Tuesday, August 06, 2019

Robinson R44 II, N724H: Accident occurred June 09, 2019 in Lebanon, Laclede County, Missouri

Hendricks Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N724H 

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA476
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 09, 2019 in Lebanon, MO
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N724H

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Loss of control on ground: Cessna 172H, N724BC; accident occurred June 29, 2019 in Greer, South Carolina

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greer, South Carolina 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N724BC

Location: Greer, SC
Accident Number: GAA19CA477
Date & Time: 06/29/2019, 1809 EDT
Registration: N724BC
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, he entered the traffic pattern, downwind, and that the airplane's airspeed was too fast, and the altitude was too high. The pilot decided to continue the landing and the airplane touched down about mid-field on the 1700ft runway. The pilot tried to use aerodynamic braking, but the airplane overran the end of the runway and collided with a drainage culvert.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left side elevator and the rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/03/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/30/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 206 hours (Total, all aircraft), 194 hours (Total, this make and model), 206 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N724BC
Model/Series: 172 H 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17255148
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/13/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8330.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGSP, 971 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 175°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Greenville, SC (GMU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greer, SC (PVT)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1801 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Flying Few (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt; Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1024 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Soft; Vegetation
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1700 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.938611, -82.227222 (est)

Cessna P172D, N8557X: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft landed and nose gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8557X

Date: 05-AUG-19
Time: 23:20:00Z
Regis#: N8557X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: P172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Fuel Contamination: Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee C, N5915U; accident occurred August 05, 2019 near Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N5915U



Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: CEN19LA252
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 0940 EDT
Registration: N5915U
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel contamination
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 5, 2019, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28 140 airplane, N5915U, impacted vegetation and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Miami Executive Airport (TMB), near Miami, Florida. The flight instructor received minor injuries and the student and passenger reported receiving serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Osorio Aviation Corp. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TMB at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, a preflight inspection of the airplane was conducted. Some oil was added to the engine and a check of the fuel revealed about 30-40 gallons was present. The passenger, student pilot, and flight instructor boarded the airplane and followed the checklist to start the airplane engine, which they describe as a "normal" start. They copied the automated terminal information service details, which indicated calm wind and that runways 27R/27L were in use. After that, they contacted clearance and ground controllers, and subsequently taxied via taxiway alpha for runway 27R.

The instructor added that the engine run up was conducted using the checklist. The magneto check produced about a 50 RPM drop for each magneto. The carburetor heat test indicated about a 50 RPM drop. The fuel pump was on, all gauges were indicating in the green arc, and all the indications were "normal."

The tower controller subsequently issued a clearance for takeoff and the student conducted the takeoff that was a normal takeoff with no flaps. The student rotated the airplane about 75 kts. At 150-200 ft above ground level, the engine RPMs dropped about 200-300 RPMs like a partial loss of power. The instructor subsequently took over the controls. The instructor checked if all the switches were on and if the throttle was full forward. "Everything" was good. The instructor elected to keep climbing at 70-75 kts, which is the best glide speed. He advised the tower that he was going to land the airplane on 9R. During the turn the engine completely lost power and the instructor decided to do a force landing on a corn field between runway 9R and 9L. After the landing, the instructor assessed the occupants and advised the tower of their location and need for immediate medical assistance. He secured the airplane and they evacuated the airplane.

At 0907, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 800 ft, few clouds at 1,400 ft; temperature 28° c; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.03 inches of mercury.

At 0953, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 30° C; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury.

The temperature and dew point spread present about the time of the accident was in the light carburetor icing range at cruise or descent power.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the airplane. During sampling the left-wing fuel tank sump, 16 oz of water was removed. The airplane was recovered on a on flatbed truck. Another sample was taken where contamination consistent with fuel and water was found. The gascolator bowl was broken. However, it contained a liquid consistent with water and fuel. The carburetor sampling also found the same contamination.

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, FAA-H-8083-25B, Aircraft Systems, in part, stated:

Fuel Contamination
Accidents attributed to powerplant failure from fuel contamination have often been traced to:

- Inadequate preflight inspection by the pilot
- Servicing aircraft with improperly filtered fuel from small tanks or drums
- Storing aircraft with partially filled fuel tanks
- Lack of proper maintenance

Fuel should be drained from the fuel strainer quick drain and from each fuel tank sump into a transparent container and then checked for dirt and water. When the fuel strainer is being drained, water in the tank may not appear until all the fuel has been drained from the lines leading to the tank. This indicates that water remains in the tank and is not forcing the fuel out of the fuel lines leading to the fuel strainer. Therefore, drain enough fuel from the fuel strainer to be certain that fuel is being drained from the tank. The amount depends on the length of fuel line from the tank to the drain. If water or other contaminants are found in the first sample, drain further samples until no trace appears.

Water may also remain in the fuel tanks after the drainage from the fuel strainer has ceased to show any trace of water. This residual water can be removed only by draining the fuel tank sump drains.

