Tuesday, August 06, 2019

Robinson R44 II, N724H: Accident occurred June 09, 2019 in Lebanon, Laclede County, Missouri

Hendricks Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N724H 

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA476
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 09, 2019 in Lebanon, MO
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N724H

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N724BC: Fatal accident occurred October 25, 2020 and accident occurred June 29, 2019

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
Continental Motors; Tampa, Florida


Location: Dunnellon, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21FA029
Date & Time: October 25, 2020, 10:52
Local Registration: N724BC
Aircraft: Cessna 172 Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:

On October 25, 2020, at 1052 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172H, N724BC, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Dunnellon, Florida. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane held a private pilot certificate for single-engine airplanes with an instrument rating. A review of preliminary air traffic control (ATC) communications and radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot was not in communication with ATC; however, radar data indicated that the airplane departed to the south from the Back Achers Airport (8FL3), Belleview, Florida, about 1034. He then turned toward the southeast and flew over Lake Weir before turning on a westerly heading toward the Marion County Airport (X35) at an altitude between 1,250 and 1,300 ft mean sea level (msl). Around 1038, the airplane began a slow descent to about 900 ft msl before climbing to about 1,000 ft msl. Between 1051:39 and 1052:02, the airplane decelerated from a groundspeed of about 94 knots to 47 knots. One second later, the airplane had climbed to 1,025 ft msl, then entered a descending left turn before the data ended at 1052:12. At that time, the airplane was at 600 ft msl, a heading of 086°, and a groundspeed of 60 knots. The airplane impacted a large open field in a nose-low attitude about 1.2 miles north-northeast of X35. The initial impact point was a ground scar that had pieces of the left-wing tip fairing embedded in the dirt. The airplane then traveled about 120 ft before coming to rest. On-scene examination of the airplane revealed that all major components of the airframe were located at the accident site and there was no postimpact fire. Both wings remained attached to the airframe but sustained extensive leading-edge impact damage. The flaps were retracted. The left fuel tank was breached and empty of fuel. The right fuel tank was intact; however, the fuel line was disconnected, and fuel was leaking from the line. A small amount of fuel was recovered from the airplane’s fuel system. The fuel was blue in color and absent of water and debris. The tail section was folded over the top of the airplane and sustained impact damage.

Flight control continuity was established from all major flight control surfaces to the cockpit. The fuel selector valve was in the “both” position. The airframe fuel filter was drained and about 1 tablespoon of cloudy water was removed. The fuel strainer was disassembled, and heavy corrosion was noted in the bowl and on the fuel filter screen.

The engine was partially separated from the firewall and came to rest next to the airplane. The two bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. One blade was bent aft about 20° and exhibited some leading-edge polishing and the other blade was straight.

The engine was placed on flatbed truck and the top spark plugs were removed and the engine was rotated manually via the propeller. Compression was established on all cylinders except for the No. 6 cylinder which sustained impact damage its pushrods. As the engine was being rotated, valvetrain continuity was established for each cylinder and spark was produced to each magneto ignition lead. The carburetor separated from the engine during impact. The carburetor was disassembled and empty of fuel;
however, a small amount of corrosion was observed in the fuel bowl and on the carburetor inlet screen.

The airplane was equipped with an electronic engine data monitor, which was removed for further examination and data download.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N724BC
Model/Series: 172 H 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OCF,89 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:51 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Belleview, FL (8FL3)
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 29.083241,-82.361285 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.
 
Police Chief Greg Graham, right, shown here flying with Marion County Sheriff Billy Woods.



DUNNELLON, Florida — Ocala Police Chief Greg Graham died Sunday morning in a small-plane crash in southwest Marion County, according to Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn.

The mayor said he received word from OPD Deputy Chief Mike Balken. Guinn has named Balken interim chief. 

Ocala Police Chief Greg Graham addressed the Ocala City Council in August when council was discussing the mask ordinance.

Marion County Fire Rescue received the plane crash call at 11:32 a.m. The plane crashed into an open field in the 9700 block of Southwest 140th Avenue, not far from the Marion County Airport, a county-owned facility in an unincorporated area near Dunnellon.

