Sunday, December 17, 2017

West Virginia Sen. Chandler Swope: State depends on general aviation

Aviation is something I was born into. My father purchased his first plane in 1947 and got his pilot license because my mother missed her hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

Dad would rather spend an hour and a half in the air than drive for 12 hours on winding West Virginia roadways long before the interstate highway and corridor system came to West Virginia. It was a passion he shared with the family and relied on when he was starting his business. I guess you could say that my fathers’ love of flying was passed down the family.

For me personally, when I owned a construction company, I needed to be able to travel across the state in a short amount of time. In fact, one year I had about seven or eight buildings being constructed, including four schools, that required me to be on-site. If I were to drive to each of these sites, over mountains and up crooked roads, it would have taken me about seven hours. With my aircraft, I was able to fly to all four within an hour and a half.

And for small businesses across the state, it is the same. General aviation serves as a vital tool for small businesses across the state and the country, especially in rural and remote regions where other transportation options are limited and time-consuming.

For example, in our state, general aviation contributes over $1 billion to the state’s annual economy. In Clarksburg, the Bombardier plant just doubled in size and added 150 jobs over the last year.

Beyond the economic benefits of general aviation, the charitable and emergency services that helicopters and small planes provide cannot be understated. The mountainous terrain and winding roads can make it difficult to deliver goods across the state. When a disaster strikes, local airports serve as a vital lifeline that connect communities to the resources they need.

Just last year, severe storms wiped out nearly 1,500 homes and 125 businesses, with damage to another 4,000 homes across the state. The general aviation community quickly responded, delivering 2,000 pounds of water, food, paper goods, shovels and trash bags to our hardest hit communities. Without general aviation, something as small as a tree branch on the road could take hours to resolve when an aircraft can take care of it in minutes.

And as everyone in Fayette County knows, we are proud to provide a home to the Boy Scouts of America for their National Jamboree every four years when 40,000 Scouts come to The Summit.

The Summit itself is not only a cultural point of pride for our state, but also an economic powerhouse that’s expected to inject $25.3 million into the local economy annually. What you may not know is that the Boy Scouts depend almost exclusively on charitable donations; it was my pleasure to fly photographers and charitable givers around the 10,600 acres of the site so they could appreciate the sheer scale of the whole site.

I am deeply concerned by legislation being considered in Washington that would threaten general aviation and this lifeline for our local community. This new legislation would separate our air traffic control system from congressional oversight and place it under the control of a board of private interests, dominated by the commercial airlines.

These are the same commercial airlines that have cut service all across West Virginia already, favoring larger hub airports. I have no doubt that should these airlines control our air space, access for small airports and aircraft across the country would suffer as they put their own interests before smaller communities.

As it stands, our aviation system gives everyone fair access. Let’s keep it that way and keep Congressional oversight in place.

Chandler Swope is a Republican state senator for Mercer and the former-owner of Swope Construction.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wvgazettemail.com

Former employee sues Tri-State Airport (KHTS) for disabilities act violation

A former Tri-State Airport Authority employee said his former bosses reneged on their efforts to accommodate his learning disability, preventing him from doing his job and ultimately leading them to terminate his employment.

James Cremeans said his supervisors at Huntington Tri-State Airport initially provided support to him, but they later failed to give him the minimum accommodations he needed to complete his job, according to a lawsuit filed in the Southern District of West Virginia in United States District Court last week.

Cremeans said his supervisors violated the Americans with Disabilities Act and the West Virginia Human Rights Act causing him emotional distress when they failed to accommodate him, then accused him of lying about his disability.

The Tri-State Airport Authority operates Huntington Tri-State Airport. The authority is named as a defendant along with Brett McCoy and Gail White, who were supervisors at the airport while Cremeans was employed there between April and August.

Cremeans was “severely learning disabled throughout school,” due to a birth defect in his brain, according to the complaint. As a result of the defect, Cremeans is illiterate, according to the complaint.

During the interview process for a cleaning job at the airport, Cremeans said an airport employee helped him by reading aloud questions on the airport’s written employment test. In April, he was hired to clean the airport during a night shift, for which he was paid $9 an hour, according to the complaint.

A few weeks after he started his job, Cremeans said White instituted a checklist process for all cleaning duties. When he informed her he couldn’t read, White told Cremeans at least five times she would review the form with him so he could check off the tasks he completed, but she never reviewed the form with him.

Initially another night-shift employee helped Cremeans fill out the form, but that employee was transferred to day shift in May and wasn’t replaced, Cremeans said.

Cremeans said he talked to McCoy, who was White’s supervisor. McCoy likewise said he would help Cremeans but never did, according to the complaint.

Cremeans was not disciplined as an employee at the airport during his employment there, according to the complaint.

In August, McCoy called Cremeans into his office and confronted him about his paperwork, according to the complaint.

Cremeans told McCoy he was illiterate and was completing his cleaning duties, but he wasn’t able to complete the corresponding checklist, according to the complaint.

McCoy called Cremeans a liar on both counts and he “fired him on the spot,” according to the complaint.

Cremeans is represented by Timothy Rosinsky of Rosinsky Law Office in Huntington.

Cremeans seeks punitive and compensatory damages as well as lost wages and attorney's fees and court costs.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wvgazettemail.com

Incident occurred December 17, 2017 at Portland International Jetport (KPWM), Portland, Cumberland County, Maine

PORTLAND, Maine —  A fuel issue on a plane flying into Portland International Jetport prompted Portland Police and Fire crews to respond to the airport Sunday night.

They responded shortly before 9:00 p.m., but released few details about the nature of the issue or the potential impact.

They also were not able to specify where the plane was coming from or how many people on board.