Water is the principal fuel contaminant. Suspended water droplets in the fuel can be identified by a cloudy appearance of the fuel, or by the clear separation of water from the colored fuel, which occurs after the water has settled to the bottom of the tank. As a safety measure, the fuel sumps should be drained before every flight during the preflight inspection. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/16/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/11/2019
Flight Time:  1539 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 1399 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 56 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Foreign; Private
Age: 18, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/16/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/27/2019
Flight Time:  99.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 66 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5915U
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1970
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 28-26897
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/24/2019, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 9800 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: Osorio Aviation Corp
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: Osorio Aviation Corp
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0907 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 31°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 800 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 26°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0940 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI EXECUTIVE (TMB)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 10 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 25.647500, -80.433333 (est)



A small plane crashed Monday morning near Miami Executive Airport.

The Piper PA-28 went down after departing Miami Executive Airport at 9:40 a.m., according to Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane landed on a grassy field owned by the airport, which used to be called the Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport.

Two people were taken to the hospital, one in serious condition, a spokeswoman for Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said. A third passenger was treated at the scene and later released.

The passengers’ identities have not been released.

The fixed wing single-engine plane, numbered “N5915U,” is owned by Osorio Aviation Corp, a Miami-Dade for-profit corporation, according to FAA records. The plane’s certificate is still valid and will expire in February 2022, according to the FAA.

The company, which was registered in April 2017 with the state, became inactive in September 2018 for failing to file the required annual reports or other legal guidelines, according to Sunbiz.org.

The corporation is registered under Joao Osorio, who was also the corporation’s director.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com



MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Florida - A small plane made a crash landing Monday morning in a field at Miami Executive Airport, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman confirmed.

The incident was reported shortly after 9:30 a.m. off Southwest 127th Street and 141st Avenue.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the Piper PA-28 crashed just after departing from Miami Executive Airport. 

According to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue spokeswoman Erika Benitez, three people -- a pilot and two passengers -- were injured during the incident.

She said one person was taken as a trauma alert to Jackson South Medical Center. Another person was also taken to a local hospital and the third victim was treated at the scene, Benitez said. 

FAA records show the plane is registered to the Osorio Aviation Corporation, which is based at the airport. The address for the registered owner comes back to Global Pilot School. 

Local 10 News reporter Andrew Perez stopped by the flight school after the crash, but an employee refused to speak with him about the incident. 

Bergen said the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.local10.com



SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, Florida (WSVN) - Two passengers on board a small airplane have been transported to the hospital after the plane had to make an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport in Southwest Miami-Dade.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue crews responded to an alert three call at the airport, located at 14150 Southwest 127th Street, just after 9:30 a.m., Monday.

Officials said one pilot and two passengers were on board the plane. Two victims were transported to the hospital, one as a trauma alert.

The third victim was treated at the scene and is said to be OK.

“When crews arrived they saw a small aircraft that had made an emergency landing,” said MDFR Public Information Officer Erika Benitez. “We have three patients, one of these patients was a trauma alert and was transported to a local trauma center, while the other two — one was transported to a local hospital and the last patient was treated and released on scene.”

7SkyForce HD flew over the scene where the small plane could be seen in a grassy field.

Federal Aviation Administration officials said the Piper PA-28 aircraft crashed shortly after taking off from the airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating and said the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://wsvn.com

Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: CEN19LA252
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 0940 EDT
Registration: N5915U
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 3 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 5, 2019, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28 140 airplane, N5915U, impacted vegetation and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power on takeoff from the Miami Executive Airport (TMB), near Miami, Florida. The flight instructor, student pilot, and a passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Osorio Aviation Corp. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TMB at the time of the accident.

According to initial information given to the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight instructor reported that "everything" was checked before the engine was started. Thirty gallons of fuel was estimated to be in the fuel tanks and "some" oil was added to the engine. The engine was started, and the engine run up checklist was used to check the engine operation. The magneto check revealed a "normal" indication, which was about a 50-75 RPM drop. The carburetor test indicated about a 50 RPM drop. Normal indications were observed during the takeoff ground roll. About 200-300 ft above ground level, the engine started to shake. The flight instructor took over the flight controls. There was not enough runway to land straight ahead. The flight instructor attempted to turn the airplane to land on runway 13 or 9R. The engine had a complete power loss. The airplane descended and subsequently had a hard landing on a corn field between runway 9L and 9R.

At 0907, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 800 ft, few clouds at 1,400 ft; temperature 28° c; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.03 inches of mercury.

At 0953, the recorded weather at TMB was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 30° C; dew point 26° C; altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5915U
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Osorio Aviation Corp
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 0907 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 26°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 25.647500, -80.433333 (est)


August 5th at 9:38 a.m., Miami-Dade Fire Rescue responded to a small aircraft that made an emergency landing on a field near Tamiami Executive Airport. There were a total of three (3) patients injured. Two (2) patients were transported to the hospital, one (1) which was a trauma alert. The third patient was treated and released on scene.