Valerie Strong, a spokeswoman for the Marion County Sheriff's Office, said no one else was injured.

According to Guinn, Graham had recently obtained his private pilot's certificate. He said the chief enjoyed skydiving and scuba diving and always had a fascination with flying.

"It's hard to believe," the mayor said.

Graham had served as chief since January 2012. At the time, the Star-Banner noted that he was the agency's 30th chief. (The police department dates back to 1869.)

Graham worked at OPD for many years, raising to the rank of deputy chief. He was interim chief for a short time in 2003 until Sam Williams was appointed. 

Graham left the agency in 2008 to become police chief in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He was the first chief to be selected from outside the Cedar Rapids department in 30 years.

While in Iowa, he guided the department through rising flood waters in June 2008. Talking with a Star-Banner reporter, Graham said, “It’s trial by fire. I feel like I’m back in Florida during the 2004-2005 hurricanes we had, and we had to get ready for them.”

Graham came back to become Ocala chief after Williams resigned in late December 2011.

In 2013, after one year at the helm back in Ocala, Graham told the Star-Banner he was paying a lot of attention to department morale and best practices.

"Graham said he felt a disconnect between the administration, officers and civilian employees," the paper  wrote at the time. "So he engaged personnel, similar to an approach he used in Iowa, and adopted a few tenets he hoped would break down barriers.

"They were simple: Do the right thing, ask for forgiveness instead of permission, find ways to say yes, treat everyone with respect and have fun." 

About two dozen law enforcement vehicles, with light bars activated, were parked in front of the Ocala Police Department on Sunday. Drivers on Pine Avenue, just south of Silver Springs Boulevard honked in salute.

In 2016, Graham was placed on paid administrative leave when a grievance was filed on behalf of three police officers alleging racial discrimination, sexual harassment, hostile treatment and retaliation. He was reinstated in January 2017 after a law firm hired by the city cleared him and recommended that he be reinstated with all rights and benefits.

Despite that report, and City Council's decision to reinstate Graham, the city later agreed to pay $500,000 in settlements to the officers.

In February 2018, through the leadership of the mayor, Graham and other community leaders, the police department started a special Heroin/Opioid Amnesty Program. Simply put, the program allowed anyone experiencing a drug addiction problem to come forward and receive help – no judgment and no penalties.

"Graham said the goal is to get those who need help the assistance they need because the agency will never be able to 'arrest our way out of this crisis,' ” the Star-Banner wrote at the time.

Most recently, Graham has been a presence at demonstrations in downtown Ocala that were held in the wake of George Floyd's death. When a group marched from downtown to a local park, Graham was there with them, bullhorn in hand, so he could be heard.

"He affirmed the group’s right to gather and said he shared their dismay about what happened in Minneapolis," the Star-Banner reported at the time. "He said members of the public could call him personally if they believe one of his officers has done anything wrong. He promised that any such complaint would prompt an investigation and consequences, if wrongdoing is confirmed."

In Ocala's system of government, the mayor oversees the police department.

"His leadership was responsible for changing the direction of the department," Guinn said on Sunday. "I couldn't have asked for anybody better."

As the news spread on Sunday, leaders and residents began posting reactions on social media.

"An incredibly tragic day for Ocala. Please pray and send comforting thoughts to the entire Graham family," City Council member Matt Wardell posted on Facebook.

"I will miss you my friend," former school board candidate and community leader Shelia Arnett wrote on Facebook.

The police department itself posted a Facebook tribute. Meanwhile, more than two dozen law enforcement vehicles, light bars activated, were parked in tribute outside police headquarters on Pine Avenue just south of Silver Springs Boulevard.

"We have had the great privilege to have called him a friend, a boss, and a part of our family for well over thirty years," the department's post said. "He was the heart of the Department. His heart beat for Ocala, for his community, for his department, and especially for his family.

"We will miss his passion for community and law enforcement; his candor and personality; his strong leadership; and most definitely his smile." 

Sheriff Billy Woods, a former OPD officer and Graham's friend, said at a news conference at the Sheriff's Office said they were shocked and grieve-stricken to learn that the pilot was his friend and mentor, Chief Greg Graham.

