Sunday, February 4, 2018

Cessna 150G, N4727X: Incident occurred February 04, 2018 in Piru, Ventura County, California

Ted Ripp confers with his mechanic regarding transporting the Cessna 150 he landed on Highway 126 east of Piru Sunday afternoon. No one was injured. 








http://registry.faa.gov/N4727X


A small plane landed safely on Highway 126 east of Piru Sunday afternoon after taking off from the Santa Paula Airport just two days after a small plane crashed while landing at the same facility.

No one was injured in either incident.

On Sunday, pilot and flight instructor Ted Ripp had taken off on his way home to the greater Los Angeles area. He planned to arrive at Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, north of Burbank.

Ripp and his passenger weren't planning to go to a Super Bowl party. But NFL football's biggest game of the year may have contributed to his uneventful landing shortly after 3 p.m.

Ripp's two-seat Cessna 150 was cruising at around 3,000 feet when the engine started running roughly and the plane wouldn't sustain altitude, Ripp said during an interview on the shoulder of the highway while awaiting his mechanic's arrival.

After running through an emergency checklist, he and his passenger, Lisa, who declined to give her last name, determined an emergency landing was required.

Ripp had enough time in the air to try various tactics to restart the plane and to plan a landing and approach. While in the sky, Lisa helped scout potential landing sites.

Ripp maneuvered to land, heading into the wind, on the westbound lanes of the highway. The 1966-vintage plane was small enough that he didn't have to worry about oncoming traffic.

"There were no cars conflicting at the time, and we landed uneventfully," Ripp said.

He then maneuvered the single-engine plane off the roadway onto a shoulder, in front of a citrus orchard. The plane was undamaged.

Ripp said he has flown for 33 years and has never had a prior flight emergency.

"I knew he'd land the plane," Lisa said.

Ventura County Fire Department crews initially responded to the scene.

Ripp's mechanic, John Clausen, drove in to handle the plane's transport.

The plane is too large to simply tow. 

A California Highway Patrol officer at the scene said it was likely the plane would need to be drained and have the wings taken off so it could be transported.

The officer also said the light traffic during Sunday's Super Bowl may have helped the plane make a safe landing.

"Everybody's home right now," he said of the clear roadway.

On Friday, two people walked away unharmed from a crash that left their plane upside down in the Santa Clara River bottom.That incident occurred during an attempted landing when the plane clipped an unoccupied helicopter and went down an embankment.

Story,  video,  photo gallery  ➤ http://www.vcstar.com

Escambia County, Florida



ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Florida  — Emergency vehicles converged on Johnson's Beach Sunday evening.

An Escambia County spokesperson told Channel 3 News emergency dispatchers got a call around 5:12 p.m. about a low-flying ultralight plane near Snug Harbor Condos, located at 10335 Gulf Beach Highway.

Maj. Andrew Hobbs, a spokesperson for the Escambia County Sheriff's Office (ECSO) said no one saw the plane go into the water, but the caller was concerned.

Crews spent about an hour searching the area.

According to Hobbs, ECSO, the Coast Guard and Escambia County EMS responded to the scene.

They did not find any sign of a person or plane in trouble. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://weartv.com

New era in Samoa and Tonga aviation history

Real Tonga Airlines Deputy CEO Tele Faletau and the Polynesian Airlines CEO Seiuli Alvin Tuala with officials of the two airlines.



A new era in the history of aviation between Samoa and Tonga is set to start when Real Tonga’s operations out of Faleolo Airport takes off seven days from today.

The Airline is set to use its SAAB 340 plane to transport passengers between the two island nations, as the start of something the management of Real Tonga hopes to expand to other parts of the region.

Real Tonga Airlines Owner and Chief Executive Officer, Tevita Palu, told the Samoa Observer that this is an exciting time for them.

The Airline has already signed a codeshare agreement with Samoa Airways. Codeshare is an aviation business arrangement where two or more airlines share the same flight. 

Last year July, test flights from Real Tonga Airlines touched down at Faleolo International Airport and the flight was 1 hour and 20 minutes from Vava’u. 

The flight out of Samoa is a step in the fight direction, according to Mr. Latu who told the Samoa Observer the Airline started in 2013. 

“I started the airline as a sole and private owner of Real Tonga in 2013 to service Tonga’s domestic air service,” he said.