Luscombe 8E, N2783K: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on takeoff veered off runway into the grass and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2783K

Date: 06-AUG-19
Time: 01:35:00Z
Regis#: N2783K
Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Aircraft Model: L8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: OKLAHOMA

Cessna 182Q Skylane, N759MA: Incident occurred August 05, 2019 at Woodland State Airport (W27), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft on taxi had a prop strike.

Valley Fliers Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N759MA

Date: 05-AUG-19
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N759MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: WOODLAND
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna 182L Skylane, N3469R: Fatal accident occurred August 05, 2019 in Wolf Point, Roosevelt County, Montana

James Dewey Heald 
May 20th, 1969 - August 5th, 2019

Benjamin Robert Casey
May 10th, 1992 - August 5th, 2019

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation (Cessna); Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3469R

Location: Wolf Point, MT
Accident Number: WPR19FA209
Date & Time: 08/05/2019, 1445 MDT
Registration: N3469R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On August 05, 2019, about 1445 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3469R, departed controlled flight and collided with terrain while attempting to land on a private road in Wolf Point, Montana. The pilot, the registered owner, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and front-seated passenger sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed. The business flight departed from Frank Wiley Field Airport, Miles City, Montana, about 1350 with a planned destination of the private road. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

A witness stated that he owned the farm adjacent to where the accident site was located. The pilot had built grain bins for him in the past and he had contracted him to build more. The pilot and passenger, an employee at the pilot's company, had planned to visit the farm that day and had discussed with the witness landing at the farm. The pilot had been to farm on prior occasions but had never flown there. The witness recalled the pilot called him at 1423 saying that he was flying over the town of Wolf Point and would be landing at the farm shortly. The witness, positioned near his bins, observed the airplane fly over his location and make a left turn to the west paralleling the dirt road he intended to land. The airplane then began a turn to the east to come back and land. He observed the airplane make a sharp turn and descend into terrain (reference picture 1). Upon impact, the airplane burst into flames and the witness drove his water truck to put out the fire.

Picture 1: Presumed Accident Flight Path (According to Witness)

The accident site was located on a flat field about 21 nautical miles north of Wolf Point. In character, the terrain was composed of hard, dry dirt and short vegetation. The wreckage was found distributed over an approximate 40-foot distance with the nose pointed on a median magnetic bearing of about 340°. The main wreckage, consisting of all of the major control surfaces, was about 60 feet south of the road. The fuselage and inboard sections of the wings had been consumed by fire.

The first identified piece of debris was fragments of red lens, consistent with the tip of the left wing contacting the ground at the beginning of the accident sequence. From the lens fragments was a disruption in the vegetation similar in shape and size to that of a wing's leading edge and pieces of lens consistent with the landing light were in the dirt. Thereafter, was a crater in the dirt with two propeller blades imbedded (see picture 2).

Picture 2: Accident Site 

During the postaccident examination, investigators moved the rudder to the full left and right deflection where the rudder would hit the stops. With the elevator control surface in the down position, investigators moved the rudder the stops. When the rudder was near full deflection (both right and left), investigators attempted to move the elevator up, but the travel was hindered from the elevator contacting the bottom of the rudder surface (see pictures 3 and 4). When the elevator was in the up position, investigators moved the rudder the stops. When the rudder was near full deflection (both right and left), investigators attempted to move the elevator down, but the travel was hindered from the elevator contacting the rivets on the rudder control.

Numerous rivets making up the horizontal line of the lower-aft rudder control surface, had heads that displayed shinny aluminum on the upper and lower half, consistent with the paint being worn away from contact with the elevator on past occasions. Additionally, the bottom of the rudder surface contained deformation and worn paint. The upper and lower skin of the inboard-aft portion of the elevator control surface contained a paint color and consistency dissimilar from the surrounding skin as well as shinny wear marks, consistent with contact with the rudder on past occasions and paint being reapplied.


Picture 3: Right Rudder Deflection Showing Elevator Interference

Picture 4: Left Rudder Deflection Showing Elevator Interference 

The rudder deflection was measured to be 9.25 inches left and 9 inches right (see picture 5). The Owner's Manual shows the limits are 8.12 inches to 8.72 inches. The left elevator was measured 23° up and 20° down; the right elevator was measured 25° up and 17° down (see pictures 6 and 7). The Owner's Manual shows the elevator travel limits were up: 23° +/- 1° ; down: 17° +/- 1°


Picture 5: Rudder Deflection

Picture 6: Left Elevator Deflection

Picture 7: Right Elevator Deflection 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3469R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOLF, 1986 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 47°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 27.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Miles City, MT (MLS)
Destination: Wolf Point, MT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 48.435833, -105.760833 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