Woods said he had the pleasure of serving with Graham for more than 30 years in law enforcement. He said they don't have all the answers on what happened, and investigators will be working on it in the coming days.

He said he and Balken met with Graham's wife and family and they will need "your prayers in the weeks and months ahead." He said he and Balken have also spoken to the staff and the men and woman of the OPD and they too will need "your prayers and thoughts."

The Sheriff said the two agencies have enjoyed "a great working relationship." He said he considered Graham a personal friend. 

"I call him a friend and mentor," Woods said, adding Graham loved being chief and loved Ocala and Ocala loved him. He said Graham did "quite a bit and was taken too soon."

In his remarks, Balken said the area has "lost one of greatest lawmen I've ever known." He called Graham "a true mentor," and "a true leader." Balken said Graham was "a forward-thinking professional," and one of the greatest friends he has ever had in his life.

Balken said Graham has done "tremendous things for this community and will be truly missed by our entire agency." He said their department is reeling upon hearing the news.

Woods said the the Federal Aviation Administration will be conducting the investigation into the cause of the crash.

  


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greer, South Carolina

Location: Greer, SC
Accident Number: GAA19CA477
Date & Time: 06/29/2019, 1809 EDT
Registration: N724BC
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, he entered the traffic pattern, downwind, and that the airplane's airspeed was too fast, and the altitude was too high. The pilot decided to continue the landing and the airplane touched down about mid-field on the 1700ft runway. The pilot tried to use aerodynamic braking, but the airplane overran the end of the runway and collided with a drainage culvert.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left side elevator and the rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/03/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/30/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 206 hours (Total, all aircraft), 194 hours (Total, this make and model), 206 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N724BC
Model/Series: 172 H 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17255148
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/13/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8330.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGSP, 971 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 175°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Greenville, SC (GMU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greer, SC (PVT)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1801 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Flying Few (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt; Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1024 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Soft; Vegetation
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1700 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.938611, -82.227222 (est)

Cessna P172D, N8557X: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft landed and nose gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8557X

Date: 05-AUG-19
Time: 23:20:00Z
Regis#: N8557X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: P172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Fuel Contamination: Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee C, N5915U; accident occurred August 05, 2019 near Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N5915U



Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: CEN19LA252
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 0940 EDT
Registration: N5915U
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel contamination
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 5, 2019, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28 140 airplane, N5915U, impacted vegetation and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Miami Executive Airport (TMB), near Miami, Florida. The flight instructor received minor injuries and the student and passenger reported receiving serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Osorio Aviation Corp. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TMB at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, a preflight inspection of the airplane was conducted. Some oil was added to the engine and a check of the fuel revealed about 30-40 gallons was present. The passenger, student pilot, and flight instructor boarded the airplane and followed the checklist to start the airplane engine, which they describe as a "normal" start. They copied the automated terminal information service details, which indicated calm wind and that runways 27R/27L were in use. After that, they contacted clearance and ground controllers, and subsequently taxied via taxiway alpha for runway 27R.

The instructor added that the engine run up was conducted using the checklist. The magneto check produced about a 50 RPM drop for each magneto. The carburetor heat test indicated about a 50 RPM drop. The fuel pump was on, all gauges were indicating in the green arc, and all the indications were "normal."

The tower controller subsequently issued a clearance for takeoff and the student conducted the takeoff that was a normal takeoff with no flaps. The student rotated the airplane about 75 kts. At 150-200 ft above ground level, the engine RPMs dropped about 200-300 RPMs like a partial loss of power. The instructor subsequently took over the controls. The instructor checked if all the switches were on and if the throttle was full forward. "Everything" was good. The instructor elected to keep climbing at 70-75 kts, which is the best glide speed. He advised the tower that he was going to land the airplane on 9R. During the turn the engine completely lost power and the instructor decided to do a force landing on a corn field between runway 9R and 9L. After the landing, the instructor assessed the occupants and advised the tower of their location and need for immediate medical assistance. He secured the airplane and they evacuated the airplane.

At 0907, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 800 ft, few clouds at 1,400 ft; temperature 28° c; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.03 inches of mercury.