Officials at the Jetport could not be reached for comment.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wmtw.com

Piper PA-28-180, N6433J, registered to and operated by a private individual: Fatal accident occurred December 17, 2017 near Branson West Airport (KFWB), Stone County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming aircraft engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6433J

Location: Reeds Spring, MO
Accident Number: CEN18FA054
Date & Time: 12/17/2017, 1830 CST
Registration: N6433J
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 17, 2017, about 1830 central standard time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N6433J, impacted terrain near Reeds Spring, Missouri. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal fight. Instrument meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The cross-country flight departed the Gardner Municipal Airport (K34), Gardner, Kansas, about 1700, and was en route to the M Graham Clark Downtown Airport (KPLK), Branson, Missouri.

Several witnesses reporting hearing the airplane overhead or circling before the engine went quiet, followed by a crash. First responders were notified and responded to the accident site. Both the witnesses and first responders reported the weather was foggy with poor visibility, about the time of the accident.

The airplane wreckage was located in an open field in a rural neighborhood, about 1.5 miles north of the Branson West Municipal Airport - Emerson Field (KFWB) and about 11 miles northwest of KPLK.

The on-site examination of the wreckage and ground scars revealed the airplane impacted terrain in a near vertical, nose down attitude. The airplane came to rest near the initial impact point, with the engine and nose of the airplane buried in a small crater. Several fragments of the airplane were scattered away from the impact point. Both wings were accordion crushed along the entire wing span; the main cabin was severely crushed, and the empennage also had heavy impact damage. The engine also had heavy impact damage with the crankshaft broken just aft of the No. 1 main journal, which had separated from the engine. The fixed pitch two-bladed propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange.

A preliminary review of radar data revealed, a visual flight rules (VFR) flight track correlated with time and location of accident airplane. A review of the flight track indicates that the airplane approached the Branson area from the north/northwest, making several turns, including circles, before the track disappeared from radar, near the accident site.

At 1835, the automated weather observation facility located at KFWB recorded: a calm wind, 0.5-mile visibility, 400 ft overcast ceiling, a temperature of 46 degrees F, dew point 46 degrees F, and an altimeter setting of 30.08 inches of mercury.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane was recovered for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N6433J
Model/Series: PA 28-180 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFWB
Observation Time: 1835 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 400 ft agl
Visibility:  0.5 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Gardner, KS (K34)
Destination: Branson, MO (KPLK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  36.724722, -93.396111 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Keith and Dawn Curtis


BRANSON, Mo. -- On Monday, the Federal Aviation Administration spent the day at a crash site outside Branson, trying to determine the cause of a fatal plane crash.

Keith and Dawn Curtis were the only people inside the 1968 Piper Cherokee. The newlyweds married just last month; Keith was a newly-minted pilot, and his wife was training to be one herself.

They departed from the Gardner Municipal Airport Sunday evening, shortly before sundown. They were on their way to a family holiday in Branson.

The aviation community -- especially those who pilot small planes -- is a tight knit one. Keith Curtis and his wife were eager to be a part of it. Keith had his VFR (Visual Flight Rules) rating, and was working on his IFR (Instrument Flight Rules). Dawn was working on getting her license.

At the Gardner Municipal Airport, where Keith and Dawn Curtis departed on their last flight, their first airplane still sits patiently in a hangar. Their black pickup truck still sits in the parking lot.

Keith and Dawn were in their second plane, a 1968 Piper Cherokee. It crashed just before 7 p.m. outside of Branson Sunday night.

“When I saw the color of the airplane in the footage,” Brent Bitikofer recalled, “I knew who it was.”

Bitikofer is a pilot, and runs the maintenance shop at Gardner Municipal Airport, and said all the pilots there knew Keith.

“He wanted to do things,” said Bitikofer Monday afternoon. “I don’t know about dreamer. I think he was a doer. He had an idea and he was going to do it.”

Keith Curtis ran his own company -- KC All American Moving -- from his home on Lake Road One in Gardner. It is a family-owned company.

The family, which had just last month celebrated Dawn and Keith’s marriage, was gathering in Branson for a holiday celebration. That is why the newlyweds flew down Sunday evening.

The family told FOX 4, in a written statement, “They were the type of people that made you happier when you were in their presence. They loved to travel, were adventurous, and loved life, loving it all the more together.”

The family also said “tragedies like this remind all of us that life is precious and short and should be cherished at every turn.”

Story and video ➤  http://fox4kc.com

Dawn Curtis

Stone County, Mo.--12/18/2017) The Stone County Sheriff's Department are still working to figure out what caused a small plane crash near Branson that left two people dead.

Investigators are still looking for answers surrounding a deadly plane crash near Branson West Sunday night.

Sheriff Doug Rader is with the Stone County Sheriff’s Department. He tells FOX5,"Around 7 p.m. m we got a call of an airplane that had went down, deputies arrived on scene, located the plane.

According to Rader, the aircraft crashed into a field while attempting to land at Branson West Airport.

"The two subjects that were in the plane were both deceased at that time."

The Stone County Coroner has identified the two people killed in the plane crash as 52 year old Keith Curtis and his wife, 45 year old Dawn Curtis.

Daniel Cataldo witness the accident and he explains," sad. All we can do is pray man. I mean I feel bad for the family."

In the moments after the crash,people near the crash site like Cataldo began to call 911.

"I jumped over that fence to go see if anybody needed some help, but then when I got down there I couldn’t see anything cause it was so foggy that I made it past that second barn down, but I didn’t see anything."

Witness John Higgins says he saw a single engine plane flying low, which was unusual.

"He sounded low, didn’t sound in distressed,but it was low and he circled like twice and then I’m thinking it’s foggy out, I’m thinking this guy is in trouble and then I heard a thump, a loud thump," says Higgins. 

Moments later, he started hearing from friends nearby about a plane crash.

"My heart really goes out to the families of the people that deceased. It’s not what you’d expect."

Neighbors describe concerns with planes coming into the Branson West Airport.

"Since they opened the airport and we’re right under the flight pattern you kind of always worry about some aircraft coming down."

The FAA is investigating the crash. The NTSB will determine the cause of the crash which investigators say could take up to a year. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox5krbk.com




A 52-year-old man and a 45-year-old woman died Sunday night after a plane crashed in a Stone County field, officials say.