James Dewey Heald
May 20, 1969 - August 05, 2019

Memorial service for James Heald will be held at 11:00 a.m., Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at High Plains Community Church with Pastor Dan Morgan officiating. On May 20th, 1969, James Dewey Heald was born to Robert Heald and Jessie Nichols. James went on to grow up on his dad's ranch in Recluse, Wyoming and with his mother in Arizona. Later he would move to his Uncle's Ranch outside of Gate, Oklahoma, where he would attend Laverene Public High School and meet his first wife, Pamela Malone. James and Pamela, after reuniting in college, graduated from Northwestern Oklahoma State University, married, and he would go on to teach math at a local school. After changing into what would be his lifelong career, grain storage construction and retail, he and Pamela had a son, Marcus James. Another marriage and promotions would come next, but also the greatest coincidence of his life, through friends and a dance hall, meeting the love of his life, Patricia. Patricia, along with her son and James' adopted daughter, Trestin Swiggett and Brooklyn Heald, joined James in the greatest and ultimate chapter of his life, as he moved across the country, back to his home in Recluse, and started his own business, J & P Grain Solutions. James and Patricia would go on to raise cattle, grow stronger together as they put their mark on the family ranch and when they could find any free time from the business they also ran together, they'd dance to any tune they could find. In addition to learning how to fly, James was happy to fulfill his dream of waking up every day a little closer to his father and to his home. James was truly a servant of God, and through his Lords' grace, a servant to others. From school children to young adults, James devoted his life to giving people the tools they needed to better themselves. Friends will miss his laugh, if only because it made him easier to find, and the love that underpinned every piece of advice. Family will miss the comfort and God-given wisdom that he brought to solve every issue, always together.  James is preceded in death by his mother, Jessie (Nichols) Heald; his brother, Robert Heald Jr.; his paternal grandparents, George and Barbara Heald; maternal grandfather, Jimmie Nichols; his maternal grandmother and second mother, Deloris Nichols. He is survived by his wife Patricia Heald; his sons, Marcus Heald and Treston Swiggett; his daughter, Brooklyn Heald; his foster son, Quinn Horst; father, Robert Heald; step-mother, Marge (Brown) Heald; sister and brother-in-law, Tammy (Russell) Good; grandchildren, Lukas Heald, Taevan and Brhysan; as well as numerous friends and family. In lieu of flowers the family asks for memorials be made to benefit the Recluse Community Center. Memorials and condolences may be sent in care of Gillette Memorial Chapel 210 West 5th Street, Gillette, WY 82716. Condolences may also be expressed at www.gillettememorialchapel.com 


https://www.gillettememorialchapel.com

Benjamin Robert Casey

Gillette resident Benjamin Robert Casey, 27, died Aug. 5, 2019, in a plane crash. He was born May 10, 1992, in Casper, the son of Bennett and Jacquelyn (Kinder) Casey.

A funeral service begins at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Gillette Memorial Chapel, 210 W. Fifth St.

A celebration of Mr. Casey’s life will follow the memorial service at 4105 Brorby Blvd. in Gillette.

He graduated from Campbell County High School in 2011, where he was a member of the football team.

Mr. Casey was an avid outdoor enthusiast who loved hunting and fishing. He also could be counted on to find humor in every situation and was always down for a good laugh.

He is survived by his parents, Bennett and Jacquelyn; and his brother, Christopher of Gillette. He also is survived by his maternal grandparents, John and Joyce Kinder of Casper; his paternal grandmother, Carol Casey of Wichita, Kansas; and by several uncles, aunts and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his paternal grandfather, Bennett Casey.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Fur Kids Foundation, P.O. Box 7074, Gillette, WY 82718, or at furkidsfoundation.org.

https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com

Roosevelt County Sheriff and Coroner Jason Frederick has confirmed the two men who were killed in a plane crash in northeast Montana on Aug. 5 were James D. Heald of Recluse and Gillette resident Benjamin Robert Casey.

The office was waiting for the release of dental records to confirm the identities of the two men and got that Thursday, Frederick said.

Original article ➤ https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com

A plane crash discovered Monday 25 miles north of Wolf Point has left two people dead, according to the Roosevelt County Sheriff's Office. 

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash, which involves a Cessna C-182 plane.

Two people were on board when it crashed, according to the FAA. The plane crashed in the area of its destination and the crash did start a small fire, Sheriff Jason Fredericks said. He described the victims as males. 

A local farmer witnessed the crash and then worked to extinguish the fire, Fredericks said.

Tuesday afternoon the sheriff's office had not yet identified the crash victims. 

The sheriff's office was called at about 2:47 p.m. Monday after an area resident discovered the crash about 2 miles west of Highway 250. Firefighters and an ambulance were also sent to the scene. Fort Peck Tribal police also responded to the crash site.

The Roosevelt County Sheriff's Office remained on scene holding the crash site for federal investigators until 7:06 a.m. Tuesday.

Original article ➤ https://billingsgazette.com

WOLF POINT — A Cessna 182 crashed in a northeastern Montana field, killing the pilot and a passenger.

Roosevelt County Undersheriff John Summers says two men died in the crash, which happened at about 2:45 p.m. Monday. Summers says the men on the plane were surveying land to find a site to build a grain silo.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating. 

Federal Aviation Administration records indicate the plane was registered in Wyoming.

Officials have not released the names of the men on board.