At 0953, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 30° C; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury.

The temperature and dew point spread present about the time of the accident was in the light carburetor icing range at cruise or descent power.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the airplane. During sampling the left-wing fuel tank sump, 16 oz of water was removed. The airplane was recovered on a on flatbed truck. Another sample was taken where contamination consistent with fuel and water was found. The gascolator bowl was broken. However, it contained a liquid consistent with water and fuel. The carburetor sampling also found the same contamination.

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, FAA-H-8083-25B, Aircraft Systems, in part, stated:

Fuel Contamination
Accidents attributed to powerplant failure from fuel contamination have often been traced to:

- Inadequate preflight inspection by the pilot
- Servicing aircraft with improperly filtered fuel from small tanks or drums
- Storing aircraft with partially filled fuel tanks
- Lack of proper maintenance

Fuel should be drained from the fuel strainer quick drain and from each fuel tank sump into a transparent container and then checked for dirt and water. When the fuel strainer is being drained, water in the tank may not appear until all the fuel has been drained from the lines leading to the tank. This indicates that water remains in the tank and is not forcing the fuel out of the fuel lines leading to the fuel strainer. Therefore, drain enough fuel from the fuel strainer to be certain that fuel is being drained from the tank. The amount depends on the length of fuel line from the tank to the drain. If water or other contaminants are found in the first sample, drain further samples until no trace appears.

Water may also remain in the fuel tanks after the drainage from the fuel strainer has ceased to show any trace of water. This residual water can be removed only by draining the fuel tank sump drains.

Water is the principal fuel contaminant. Suspended water droplets in the fuel can be identified by a cloudy appearance of the fuel, or by the clear separation of water from the colored fuel, which occurs after the water has settled to the bottom of the tank. As a safety measure, the fuel sumps should be drained before every flight during the preflight inspection. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/16/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/11/2019
Flight Time:  1539 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 1399 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 56 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Foreign; Private
Age: 18, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/16/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/27/2019
Flight Time:  99.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 66 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5915U
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1970
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 28-26897
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/24/2019, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 9800 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: Osorio Aviation Corp
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: Osorio Aviation Corp
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0907 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 31°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 800 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 26°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0940 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI EXECUTIVE (TMB)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 10 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 25.647500, -80.433333 (est)



A small plane crashed Monday morning near Miami Executive Airport.

The Piper PA-28 went down after departing Miami Executive Airport at 9:40 a.m., according to Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane landed on a grassy field owned by the airport, which used to be called the Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport.

Two people were taken to the hospital, one in serious condition, a spokeswoman for Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said. A third passenger was treated at the scene and later released.

The passengers’ identities have not been released.

The fixed wing single-engine plane, numbered “N5915U,” is owned by Osorio Aviation Corp, a Miami-Dade for-profit corporation, according to FAA records. The plane’s certificate is still valid and will expire in February 2022, according to the FAA.

The company, which was registered in April 2017 with the state, became inactive in September 2018 for failing to file the required annual reports or other legal guidelines, according to Sunbiz.org.

The corporation is registered under Joao Osorio, who was also the corporation’s director.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com



MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Florida - A small plane made a crash landing Monday morning in a field at Miami Executive Airport, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman confirmed.

The incident was reported shortly after 9:30 a.m. off Southwest 127th Street and 141st Avenue.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the Piper PA-28 crashed just after departing from Miami Executive Airport. 

According to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue spokeswoman Erika Benitez, three people -- a pilot and two passengers -- were injured during the incident.

She said one person was taken as a trauma alert to Jackson South Medical Center. Another person was also taken to a local hospital and the third victim was treated at the scene, Benitez said. 

FAA records show the plane is registered to the Osorio Aviation Corporation, which is based at the airport. The address for the registered owner comes back to Global Pilot School. 

Local 10 News reporter Andrew Perez stopped by the flight school after the crash, but an employee refused to speak with him about the incident. 

Bergen said the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.local10.com



SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, Florida (WSVN) - Two passengers on board a small airplane have been transported to the hospital after the plane had to make an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport in Southwest Miami-Dade.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue crews responded to an alert three call at the airport, located at 14150 Southwest 127th Street, just after 9:30 a.m., Monday.

