Thursday, October 20, 2016

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N5541F: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 at Fresno Yosemite International Airport (KFAT), Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf  

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5541F

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office:  Fresno, California


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA035
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Fresno, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28, registration: N5541F
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he flew to a tower-controlled airport to practice simulated engine failure approaches and landings. During departure following his fifth approach, he wanted to know what time it was and began looking for his phone, including reaching behind the seat to find it. He further reported that he must have been pulling back on the yoke while searching, and when he looked forward, the airplane was in a right yaw. He reported that he did not remember anything after that but believed that the airplane aerodynamically stalled and subsequently impacted the ground. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack during departure due to being distracted by looking for his phone. 

The pilot reported that he flew to a tower-controlled airport to practice simulated engine failure approach and landings. During departure following his fifth approach, he wanted to know what time it was and began looking for his phone, including reaching behind the seat to find it. He further reported that he must have been pulling back on the yoke while searching and when he looked forward, the airplane was in a right yaw. He reported that he does not remember anything after that, but believed that the airplane aerodynamically stalled and subsequently impacted the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.





FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- Investigators are on the scene of small plane crash at Fresno Yosemite International Airport.

FAA spokesperson said a Piper PA-28 aircraft crashed on the runway shortly after 2:30 p.m.

Authorities said the pilot was the only person on board and his condition remains unknown at this time but he was taken to the hospital.

An FAA spokesperson said that they believe the plane crashed while attempting to land.

The FAA and NTSB will take over the investigation as they try to uncover the reason behind the crash.

Story and video:   http://abc30.com

Cessna 172C Skyhawk, N1827Y: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 near George T. Lewis Airport (KCDK), Cedar Key, Levy County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Analysis

Two witnesses reported that, during the first takeoff attempt, the accident airplane's engine was "sputtering," and the pilot aborted the takeoff about halfway down the 2,355-ft-long runway. The noncertificated pilot reported that, during the accident takeoff, the airplane would not climb out of ground effect. (The witnesses stated that the engine sounded normal.) When the airplane reached about 100 ft above ground level, the pilot attempted to return to the airport; however, the airplane descended and impacted shallow water about 600 ft short of the runway. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed damage consistent with a

Review of weight and balance data and loading information revealed that the airplane's gross weight at the time of the accident was about 50 lbs over its maximum allowable gross weight and that the center of gravity was at or beyond the forward limit. The pilot's loading of the airplane placed it outside of its operating envelope, which likely significantly degraded its performance.

Postaccident examination of the engine found one exhaust valve stuck in the "open" position. If the valve had been stuck during all or a portion of either takeoff, the airplane's acceleration and climb performance would have been significantly degraded.

It is likely that the airplane was unable to attain a positive climb rate due to a combination of the stuck exhaust valve and the pilot's operation of the airplane over its weight limit. It is also likely that, while attempting to return to the airport instead of landing straight ahead, the pilot failed to maintain adequate airspeed and exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack, which led to an aerodynamic stall.

Probable Cause and Findings
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

A partial loss of engine power due to a stuck exhaust valve and the noncertificated pilot's inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in the airplane being overloaded, both of which led to the airplane's inability to attain a positive climb rate. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's improper decision to attempt to return to the airport at low altitude and his subsequent failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack, which led to an aerodynamic stall. 

Findings

Aircraft
Recip eng cyl section - Malfunction (Cause)
Climb rate - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Maximum weight - Capability exceeded (Cause)
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Factor)
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Factor)

Personnel issues
Weight/balance calculations - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Factor)
Qualification/certification - Pilot

Environmental issues
Water - Contributed to outcome

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1827Y

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Cedar Key, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1827Y
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0725 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172C, N1827Y, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an attempt to return to the airport immediately after takeoff from George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida. The pilot was not injured and the two passengers received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The airplane was privately owned, and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, during takeoff from runway 05, the airplane "wasn't climbing" as he attempted to climb "out of ground effect." At an altitude about 100 feet above ground level, the pilot attempted to return to the airport and land on runway 23. The airplane then descended and impacted a swamp about 600 feet short of the runway. The pilot indicated that the engine sounded normal, and there were no issues with the airplane other than the climb performance.