According to a news release from the Stone County Sheriff's Office, Keith M. Curtis and Dawn M. Curtis — both from Gardner, Kansas — were pronounced dead at the scene.

Family members say Keith and Dawn Curtis got married last month, and they were in the Branson area this weekend for vacation.

Sheriff's deputies responded to the scene at 6:45 p.m. Sunday and found a 1968 Piper single-engine aircraft, the release said.

The release said the Federal Aviation Administration is expected to investigate the crash Monday.

The Branson West Airport directed a News-Leader reporter to local law enforcement for information on the crash. It's unclear if the plane was headed to the airport.

Elizabeth Cory, a spokeswoman for the FAA, said a single-engine plane crashed into a field about 1.25 miles north of Branson West Airport.

Cory said both the FAA and the National Traffic Safety Board will be investigating the crash. Investigations normally take several months and can last longer than a year, Cory said.

Dan Cataldo lives near the scene of the crash. 

Cataldo said he heard a loud noise and saw the plane circling around before crashing into the ground.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤  http://www.news-leader.com




BRANSON, Mo. — A  Gardner, Kan., couple who was recently married died in a plane crash Sunday night near Branson.

Keith Curtis, 52 and Dawn Curtis, 45, were both pronounced dead the the scene. Their plane crashed in the area of Branson West Airport after 6:30 p.m. Sunday. The plane was a 1968 Piper single engine aircraft.

“I kept hearing the plane flying around and it sounded like he was having motor problems,” Martin West told KY3 in Springfield.

“All of the sudden, the motor stopped and I heard a big boom,” neighbor Vicki Morrow reported to KY3.

According to a family member (see full message below), the Curtises were flying to Branson West to begin a four-day pre-Christmas family vacation. They were meeting their parents who are from Belton there.

Authorities do not yet know why the plane went down.

Fox 4’s Rebecca Gannon messaged the family, who released a statement about their loss:

Our hearts are clearly broken as we are all trying to process this tragedy. Dawn Mustain Curtis and Keith Curtis, Sr. Of Garner, Kansas, had just gotten married November 11, 2017 after several years of dating. They were the type of people that made you happier when you were in their presence. They loved to travel, were adventurous, and loved life, loving it all the more together. They frequently traveled to the Springfield and Branson areas via their private plane and had journeyed to Branson West yesterday to begin a four-day, pre Christmas family vacation. Their parents, Norman and Vickey Eagleton, of Belton, Missouri, arrived in Branson yesterday afternoon for that vacation and will remain here until the many details involved can be attended to properly. We would like to thank the Stone and Taney County Sheriff Departments for their compassionate, prompt communication with us, the rescue personnel who responded and the staff at Subway in Hollister, Missouri who stayed way past closing last night to accommodate us in our grief. Also, the witnesses who privately shared their accounts with us nearly immediately through the power of Facebook. Tragedies like this remind all of us that life is precious and short and should be cherished at every turn. We will get through this with the power of faith and the love of family and friends, one day at a time.

-Joyelle Low Buckley, family member

Story and photo ➤ http://fox4kc.com












Authorities say a recently-married couple killed in a southwest Missouri plane crash were from Gardner, Kansas.

Stone County Missouri Sheriff Doug Rader on Monday identified the victims as 52-year-old Keith Curtis and 45-year-old Dawn Curtis.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Elizabeth Isham Cory said their Piper PA-28-180 went down Sunday night in a pasture about a mile northwest of the Branson West Municipal Airport.

Relatives said in a statement that the couple was married on Nov. 11 after dating for several years. They were on their way to Branson for a four-day, pre-Christmas family vacation.

The FAA is investigating the cause of the crash.


http://www.koamtv.com







BRANSON WEST, Mo. (KY3) The Stone County sheriff confirms to KY3 News that two people were killed in a single-engine Piper plane crash near Branson West on Sunday night.

Original reports from authorities listed three victims. However, they later realized that they had mistaken a coat in the plane for another person.

According to the Southern Stone County Fire Protection District, the plane went down in the area of Branson West Airport and Yocom Pond just after 6:30 p.m.

Witnesses who live nearby told KY3 News that they heard the plane flying low to the ground before it crashed.

"All of the sudden, the motor stopped and I heard a big boom," Neighbor Vicki Morrow said.

"I kept hearing the plane flying around and it sounded like he was having motor problems. I told my wife 'It sounds like he is going to crash.' It wasn't but a few seconds later and there was a big 'thump.' It shook the whole floor and the ground and everything and we ran outside and my wife called 911. We went looking for it and there it was over there right in the field," Neighbor Martin West said.

Story and photos ➤ http://www.ky3.com

Cape Girardeau to see increased revenue from SkyWest flights



SkyWest Airlines is expected to pay the city of Cape Girardeau more than $426,000 over a two-year period, ending Nov. 30, 2019, city officials said.

That revenue figure is calculated on the basis of a new two-year agreement with the commuter airline, which the city council is expected to approve Monday.

SkyWest Airlines, which also does business as United Express, began offering round-trip flights from Cape Girardeau to Chicago on Dec. 1. SkyWest replaced Cape Air, which had provided flights to St. Louis.

The federal government subsidizes passenger service to and from the Cape Girardeau Regional Airport through the Essential Air Service program.

Airport manager Bruce Loy said SkyWest offers 12 weekly round trips, with half of the trips connecting through Quincy, Illinois.

Loy said Friday the new agreement is expected to generate nearly $235,000 more revenue than under the Cape Air contract.

Fuel sales will account for most of the revenue, Loy said.

The agreement and fees, retroactive to Dec. 1, show annual revenue of more than $213,000, Loy wrote in an agenda report to the city council.

Loy said fuel sales could total $171,000.

"That is an estimate," he said.

The remainder of the annual revenue includes $11,578 for terminal/office space rent, $11,100 in ramp/parking fees and $19,503 in landing fees, Loy said.

SkyWest is renting 804 square feet of space in the terminal for office and baggage operations, he said.

Mayor Harry Rediger welcomed the opportunity for the city to generate added revenue at the airport.