Original article ➤ https://www.greatfallstribune.com

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Piper PA-22-150 Tri-Pacer, N7402D; fatal accident occurred August 04, 2019 near Girdwood Airport (AQY), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N7402D


Location: Girdwood, AK
Accident Number: ANC19FA042
Date & Time: 08/04/2019, 1627 AKD
Registration: N7402D
Aircraft: Piper PA22-150
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 4, 2019, about 1627 Alaska daylight time, a Piper PA22-150 airplane, N7402D, was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire when it collided with terrain about 5 miles north of Girdwood Airport (AQY), Girdwood, Alaska. The airline transport pilot (ATP), and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned by one of the passengers and was operated by the ATP pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which departed AQY about 1615.

A friend of the airplane owner stated that he and the owner had been conversing via text message on the day of the accident. The owner, who held a student pilot certificate, indicated that he and the pilot had been drinking alcoholic beverages, but stated that he would not be flying the airplane and would be a passenger on the accident flight. The purpose of the flight was to take the passengers on a short 15-20-minute sightseeing flight of the Girdwood area, which consists of remote, steep, mountainous terrain, ranging from sea level to about 7,000 ft, which is part of the Chugach Mountain Range.

Multiple witnesses observed the airplane flying parallel to a mountain ridge before it entered a turn to the north and began a descent. The airplane then disappeared from view, and then they saw a plume of black smoke. One witness saw the airplane performing aggressive maneuvers earlier in the flight, and observed the airplane approach a mountain ridge, its nose pitched up and the airplane entered a steep climb before disappearing from view. No witnesses reported hearing any unusual sounds from the accident airplane.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/26/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2700 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 31, held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft-helicopter rating. Additionally, he held commercial pilot privileges for airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, airplane multi-engine, rotorcraft-helicopter, instrument airplane, and instrument helicopter ratings. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued on February 26, 2019, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for that medical certificate, he reported 2,700 hours total flight experience, of which 40 hours were in the previous 6 months.

Some personal flight records were located for the pilot; however, they were not complete. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N7402D
Model/Series: PA22-150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-5163
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/17/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3175 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: Erickson Karl F
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was manufactured in 1957 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 A1A engine rated at 150 horsepower. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection of the airframe and engine was completed on September 17, 2018, when the airframe had accumulated 3,175 hours total time in service and the engine had accumulated 1,336 hours since overhaul.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Girdwood, AK
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Girdwood, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

The closest official weather observation station to the accident site was Portage Glacier, Whittier, Alaska, located about 22 miles southeast. The 1653 observation included wind from 080° at 7 knots, gusting to 15 knots; 10 statute miles visibility; overcast clouds at 6,000 ft above ground level; temperature 70°F; dew point 57°F; and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 61.036944, -149.045278 

The remote accident site was located on the south face of Goat Mountain in steep, mountainous terrain. The airplane impacted the terrain about 15 ft below the top of a rock-faced ridgeline at an altitude of about 5,512 ft mean sea level (msl) and came to rest inverted on a narrow rock shelf at an altitude of about 5,437 ft msl. The wreckage was largely consumed by postcrash fire; small fragments of wreckage were located on the opposite side of the ridge.

The airplane was not recovered and could not be examined. Review of photographs provided by the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group and the Alaska State Troopers revealed that the left and right wings and their respective control surfaces were destroyed by fire, with only portions of the wing spars remaining. The cockpit, fuselage, and empennage exhibited extensive thermal damage and control continuity could not be verified.

The engine exhibited extensive impact and thermal damage. The propeller separated from the engine crankshaft. One propeller blade exhibited torsional "S" twisting and aft bending about 12 inches from the tip. The other propeller blade exhibited significant torsional "S" twisting and buckling on the trailing edge of the blade.

Medical And Pathological Information

Pilot

An autopsy of the pilot was performed by the Alaska State Medical Examiner, Anchorage, Alaska. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt (deceleration type) injuries.

Postmortem toxicological testing by the Alaska State Medical Examiner of the pilot's femoral blood was positive for ethanol at 0.226 grams per deciliter (gm/dl). Toxicology testing performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory detected ethanol in cavity blood at 0.252 gm/dl and in vitreous fluid at 0.238 gm/dl; methanol in an amount too low to quantify was detected in cavity blood and vitreous fluid.

Student Pilot/Passenger

Toxicology testing of the student pilot/passenger performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory detected ethanol in vitreous fluid at 0.058 gm/dl and in brain and muscle at 0.055 and 0.038 grams per hectogram, respectively.

Ethanol

Ethanol is a social drug commonly consumed by drinking beer, wine, or liquor. Ethanol acts as a central nervous system depressant; it impairs judgment, psychomotor functioning, and vigilance. Effects of ethanol on aviators are generally well understood; it significantly impairs pilot performance, even at very low levels. Title 14 CFR 91.17(a) prohibits any person from acting or attempting to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft while having 0.040 gm/dl or more ethanol in the blood.

Ethanol is water soluble, and after absorption it quickly and uniformly distributes throughout the body's tissues and fluids. The distribution pattern parallels water content and blood supply of the tissue. A small amount of ethanol can be produced after death by microbial activity, usually in conjunction with other alcohols such as methanol; vitreous humor does not suffer from such production. Post absorption, vitreous humor has about 12% more ethanol than blood.