Two witnesses reported that the pilot had aborted a previous takeoff immediately prior to the accident takeoff. They reported that the airplane's engine was "sputtering" as it accelerated. When it was approximately halfway down the runway, the pilot aborted the takeoff, then turned around and performed the accident takeoff. They indicated that the accident takeoff roll was unremarkable.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot's certificate status was "revoked", effective July 2005. He had held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held private pilot certificate with privileges for airplane single engine sea. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in January 2009, at which time he reported a total of 1,800 flight hours of flight experience.

The four-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1962, and was equipped with a Continental O-300D, 145-horsepower reciprocating engine. According to the pilot, its most recent annual inspection was completed on October 3, 2015, at 5,013 total aircraft hours, and 1,031 hours since engine overhaul. The airplane's maintenance logbooks were not recovered.

CDK was located at an elevation of 11 feet mean sea level, and was surrounded by water. The airport was equipped with one asphalt runway, oriented 05/23, which measured 2,355 feet long by 100 feet wide.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that it came to rest upright and partially submerged in shallow water. The outboard 3 feet of both wingtips were crushed aft and bent upwards. Both ailerons were damaged. The fuselage was buckled on the right side in the area of the cabin door, and the firewall was damaged. The airplane was further damaged during the recovery operation due to being submerged in water. The engine's crankshaft was rotated by hand via the propeller, and compression was confirmed on all cylinders with the exception of the No. 4 cylinder. Valve action was observed on all rocker arms; however, the exhaust valve on the No. 4 cylinder was found stuck in the open position. The top spark plugs were removed. Their electrodes were intact, and slightly corroded with surface rust consistent with water immersion.

The pilot reported that the fuel tanks were nearly full, as the airplane had flown one flight leg (about 20 minutes long) since the last full fueling. The airplane was equipped with an 18-gallon auxiliary fuel tank that was installed in the baggage compartment, which was also full. According to first responders, there was an estimated 25 pounds of baggage found in the unoccupied rear seat.

According to the owner's manual, the maximum allowable gross weight for the airplane was 2,250 pounds. The airplane's weight at the time of the accident was estimated to be 2,307 pounds based on the available weight and balance data for the airplane, fuel records, and self-reported occupant weights. The center of gravity was estimated to be 90.6 pound-inches, which was slightly forward of the maximum gross weight forward limit of 91.

Takeoff performance data found in the airplane owner's manual indicated that a maximum gross weight takeoff at sea level and 59 degrees F would require a ground roll of 825 feet, with a distance of 1430 feet require to clear an obstacle 50 feet tall.


Crystal River Airport, Crystal River Florida, was located about 30 nautical miles southeast of the accident site, at an elevation of 9 feet. At 0715 the reported weather included wind calm, temperature 17 degrees C (62 F), dew point 17 degrees C (62 F), and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury.

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Cedar Key, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1827Y
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0725 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172C, N1827Y, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain, during an attempt to return to the airport immediately after takeoff, in Cedar Key, Florida. The pilot was not injured, the two passengers received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was privately owned, and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight departed the George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida.

According to the pilot, during takeoff from runway 05, the airplane "wasn't climbing" as he attempted to climb "out of ground effect." At an altitude of about 100 feet above ground level, he attempted to turn around and land on runway 23. The airplane then descended and impacted a swamp about 600 feet short of the runway. The pilot indicated that the engine sounded normal, and there were no issues with the airplane other than the climb performance.

