Thursday, April 13, 2017

Arion Lightning LS-1, N481SL: Accident occurred August 24, 2016 at Northeast Florida Regional Airport (KSGJ), St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N481SL

Raw video: https://www.instagram.com

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA502
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 24, 2016 in St. Augustine, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: ARION SKYS OPEN SPORT AVIATION LIGHTNING, registration: N481SL
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the experimental light-sport airplane, following a personal flight, he made a straight-in approach to runway 13. He recalled that the tower reported the wind as 070° at 12 knots. During the approach, the airplane encountered “convective turbulence,” but he established a stabilized approach over the runway centerline. He remarked that, about 5 ft above the runway, the airplane encountered what he estimated to be a 20-knot or greater wind gust. He reported that the airplane ballooned and touched down on the nosewheel, the propeller struck the ground, and he used differential braking to stop the airplane on the runway. The nose landing gear separated from the airplane, and the engine mounts and the spar box sustained substantial damage.

The METAR at the accident airport indicated that, at the time of the accident, the wind was 040° true at 12 knots. There were no METARs throughout the day at the accident airport that indicated wind gusts. 

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airframe or engine that would have prevented normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

According to the pilot in the experimental light-sport airplane, following a personal flight he made a straight-in approach to runway 13. He recalled that the tower reported the wind as 070° at 12 knots. During the approach the airplane encountered "convective turbulence," but he established a stabilized approach over the runway centerline. He remarked that about five feet above the runway the airplane encountered what he estimated to be a 20 knot or greater wind gust. He reported that the airplane ballooned, touched down on the nose wheel, the propeller struck the ground, and he used differential braking to stop the airplane on the runway. The nose landing gear separated from the airplane, and substantial damage was sustained to the engine mounts and the spar box.

The meteorological aerodrome report (METAR) at the accident airport, indicated that at the time of the accident the wind was 040° true, at 12 knots. There were no METAR's throughout the day, at the accident airport, that indicated wind gusts. 

Jabiru J250-SP, N250 MR LLC, N250MR: Incident occurred April 13, 2017 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Colorado

N250 MR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N250MR

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;   Denver, Colorado

Aircraft on takeoff, went off the runway into the grass. 

Date: 15-APR-17
Time: 19:35:00Z
Regis#: N250MR
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL JABIRU
Aircraft Model: 1250 SP
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Aircraft on departure, went off the end of the runway into an empty retention pond.

Date: 13-APR-17
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N250MR
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL JABIRU
Aircraft Model: J250 SP
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO


CENTENNIAL, Colo. (CBS4)– A small plane went off the runway at Centennial Airport on Thursday afternoon.

The pilot was landing the Jabiru J250, experimental light sport aircraft, on runway 10/28 when the aircraft went off the runway.

Centennial Airport tweeted an update on the aircraft and said the pilot was not injured.

The aircraft will be removed. 

It is unclear what caused the plane to go off the runway. 

Story and photo:  http://denver.cbslocal.com

Steamboat Springs (KSBS), Colorado: Airport manager aims to keep airspace safe



Steamboat Springs — With a medical helicopter regularly flying missions less than 500 feet above the city of Steamboat Springs, the city’s airport manager is reminding a growing population of local drone pilots they need to register their aircraft and follow federal rules to keep the skies safe.

Those rules include the need for pilots of unmanned aircraft to contact the Steamboat Springs Airport anytime they plan to fly within five miles of the runway.

The five-mile radius around the city’s municipal airport covers much of the city limits and extends very close to the base of Steamboat Ski Area.

“The last thing we want is for a drone to pop up and fly into the windscreen (of a helicopter) or get caught in the rotor head,” Airport Manager Stacie Fain said.

Fain said Thursday she hasn’t heard of any close calls between local aircraft and drones.

But with drones rapidly increasing in popularity, and some close encounters with passenger aircraft making national headlines, she’s hoping some education could help avert a disaster down the road.

“I’m trying to get out in front of it,” she said.

Fain said some commercial drone pilots who are flying within five miles of the airport have already contacted her and provided flight plans.

In one instance, a commercial drone pilot was taking real estate photos close to the helipad at Yampa Valley Medical Center.