While the acute effects of ethanol can vary depending on an individual's frequency of use, body weight, and tolerance, in general, at blood ethanol concentrations as low as 0.02 gm/dl there is relaxation and some loss of judgment; at 0.05 gm/dl, there is further degradation of judgment, psychomotor functioning, and alertness. At blood ethanol concentrations above 0.10 gm/dL, there is prolonged reaction time, altered perception of the environment, lack of coordination, slowed thinking, and mood and behavioral changes. Above 0.15 gm/dl, individuals may have significant loss of muscle control and major loss of balance. In addition to worsening motor coordination and disorientation, at concentrations above 0.20 gm/dl, individuals may experience amnesia or blackouts and double vision.

A copy of the National Transportation Safety Board's medical officer's factual report is available in the public docket for this accident.

Additional Information

The airplane's weight and balance at the time of the accident was estimated based on the pilot's weight from his most current FAA medical examination (180 lbs) and the weights of the passengers taken from government records (200 lbs for the front seat passenger and 300 lbs combined for the rear seat passengers).

A friend of the airplane owner reported that the airplane was fueled about a week and a half before the accident and had not been flown since that time. Accounting for the fuel burned during the accident flight, the estimated fuel onboard at the time of the accident was 34 gallons (204 lbs). The oil onboard weighed about 15 lbs.

The last documented weight and balance information located for the airplane was dated November 1, 2014. At that time, the basic empty weight of the airplane on wheels was 1,149.3 lbs with a center of gravity of 13.43 inches.


Using the values listed above, the gross weight of the airplane at the time of the accident was about 2,048.3 lbs, which was 48.3 lbs over the airplane's approved maximum takeoff gross weight of 2,000 lbs. The estimated center of gravity at the time of the accident was 20.79 inches. The center of gravity range at 2,000 lbs (maximum gross weight) was 17.5 inches to 23.0 inches.

Location: Girdwood, AK
Accident Number: ANC19FA042
Date & Time: 08/04/2019, 1627 AKD
Registration: N7402D
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 4, 2019, about 1627 Alaska daylight time, a Piper PA22-150 airplane, N7402D, was destroyed by impact forces and a postcrash fire when it collided with steep, mountainous terrain, about 5 miles north of the Girdwood Airport (AQY), Girdwood, Alaska. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Of the four occupants on board, the airline transport pilot, who was also a certified flight instructor, the student pilot-rated passenger, who was the registered owner of the airplane, and two additional passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. According to witnesses, the flight departed AQY about 1615.

According to a friend of the airplane owner, the purpose of the flight was to take friends on a short 15-20-minute aerial tour of the local Girdwood valley. The area around the resort town of Girdwood consists of remote, steep, mountainous terrain, ranging from sea level to about 7,000 ft, which is part of the Chugach Mountain Range.

Multiple witnesses in and around the Girdwood valley reported that, just before the accident, the airplane was observed flying parallel to a mountain ridge prior to entering a turn to the north, and then beginning a descent. The airplane then disappeared from view, which was followed by a plume of black smoke. None of the witnesses reported hearing any unusual sounds from the accident airplane.

One witness observed the airplane earlier in the flight performing aggressive flight maneuvers. He said that as the airplane approached a mountain ridge, it pitched up and entered a steep climb prior to disappearing from view. Shortly thereafter, he was notified of smoke rising from an area known as Goat Mountain.

The airplane impacted the south face of Goat Mountain about 15 feet below the top of a rock faced ridgeline at an altitude of about 5,512 ft, and the wreckage came to rest on a narrow rock shelf at an altitude of about 5,437 ft. The wreckage was largely consumed by a postcrash fire. Small fragments of wreckage were located on the opposite side of the ridge. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following wreckage recovery efforts.

The closest official weather observation station to the accident site was Portage Glacier (PATO), Whittier, AK, located about 22 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1653, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind, 080° at 7 knots, gusting 15 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, overcast clouds at 6,000 ft.; temperature, 70°F; dew point, 57°F; and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N7402D
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 15 knots, 80°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Girdwood, AK
Destination: Girdwood, AK 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 61.036944, -149.045278

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Karl Erickson


Karl Erickson and Boonie LeBlanc. Karl Erickson was aboard the plane which crashed into Goat Mountain, August 4th, 2019. 

Paul Wiley was one of the passengers in the plane which crashed into Goat Mountain, August 4th, 2019.


Charles Dean Weimer, age 31

Charles Weimer, born in Minneapolis on March 13th, 1988, died on August 4th, 2019, in a plane crash in Alaska. The cause of the crash is under investigation; the plane is speculated to have been caught in a downdraft and was not able to clear the mountains. The aircraft had two controls and the second pilot in command was the owner of the plane; the person at the controls will remain unknown.

As a 12-year-old boy, Charles would spend hours and hours researching civilian and military planes and helicopters, as well as, building small model planes. He would say, “I just want to get off the ground.” He never stopped pursuing this passion and love for flying.

