Thursday, June 30, 2016

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, RG Acquisitions LLC, N2473G: Accident occurred June 29, 2016 at Frederick Municipal Airport (KFDK), Frederick County, Maryland

RG ACQUISITIONS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2473G 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baltimore FSDO-07
  
Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms  

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA343
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Frederick, MD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2473G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot of the tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane reported that he executed a normal approach to the asphalt runway. He recalled that the airplane touched down on the main landing gear and bounced. He reported that when the airplane settled to the runway after it bounced, the nose gear struck the ground hard. The student pilot taxied the airplane to the ramp per the control tower's instruction and shut down. A post flight examination of the airplane by the flight school revealed substantial damage to the firewall. 

The student pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain pitch control during the touch down resulting in a bounced landing, subsequent hard landing and substantial damage to the firewall.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

PZL-MIELEC M2601, Mykrantic Company LLC, N260AW: Incident occurred July 20, 2016 in Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon

MYKRANTZ COMPANY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N260AW

Date: 20-JUL-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N260AW
Aircraft Make: PZL MIELEC
Aircraft Model: M26
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CORVALIS
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. CORVALIS, OREGON.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Cessna 170A, Retro Air LLC, N401P: Accident occurred June 28, 2016 at Paine Field - Snohomish County Airport (KPAE), Everett, Washington
















AIRCRAFT: 1951 Cessna 170, N401P S/N 20022

ENGINE:   M&M, S/N:  Continental C-145-A, S/N 5802-D-1-2

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N:  McCauley 1C172/MDM7653, S/N 56402
    
APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   TSOH: 341 (estimated)

PROPELLER:    TSOH: 1847 (estimated)         

AIRFRAME:         TT: 3707 (estimated)             

OTHER EQUIPMENT: Transponder is a KT-76A with Narco AR 850 encoder, Audio Panel is KMA 20, 1xKX-170B NAV COM, 1xKX-175B NAV COM, 1xKI-206 NAV HEAD, 1xKI-208 NAV HEAD, 1xKN-75 External Glideslope receiver (remote), 1x KN-72 externa localizer receiver (remote), ELT:EBC-406AP No external GPS f.  Engine: B&C Starter, JASCO 50 Amp alternator, 6364 mags, F&M Spin on oil filter.  

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Prop, engine, gear, wing, fuselage, see photos.  

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:     Payne Field, WA

REMARKS: Aircraft is intact    

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N401P.htm

RETRO AIR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N401P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Seattle FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA345
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 28, 2016 in Everett, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 170, registration: N401P
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in crosswind conditions the airplane veered to the left and the left main landing gear exited the runway. The pilot further reported that he applied right rudder to correct for the veer, and as the left main landing gear returned to the pavement the wheel separated from the gear leg. He reported that the leg drug along the runway and the airplane came to a stop nose down, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion and substantial damage to the fuselage.




EVERETT, Wash. —

25.+A small plane crashed at Paine Field in Everett Tuesday evening, fire officials say.

Officials told KIRO 7 there were no serious injuries. A pilot and an instructor walked away after the crash.

There was a small fuel leak on the scene but was cleaned up. 

Chopper 7 flew over the scene and it appeared the plane crashed nose first.

Story and video:  http://www.kiro7.com

Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, C-GPJH; Accident occurred June 28, 2016 at Nemacolin Airport (PA88), Farmington, Wharton Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allegheny PFSDO-03

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA233
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 28, 2016 in Farmington, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/22/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA T206, registration: C-GPJH
Injuries: 4 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during his first attempt to land on the 3,950-foot-long asphalt runway, the airplane touched down too long and he performed a go-around. During the second attempt, the airplane touched down on the first one-third of the runway, when a gust of wind forced the airplane back into the air and it subsequently touched down further down the runway than during the first attempt. The pilot thought a go-around would be too dangerous at that point and applied brakes, but the airplane traveled off the end of the runway and struck and asphalt berm. The pilot further stated that the airplane landed with a headwind of 15 knots, gusting to 25 knots. A witness, who worked at the airport, stated that the airplane was still airborne as it flew over the runway numbers at the departure end of the runway. Examination of the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector did not reveal any skid marks on the runway; however, the inspector observed skid marks in the grass beyond the runway. The inspector did not observe any preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the airplane, nor did the pilot report any. The inspector added that during the impact, the airplane sustained damage to the firewall and lower fuselage.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to obtain the proper touchdown point and failure to perform a go-around once a safe landing on the runway could not be accomplished.






