Thursday, October 20, 2016

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N5541F: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 at Fresno Yosemite International Airport (KFAT), Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf  

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5541F

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office:  Fresno, California


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA035
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Fresno, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N5541F
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he flew to a tower-controlled airport to practice simulated engine failure approaches and landings. During departure following his fifth approach, he wanted to know what time it was and began looking for his phone, including reaching behind the seat to find it. He further reported that he must have been pulling back on the yoke while searching, and when he looked forward, the airplane was in a right yaw. He reported that he did not remember anything after that but believed that the airplane aerodynamically stalled and subsequently impacted the ground. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack during departure due to being distracted by looking for his phone. 

The pilot reported that he flew to a tower-controlled airport to practice simulated engine failure approach and landings. During departure following his fifth approach, he wanted to know what time it was and began looking for his phone, including reaching behind the seat to find it. He further reported that he must have been pulling back on the yoke while searching and when he looked forward, the airplane was in a right yaw. He reported that he does not remember anything after that, but believed that the airplane aerodynamically stalled and subsequently impacted the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.





FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- Investigators are on the scene of small plane crash at Fresno Yosemite International Airport.

FAA spokesperson said a Piper PA-28 aircraft crashed on the runway shortly after 2:30 p.m.

Authorities said the pilot was the only person on board and his condition remains unknown at this time but he was taken to the hospital.

An FAA spokesperson said that they believe the plane crashed while attempting to land.

The FAA and NTSB will take over the investigation as they try to uncover the reason behind the crash.

Story and video:   http://abc30.com

Cessna 172C Skyhawk, N1827Y: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 in Cedar Key, Levy County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N1827Y

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Cedar Key, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1827Y
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0725 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172C, N1827Y, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain, during an attempt to return to the airport immediately after takeoff, in Cedar Key, Florida. The pilot was not injured, the two passengers received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was privately owned, and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight departed the George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida.

According to the pilot, during takeoff from runway 05, the airplane "wasn't climbing" as he attempted to climb "out of ground effect." At an altitude of about 100 feet above ground level, he attempted to turn around and land on runway 23. The airplane then descended and impacted a swamp about 600 feet short of the runway. The pilot indicated that the engine sounded normal, and there were no issues with the airplane other than the climb performance.

The pilot reported that the fuel tanks were nearly full, as the airplane flew one flight leg (about 20 minutes long) since the last full fueling. The airplane was equipped with an 18-gallon auxiliary fuel tank that was installed in the baggage compartment, which was also full. According to first responders, there was an estimated 25 pounds of baggage found in the unoccupied rear seat.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot's certificate status was "revoked." He had held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held private pilot certificate privileges for airplane single engine sea. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued in January 2009, at which time he reported a total of 1,800 flight hours of experience.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest upright and partially submerged in shallow water. The outboard 3 feet of both wingtips were crushed aft and bent upwards. Both ailerons were damaged. The fuselage was buckled on the right side in the area of the cabin door, and the firewall was damaged. The airplane was further damaged during the recovery operation due to being submerged in water. The engine was rotated by hand via the propeller, and compression was confirmed on all cylinders with the exception of No. 4. Valve action was observed on all rocker arms, however the exhaust valve on the No. 4 cylinder was found stuck in the open position. The top spark plugs were removed. Their electrodes were intact, and slightly corroded with surface rust consistent with water immersion.

Beechcraft G18S, N1480K: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N1480K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19


AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA.  


Date: 19-OCT-16

Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N1480K
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 200
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida






FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - A small plane caught fire Wednesday morning at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Greg May said.

May said a fire truck at the airport spotted flames coming from the twin-engine plane after it made a rough landing.

Sky 10 was above the scene shortly before 11:30 a.m. and saw that fire rescue crews had already extinguished the flames with foam.

May said two people were aboard the plane.

"It looks like an older-type plane -- one that routinely flies back and forth, making deliveries to the Bahamas and to the islands," May said.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Registry, the Beechcraft G18S is owned by Chase William of West Des Moines, Iowa.

FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen confirmed that the plane's landing gear collapsed after it landed at the airport.

"The landing gear collapsed and you can see the damage to the propellers. They are all bent back," Mitchell Faine, who was at the airport at the time, said.

No injuries were reported.

The runway was closed for much of the day, but has since reopened.

"It is a good plane," Faine said. "It doesn't fly that fast. He was under control. Perfect conditions for a day. If you are going to drop something on the ground, this is the way to do it."

Bergen said the FAA is investigating the incident.

Story and video:   http://www.local10.com

Gray Jim Robert Exec 90, N716JB: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 in Caldwell, Canyon County, Idaho

http://registry.faa.gov/N716JB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA009
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Caldwell, ID
Aircraft: Gray Jim Robert Exec 90, registration: N716JB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0910 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Gray Jim Robert Exec 90 helicopter, N716JB, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after experiencing a loss of engine power at the Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot and registered owner of the helicopter were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The proposed local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that after taking off and attaining a speed of about 50 knots, the helicopter's engine quit. The pilot stated that he attempted to land off of the side of the paved runway, during which the helicopter rolled over onto its left side. The pilot stated further that he had fueled the helicopter just prior to takeoff, and estimated that he had between 8 to 10 gallons of fuel on board for the local flight.

The helicopter was recovered to the pilot's on-field hangar for further examination.

Stinson 108-3 Voyager, N818C: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 in Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N818C

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA033
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Boulder City, NV
Aircraft: STINSON 108 3, registration: N818C
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC), the pilot stated that during the initial climb after an aerial pickup of a banner, the towline cable became entangled with the right horizontal stabilizer and the right elevator. Subsequently the airplane pitched down, impacted the ground, and nosed over.

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut and the empennage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


After multiple requests, the pilot did not return the NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report.

Beechcraft (Raytheon) B200 King Air, N680CA: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 at Wiley Post Airport (KPWA), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT LOGISTICS GROUP LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N680CA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT LANDED NOSE GEAR UP, WILEY POST AIRPORT, OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA 

Date: 19-OCT-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N680CA
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 200
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: Oklahoma







OKLAHOMA CITY - It was a scary afternoon for one pilot when he was forced to land a plane without any nose gear.


Initial reports indicate a Beechcraft (Raytheon) B200 King Air nose gear failed to come down when the pilot attempted to land at Wiley Post Wednesday afternoon.

That is when the pilot let air traffic control know he would attempt to land at Will Rogers World Airport.

Fortunately, the pilot was able to successfully land the plane.

The pilot was the one person on board the plane.

Story and video:   http://kfor.com

Beech 76 Duchess, H&S Aviation LLC, N6199X: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 in Suffolk, Virginia

H&S AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6199X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA.  

Date: 19-OCT-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N6199X
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 76
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SUFFOLK
State: Virginia