Officials said one pilot and two passengers were on board the plane. Two victims were transported to the hospital, one as a trauma alert.

The third victim was treated at the scene and is said to be OK.

“When crews arrived they saw a small aircraft that had made an emergency landing,” said MDFR Public Information Officer Erika Benitez. “We have three patients, one of these patients was a trauma alert and was transported to a local trauma center, while the other two — one was transported to a local hospital and the last patient was treated and released on scene.”

7SkyForce HD flew over the scene where the small plane could be seen in a grassy field.

Federal Aviation Administration officials said the Piper PA-28 aircraft crashed shortly after taking off from the airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating and said the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://wsvn.com

Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: CEN19LA252
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 0940 EDT
Registration: N5915U
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 3 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 5, 2019, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28 140 airplane, N5915U, impacted vegetation and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power on takeoff from the Miami Executive Airport (TMB), near Miami, Florida. The flight instructor, student pilot, and a passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Osorio Aviation Corp. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TMB at the time of the accident.

According to initial information given to the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight instructor reported that "everything" was checked before the engine was started. Thirty gallons of fuel was estimated to be in the fuel tanks and "some" oil was added to the engine. The engine was started, and the engine run up checklist was used to check the engine operation. The magneto check revealed a "normal" indication, which was about a 50-75 RPM drop. The carburetor test indicated about a 50 RPM drop. Normal indications were observed during the takeoff ground roll. About 200-300 ft above ground level, the engine started to shake. The flight instructor took over the flight controls. There was not enough runway to land straight ahead. The flight instructor attempted to turn the airplane to land on runway 13 or 9R. The engine had a complete power loss. The airplane descended and subsequently had a hard landing on a corn field between runway 9L and 9R.

At 0907, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 800 ft, few clouds at 1,400 ft; temperature 28° c; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.03 inches of mercury.

At 0953, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 30° C; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5915U
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Osorio Aviation Corp
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 0907 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 26°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 25.647500, -80.433333 (est)


August 5th at 9:38 a.m., Miami-Dade Fire Rescue responded to a small aircraft that made an emergency landing on a field near Tamiami Executive Airport. There were a total of three (3) patients injured. Two (2) patients were transported to the hospital, one (1) which was a trauma alert. The third patient was treated and released on scene.

Luscombe 8E, N2783K: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on takeoff veered off runway into the grass and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2783K

Date: 06-AUG-19
Time: 01:35:00Z
Regis#: N2783K
Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Aircraft Model: L8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: OKLAHOMA

Cessna 182Q Skylane, N759MA: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 at Woodland State Airport (W27), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft on taxi had a prop strike.

Valley Fliers Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N759MA

Date: 05-AUG-19
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N759MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: WOODLAND
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna 182L Skylane, N3469R: Fatal accident occurred August 05, 2019 in Wolf Point, Roosevelt County, Montana

James Dewey Heald 
May 20th, 1969 - August 5th, 2019

Benjamin Robert Casey
May 10th, 1992 - August 5th, 2019

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation (Cessna); Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3469R

Location: Wolf Point, MT
Accident Number: WPR19FA209
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 1445 MDT
Registration: N3469R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On August 05, 2019, about 1445 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3469R, departed controlled flight and collided with terrain while attempting to land on a private road in Wolf Point, Montana. The pilot, the registered owner, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and front-seated passenger sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed. The business flight departed from Frank Wiley Field Airport, Miles City, Montana, about 1350 with a planned destination of the private road. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

A witness stated that he owned the farm adjacent to where the accident site was located. The pilot had built grain bins for him in the past and he had contracted him to build more. The pilot and passenger, an employee at the pilot's company, had planned to visit the farm that day and had discussed with the witness landing at the farm. The pilot had been to farm on prior occasions but had never flown there. The witness recalled the pilot called him at 1423 saying that he was flying over the town of Wolf Point and would be landing at the farm shortly. The witness, positioned near his bins, observed the airplane fly over his location and make a left turn to the west paralleling the dirt road he intended to land. The airplane then began a turn to the east to come back and land. He observed the airplane make a sharp turn and descend into terrain (reference picture 1). Upon impact, the airplane burst into flames and the witness drove his water truck to put out the fire.