FARMINGTON, Pa. —A pilot and three passengers escaped serious injury when the small plane they were landing in ran off the end of a private runway during Tuesday's lunch hour at the Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Fayette County.

The resulting crash happened near Nemacolin's miniature golf course and Caddyshack Restaurant, in view of a children's carousel ride.

"A Canadian registered aircraft went off the end of Runway 5-23 at a private airstrip in Farmington, PA at 12:50 p.m.," Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters emailed to Pittsburgh's Action News 4. "The aircraft landed long on the runway."

Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

The Canadian Civil Aircraft Register said the plane is a Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair based out of Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

The crash was a starting sight for guests -- including families --- who were having lunch at the restaurant, which is just yards away.

"The plane was off the runway. Initial reports said four injuries.  We had four different ambulances come in. Checked the patients out.  Everybody refused treatment at the time," said the Assistant Fire Chief, Eric Baker, of the Farmington fire department.

Local emergency responders and Fayette County's Hazmat Team spent the afternoon cleaning up a resulting fuel spill. There was no fire in the crash.

Nemcolin spokeswoman Ashi Mazer-Workman said the single engine plane was arriving from Ontario and that all four occupants are guests at the resort.

"The plane has damage to its nose and is disabled, meaning it cannot take off and will need to be moved from the site," Mazer-Workman said. "Nemacolin has been operating an airfield on its 2,000-acre resort since 1987. The airfield is for private usage, subject to prior approval and reservations made with the resort's security department."

She said the National Transportation Safety Board was also investigating the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.wtae.com

Cessna 150L, N6622G; Fatal accident occurred June 27, 2016 near Coleman A Young Municipal Airport (KDET), Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan and Accident occurred February 12, 2011 in Trenton, Michigan

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises LLC, and operated by Air America Aerial Ads: http://registry.faa.gov/N6622G

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a banner-tow flight. He reported that the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power after being airborne for at least 3 hours 9 minutes. He informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and conducted a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. The pilot reported that he had used a higher-than-normal engine power setting to maintain altitude throughout the accident flight.

A postaccident examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, that the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and that the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel. A subsequent test run established that there were no anomalies with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The operator had a policy that limited all banner-tow flights in the accident airplane to 3 hours or less to avoid fuel exhaustion. The operator also noted that environmental considerations, such as operating at a high-density altitude and/or in windy conditions, could require a higher-than-normal engine power setting and increased fuel consumption. Additionally, the operator told its pilots that banner-tow flights operating in such conditions should be reduced to between 2 hours 30 minutes and 2 hours 45 minutes. The pilot had received a verbal briefing within a month of the accident that covered the operator’s policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration in the accident airplane while towing banners and acknowledged knowing these procedures.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s disregard of the banner-tow operator's policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, and operated by Air America Aerial Ads, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line and subsequently died, on July 6, 2016, while being treated at a local hospital.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine, serial number RL-20646-36A. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks, installed in conformance with STC No. SA5733SW, that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37.2 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 3 hours or less. However, the operator also noted that environmental considerations, such as operating at a high density altitude and/or in windy conditions, could require a higher-than-normal engine power setting and increased fuel consumption. Further, the operator told their pilots that banner-tow flights should be reduced to between 2 hours 30 minutes and 2 hours 45 minutes in those conditions that required increased fuel consumption. According to the operator, the accident pilot had received a verbal briefing, within a month of the accident, that covered the company's policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration in the Cessna 150 airplane while towing banners.

According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Additionally, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used to maintain altitude throughout the accident flight. Further, when interviewed, the pilot acknowledged knowing the company's policy that limited banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 to 3 hours or less.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel. A subsequent test run established that there were no anomalies with the engine that would have precluded its normal operation.

Federal regulation 14 CFR Part 91.151 stipulates that no person may begin a flight in an airplane, in day visual meteorological conditions, unless (after considering wind and forecast weather conditions) there is enough fuel to reach the intended destination, plus 30 minutes while at a normal cruising speed.


