no air traffic controllers - airplanes fly in and out without pilots checking in all the time. “They do not request to take off. They do not request to land. They announce their intentions for the aircraft that may be in the area,” Foti said.

“We’re trying to find out if they tried to make an approach back to land once they may have realized that the weather was you know, not suitable. Based off of our video footage, it looked like it was very foggy at the that time. We could not even see the other end of our parking lot,” said Foti.

Oceanside Municipal Airport would not release or share surveillance video out of fear the public would know where the cameras are located, but said surveillance cameras show three men were onboard the plane on Monday.

A third individual was dropped off before the final flight at 9 p.m., on Monday. 

Timeline of events:

Monday

4:30 p.m. – The plane left the airport safely.
6:30 p.m. – The plane returns to the airport and remains on the ground for about an hour. The third individual is dropped off.
8:30 p.m. – Surveillance video shows the men in the parking lot.
8:53 p.m. – The rented piper fixed-wing single engine aircraft takes off for a final time with two men onboard. The third individual sees the aircraft depart.
9:00 p.m. – Oceanside Police receive a call of someone hearing a loud crash noise off Highway 76. Officers search for hours in the dark but do not find anything.

Tuesday

7:00 a.m. – Police discover the plane wreckage.

“We don’t know if they were capable of flying in the weather conditions,” said Foti. He said to fly in fog, it is required that pilots and planes be certified to do so. “We don’t know if that is the case. We will have to find out from the FAA.”

News 8 has learned the plane is registered to a man in Vista. That man’s wife told News 8 the plane had been rented out and she had no idea who was onboard.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are continuing their investigation into the cause of the crash.




OCEANSIDE, Calif. - A pilot and his passenger were found five hours after his small plane crashed on a hillside in Oceanside Tuesday, police said.

The pilot died and his passenger was badly injured when a private single-engine plane crashed near the top of a ridge  just west of Oceanside Municipal Airport, near state Route 76 near Canyon Drive around 2 a.m., according to Oceanside Police Department spokesman Tom Bussey. The two men aboard the plane were in the wreckage for about five hours before people found them.

A driver on the highway saw the wreckage of the plane around 7:15 a.m. and called authorities, Bussey said.

"When we contacted the person in the plane he was still alive they indicated they’d been there for 5 hours so that would put the crash at about 2 o’clock this morning,” said Bussey.

About a dozen firefighters were seen rescuing the passenger at 7:45 a.m. A helicopter took the injured person to a Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla.

The single-engine Piper PA-28 took off from Oceanside Airport at about 9 p.m. Monday and crashed into the hillside about a quarter of a mile south of the airport just after takeoff, according to FAA  spokesman Ian Gregor. The National Transportation Safety Board and FAA officials will investigate the plane crash and determine what caused it.

Eastbound SR-76 was closed from Canyon Drive to Airport Road due to the possibility of the plane sliding down the hillside, Bussey said. At first, authorities said it would remain closed until the wreckage can be removed from the hillside, but they decided to reopen the roadway at around 1 p.m..

"It'll be a challenge removing the plane from the hillside," Bussey said. “Trying to stabilize the plane at this point so we don’t know if they’re going to get it off the top and drag it up there’s no roadways at the top so there’s a good chance they may have to airlift it off the side of the hill."


Story and video: https://fox5sandiego.com













One man died and another man was trapped for hours after a plane crashed Monday night on a hillside in Oceanside, officials told NBC 7.

The single-engine airplane crashed into the side of a hill on Canyon Drive near State Route 76, approximately 10 to 20 feet from the top of the ridge.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed the plane went down at 9 p.m. Monday night about a half mile from the Oceanside Airport where it took off. 

The Oceanside Police Department was first made aware of the crash at 7:14 a.m. Tuesday when a driver called 911 after spotting the wreckage from the freeway, OPD spokesperson Tom Bussey said.

When firefighters and emergency personnel made their way to the site of the crash, they found the pilot dead and a passenger suffering from major injuries including broken bones and cuts to his face, Bussey said.

The passenger was freed from the aircraft wreckage and loaded onto a San Diego County Sheriff's Department helicopter. He was flown to a nearby airstrip where a medical transport helicopter was waiting.

The survivor told rescue crews the plane crashed over five hours before they were found, but the FAA confirmed the man was trapped in the wreck for much longer.

The unidentified survivor was taken to Scripps La Jolla Hospital by Mercy Air, fire officials said.

Eastbound SR-76 was closed due to the emergency response. Commuters were advised to avoid eastbound SR-76 between Canyon and Benet until further notice.

Officials reopened eastbound State Route 76 just before 1 p.m.

The crash occurred less than a mile west of Oceanside Municipal Airport.

FAA spokesperson Ian Gregor said there were only two people onboard the plane. He said an investigation has been launched into the cause of the crash.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board were on the way to the crash scene.

The wreckage has been secured at the top of the ridge but police officials say they are not sure how they will remove it.

"It is pretty steep," Bussey said. "We've got eastbound SR 76 closed for some time until they figure out how to get the plane off this hill." 

Story and video: https://www.nbcbayarea.com