"I knew it was going to be an advantage," he said of landing SkyWest Airlines' service.

"It is all a good thing," he said of SkyWest flights.

Story, comments and photo ➤ http://www.semissourian.com

Golden Circle Air T-Bird II, N5619Z: Incident occurred December 17, 2017 at Wiscasset Municipal Airport (KIWI), Lincoln County, Maine

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft veered off departing runway. Hit snow bank and flipped over.

http://registry.faa.gov/N5619Z

Date: 17-DEC-17
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N5619Z
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: T BIRD II
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: PORTLAND
State: MAINE



Gusty wind apparently forced an airplane taking off from Wiscasset Municipal Airport Sunday back down and into the snow near the runway, interim airport manager Rick Tetrev said.

Longtime pilot Charlie Gabelmann, the ultralight plane’s lone occupant, was not hurt, Tetrev said in a phone interview Sunday evening. He described Gabelmann as shaken up after the accident, which Tetrev said cracked the plane in half. The plane was later hauled to Gabelmann’s hangar at the airport, Tetrev said.

Tetrev was called to the airport. Wiscasset Airport Advisory Committee Chairman Steve Williams  called the Portland tower to alert the Federal Aviation Administration, Tetrev said. Williams confirmed he did and said he believed Wiscasset police did, as well.

Williams, a pilot, said in a phone interview, he arrived at the airport shortly after the incident on other business. He hadn’t heard about the accident; when he got there and saw an emergency vehicle, he thought it might be there for a Lifelight transport. Then he saw two police cruisers and the aircraft. By then Gabelmann was in a truck that was being set up to haul the aircraft, Williams said.

Despite the damage to the plane, he was not surprised the pilot was unhurt because the cockpit was intact, Williams said. He also was not surprised about the damage, for two reasons: The plane was an ultralight and the snow near the runway didn’t allow the plane to roll as it might have on grass, he said.

The FAA barred all aircraft from landing in Wiscasset; the ban was later lifted and access to the runway returned to normal, he said.

The FAA did not respond to the scene, he said. He expects it will as part of the investigation.

Asked about the incident’s handling, Tetrev said, between the pilots’ professionalism and the town’s response with emergency crews, “It was marvelous. It went smoothly, like clockwork, and that’s how it’s supposed to go.”

The response was stellar, Williams said.

Wiscasset Fire Chief T.J. Merry said the department was dispatched to the airport shortly after 3 p.m. and checked to make sure the craft was not at risk of catching fire; fuel did not leak from the aircraft, Merry said. No ambulance was called to the scene because it was known there were no injuries, he said.

Williams said Gabelmann is a certified flight instructor and an excellent pilot. “He’s very safe and takes extensive retraining,” Williams said.

Story and photo ➤ http://www.wiscassetnewspaper.com



No injuries were reported after a small aircraft slid off the runway during takeoff at Wiscasset Municipal Airport on the afternoon of Sunday, Dec. 17.

According to Sergeant Craig Worster of the Wiscasset Police Department, the aircraft was on the runway when a crosswind grabbed the small plane pushing it off the paved area and into the snow.

Worster said no injuries were reported as a result of the crash and the pilot was the sole occupant of the aircraft when it slid off the runway.

Worster said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board had been contacted regarding the incident.

Worster said he believed the aircraft would be removed from the runway shortly.

Lincoln County Communications paged out the Wiscasset Fire Department at 3:23 p.m.

Joining the fire department at the scene were units from the Wiscasset Police Department.

The identity of the pilot was not immediately available at the scene.

Story and photo ➤ http://lcnme.com

Skydiving Santa at Skydive Cross Keys: Cross Keys Airport (17N), Williamstown, Monroe Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey





Photo gallery ➤ http://www.nj.com

Following San Francisco International Airport (KSFO) runway close calls, Bay Area congressman wants pilot conversations saved

Cockpit voice recorders, like the one seen here, have not been saved after recent incidents at San Francisco International Airport and elsewhere leading critics to ask why more is not being done to save such critical evidence.



SAN FRANCISCO — After two San Francisco airport close calls earlier this year and yet another plane nearly landing on an occupied taxiway last month in Atlanta, investigators now say the pilot conversations in all three incidents were lost because the cockpit voice recorders were not removed from the planes in a timely manner, this news agency has learned.

Congressman Mark DeSaulnier wants to know what it will take to preserve the piece of evidence that aviation experts call critical. He has proposed new legislation to find a way to safeguard cockpit voice recorders, but finds himself up against the very federal agency that investigates such evidence and aviation incidents — the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB calls it unnecessary.

“It was shocking to me that in this day and age with technology as it is how they don’t store almost everything. It’s just crazy to me,” DeSaulnier said by phone Friday. “It seems so corrective and it would be such an advantage for the NTSB to access.”

A challenging loophole also muddies when airlines must immediately save cockpit voice recorders. Because these airplanes didn’t actually land on the crowded taxiways — potentially killing thousands of people —  the events are not classified as “serious incidents” which would require archiving of the pilot conversations.

In October, DeSaulnier filed amendments to the proposed 21st Century AIRR Act, calling on the Federal Aviation Administration to issue guidance for air carriers on best practices for removing and saving cockpit voice recorders, as well as asking the federal agency to provide recommendations to prevent the loss of cockpit voice recorders.

However, it’s unclear when Republicans will bring the wide-ranging bill, which would privatize air traffic control, among other aviation measures, to the floor, the congressman said.

On Nov. 15, DeSaulnier wrote to FAA Administrator Michael Huerta asking the agency to take action to prevent the future loss of cockpit voice recorders in light of the July 7 incident at SFO. He has not heard back.

“From a public safety perspective, this is unacceptable, and I am concerned that we are missing opportunities to learn from all of the facts when safety issues arise,” DeSaulnier wrote.