Picture 1: Presumed Accident Flight Path (According to Witness)

The accident site was located on a flat field about 21 nautical miles north of Wolf Point. In character, the terrain was composed of hard, dry dirt and short vegetation. The wreckage was found distributed over an approximate 40-foot distance with the nose pointed on a median magnetic bearing of about 340°. The main wreckage, consisting of all of the major control surfaces, was about 60 feet south of the road. The fuselage and inboard sections of the wings had been consumed by fire.

The first identified piece of debris was fragments of red lens, consistent with the tip of the left wing contacting the ground at the beginning of the accident sequence. From the lens fragments was a disruption in the vegetation similar in shape and size to that of a wing's leading edge and pieces of lens consistent with the landing light were in the dirt. Thereafter, was a crater in the dirt with two propeller blades imbedded (see picture 2).

Picture 2: Accident Site 

During the postaccident examination, investigators moved the rudder to the full left and right deflection where the rudder would hit the stops. With the elevator control surface in the down position, investigators moved the rudder the stops. When the rudder was near full deflection (both right and left), investigators attempted to move the elevator up, but the travel was hindered from the elevator contacting the bottom of the rudder surface (see pictures 3 and 4). When the elevator was in the up position, investigators moved the rudder the stops. When the rudder was near full deflection (both right and left), investigators attempted to move the elevator down, but the travel was hindered from the elevator contacting the rivets on the rudder control.

Numerous rivets making up the horizontal line of the lower-aft rudder control surface, had heads that displayed shinny aluminum on the upper and lower half, consistent with the paint being worn away from contact with the elevator on past occasions. Additionally, the bottom of the rudder surface contained deformation and worn paint. The upper and lower skin of the inboard-aft portion of the elevator control surface contained a paint color and consistency dissimilar from the surrounding skin as well as shinny wear marks, consistent with contact with the rudder on past occasions and paint being reapplied.


Picture 3: Right Rudder Deflection Showing Elevator Interference

Picture 4: Left Rudder Deflection Showing Elevator Interference 

The rudder deflection was measured to be 9.25 inches left and 9 inches right (see picture 5). The Owner's Manual shows the limits are 8.12 inches to 8.72 inches. The left elevator was measured 23° up and 20° down; the right elevator was measured 25° up and 17° down (see pictures 6 and 7). The Owner's Manual shows the elevator travel limits were up: 23° +/- 1° ; down: 17° +/- 1°


Picture 5: Rudder Deflection

Picture 6: Left Elevator Deflection

Picture 7: Right Elevator Deflection 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3469R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOLF, 1986 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 47°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 27.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Miles City, MT (MLS)
Destination: Wolf Point, MT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 48.435833, -105.760833 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