He joined the U.S Marines and was medically discharged after three years. He built his career with a degree in aviation from Central Oregon Community College and obtained his ratings from Leading Edge in Bend, Oregon. He held commercial ratings in both fixed-wing and helicopter. He was a certified flight instructor and held several other flight ratings. He worked as an instructor for Leading Edge as well as Red Eagle in Kalispell. He has spent the last six years in Alaska flying, doing utility work as well as several other job projects.

Charles’s life on paper was quite accomplished but it is his heart and character that will be remembered the most. Charles’s community has described him as, “a light in my life,” sought after man, and was very respected.

A pilot dedicated a tattoo to Charles days after the incident. He impacted everyone he encountered, whether it was the cook, the mechanic, a fellow pilot, or the owner of the company he was employed by. He was also passionate about rock climbing, reading, river kayaking, rafting and cooking.

As Charles embarks on a brand new life, our hearts will always feel the void of his kindness, generosity, laugh and love of which we will always be grateful for, and now leave him in the peace that passes understanding.

Charles was the eldest of three siblings and is survived by his mother, DeNae Weimer, and brother and sister, Anthony and Jordanna.  There will be a celebration of life from 3 to 7 p.m. on Sunday, Aug.18, at 1946 Whitefish Stage Road, Kalispell.


Karl Erickson’s text message came minutes before Sunday’s fiery plane crash that killed him and three other men in the Chugach Mountains above Girdwood.

Retired Arizona art gallery owner Boonie LeBlanc said his adopted grandson, Paul Wiley, was a passenger in Erickson’s Piper PA-22. LeBlanc knew Erickson from their time together in Superior, Arizona, where the Girdwood resident usually spent the winter.

A few days earlier, LeBlanc said, Erickson told him a friend who was a pilot would be at the controls Sunday.

Then a message Erickson sent just before the flight indicated they planned to take Wiley and the other person up for a few minutes, “see some scenery” and then land and drop off the passengers so Erickson, a student pilot, could log some hours toward his license, LeBlanc said.

“That was the last text message from Karl," LeBlanc said Wednesday by phone. “He sent that out to several friends in Girdwood, while he was in the plane taking off.”

The plane crashed in steep, rocky terrain at 5,000 feet on Goat Mountain near Eagle Glacier at around 5 p.m. Sunday. An elite ski team training nearby reported it to authorities.

Erickson was a student pilot, federal records show. Student pilots aren’t supposed to carry passengers if they are flying the plane.

The man LeBlanc identified as flying the plane was a licensed pilot with certificates as a helicopter transport pilot and commercial ratings for fixed-wing aircraft, according to a Federal Aviation Administration database. He also held a flight instructor certification, records show.

The Anchorage Daily News is not identifying the man described as Sunday’s pilot or the other passenger until authorities release their names.

Alaska State Troopers, with help from members of the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group, retrieved the bodies of all four Tuesday evening. The State Medical Examiner Office was still confirming their identification Wednesday.

Along with working as a health and safety officer, Erickson served with fire departments in Girdwood and Whittier. Officials at Girdwood said they were waiting on official identification before commenting.

Erickson “professed to having his 55th birthday” and was an avid folk-art collector and philanthropist who lived simply but loved to travel and entertain, LeBlanc said. An avid mountaineer, Erickson’s expeditions included Mount Everest. Erickson grew up in Arizona and owned several properties in Superior including commercial and rental units.

The Friday before his death, Erickson closed on a three-story home in Superior, LeBlanc said. He also talked about expanding his more modest Girdwood home this summer.

Wiley, who was 37, was staying in Alaska with Erickson and doing odd jobs. He’d been in Girdwood for two months and was scheduled to return to Superior in late August. He loved four-wheeling and fishing and got to Seldovia in July.

The deaths of LeBlanc’s family member and close friend together came as a shock, he said.

“While my heart is broken for the loss of Paul and my friend Karl, grief is a price we pay for love,” LeBlanc said. “And we can only celebrate the loss of our loved ones’ lives by continuing to live.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com


Chris von Imhof
Chris von Imhof lives across the street from Karl Erickson, the pilot and aircraft owner of Piper PA-22-150, N7402D
 
GIRDWOOD, Alaska (KTUU) - For twenty years, Karl Erickson was the life of neighborhood gatherings in Girdwood. On Sunday, he tragically passed away in a plane crash that killed four in the mountains near the town.

Chris von Imhof lives across the street from Erickson and regards him as a good friend and neighbor.

"Karl and their friends just celebrated their 55th birthday the day before, on Saturday, and were singing and having a wonderful time," von Imhof told Channel 2 Monday.

Von Imhof says the Girdwood community will have a difficult time saying goodbye to a long-standing member.

"We're going to miss him,” von Imhof said. “He has lots of good friends right in the neighborhood, and it's just a big shocker. I just hope we can have a good celebration of life."