He specifically wrote about the valuable information lost in the SFO incidents. In July, an Air Canada flight mistook a crowded SFO taxiway for a runway, barely missing four fully loaded planes awaiting takeoff on the ground. In October, another Air Canada flight crew landed on a SFO runway despite repeated warnings by an air traffic controller to abort because he believed another airplane had not left the area yet.

On Nov. 29, a Delta Air Lines plane lined up toward a taxiway at an Atlanta airport before performing a late go-around. A NTSB official told this news agency Thursday the cockpit voice recorder was not recovered following the latest incident last month.

All three incidents are under federal investigation without the dialogue between pilots available that might explain the confusion.

Cockpit voice recorders tape the dialogue among the flight crew and newer planes must have a two-hour tape limit, while older models are only required to have 30 minutes of tape. The recorder runs as long as the plane is powered, but once the recording reaches the end, it begins taping over at the beginning.

“We believe that we get all the information that we need when it’s reportable. We don’t think anything else needs to be done than what is currently being done,” NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said, adding the NTSB is not recommending any changes to regulations.

He called the cockpit voice recorder an “added bonus, but not the end-all-be-all.” He also said the surviving pilots provided valuable information and can be compared to flight data, making the voice recorder less important.

Jim Hall, former NTSB chairman, disagreed in an interview earlier this year, calling the cockpit conversations “critical,” especially in such close-calls.

“It reflects the conversation in the cockpit of how this airplane might have ended up in this position,” he said, adding that requirements on saving cockpit conversations must tighten.

DeSaulnier also argued that relying on the crew is not ideal.

“The pilot is often the person who is the culprit in making the mistake and humans memories are not perfect,” he said.

Holloway stressed that the SFO and Atlanta incidents did not reach the threshold of a “reportable incident,” which requires airline notification when a plane “lands or departs on a taxiway, incorrect runway, or other area not designed as a runway.” Even for those, the NTSB must put in a request for the cockpit voice recorder to be saved, which can take time in during the short window before it gets overwritten.

In 2002, the NTSB sent a safety recommendation to the FAA saying it had a “longstanding concerns” about the availability of cockpit voice recorders, saying it’s one of the most valuable tools in investigations. During catastrophic accidents the plane’s electrical system cuts out which preserves the recorder, many investigations occur after incidents where the plane’s electrical system is operational, such as runway and taxiway incursions, rejected takeoffs or runway overruns.

In that 2002 memo, the NTSB said in those incidents “nearly every” CVR was overwritten. Often the only sound they get is background noise from an unoccupied cockpit from the plane sitting at a gate well after the incident.

Story, comments and photo ➤ http://www.mercurynews.com

Atlanta Airport Blackout Exposes a Flaw in Backup Power Systems: Officials say they will investigate whether they need to install more redundant power, a day after an outage that caused hundreds of flight cancellations



The Wall Street Journal
By Russell Gold and  Susan Carey
Updated Dec. 19, 2017 8:50 a.m. ET

The power failure that brought the world’s busiest airport to a standstill underscored the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to electrical disruptions, despite backup systems designed to keep the lights on.

A fire in a crucial piece of electrical equipment shut down the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport for nearly 11 hours on Sunday, stranding hundreds of thousands of passengers on airplanes and in terminals. It caused a cascade of delays that continued to affect air travel around the country on Monday during the start of the hectic holiday travel period and risks further delays into Tuesday.

Delta Air Lines Inc., the biggest carrier at Atlanta with more than 73% of the passenger traffic, said it cancelled 1,000 flights Sunday and at least 400 on Monday as it strives to normalize operations.

Problems began around 1 p.m. Sunday when an underground piece of electrical equipment owned by Georgia Power failed and caught fire, the utility believes. Two separate electrical substations feed power into the equipment, called a transfer switch. Normally, if one substations fails, the switch can go to the other in milliseconds, allowing for a seamless supply of power.



But in this case, both the switch and the cables providing the redundant power to the airport were damaged by a fire in the tunnel, disabling the power flow to the airport, officials said.

It wasn’t clear whose responsibility it was to have more redundant power. The airport and the power company are required to have a backup emergency electricity plan that must be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA said it would work closely with the airport in its investigation over the incident.

The airport had backup power for emergency lights and other life-saving equipment, said airport spokesman Reese McCranie, but nothing else. He said the airport planned to look at adding more backup power among other possible fixes.

“I don’t want to get into finger pointing here. The airport and Georgia Power are going to be working very closely in the days and weeks ahead to review what we have currently in place and make improvements where needed,” he said.

Jacob Hawkins, a spokesman for Georgia Power, a subsidiary of Southern Co., said, “We’re evaluating the system and will be working with the airport to ensure that this doesn’t happen again.” He added “we will need to add more redundancy.”

The Atlanta airport’s electricity configuration, where redundant power sources flow through a single piece of equipment, is typical of how major power networks operate, said Paul Bowers,  chief executive of Georgia Power.

Nam Paik, vice president of sales at TSi Power, a Wisconsin company that designs and builds smaller transfer switches that aren’t used in Atlanta, questioned why a backup switch wasn’t in place to act as a safeguard in case the first failed. Such a secondary switch of the size needed for Atlanta, connected to a large portable generator, would likely cost several million dollars.

“Basically the Atlanta airport’s problem was they put all their eggs in one basket and that basket caught on fire,” Mr. Paik said. “Major airports should have at least three redundant power systems.”

Some other airports have different configurations to protect against power outages. The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is fed by two sets of power lines, one entering the facility from the north and the other from the south. If one fails, the other can power the entire airport, said David MagaƱa, a Dallas airport spokesman.

The half-day shutdown could prove expensive for airlines. A Delta information-technology center failure at the Atlanta airport in the summer of 2016 led to the cancellations of 2,300 flights over three days. The company later estimated it lost $150 million in pretax income due to the outage in the third quarter of 2016.

Passengers were stunned that the sprawling airport could be immobilized for so long. Jet bridges couldn’t be used to get passengers off planes. The airport train, security scanners, baggage systems and airline computer systems were inoperable and only emergency lighting worked throughout the terminals. Power was restored at about 11:45 p.m., said a Georgia Power spokesman.