The pilot reported that the fuel tanks were nearly full, as the airplane flew one flight leg (about 20 minutes long) since the last full fueling. The airplane was equipped with an 18-gallon auxiliary fuel tank that was installed in the baggage compartment, which was also full. According to first responders, there was an estimated 25 pounds of baggage found in the unoccupied rear seat.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot's certificate status was "revoked." He had held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held private pilot certificate privileges for airplane single engine sea. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued in January 2009, at which time he reported a total of 1,800 flight hours of experience.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest upright and partially submerged in shallow water. The outboard 3 feet of both wingtips were crushed aft and bent upwards. Both ailerons were damaged. The fuselage was buckled on the right side in the area of the cabin door, and the firewall was damaged. The airplane was further damaged during the recovery operation due to being submerged in water. The engine was rotated by hand via the propeller, and compression was confirmed on all cylinders with the exception of No. 4. Valve action was observed on all rocker arms, however the exhaust valve on the No. 4 cylinder was found stuck in the open position. The top spark plugs were removed. Their electrodes were intact, and slightly corroded with surface rust consistent with water immersion.

Beechcraft G18S, N1480K: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N1480K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19


AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA.  


Date: 19-OCT-16

Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N1480K
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 200
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida






FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - A small plane caught fire Wednesday morning at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Greg May said.

May said a fire truck at the airport spotted flames coming from the twin-engine plane after it made a rough landing.

Sky 10 was above the scene shortly before 11:30 a.m. and saw that fire rescue crews had already extinguished the flames with foam.

May said two people were aboard the plane.

"It looks like an older-type plane -- one that routinely flies back and forth, making deliveries to the Bahamas and to the islands," May said.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Registry, the Beechcraft G18S is owned by Chase William of West Des Moines, Iowa.

FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen confirmed that the plane's landing gear collapsed after it landed at the airport.

"The landing gear collapsed and you can see the damage to the propellers. They are all bent back," Mitchell Faine, who was at the airport at the time, said.

No injuries were reported.

The runway was closed for much of the day, but has since reopened.

"It is a good plane," Faine said. "It doesn't fly that fast. He was under control. Perfect conditions for a day. If you are going to drop something on the ground, this is the way to do it."

Bergen said the FAA is investigating the incident.

Story and video:   http://www.local10.com

Jim Gray Rotorway Exec 90, N716JB, registered to and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred December 17, 2017 -and- Accident occurred October 19, 2016 at Caldwell Industrial Airport (KEUL), Canyon County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N716JB

Location: Caldwell, ID
Accident Number: WPR18LA050
Date & Time: 12/17/2017, 1300 MST
Registration: N716JB
Aircraft: GRAY JIM ROBERT EXEC
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 17, 2017, about 1300 mountain standard time, an experimental amateur-built Rotorway Exec series helicopter, N716JB, landed hard following a loss of engine power at Caldwell Industrial Airport, Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and tailboom during the accident sequence. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. The local flight departed Caldwell about 1250. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated that he planned to perform a series of hover taxi maneuvers, and then fly the helicopter in the traffic pattern. After taxiing around the airport for about 10 minutes, he heard an unusual engine sound, and the engine then lost all power. He performed an autorotation, and the helicopter landed hard, spreading the skids.

Examination of the helicopter revealed that oil was leaking from the lower engine area, and a trail of oil was present on the ground in the areas that the helicopter was taxing.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: GRAY JIM ROBERT
Registration: N716JB
Model/Series: EXEC UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEUL, 2429 ft msl
Observation Time: 1956 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 90°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: CALDWELL, ID (EUL)
Destination: CALDWELL, ID (EUL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.641944, -116.635833 (est)

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board:https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Caldwell, ID
Accident Number: WPR17LA009
Date & Time: 10/19/2016, 0910 MDT
Registration: N716JB
Aircraft: Gray Jim Robert Exec 90
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

Shortly after takeoff for the personal flight, about 15 to 20 ft above ground level, the experimental amateur-built helicopter suddenly yawed right, followed by a partial loss of engine power. The private pilot then performed a partial nose-up, collective-down maneuver, but due to the low altitude and not being able to maintain sufficient rotor rpm, he chose to land in soft dirt off the side of the runway; the helicopter landed hard.

The pilot had recently changed the alternator belt. A postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed that, during the maintenance, the pilot failed to properly tighten the tension bolts, which resulted in inadequate voltage to sustain ignition and the subsequent partial loss of engine power.