Fain said a call from that drone pilot allowed her to alert local helicopter pilots who regularly fly in that area so they had a heads up about the other aircraft.

Drone pilots should call the airport at least two hours in advance if they are flying nearby.

The rules are not meant to deter drone pilots from flying, Fain said.

Fain herself pilots a Phantom II drone, and she did consulting work for commercial drone companies before moving to Steamboat.

“We want people to fly them and enjoy them and use them for business,” she said. “But this also means they need to take more responsibility for safety.”

As airport manager, Fain said she mostly fears the risks of recreational drone pilots putting their crafts into the skies without knowing the rules.

Some drones can operate higher than 1,000 feet off the ground, and pilots of manned-aircraft often cannot see them in flight.

Up until recently, commercial drone pilots previously had to get a pilot’s license before they were legal to fly.

With rule changes that went into effect last fall, commercial pilots are able to more easily obtain a pilot certificate specifically for drones that weigh less than 55 pounds.

To learn more about drone safety and federal rules, visit knowbeforeyoufly.org.

How to provide drone flight plan to KSBS

Pilots flying drones within five miles of Steamboat Springs Airport need to call 970-879-9042 or 970-879-1204 at least two hours before they plan to fly. Pilots will be asked to provide the drone registration number, as well as their flight plans.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.steamboattoday.com

Tercel USA, Tinz Gyro LLC, N528WM: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Warren County, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA499 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/15/2017
Aircraft: ALEX MICHAEL BANTUM/TERCEL USA TERCEL-GYROPLANE, registration: N528WM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the solo student pilot, the experimental, amateur-built gyrocopter was positioned for takeoff on the runway and stopped with the brakes set. 

He recalled that he engaged the prerotor, increased the main rotor speed to 180 rpm, then disengaged the prerotor, released the brake, and applied full throttle. 

He reported that, “this is where I made my mistake. At this point I should have brought the control stick all the way back, but did not.” He recalled that the gyrocopter was moving forward rapidly but that the rotor rpm decreased and that he then pulled the control stick aft. He reported that the rotor blades were flapping, the control stick became uncontrollable, and the gyrocopter exited the runway to the left. 

The student pilot reduced the throttle to idle, and during the runway excursion, the left main and the nose landing gear separated from the gyrocopter. The main rotor blade struck the ground, the blade grip sustained substantial damage, and the rotor head partially separated from the frame. 

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airframe or the engine that would have prevented normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s incorrect takeoff procedure, which resulted in a loss of main rotor rpm and the subsequent loss of directional control and runway excursion.

TINZ GYRO LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N528WM

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA499
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Aircraft: ALEX MICHAEL BANTUM/TERCEL USA TERCEL-GYROPLANE, registration: N528WM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the solo student pilot, the experimental amateur built gyrocopter was positioned for takeoff on the runway, and stopped with the brakes set.

He recalled that he engaged the pre-rotor, increased the main rotor speed to 180 revolutions per minute (rpm), then disengaged the pre-rotator, released the brake, and applied full throttle. 

He reported that, "this is where I made my mistake. At this point I should have brought the control stick all the way back, but did not." He recalled that the gyrocopter was moving forward rapidly, but the rotor rpm decreased, and he then pulled the control stick aft. He reported that the rotor blades were flapping, the control stick became uncontrollable, and the gyrocopter exited the runway to the left. 

The student pilot reduced the throttle to idle, and during the runway excursion the left main and the nose landing gear separated from the gyrocopter. The main rotor blade struck the ground, the blade grip sustained substantial damage, and the rotor head partially separated from the frame. 

The student pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airframe or the engine that would have prevented normal flight operation.