“There is no excuse for lack of workable redundant power source. None!” wrote former U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx on twitter. He was stuck on a Delta flight on the tarmac for about five hours, he tweeted.

A lack of adequate power backup is effectively a choice companies make, said Gil Hecht, CEO of consultancy Continuity Software.

“For real critical projects the technology is readily available and is being used all over the market,” such as in data centers used by financial services, he said.

Having redundancy in power suppliers or providing for local backup that kicks in when primary power is lost can be costly, he said, adding “it is all about the money.”

Hartsfield-Jackson handles about 104 million passengers a year, with a total of 2,500 arriving and departing flights a day.

FlightAware.com, the flight tracking provider, said there were 1,285 flight cancellations in the U.S. Sunday, and nearly 3,100 delays, many tied to the Atlanta problem. Southwest Airlines Co. also scrubbed many of its Atlanta flights. For Monday, FlightAware is showing 570 cancellations in the U.S., most of them by Delta.

Sunday’s outage forced airlines to halt all outbound flights Sunday and planes heading to Atlanta were held on the ground at their points of origin. International flights were diverted to other airports that have customs and immigration facilities.

Though the Atlanta outage was an extreme case, airports and airlines around the world have been vulnerable to electrical disruptions.



A power outage at a British Airways data center this year caused widespread disruptions at one of Europe’s biggest airlines. London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest hub and the biggest gateway for U.S. passengers to Europe, two years earlier suffered disruptions to its luggage system when the airport temporarily lost power.

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, another major European transfer hub for international flights, in 2015 also had flight plans thrown into chaos when an electric substation failed cutting power supply to the airport.

Since an August 2016 fire that crippled Delta’s IT center, the company has built a new data center “so we don’t need to worry about the fragility of the old data center,” Ed Bastian, the chief executive, said last week in an investor briefing. He called 2017 “a year of significant investment in reliability and the infrastructure of the enterprise.”

Delta, the nation’s No. 2 airline by traffic, told passengers early Monday that they can change their flights planned for Sunday through Tuesday without a fee if they travel by Friday. It also said it would pay for their hotel stays in Atlanta on Sunday and urged passengers with checked luggage destined for Atlanta to file claims online and avoid going to Hartsfield-Jackson Monday to retrieve their luggage.

—Robert Wall contributed to this article.

https://www.wsj.com



Airlines serving Atlanta’s airport struggled to resume their normal schedules on Monday, a day after a sudden electrical outage sparked thousands of flight cancellations on Sunday and hundreds more on Monday.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest by passenger traffic and a major hub for Delta Air Lines Inc., said power was fully restored around midnight on Sunday after the stoppage halted the airport train, baggage belt systems and airline computer access.

Thousands of fliers were trapped in the airport Sunday at the start of the hectic holiday travel period, leading to overbooked planes on Monday.

The airport said early Monday that the power had returned along with concession shops and restaurants and Transportation Security Administration checkpoints. The airport said fliers had to reprint any Sunday tickets before security screening.

Paul Bowers, chief executive of Georgia Power, said Monday that the airport is served by two electrical substations, either of which could have powered the facility. But he said a fire in an underground concrete tunnel, where cables from both substations come together, damaged a switch that determines which substation is used.

“It is so rare that a switch would fail like that,” he said. But “issues like this occur” and the power company, a unit of Southern Co., is looking at ways of preventing such a problem in the future. Mr. Bowers said it is normal to have all the power cables in one tunnel. In an interview with ABC, said the power company will assess “what else do we do? Do we separate the cables?”

The outage forced airlines to halt all outbound flights Sunday at an airport that handles about 2,500 flights a day. Planes heading to Atlanta were held on the ground at their points of origin. Authorities diverted international flights to other airports that have customs and immigration facilities.

FlightAware.com, the flight tracking provider, said there were 1,285 flight cancellations in the U.S. Sunday, and nearly 3,100 delays, many tied to the Atlanta problem. Southwest Airlines Co. , also scrubbed many of its Atlanta flights. For Monday, FlightAware is showing 570 cancellations in the U.S., most of them by Delta.

Delta alone said it canceled nearly 1,000 flights on Sunday and scrubbed another 300 flights slated for Monday morning, mostly early inbound flights to Atlanta. Delta said it expects operations to return to normal later Monday, but it was still unclear on Monday afternoon if that was possible.

Delta, the nation’s No. 2 airline by traffic, told passengers early Monday that they can change their flights planned for Sunday through Tuesday without a fee if they travel by Friday. It also said it would pay for their hotel stays in Atlanta on Sunday and urged passengers with checked luggage destined for Atlanta to file claims online and avoid going to Hartsfield-Jackson Monday to retrieve their luggage.

Georgia Power said Sunday that a “switchgear” in the underground facility could have failed and started the fire, which caused no injuries. Mayor Kasim Reed said in a press briefing that it took almost two hours to contain the fire.

The outage comes at a sensitive time for Georgia Power. On Thursday, the Georgia Public Service Commission is scheduled to vote on the future of the half-built Vogtle nuclear power plant. The project is billions of dollars over budget and years behind schedule.

The Trump administration in September offered $3.7 billion in additional loan guarantees, potentially raising the total federal loan guarantees to $12 billion. The utility wants to pass on the higher costs to ratepayers, hence a vote on whether those higher expenses can be passed on to customers.

Delta in August 2016 had a fire in its information-technology center that forced it to cancel 2,300 flights over three days. Since then, the Atlanta company has built a new data center “so we don’t need to worry about the fragility of the old data center,” Ed Bastian, the chief executive, said last week in an investor briefing. He called 2017 “a year of significant investment in reliability and the infrastructure of the enterprise.”

Many airlines strive to have redundant power sources for their IT operations because those functions are central to many operational tasks and to dealing with customers. But it has little control over the electric utility that powers the Atlanta airport.