In response to the accident, in order to enhance the safety of future banner-tow operations and to ensure future compliance with regulation 91.151, the operator updated their company policy to limit banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 airplane to 2 hours 45 minutes or less. Additionally, the operator agreed to install cockpit placards, in each Cessna 150 airplane used for banner-tow operations, which will reinforce the updated company policy limiting banner-tow flights to 2 hour 45 minutes or less. Finally, the operator committed to install fuel flow/totalizers in all of their banner-tow airplanes and provide training on their proper use.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line. On July 6, 2016, the individual subsequently died while being treated at a local hospital.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Further, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used throughout the accident flight.


A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.


A woman electrocuted by a live wire downed by a crashing plane has died, more than a week after she was declared brain dead, according to officials and a family friend.

Theresa Surles, 38, died Wednesday, according to the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office. She is scheduled for an autopsy Thursday.

Surles initially was reported by police to be 45 years old.

“She leaves behind six kids, two grandbabies, a grandbaby on the way and a host of family and friends,” longtime family friend Lisa Jones said. “We all had hope. That’s a lot to leave behind.”

Jones is godmother to Surles’ 19-year-old daughter and knew the woman for more than 20 years, she said. Other children range in age from 17 to 24 years old, including two sets of twins.

“The children took it hard,” Jones said.

Funeral arrangements are pending, but there are plans for the women in Surles’ life to serve as pallbearers at a Monday service, Jones said.

“We all grew up with her,” said Jones, who will be a pallbearer. “Her sister said she wanted (Surles’) friends to be part of it.”

Family and friends were there when Surles was struck by a live wire around 9 p.m. June 27 outside her home at Shoemaker and Cooper, Jones said.

“She was preparing to go to the fireworks with her children, so they witnessed this ordeal,” Jones said. “As Theresa was getting out of the car, the wire hit her in the chest and she fell. She stopped breathing, she died, they tried to resuscitate her and her heart started.

“But she never regained consciousness through this whole ordeal and they decided to take her off life support.”

The single-engine Cessna 150L was registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, according to a preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board. It crashed while helmed by an 18-year-old commercial pilot who ran out of fuel on his way to the Coleman A. Young International Airport on the city’s east side, officials said last week.

It struck a utility pole, bringing down the wire that electrocuted Surles. She was rushed to Detroit Receiving Hospital, initially listed in serious condition. The pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane.

The plane crashed after the pilot flew for too long and ran out of fuel, according to the NTSB.

“To avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was (Drake Aerial Enterprises) company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot’s statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration,” officials said. “The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.”

The plane first encountered trouble when its “engine began to run roughly” while returning to the airport after towing a banner over the Detroit River during the fireworks, according to the report. The pilot enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump before the plane experienced a total loss of power.

“The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street,” NTSB wrote in its report. “The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line.”

The report was later updated to reflect Surles’ death.

The pilot was not taken into custody last week at the crash scene. Detroit police referred questions to the FAA and NTSB, which are investigating the crash. Officials with both agencies could not comment on the pilot’s status.


http://www.detroitnews.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Further, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used throughout the accident flight.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.









DETROIT (AP) — A small plane that had been trailing a banner over crowds gathered for a fireworks display crash-landed in a Detroit residential street, injuring the pilot and a bystander who was electrocuted by a power line that the aircraft brought down, authorities said.

Early reports by police suggested the plane had to land Monday night because it was running out of fuel. The pilot reported engine failure, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro said Tuesday, and he anticipated it would take a few weeks to investigate the crash.

"I was walking up the street here, and then all of a sudden, a plane was just a little too low and it actually hit poles and a wire here," witness Dondra Mainor told WDIV-TV.

The plane flew out of Coleman A. Young International Airport, Molinaro said. Located near the crash site on Detroit's east side, the small airport also is known as City Airport.

The pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane. Detroit police spokeswoman Nicole Kirkwood told the Detroit Free Press that the woman on the ground who was electrocuted was in serious condition.

The Detroit News, citing city spokesman John Roach, reported the plane had been trailing a banner over crowds gathered for the annual fireworks. The plane came to rest with its nose on the pavement, just beyond a stop sign and near parked cars.

The Ford Fireworks is produced by The Parade Co. and included thousands of pyrotechnic effects visible for miles along the Detroit River between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario. It's the event's 58th year. Dearborn-based Ford Motor Co. has been the title sponsor since 2013.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.ksl.com







A single-engine plane that crashed Monday night near Coleman A. Young International Airport on Detroit’s east side ran out of fuel, forcing the emergency landing near Interstate 94 and Gratiot, according to police.