Piper PA-22-108, N4751Z: Fatal accident occurred January 14, 2016 in Garden City, Glasscock County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA087
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 14, 2016 in Garden City, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-108, registration: N4751Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had recently purchased the airplane and planned to fly it to a friend's private airport to show him the airplane. The private airport was located about 27 nautical miles east of the departure airport. A witness observed the pilot start the airplane's engine, but he did not observe the airplane take off. The airplane did not arrive at the destination, an alert notice was issued, and the wreckage was found the following day about 8 nautical miles southwest of the intended destination and about 6 nautical miles south of the direct route of flight. Although radar coverage was available and showed other airplanes in the accident area using a transponder code of 1200, no radar data were found for the accident flight. There were no known witnesses to the accident. The accident site was located in an area of mostly flat terrain with mesquite trees and shrubs immediately adjacent to a caliche pit that was surrounded by large dirt piles on three sides and measured about 35 ft from the bottom of the pit to the top of the dirt piles. The airplane struck the top of the dirt pile on the east side of the pit, and the debris extended 100 yards to the east, indicating that the airplane was heading east at impact. The damage to the airplane was consistent with impact at a high forward velocity in a relatively level attitude. The signatures observed on the propeller were consistent with the engine operating at a high power setting at the time of impact. There was no evidence of preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

A review of weather information found no evidence of convective activity, a significant surface wind condition, or a low-level wind shear hazard in the accident area. The reported weather conditions at stations near the accident site included clear skies, visibility of 10 miles, and wind from the west at less than 20 knots. 

Although the caliche pit was a whitish color that contrasted with the brownish color of the surrounding flat terrain, the dirt pile that the airplane struck was similar in color to the surrounding terrain. Due to this color similarity, it is possible that, while flying at low altitude, the pilot did not recognize that the dirt pile was higher than the surrounding flat terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance with terrain during a low altitude flight.


Former Midland County Sheriff Dallas Smith 



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas
Piper Aircraft; Texas
Lycoming Engines; Texas

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4751Z 




NTSB Identification: CEN16FA087
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 14, 2016 in Garden City, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-108, registration: N4751Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 14, 2016, about 1610 central standard time, a Piper PA-22-108 airplane, N4751Z, impacted terrain near Garden City, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane departed from the Midland Airpark (MDD), Midland, Texas, about 1545 and was en route to the Edwards Lucian Wells Ranch Airport (TX31), a private airport near Big Spring, Texas.

An employee of the pilot stated that the pilot planned to fly from MDD to TX31 to show the airplane to a friend, who was the owner of TX31. The employee reported that the pilot left the shop about 1400 and went to the airport. A witness at the airport, who spoke with the pilot before the airplane departed, confirmed that the pilot intended to fly the airplane to TX31. The witness saw the pilot start the engine about 1530, but he did not see the airplane take off. TX31 was located about 27 nautical miles east of MDD.

Family members reported the pilot missing the following day, and an alert notice was issued. The airplane was found by law enforcement via cell phone ping and a Civil Air Patrol pilot. The accident site was located about 8 nautical miles southwest of the intended destination, TX31, and about 6 nautical miles south of the direct route of flight. There were no known witnesses to the accident.

Radar coverage was available and detected other airplanes in the accident area using a transponder code of 1200. No radar data were found for the accident flight.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 73, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multi-engine land, airplane single engine land, and rotorcraft-helicopter. The pilot also held a type rating for Learjet airplanes. Additionally, he held a flight instructor certificate with a single engine airplane rating, which had expired on December 31, 1987. On June 1, 2015, he was issued a third class medical certificate with the following limitation: must have available glasses for near vision. On the medical certificate application, the pilot reported his flight experience included 5,342 total hours and 0 hours in the preceding six months.

A review of the pilot's logbook revealed 5,345.8 total hours of which 3.2 hours were in the accident airplane. The pilot logged 5 flights in 2011 totaling 6.2 hours. There were no logbook entries from 2012 to 2014. The pilot logged 5 flights in 2015 totaling 4.4 hours. On October 25, 2015, the pilot completed a flight review with a flight instructor in a Cessna 206 airplane. On December 13, 2015, the pilot flew the accident airplane with a flight instructor, and the remarks section noted that the pilot completed stalls, steep turns, and landings.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Piper PA-22-108 Colt, serial number 22-8307, was a two-place, high-wing, tricycle landing gear airplane, manufactured in 1961. The airplane was constructed of metal tube and fabric and was equipped with one 18-gallon fuel tank located near the inboard portion of the left wing. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-235-C1B engine, serial number L-7020-15, rated at 108 horsepower at 2,600 rpm, which drove a two blade, fixed pitch, metal Sensenich propeller.

The airplane was sold to the pilot on November 30, 2015. On January 5, 2016, the FAA suspended the airplane's registration because the paperwork had not been submitted properly.