Von Imhof is not the only one in mourning. Erickson worked for a company called Beacon, which provides safety services and training in high-risk occupations. The company released a statement Monday:

"Karl has been a valuable part of the Beacon family for a couple of years and has worked throughout Alaska on safety and rescue projects. We're all holding his family and friends in our hearts and prayers during this tragic time."

Karl Erickson is listed as the registered owner of the Piper PA-20 that went down on Sunday.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktuu.com


No one survived the fiery crash of a plane outside Girdwood on Sunday evening that killed four, authorities say.

A private pilot and three passengers died in the crash of the Piper PA-22, according to a Federal Aviation Administration site. Authorities didn’t immediately respond to requests for more information.

The plane “crashed under unknown circumstances after takeoff," according to the FAA site. It departed from Girdwood. The National Transportation Safety Board tweeted Monday that it was investigating the accident.

The crash was reported at about 5 p.m. Sunday on Goat Mountain near Eagle Glacier at about 5,000 feet elevation, troopers spokesman Ken Marsh said in an email. An Alaska National Guard Pave Hawk helicopter confirmed the crash and “that there were no survivors.”

The wreckage of the plane was incinerated in a post-crash fire, said Clint Johnson, National Transportation Safety Board Alaska chief.

Troopers and a National Transportation Safety Board investigator headed to the scene Monday to assess the terrain and develop a recovery plan, authorities said.

Members of Alaska Pacific University’s elite ski team were training on the glacier when the plane went down just over a ridge.

Luke Jager, a 19-year-old member of the U.S. Cross Country Ski Team, said he and other skiers were out for an afternoon training session.

“I had my head down and was listening to music so I didn’t actually see the plane hit, but we saw lots of black smoke coming from the mountain side all of a sudden,” Jager said in a text message. Skiers heard an explosion, and watched “a massive face of the ridge overlooking the glacier collapse and slide. It was huge. I have to imagine the two were related somehow.”

Jager saw teammates above him on the course and yelled to them, asking what happened. They said they’d seen a plane crash, he said, “so I turned around and skied as fast as I could from the course up to the building to let (coach Erik) Flora know what was going on. He was really good about making sure everyone took a deep breath before we proceeded.”

Flora and the team loaded glacier travel gear onto a snowmachine but couldn’t get to the crash site, Jager said. The coach called Alpine Air in Girdwood and they sent a helicopter to the site.

An Alpine Air representative had no comment Monday.

The National Guard helicopter arrived within an hour. The Guard sent the Pave Hawk and two pararescuemen, a spokeswoman said. They rappelled down to the wreckage.

“We were all really saddened to hear the outcome of it,” Jager texted Monday. “I think we were all kind of prepared for that though. It didn’t look like the kind of thing a person could survive.”

Twenty-five people have now died in 11 fatal plane crashes in Alaska so far this year, according to an NTSB database. That total includes six people who died in one crash in May when two floatplanes carrying passengers from the same cruise ship collided in midair near Ketchikan.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com



ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - Alaska State Troopers confirm a Piper PA-20 plane went down Sunday on Goat Mountain near Alyeska. On board were the pilot and three passengers, none of whom survived, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

AST says the crash happened at about 5,000 feet elevation and that a Pave Hawk helicopter responded. FAA says that the preliminary cause was "unknown circumstances after take off." FAA records show that the plane was built in 1957.

The names of the people on board have not been released by investigators, but Beacon Occupational Health and Safety Services, an Anchorage company, sent out an email to its employees confirming that the owner of the plane, Karl Erickson worked at the company.

The email said "It is with a heavy heart that we share Karl Erickson was involved in a fatal airplane accident" on Sunday.

The email says that the employee had worked on the Port of Anchorage providing safety support to Marathon Oil.

"We're all holding his family and friends in our hearts and prayers during this tragic time," writes the email.

According to APU Nordic Ski Center head coach Erik Flora, who was overseeing a training camp on the glacier at the time of the accident, the wreck occurred in a difficult-to-access area on the south side of Eagle Glacier.

"We were standing on the top of our course which is on the south end of Eagle Glacier and between where the ski tracks are, there's a blue ice field and then a rocky cliff area, so it would have been extremely hard to access by foot," he said.

Flora said that he was at the Thomas Glacier Training Center on the southeastern side of the glacier when an athlete skied up and told him they had witnessed the crash.

"I called Alpine Air, which is a helicopter service out of Girdwood and notified them and asked for help," he recounted. "I then organized one of my staff and we got some emergency equipment together and some fire extinguishers and got on our snow machines and went to see if we could find the, you know, where the smoke was and see if we could help. By the time we got over on the edge of the glacier Alpine Air was on site, and so they were able to get to the accident."

Later, para jumpers arrived to assess the wreckage, Flora said.

He said the area is a common place for planes to be flying.

"We see planes regularly flying over Eagle, regularly during the week," he said.

AST says a crew, along with the NTSB, are heading to the scene to investigate and that they are still at work formulating a plan for recovery of the wreckage.

According to the FAA's website, four people died. The plane that went down was a Piper PA22. One crew member and three passengers died.

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