The plane struck a utility pole at about 9 p.m. at Shoemaker and Cooper, bringing down power lines. A 45-year-old woman on the ground was electrocuted by a live wire and was taken to Detroit Receiving Hospital in serious condition.

The 18-year-old male pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane.

The plane came to rest in the middle of a street in the residential area with its nose on the pavement, just beyond a stop sign. It missed some cars that were parked at the curb. There was no smoke or fire.

No one answered the phone at the airport late Monday. The facility at Conner and I-94 is formerly known as City Airport.

The plane had been trailing a banner over the crowds gathered Monday for the downtown fireworks and was returning to the airport when it went down, according to city spokesman John Roach. He didn’t know what happened to the banner.

Roach said the pilot was not taken into custody.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash, according to police.




NTSB Identification: CEN11LA182
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 12, 2011 in Trenton, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/18/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had been conducting a banner towing operation for about 55 minutes when he felt a heavy vibration and heard a “loud bang.” The airplane's engine subsequently lost power, and the pilot executed a forced landing. 

During the forced landing, the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain," resulting in substantial damage to the firewall. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that one of the connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft. Metallurgical examination determined that one of the two connecting rod bolts had failed in overstress. The second connecting rod bolt was deformed but otherwise intact; its associated nut had separated from the bolt and was undamaged. The lack of damage to one of the connecting rod nuts in conjunction with the overstress failure of the opposing bolt was consistent with a loss of installation torque on the intact nut. The engine had accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul. The operator did not supply engine overhaul maintenance records but provided a statement indicating that the installed bolts and nuts were new at the engine cylinder's last maintenance (an engine manufacturer service bulletin instructs that connecting rod bolts and nuts be replaced any time they are removed). However, due to the lack of maintenance records and the number of hours since last overhaul, the investigation could not conclusively attribute the loss of preload torque to the overhaul operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of preload torque on a connecting rod nut and bolt, which precipitated a separation of the connecting rod from the engine's crankshaft and resulted in the total loss of engine power.

On February 12, 2011, about 1150, eastern standard time, a Cessna 150L airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Trenton, Michigan, following an in-flight loss of engine power. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant on board the airplane, reported no injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a banner towing flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operating on a flight plan. The local flight departed from the Oakland/Troy Airport, near Troy, Michigan, about 1100, and was destined for the Grosse Ile Municipal Airport, near Grosse Ile, Michigan.

The operator's accident report stated that the pilot was flying the airplane with a banner in tow for about 55 minutes when the pilot felt a heavy vibration and heard a loud bang. The airplane "instantly" lost power and the pilot was unable to "keep the engine running." He released the banner over an area away from people and structures and performed a forced landing. During the forced landing the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain." Substantial damage occurred when the collapsed nose landing gear bent the firewall.

The airplane was a 1970 Cessna 150L, serial number 15072122, was an all-metal, high-wing, semimonocoque design airplane. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4A, serial number L-28947-35A, installed under supplemental type certificate SA4795SW. The installation was documented on a major repair and alteration form, dated December 8, 2003. The airplane was maintained under an annual inspection program and the operator reported that the airplane’s most recent annual inspection was conducted on February 7, 2010. The airplane reportedly accumulated 8,201 hours of total time and the engine accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the no. four connecting rod had separated from its crankshaft. One of the two corresponding connecting rod bolts was deformed. However, the associated nut had separated from the bolt and appeared undamaged. The second connecting rod bolt was fractured near the midpoint of the shank. Metallurgical examination of the fracture surface revealed features consistent with overstress separation.

The Lycoming Service Bulletin No. 240W, Mandatory Parts Replacement at Overhaul and During Repair or Maintenance, in part, stated:

AT OVERHAUL OR UPON REMOVAL: ... Any time the following parts are removed from any Lycoming reciprocating engine, it is mandatory that the following parts be replaced regardless of their apparent condition: ... Stressed bolts and fasteners, such as: ... Connecting rod bolts and nuts

The operator indicated that the installed connecting rod bolts and nuts were new when the last maintenance was performed on this cylinder.