A review of the airplane's maintenance logbooks revealed that, on January 23, 2015, at a tachometer time of 3,501.92 hours, an airframe annual inspection and an engine 100-hour inspection were completed. The tachometer time at the accident site was 3,517.59 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1615, the automated weather observation station, located at the Big Spring McMahon-Wrinkle Airport (BPG), Big Spring, Texas, about 16 miles northeast of the accident site, recorded wind from 230° at 15 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear sky, temperature 63° F, dew point 23° F, and altimeter setting 29.74 inches of mercury. The reported weather conditions at other stations near the accident site included clear skies, visibility of 10 miles, and wind from the west at less than 20 knots.

There was no evidence of the pilot receiving a weather briefing. A review of weather information found no applicable pilot reports and no evidence of convective activity, a significant surface wind condition, or a low-level wind shear hazard in the accident area. There was an active airmen's meteorological information (AIRMET) for moderate turbulence below 10,000 ft.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage came to rest in an area of mostly flat terrain with mesquite trees and shrubs immediately adjacent to a caliche pit, which was surrounded on three sides by large dirt piles. The dirt piles were a brownish color, similar to the color of the flat terrain surrounding the pit, and the pit was a contrasting whitish color. The caliche pit measured about 35 ft from the bottom to the top of the dirt piles. The initial impact point was on the west side of a large dirt pile that defined the eastern boundary of the caliche pit. The debris field and main wreckage were located on top of and to the east of the dirt pile. The debris field extended 100 yards to the east on a heading of 065° magnetic. The engine was found about 30 yards from the initial impact point, and the main wreckage was 10 yards beyond that. The farthest extent of the debris path was defined by a piece of broken windscreen.

The initial impact area on the side of the dirt pile was defined by several areas of disturbed dirt and airplane debris. The first impact marks were toward the bottom of the dirt pile and were spaced similar to the airplane's landing gear. A horizontal line of debris and white paint chips, about 26 ft in length, was noted near the top of the dirt pile. On the left side of the line were pieces of broken red lens, and on the far right side were pieces of green lens. The propeller was found detached from the engine and partially embedded near the top of the dirt pile. The propeller blades exhibited chordwise scratches, leading edge gouges and polishing, and S-shape bending. The propeller spinner was crushed inward. The propeller mounting bolt holes were elongated.

The engine was found inverted in the middle of the debris path and sustained impact damage. The carburetor, starter, generator, and one magneto had separated during impact and were found near the engine. The other magneto remained attached to the engine and was impact damaged. When rotated by hand, neither magneto was able to produce a spark due to internal damage. The carburetor air box, all intake piping, and all fluid carrying lines were impact damaged. The pushrods and rocker arms appeared in place and secure. The engine oil appeared clean. The crankshaft could not be rotated due to impact damage and rearward bending of the propeller flange. To the extent that the engine could be examined, there was no evidence of preimpact anomalies. 

The main wreckage was found upright and consisted of the left and right wings, fuselage and empennage. The fuselage was impact damaged and had been cut open to facilitate the pilot's extraction. The pilot seat was impact damaged and partially separated from the fuselage. The left wing was partially separated from the fuselage and exhibited impact damage. The left aileron remained attached and sustained impact damage. The right wing was partially separated from the fuselage. The empennage remained attached to the rear fuselage, and the vertical stabilizer and rudder were in place, but the lower rudder hinge point was impact separated. The horizontal stabilizer and elevator remained attached and were impact damaged. The rudder cables remained attached to the rudder bar and were continuous to the rudder bellcrank. The elevator control cables were attached to the elevator control horn and to the elevator bellcrank; both cables had been cut to facilitate the pilot's extraction. The elevator bellcrank rod was impact separated. The pitch trim jackscrew was found in a neutral setting. The left and right aileron control cables remained attached and were continuous from the control wheel chain to their respective bellcranks. The airplane was not equipped with flaps. The right landing gear remained attached, the nose gear was separated and found in the debris path about 15 yards beyond the initial impact, and the left main gear was separated and found beyond the main wreckage. There was no evidence of preimpact anomalies with the airframe that would have precluded normal operation. 