James Dewey Heald
May 20, 1969 - August 05, 2019

Memorial service for James Heald will be held at 11:00 a.m., Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at High Plains Community Church with Pastor Dan Morgan officiating. On May 20th, 1969, James Dewey Heald was born to Robert Heald and Jessie Nichols. James went on to grow up on his dad's ranch in Recluse, Wyoming and with his mother in Arizona. Later he would move to his Uncle's Ranch outside of Gate, Oklahoma, where he would attend Laverene Public High School and meet his first wife, Pamela Malone. James and Pamela, after reuniting in college, graduated from Northwestern Oklahoma State University, married, and he would go on to teach math at a local school. After changing into what would be his lifelong career, grain storage construction and retail, he and Pamela had a son, Marcus James. Another marriage and promotions would come next, but also the greatest coincidence of his life, through friends and a dance hall, meeting the love of his life, Patricia. Patricia, along with her son and James' adopted daughter, Trestin Swiggett and Brooklyn Heald, joined James in the greatest and ultimate chapter of his life, as he moved across the country, back to his home in Recluse, and started his own business, J & P Grain Solutions. James and Patricia would go on to raise cattle, grow stronger together as they put their mark on the family ranch and when they could find any free time from the business they also ran together, they'd dance to any tune they could find. In addition to learning how to fly, James was happy to fulfill his dream of waking up every day a little closer to his father and to his home. James was truly a servant of God, and through his Lords' grace, a servant to others. From school children to young adults, James devoted his life to giving people the tools they needed to better themselves. Friends will miss his laugh, if only because it made him easier to find, and the love that underpinned every piece of advice. Family will miss the comfort and God-given wisdom that he brought to solve every issue, always together.  James is preceded in death by his mother, Jessie (Nichols) Heald; his brother, Robert Heald Jr.; his paternal grandparents, George and Barbara Heald; maternal grandfather, Jimmie Nichols; his maternal grandmother and second mother, Deloris Nichols. He is survived by his wife Patricia Heald; his sons, Marcus Heald and Treston Swiggett; his daughter, Brooklyn Heald; his foster son, Quinn Horst; father, Robert Heald; step-mother, Marge (Brown) Heald; sister and brother-in-law, Tammy (Russell) Good; grandchildren, Lukas Heald, Taevan and Brhysan; as well as numerous friends and family. In lieu of flowers the family asks for memorials be made to benefit the Recluse Community Center. Memorials and condolences may be sent in care of Gillette Memorial Chapel 210 West 5th Street, Gillette, WY 82716. Condolences may also be expressed at www.gillettememorialchapel.com 


https://www.gillettememorialchapel.com

Benjamin Robert Casey

Gillette resident Benjamin Robert Casey, 27, died Aug. 5, 2019, in a plane crash. He was born May 10, 1992, in Casper, the son of Bennett and Jacquelyn (Kinder) Casey.

A funeral service begins at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Gillette Memorial Chapel, 210 W. Fifth St.

A celebration of Mr. Casey’s life will follow the memorial service at 4105 Brorby Blvd. in Gillette.

He graduated from Campbell County High School in 2011, where he was a member of the football team.

Mr. Casey was an avid outdoor enthusiast who loved hunting and fishing. He also could be counted on to find humor in every situation and was always down for a good laugh.

He is survived by his parents, Bennett and Jacquelyn; and his brother, Christopher of Gillette. He also is survived by his maternal grandparents, John and Joyce Kinder of Casper; his paternal grandmother, Carol Casey of Wichita, Kansas; and by several uncles, aunts and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his paternal grandfather, Bennett Casey.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Fur Kids Foundation, P.O. Box 7074, Gillette, WY 82718, or at furkidsfoundation.org.

https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com

Roosevelt County Sheriff and Coroner Jason Frederick has confirmed the two men who were killed in a plane crash in northeast Montana on Aug. 5 were James D. Heald of Recluse and Gillette resident Benjamin Robert Casey.

The office was waiting for the release of dental records to confirm the identities of the two men and got that Thursday, Frederick said.

Original article ➤ https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com

A plane crash discovered Monday 25 miles north of Wolf Point has left two people dead, according to the Roosevelt County Sheriff's Office. 

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash, which involves a Cessna C-182 plane.

Two people were on board when it crashed, according to the FAA. The plane crashed in the area of its destination and the crash did start a small fire, Sheriff Jason Fredericks said. He described the victims as males. 

A local farmer witnessed the crash and then worked to extinguish the fire, Fredericks said.

Tuesday afternoon the sheriff's office had not yet identified the crash victims. 

The sheriff's office was called at about 2:47 p.m. Monday after an area resident discovered the crash about 2 miles west of Highway 250. Firefighters and an ambulance were also sent to the scene. Fort Peck Tribal police also responded to the crash site.

The Roosevelt County Sheriff's Office remained on scene holding the crash site for federal investigators until 7:06 a.m. Tuesday.

Original article ➤ https://billingsgazette.com

WOLF POINT — A Cessna 182 crashed in a northeastern Montana field, killing the pilot and a passenger.

Roosevelt County Undersheriff John Summers says two men died in the crash, which happened at about 2:45 p.m. Monday. Summers says the men on the plane were surveying land to find a site to build a grain silo.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating. 

Federal Aviation Administration records indicate the plane was registered in Wyoming.

Officials have not released the names of the men on board.

Original article ➤ https://www.greatfallstribune.com