—Russell Gold contributed to this article.

https://www.wsj.com




The Wall Street Journal 
By Susan Carey
Dec. 18, 2017 7:54 a.m. ET

After a sudden electrical outage halted flights to and from Atlanta’s giant airport for 11 hours on Sunday, the lights came on again around midnight but airport operations won’t return to normal on Monday as airlines struggle to get back on track.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest by passenger traffic and a major hub for Delta Air Lines Inc., said power was fully restored around midnight Sunday after going out around 1 p.m. ET. The outage meant elevators and the airport train were inoperable, baggage belt systems were out and check-in agents had no computer access.

Thousands of fliers were trapped in the airport Sunday, well into the start of the hectic holiday travel period. This would mean that planes are full and there will be few seats available for passengers on later flights as airlines tried to restore regular service.

The airport tweeted early Monday that the power was back on, airport concession shops and restaurants were opening and Transportation Security Administration checkpoints were operational. The airport also told fliers that if they had tickets for Sunday flights, they would have to reprint them before security screening.

Hartsfield handles about 104 million passengers a year, with a total of 2,500 arriving and departing flights a day.

Delta said it canceled nearly 1,000 flights on Sunday and scrubbed another 300 flights slated for Monday morning, mostly early inbound flights to Atlanta.

The outage forced airlines to halt all outbound flights Sunday and planes heading to Atlanta were held on the ground at their points of origin. International flights were diverted to other airports that have customs and immigration facilities.

Delta, the nation’s No. 2 airline by traffic, told passengers early Monday that they can change their flights planned for Sunday through Tuesday without a fee if they travel by Friday. It also said it would pay for their hotel stays in Atlanta on Sunday and urged passengers with checked luggage destined for Atlanta to file claims online and avoid going to Hartsfield Monday to retrieve their luggage.

Southern Co. , the parent of Georgia Power, said a fire caused extensive damage to a Georgia Power underground facility, which affected electric substations serving the airport. The fire was extinguished without injury. Southern said that the outage was “rare” and that it has redundant systems in place to guard against such problems.

One flier stuck on a Delta flight tweeted Sunday that “there is no excuse for lack of redundant power source.”

Delta in August 2016 had a fire in its information-technology center that forced it to cancel 2,300 flights over three days. Since then, the Atlanta company has built a new data center “so we don’t need to worry about the fragility of the old data center,” Ed Bastian, the chief executive, said last week in an investor briefing. He called 2017 “a year of significant investment in reliability and the infrastructure of the enterprise.”

Many airlines strive to have redundant power sources for their IT operations because those functions are central to many operational tasks and to dealing with customers. But there is less an airline can do about an electric utility that powers its largest airport.

Local media in Atlanta reported that Mayor Kasim Reed said in a press briefing that it took almost two hours to contain the Georgia Power fire. He said the utility’s switch that accesses the backup power system was also damaged in the blaze, causing both do go down.

FlightAware.com, the flight tracking provider, said there were 1,285 flight cancellations in the U.S. Sunday, and nearly 3,100 delays, many tied to the Atlanta problem. Southwest Airlines Co. , also scrubbed many of its Atlanta flights. For Monday, FlightAware is showing 536 cancellations in the U.S., most of them by Delta, by far the largest operator in Atlanta.

Delta said it expects operations to return to normal later Monday, which could be a feat given that crews and airplanes are out of position and airports are thronged with holiday fliers.

https://www.wsj.com



The Wall Street Journal

By Ian Lovett and  Susan Carey
Updated Dec. 18, 2017 12:15 a.m. ET


Electricity has been restored to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport late Sunday, hours after an outage unleashed havoc on travelers around the country, leading to hundreds of flight cancellations during one of the most hectic travel periods of the year.

The power went out at Hartsfield-Jackson—the busiest airport in the world by passenger traffic, with an average of 275,000 passengers daily—shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday, according to airport officials.

Shortly before midnight, Georgia Power tweeted that power had been restored to all essential services at the airport, including all concourses and flight operations.

The outage may be linked to a fire that caused extensive damage to a Georgia Power underground electrical facility, the utility said in a press release.

The effects of the outage are likely to spill into Monday’s flights, given that aircraft and crew won’t be in position to operate as scheduled and displaced passengers will need to be accommodated.

As a result of Sunday’s outage, the Federal Aviation Administration ordered all flights bound for Atlanta held on the ground. International flights bound for the airport were diverted elsewhere, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

“The cause of the incident remains under investigation,” according to a message on the airport’s Twitter page, posted Sunday afternoon. “ATL officials are working with Georgia Power to identify the cause and remedy the situation.”

In a statement, the FAA said, “The FAA Tower can operate normally, however, departures are delayed because airport equipment in the terminals is not working.”

The outage affected “all concourses and terminal buildings,” according to Twitter posts from Delta Air Lines Inc., which has a major hub in Atlanta.

Delta said it canceled 900 flights on Sunday. The airline said in a tweet that it expected to operate a nearly full schedule on Monday, pending the resumption of power.

Southwest Airlines canceled all flights to or from Atlanta for the rest of the day on Sunday.

American Airlines Group Inc., the largest airline by traffic, isn’t big in Atlanta. The airline said it had 47 fights scheduled to depart Sunday from the city, 24 of which were canceled, and a similar number of arrivals. Three arriving planes were unloaded and three planes were diverted to other airports.

This weekend marks the beginning of the hectic holiday travel season. Airlines for America, a trade group, estimated that 51 million passengers would fly on U.S. carriers globally from Dec. 15 to Jan. 4, up 3.5% from a year ago.

https://www.wsj.com



A major power outage grounded flights at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport Sunday afternoon.

Here are the latest updates:

5:12 pm - -Delta says it is deplaning aircraft that have not been able to depart due to the power outage.

4:43 -- A friend of 11Alive reporter Natisha Lance says partial power has been restored in the International Terminal via a generator, but none of the monitors are on. She says people are “surprisingly calm” because “no one knows what is going on.” No one has told them anything. 

4:31 pm -- Delta has issued a travel waiver for passengers affected by the power outage.