The fuel selector was found in the "ON" position. The investigation was unable to determine the amount of fuel onboard before departure or the last time the airplane had been fueled. The emergency locator transmitter (ELT) was found separated from the airplane, and the switch was in the "ON" position; the ELT transmission was detected by the US Air Force. The cockpit instruments were impact damaged; the tachometer showed 3,517.59 hours, and the altimeter's Kollsman window was set to 29.92. The communication radio was set to 122.8 Megahertz (MHz), a popular common traffic advisory frequency. The navigation radio was set to 114.8 MHz, which was the same frequency as the Midland Very High Frequency Omni Directional Radio Range navigation aid.

A damaged cell phone was found in cockpit area, and its battery had separated from the phone. Law enforcement used the ping of this cell phone to locate the wreckage. An unfolded San Antonio Visual Flight Rules Sectional Aeronautical Chart was found next to the wreckage. The chart showed the area encompassing the direct route of flight and the accident location.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

South Plains Forensic Pathology, P.A., Lubbock, Texas, completed an autopsy of the pilot, and the cause of death was attributed to visceral injuries due to blunt impact trauma. The Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory at the FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute conducted toxicological testing, which revealed the presence of amlodipine and was negative for other substances.

Amlodipine (generic and brand name Norvasc) was a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure. The pilot had previously reported this medication to the FAA. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Title 14 CFR Part 91.119 Minimum Safe Altitudes


Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.


Former Midland County Sheriff Dallas Smith 


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA087 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 14, 2016 in Garden City, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-108, registration: N4751Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On January 14, 2016, at 1609 central standard time a Piper PA22-108 airplane, N4751Z, impacted terrain near Garden City, Texas. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane's registration was suspended and it was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The airplane departed from the Midland Airpark (MDD), Midland, Texas, about 1545 and was en route to the Edwards Lucian Wells Ranch Airport, (TX31), Big Spring, Texas. 


An employee of the pilot stated that the pilot intended to fly from MDD to TX31 to show the airplane to a friend. He reported that the pilot left the shop about 1400 and went to the airport. 


A witness at the airport who spoke with the pilot prior to departure stated that the pilot was flying the airplane to TX31 to meet with a friend. The witness saw the pilot start the engine about 1530, but did not see the pilot depart. 


The accident site was located about 8 miles southwest of TX31 and about 4 miles south of expected route of flight. The main wreckage came to rest in an area of mostly flat terrain with mesquite trees and shrubs. The propeller was found embedded in the west side of a large dirt pile, which was next to a small open-pit mine. The debris field and main wreckage were located to the east of the dirt pile. The debris field was about 100 yards long. 


At 1615, the automated weather observation station, located at the Big Spring McMahon-Wrinkle Airport (BPG), Big Spring, Texas, and about 16 miles northeast of the accident site, recorded wind from 230 at 15 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 63° F, dew point 23° F, altimeter setting 29.74 inches of mercury.

Avid Mark IV, N72MT: Accident occurred January 09, 2016 near Florida Flying Gators Ultralight Airpark (3FD4), Minneola, Lake County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA086
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 09, 2016 in Minneola, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/23/2017
Aircraft: WAYLAND JOHN H AVID MARK IV, registration: N72MT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot of the experimental, amateur-built, light sport airplane performed a takeoff and initiated a steep, left, crosswind turn to avoid horses off the end of the runway. About 300 ft above the ground, he smelled "burning wires" and thought he saw a "wisp of smoke." The engine "sputtered then died." The left wing stalled, the airplane rolled inverted, and entered a downward spiral. The airplane collided with trees and terrain before coming to rest, inverted, in a grassy field. Examination of the airframe and engine found no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction that would have prevented normal operation. The pilot received his sport pilot certificate about 4 months before the accident and had accumulated about 120 hours of total flight time at the time of the accident. It is likely that, following the total loss of engine power, the pilot failed to reduce the airplane’s angle of attack either sufficiently or quickly enough to prevent an aerodynamic stall/spin.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack during the crosswind turn, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin.