Probable Cause and Findings
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's failure to properly tighten the tension bolts during the installation of the alternator belt, which resulted in inadequate voltage to sustain ignition and the subsequent partial loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Ignition power supply - Incorrect service/maintenance (Cause)

Personnel issues
Installation - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

On October 19, 2016, about 0910 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Jim Gray Rotorway Exec 90 helicopter, N716JB, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after experiencing a loss of engine power at the Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot and registered owner of the helicopter was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The proposed local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In a report submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that during the takeoff everything seemed normal. He then accelerated and began a slow climb. At between 15 to 20 ft above ground level and about 40 to 45 knots, the helicopter suddenly yawed right, followed by the engine losing power. The pilot stated that being so low he could not perform a normal autorotation. The pilot opined that he did a partial nose-up, collective-down maneuver, but due to the low altitude and not being able to maintain sufficient rotor rpm, he elected to land in the soft dirt off the side of the runway. A hard landing resulted in the helicopter coming to rest on its left side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail boom and horizontal stabilizer.

Subsequent to a postaccident examination of the engine, which was performed by a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector, the inspector reported to the NTSB IIC that the pilot had recently changed the alternator belt, however, had failed to properly tighten the tension bolts, which resulted in inadequate voltage to sustain ignition, thus precipitating the loss of engine power and hard landing. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/29/2015
Flight Time:  577 hours (Total, all aircraft), 403 hours (Total, this make and model), 422 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: Gray Jim Robert
Registration: N716JB 
Model/Series: Exec 90
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1998
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: Exec-3000
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/28/2016, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 223 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 223 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotorway
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 55005
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 152 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EUL, 2432 ft msl
Observation Time: 0856 MDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / 2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  8 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 40°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Caldwell, ID (EUL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Caldwell, ID (EUL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Caldwell Industrial (EUL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2432 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.641944, -116.635833 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA009
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Caldwell, ID
Aircraft: Gray Jim Robert Exec 90, registration: N716JB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0910 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Gray Jim Robert Exec 90 helicopter, N716JB, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after experiencing a loss of engine power at the Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot and registered owner of the helicopter were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The proposed local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that after taking off and attaining a speed of about 50 knots, the helicopter's engine quit. The pilot stated that he attempted to land off of the side of the paved runway, during which the helicopter rolled over onto its left side. The pilot stated further that he had fueled the helicopter just prior to takeoff, and estimated that he had between 8 to 10 gallons of fuel on board for the local flight. The helicopter was recovered to the pilot's on-field hangar for further examination. The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N716JB

Location: Caldwell, ID
Accident Number: WPR18LA050
Date & Time: 12/17/2017, 1300 MST
Registration: N716JB
Aircraft: GRAY JIM ROBERT EXEC
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 17, 2017, about 1300 mountain standard time, an experimental amateur-built Rotorway Exec series helicopter, N716JB, landed hard following a loss of engine power at Caldwell Industrial Airport, Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and tailboom during the accident sequence. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. The local flight departed Caldwell about 1250. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated that he planned to perform a series of hover taxi maneuvers, and then fly the helicopter in the traffic pattern. After taxiing around the airport for about 10 minutes, he heard an unusual engine sound, and the engine then lost all power. He performed an autorotation, and the helicopter landed hard, spreading the skids.

Examination of the helicopter revealed that oil was leaking from the lower engine area, and a trail of oil was present on the ground in the areas that the helicopter was taxing.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: GRAY JIM ROBERT
Registration: N716JB
Model/Series: EXEC UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEUL, 2429 ft msl
Observation Time: 1956 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 90°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: CALDWELL, ID (EUL)
Destination: CALDWELL, ID (EUL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.641944, -116.635833 (est)

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Caldwell, ID
Accident Number: WPR17LA009
Date & Time: 10/19/2016, 0910 MDT
Registration: N716JB
Aircraft: Gray Jim Robert Exec 90
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 19, 2016, about 0910 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Jim Gray Rotorway Exec 90 helicopter, N716JB, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after experiencing a loss of engine power at the Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot and registered owner of the helicopter was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The proposed local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In a report submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that during the takeoff everything seemed normal. He then accelerated and began a slow climb. At between 15 to 20 ft above ground level and about 40 to 45 knots, the helicopter suddenly yawed right, followed by the engine losing power. The pilot stated that being so low he could not perform a normal autorotation. The pilot opined that he did a partial nose-up, collective-down maneuver, but due to the low altitude and not being able to maintain sufficient rotor rpm, he elected to land in the soft dirt off the side of the runway. A hard landing resulted in the helicopter coming to rest on its left side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail boom and horizontal stabilizer.