4 pm -- Airport officials say they are still working to restore power at the airport. The ground stop continues, and there is no timetable for when flights will be allowed to resume. The exact cause of the power outage is still under investigation. Many inbound flights to Atlanta are being diverted.

3:53 pm -- Southwest Airline has canceled all flights into and out of Atlanta for the rest of the day.

3:37 pm -- According to the U.S. Customs and Border southeastern division, all international flights heading into Atlanta are being diverted to other airports.

3:22 pm -- The FAA has extended the ground stop to at least 4 pm, and says between 80 to 100 jets are parked on the taxiways, waiting for gates.

3:15 pm -- Major airlines are canceling flights at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in the aftermath of a major power outage Sunday afternoon.

Southwest Airlines is canceling "all but a handful of international flights," according to an airline spokesperson.

Delta Air Lines says it is aware of the power outage and the flight disruptions are expected. Delta customers are encouraged check the status of their flight via the Fly Delta Mobile App or Delta.com.

Airport officials say the outage occurred at 12:55 p.m., and affects several areas of the airport. The outage was due to an electrical issue at a Georgia Power substation, according to an airport spokesperson who spoke to NBC News.

Read more here ➤ http://www.11alive.com



ATLANTA - The Federal Aviation Administration has issued a ground stop for all flights into Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport after a large power outage Sunday around 1 p.m., according to a statement released on the airport's official Twitter account.

According to the release a ground stop means flights into Atlanta are being held at their departure airports. 

Atlanta's Fire Rescue reported flight, security and taxiing delays. 

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection reports that because of the power outage International arriving flights will be diverted and land at other airports.

Delta Airlines official Twitter account tweeted that travel waivers will be given out for December 17-18.

Some passengers have reported being stuck in airplanes for around three hours. There are significant cell reception issues at the airport, making it difficult for people to reach their loved ones. 

The airport recommends passengers check with their individual airlines' for flight information. 

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.fox5atlanta.com





ATLANTA (RNN) - Emergency lights flashed, ground traffic came to a halt and inbound passengers are stuck on their planes after power was lost at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta on Sunday.

In addition to all air traffic coming to a halt in Atlanta, the Federal Aviation Administration enacted a ground stop for all flights headed to Atlanta, meaning that they will not be allowed to take off until the stop is lifted.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported a pilot relayed a message to passengers saying a construction crew severed a power line that serves the airport. Georgia Power said it was working with airport authorities to determine the cause of the outage.

Power was lost in at least two terminals and the airport public address system reported an emergency. An airport customer service representative confirmed a power outage, but could not say how much of the airport was affected.

There are reports from people at the airport that flights are delayed and inbound flights cannot deplane due to lack of power in the jetways.

The outage was first reported about 1 p.m. Eastern.

Dozens of passengers have tweeted reports of planes stuck at the gate, power lost throughout the airport, pilots announcing diverted flights and TSA not allowing people off of stalled escalators.

It is not known how many flights may be affected.

It is raining in the Atlanta area, but it is not known if the weather played a role in the outage.

Hartsfield-Jackson is the busiest airport in the world, serving 150 domestic destinations and 75 international airports in 50 countries. On average, 275,000 passengers pass through the airport each day.

Story, photo gallery and video ➤ http://www.wafb.com





A power outage grounded all flights at the world's busiest airport on Sunday afternoon, causing a ripple effect that will likely push across the entire nation.

Power went out at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport early Sunday afternoon.

Airport officials say the outage occurred at 12:55 p.m., and affects several areas of the airport. The outage was due to an electrical issue at a Georgia Power substation, according to an airport spokesperson who spoke to NBC News.

11Alive's Faith Abubey was in the North Terminal at the time of the outage, and reports that all power is out there. In speaking to staff at the United Airlines desk, she says she was told that the outage was over the entire airport and that flights were grounded.

Abubey reports that the Plane Train, which connects each of the terminals below ground, is also affected.

Additionally, data service in and around the airport area is affected, limiting cell phone service in that area.

John Creft with Georgia Power indicated at 1:30 pm that there was a power outage at Hartsfield-Jackson, and that repair crews had been dispatched to the airport to work on the problem.

Airport officials said they were aware of the problem and were working to update the situation.

Georgia Power officials have also indicated they are working to alleviate the issue as soon as possible.

The FAA released a statement noting a ground stop for all flights heading to Atlanta from other airports around the nation as a result of the power outage at Hartsfield-Jackson.

The Federal Aviation Administration has put in a ground stop for flights headed to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport due to a power outage affecting the airport terminals. The FAA Tower can operate normally, however, departures are delayed because airport equipment in the terminals is not working. A ground stop means that flights headed to Atlanta are held on the ground at their departure airport.

FAA officials said they will provide an update as new information becomes available.

A ground stop at Hartsfield-Jackson will likely affect flights across the entire nation, due to delays resulting from passengers connecting through Atlanta. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.11alive.com





Hartsfield-Jackson international Airport is reporting a loss of electricity.

The FlightAware site reports the airport is currently holding all inbound flights due to an equipment outage.

The outage was reported about 1:15 p.m.

Flyers should check the official FAA website for air traffic control updates. As of 2:20 p.m., traffic destined to Atlanta was being delayed at its departure point.

A Delta Air Lines pilot told passengers a construction crew cut a power line, causing the outage, but an airport spokesman, Andy Gobeil, said officials still weren’t sure.

“We have not determined what caused it,” Gobeil said. Atlanta fire officials and others are “trying to determine how long it will take to get everything up and running.” 

Georgia Power officials confirmed they are aware of the problem, but didn’t have additional information.

John Reetz, a passenger on Flight DL 5297, said his is one of about 30 planes parked on the tarmac, waiting for power to be restored.

“Can’t extend jetways from terminal so planes are parking on tarmac,” Reetz said in an email.

The pilot told passengers about 2:30 p.m. that nobody had issued any estimate on when the power would be restored, Reetz said.

“All we can do is listen and wait to hear something," the pilot told passengers. 

Read more here ➤ http://www.ajc.com