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Orlando, Florida 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N72MT

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA086 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 09, 2016 in Minneola, FL
Aircraft: WAYLAND JOHN H AVID MARK IV, registration: N72MT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 9, 2016, about 1600 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Avid Mark IV, N72MT, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after takeoff from Florida Flying Gators Ultralight Flightpark (3FD4), Minneola, Florida. The sport pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that, after takeoff, he turned onto the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern. He performed a steep turn after takeoff to avoid horses off the end of the runway. He then noticed the smell of "burning wires" and "may have seen a wisp of smoke." At 300 feet above the ground, and while still climbing, the engine "sputtered, then died." He made a radio call that he was returning to the runway. The left wing then stalled and the airplane rolled inverted and entered a downward spiral. The airplane collided with two trees during the descent before colliding with the terrain. The airplane came to rest in a grassy area, inverted.

Inspectors with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. They observed structural damage to fuselage, empennage, and both wings. An FAA airworthiness inspector examined the engine and found no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction. There were no arcing or burn signatures on the engine's electrical wiring or connectors. A postaccident test run of the engine could not be performed due to impact damage.

The pilot received his sport pilot certificate on September 2, 2015, after taking a two-week training course. He reported 120 hours of total flight time, including 100 hours as pilot-in-command. He also reported 65 hours in the accident airplane make and model, all as pilot-in-command. He stated that, after the accident, he took additional lessons with his original flight instructor to practice emergency procedures, stalls, and stall recovery.






NTSB Identification: ERA16LA086 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 09, 2016 in Minneola, FL
Aircraft: WAYLAND JOHN H AVID MARK IV, registration: N72MT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 9, 2016, about 1600 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Avid Mark IV, N72MT, was substantially damaged following a forced landing after takeoff from Florida Flying Gators Ultralight Flightpark (3FD4), Minneola, Florida. The sport pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that, after takeoff, he turned onto the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern. At 300 feet above the ground, and while climbing, the engine "sputtered then died." He made a radio call that he was returning to the runway. The airplane "stalled and entered a spin attitude." The airplane impacted a grassy area and came to rest inverted.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to fuselage, empennage, and both wings was noted.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Titan Tornado I, N5131H: Accident occurred April 13, 2017 near Spanaway Airport (S44), Pierce County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.  

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office; Renton, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5131H

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA087
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 13, 2017 in Spanaway, WA
Aircraft: TITAN TORNADO I, registration: N5131H
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 13, 2017, about 0945 Pacific daylight time, a Titan Tornado I, N5131H, experienced an in flight loss of control and impacted terrain during departure from the Spanaway Airport, Spanaway, Washington. The certified flight instructor (CFI), the sole pilot, was seriously injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight departed from Spanaway about 0940 with an intended destination of Auburn, Washington. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight.

Witnesses stated that they observed the airplane climb out and turn. The ballistic recovery parachute (BRS) was activated while the airplane was at a low altitude. The accident site was located about 450 feet from the runway surface.




The pilot of a homebuilt plane deployed the craft’s parachute just before crashing Thursday at the edge of Spanaway Airport.

The Titan Tornado I aircraft came to rest in a field a few feet from the runway, behind some houses on 192nd Street Court East. The plane seats one person and has a push propeller.

The male pilot was freed and taken to the hospital with “obvious facial and lower extremities” injuries, Central Pierce Fire & Rescue said.

The pilot’s injuries do not appear to be life-threatening, firefighters said.

The name of the pilot was not released. The plane is registered to a Spanaway man.

Eric Paez, an employee of Roy “Y” Auto Wrecking, located just west of the runway, said he sees the plane fly every day.

“We watch it take off just about every day,” he said.

On Thursday, the plane sounded as if it lost power seconds after taking off, Paez said. The craft immediately banked.

“Like he knew something was happening so he tried to come back,” Paez said.

The plane’s large orange-and-white striped parachute deployed with a loud sound when the craft was only a couple hundred feet off the ground.

“By the time he deployed his chute, he was already going down,” Paez said.

Paez jumped the fence of the wrecking yard and ran to the crash. He was first on the scene.

“As I’m running up to it I’m yelling, ‘Are you alive? Are you OK’?”

The plane was nose down, Paez said. The parachute was splayed behind the craft and still attached to the plane.

“It seemed like (the pilot) was coming out of unconsciousness,” Paez said. “He could barely talk.”