Subsequent to a postaccident examination of the engine, which was performed by a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector, the inspector reported to the NTSB IIC that the pilot had recently changed the alternator belt, however, had failed to properly tighten the tension bolts, which resulted in inadequate voltage to sustain ignition, thus precipitating the loss of engine power and hard landing. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/29/2015
Flight Time:  577 hours (Total, all aircraft), 403 hours (Total, this make and model), 422 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: Gray Jim Robert
Registration: N716JB 
Model/Series: Exec 90
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1998
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: Exec-3000
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/28/2016, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 223 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 223 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotorway
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 55005
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 152 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EUL, 2432 ft msl
Observation Time: 0856 MDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / 2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  8 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 40°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Caldwell, ID (EUL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Caldwell, ID (EUL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Caldwell Industrial (EUL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2432 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.641944, -116.635833 (est)


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA009
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Caldwell, ID
Aircraft: Gray Jim Robert Exec 90, registration: N716JB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 19, 2016, about 0910 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Gray Jim Robert Exec 90 helicopter, N716JB, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after experiencing a loss of engine power at the Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The private pilot and registered owner of the helicopter were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The proposed local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that after taking off and attaining a speed of about 50 knots, the helicopter's engine quit. The pilot stated that he attempted to land off of the side of the paved runway, during which the helicopter rolled over onto its left side. The pilot stated further that he had fueled the helicopter just prior to takeoff, and estimated that he had between 8 to 10 gallons of fuel on board for the local flight.

The helicopter was recovered to the pilot's on-field hangar for further examination.

Stinson 108-3 Voyager, N818C: Accident occurred October 19, 2016 in Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA033
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Boulder City, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: STINSON 108 3, registration: N818C
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge, the pilot stated that, during the initial climb after an aerial pickup of a banner, the towline became entangled with the right horizontal stabilizer and the right elevator. Subsequently the airplane pitched down, impacted the ground, and nosed over.

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut and the empennage. 

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
After multiple requests, the pilot did not return the NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to ensure that the aerial pickup towline was not entangled around the horizontal stabilizer after the banner pickup. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N818C

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA033
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 19, 2016 in Boulder City, NV
Aircraft: STINSON 108 3, registration: N818C
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC), the pilot stated that during the initial climb after an aerial pickup of a banner, the towline cable became entangled with the right horizontal stabilizer and the right elevator. Subsequently the airplane pitched down, impacted the ground, and nosed over.

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut and the empennage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


After multiple requests, the pilot did not return the NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report.

Beechcraft (Raytheon) B200 King Air, N680CA: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 at Wiley Post Airport (KPWA), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT LOGISTICS GROUP LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N680CA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT LANDED NOSE GEAR UP, WILEY POST AIRPORT, OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA 

Date: 19-OCT-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N680CA
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 200
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: Oklahoma







OKLAHOMA CITY - It was a scary afternoon for one pilot when he was forced to land a plane without any nose gear.


Initial reports indicate a Beechcraft (Raytheon) B200 King Air nose gear failed to come down when the pilot attempted to land at Wiley Post Wednesday afternoon.

That is when the pilot let air traffic control know he would attempt to land at Will Rogers World Airport.

Fortunately, the pilot was able to successfully land the plane.

The pilot was the one person on board the plane.

Story and video:   http://kfor.com

Beech 76 Duchess, H&S Aviation LLC, N6199X: Incident occurred October 19, 2016 in Suffolk, Virginia

H&S AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6199X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA.  

Date: 19-OCT-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N6199X
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 76
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SUFFOLK
State: Virginia