Robinson R44, Universal Aviation LLC, N8325X; accident occurred June 27, 2016 in El Centro, Imperial County, California -Kathryn's Report

UNIVERSAL AVIATION LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N8325X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Diego FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA132
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in El Centro, CA
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N8325X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, at 2010 Pacific daylight time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N8325X, experienced a loss of engine power during cruise and made a forced landing to an open field in El Centro, California. Custom Ag operated the helicopter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural crop dusting operation. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail boom. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the night local crop dusting flight that departed a private airstrip about 2000, the night of the accident.

According to inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot was transitioning from the airstrip to a crop that he would be spraying. At the time of the accident, the helicopter did not have any chemical spraying product onboard. The intent was to fly to the field, meet the truck with the chemical and upload the chemical product at the field.

Shortly after takeoff, while in cruise flight, the pilot felt a vibration, along with a low rpm horn, as well as a loss of engine power. The pilot decided to make an autorotation. During the turn into the wind, the pilot observed that the engine was still at idle. The pilot rolled on the throttle, as the engine returned to 100-percent, he raised the collective and the rpm decreased again along with an engine vibration. The helicopter touched down hard on uneven terrain; the right toe skid dug into the ground and broke, which caused the helicopter to roll onto its right side.

The helicopter has been recovered for additional examination.

Beechcraft 95-C55 Baron, Green Transportation Inc., N4882J: Incident occurred June 25, 2016 in Grenville, Union County, New Mexico

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

GREEN TRANSPORTATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4882J

Date: 25-JUN-16
Time: 22:37:00Z
Regis#: N4882J
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 55
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01
City: GRENVILLE
State: New Mexico

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, 11 MILES FROM GRENVILLE, NEW MEXICO.

Piper PA28, University of Oklahoma, N4830U: Incident occurred June 27, 2016 in Purcell, McClain County, Oklahoma

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA: http://registry.faa.gov/N4830U

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK THE PROPELLER, PURCELL, OKLAHOMA.

Date: 27-JUN-16
Time: 20:58:00Z
Regis#: N4830U
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PURELL
State: Oklahoma

Cessna 180K Skywagon, Yellow Jacket Aero LLC, N180FJ: Incident occurred June 27, 2016 in Crystal, Hennepin County, Minnesota

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

YELLOW JACKET AERO LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N180FJ

Date: 27-JUN-16
Time: 22:01:00Z
Regis#: N180FJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15
City: CRYSTAL
State: Minnesota

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLL WENT OF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK THE WING, CRYSTAL, MINNESOTA.

Delta Airlines, Boeing 737-832, N395DN: Incident occurred June 27, 2016 in Fairbanks, Alaska

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

DELTA AIR LINES INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N395DN

Date: 27-JUN-16
Time: 21:50:00Z
Regis#: N395DN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: None
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: DAL-Delta Air Lines
Flight Number: DAL1780
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fairbanks FSDO-01
City: FAIRBANKS
State: Alaska

N395DN DELTA AIRLINES FLIGHT DAL1780 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE AND 1 FLIGHT ATTENDANT SUSTAINED UNKNOWN INJURY, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, FAIRBANKS, ALASKA.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, Aurora Enterprise USA Inc., N734UF: Incident occurred June 26, 2016 in Hollywood, Broward County, Florida

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

AURORA ENTERPRISE USA INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N734UF

Date: 26-JUN-16
Time: 22:49:00Z
Regis#: N734UF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: HOLLYWOOD
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD OFF THE RUNWAY, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA.

Cessna 310, N455CB: Incident occurred June 26, 2016 in Scharfer, Montana

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N455CB

Date: 26-JUN-16
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N455CB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Helena FSDO-05
City: SCHAFER
State: Montana

AIRCRAFT, ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, SHAFER, MONTANA.

Van's RV-4, N3446: Accident occurred June 25, 2016 in Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N3446

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Windsor Locks FSDO-63

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA344
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 25, 2016 in Fitchburg, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2016
Aircraft: BENJAMIN HAROLD E RV-4, registration: N3446
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that he made a normal three-point landing, shortly after touchdown the airplane veered to the left, then veered to the right. The pilot further reported that he applied power in an attempt to regain control, however the airplane veered back to the left and he reduced power as the airplane departed the runway. The airplane ground looped and the right wing impacted terrain causing substantial damage to the right aileron. 

The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control upon landing, which resulted in a runway excursion followed by impact with terrain.