Because there was no fire, Paez didn’t try to free the pilot.

“His legs looked like they were buried in the ground,” he said.

Kodiak Wright, a nearby resident, said he heard the chute deploy followed by the sound of the crash, and within seconds, Pierce County sheriff’s deputies were arriving on scene.

Wright also was familiar with the plane.

“I see him every day,” Wright said. “He’s a really good flier.”

Story and video: http://www.thenewstribune.com









SPANAWAY, Wash. - The pilot of a small plane was injured when his aircraft crashed in a field near the Spanaway airport, emergency officials report.

Crews responded to the scene, near 192nd Street East and B Street, at about 10 a.m. after receiving reports that a light aircraft had crashed, said Central Pierce Fire & Rescue Assistant Chief Guy Overby.

The mangled wreckage of a small single-seater Titan Tornado I plane was found at the scene. The pilot was extricated and taken to the hospital for treatment of his injuries.

Emergency responders said the man, believed to be in his 30s, had suffered lacerations to the face and fractures to the lower extremities. He was conscious and alert when rescuers arrived on scene.

No one else was aboard the aircraft, Overby said.

He said the pilot did a good job of finding an open field with no trees away from houses to bring the plane down. A parachute reportedly deployed from the aircraft before impact, which may have prevented the pilot from suffering more serious injuries

The plane apparently crashed after taking off from a runway at the nearby Spanaway airport. The weather was calm and slightly overcast at the time.

An FAA representative arrived later and documented the scene for use in an investigation of the crash.

Story and video:  http://komonews.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N65645: Incident occurred April 12, 2017 in Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida (and) Accident occurred July 02, 2016 at North Perry Airport KHWO, (and) Accident occurred March 08, 2015 in Newport, Rhode Island

WELLS FARGO BANK NORTHWEST NA TRUSTEE: http://registry.faa.gov/N65645

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway.

Date: 12-APR-17
Time: 12:42:00Z
Regis#: N65645
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PEMBROKE PINES
State: FLORIDA

Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Wayman Aviation LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N65645

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA360
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 02, 2016 in Pembroke Pines, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N65645
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that during the landing flare of his second solo, after the main landing gear touched down the "nose of the airplane swung" to the right. He further reported that he attempted to correct with left rudder, and that this is where "he lost control of the airplane". The airplane veered off the runway to the left, impacted an airport sign, and came to a stop at an intersecting taxi way. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

The student pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing flare, which resulted in a runway excursion, and impact with a sign.



A 36-year-old student pilot crashed upon landing at North Perry Airport in Pembroke Pines on Saturday morning, police said.

The crash happened at 9:35 a.m. as the plane made contact with the runway and drifted from the asphalt onto the grassy field and collided with an electrical sign, according to Sgt. Adam Feiner.

There were no passengers on board and the pilot, identified as Luis Castillo, of Miramar, was not harmed, Feiner said. The estimated damage to the sign and aircraft totaled nearly $15,000.

Pembroke Pines Fire-Rescue responded to the scene, and the Federal Aviation Administration was expected to resume the investigation into the crash.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com 





Police and rescue crews responded to an airplane crash at North Perry Airport in Pembroke Pines Saturday morning.

According to Pembroke Pines Police, a student pilot, 36-year-old Luis Castillo, was flying a Cessna 172P Skyhawk. While landing, the aircraft skidded from the runway and traveled on the air field colliding with a runway identification marker sign.

The crash caused around $4,500 of property damage to the runway sign, and around $10,000 of property damage to the plane, police say.

The Federal Aviation Administration responded to further the investigation.

Origina
l article can be found here:   http://www.nbcmiami.com

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15CA153
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 08, 2015 in Newport, RI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/11/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N65645
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was conducting a solo flight and landing on a 2,999-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. During touchdown, the airplane began to bounce, and subsequently landed hard, which resulted in substantial damage to the nose landing gear and firewall. The airplane veered to the left and contacted a snowbank that extended parallel to the runway. The student pilot reported that he did not experience any preaccident malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. He further reported 43 hours of total flight experience, all in the same make model as the accident airplane, which included 7 hours logged as pilot-in-command.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control during landing, and his subsequent failure to recover from a bounced landing, which resulted in a hard landing.