 “Moving to start international and regional air service is quite an achievement for Real Tonga.

 “I look forward to working hand in hand with Samoa’s owned airline, Samoa Airways, to develop the air transportation between our two nations and to support tourism growth in the Pacific.”

To start, Real Tonga will operate two flights from Tongatapu via Vavau per week. 

 “We have three engineers based at Faleolo Airport as support maintenance for Real Tonga.” 

 “The Airline is currently completing final license requirements in Samoa and will commence operations with two flights per week.

“All flights are to be operated from Fua’amotu Domestic Airport to Faleolo International Airport in Samoa, via Salote Lupepau’u International Airport, Vava’u

“Real Tonga will be utilising the SAAB 340 for our regional flights, which will be offering up to thirty passenger seats and a full meal service.

“It has been over a decade since there was any significant commercial capacity between the two Polynesian nations.”

 “He had always envisaged more than just offering a domestic service for the people of Tonga and he always expected that REALTonga air services would expand internationally and offer our people more choice, more flexibility and better fares than are currently available. 

He went on to say, that the airline is in its 5th year of operation and whilst it has been a long process developing the airline’s standards to fit the international arena, he had made it clear to his management team, that he wanted services to Samoa to be available to our people and to the people of Samoa to be able to travel to their respective homes in order to celebrate Christmas.

Mr. Palu said whilst Samoa is the first of our international routes, his management team are already working on plans to extend our regional routes to offer safe, convenient, comfortable and cheaper options to the people of Tonga to other neighbouring countries.

“The two flights weekly are being scheduled, to provide convenient flight times as well as good connections to Pagopago and to the U.S.A.

“This operation looks to open up more travel, trade and business opportunities between the two neighbouring countries and the international leg between Vava’u and Samoa will offer further growth opportunities for the tourism market. 

“The Samoa route offers the people of Tonga huge reductions in travelling time as well as air fares,” according to the statement posted on the Airline’s website. 

Last year, Deputy Chief Executive Officer and General Manager of Commercial, Tele Faletau told the Samoa Observer that Samoa has always been in the plans for Real Tonga Airlines. 

“While a lot of people suggested Fiji, but for us, we’ve had a connection with Samoa for far too long,” he said.

“This has always been our primary objective for our regional flights and that is flying to Samoa. 

“We’re very happy to be discussing a code share with Polynesian Airlines so that will be a joint Polynesian Airlines and Real Tonga.”

Mr. Faletau said Samoa and Tonga are next-door neighbours and it makes sense for them to work together.

 “We’re brothers, and we haven't had any direct services for more than ten years. Ever since Polynesian halted their fully fledged airlines services, that all stopped.”

But the plan to revive Polynesian Airlines international operations is exciting. 

“We have a lot of Tongas here in Samoa and there are a lot of Samoans in Tonga. 

“To get between Samoa and Tonga, is very costly to customers over $2,000 and on top of that required an overnight and that didn't matter which way you went, whether it’s Fiji, or NZ,” he said. 

“So now we’re going to offer a much more cost effective option for the traveling public and a much more convenient services... the airfare will be less than $1,000WST, because the flight is just over an hour. 

“All the flights will come through Vava’u, the flight time that was discovered today [yesterday] was an hour and 20 minutes. 

“It’s a very quick flight and it’ll be very convenient and on to top it off that this partnership will strengthen our Polynesian ties.”   

Original article can be found here ➤ http://sobserver.ws

Boeing officials in Kathmandu to woo Buddha Air

KATHMANDU, Feb 5: Officials of aircraft maker The Boeing Company arrived in Nepal on Sunday to hold discussions with Buddha Air which has unveiled plan to expand its wings in the international skies.

The team comprising of Suvendoo Ray, senior director of International Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes and David M Schulte, regional marketing director of Asia Pacific & India Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes,  will hold discussion with Buddha Air officials on Monday.

“They will be here for two days -- Sunday and Monday,” Birendra Bahadur Basnet, managing director of Buddha Air, said adding that the team has suggested them that Boeing B737 Max 8 series aircraft will be suitable for Nepal. 

Buddha Air has already held discussion with Airbus SE. Officials of the European aircraft manufacturer suggested the Nepali private carrier that Airbus A319 aircraft will be the best option for it, according to Basnet.

“We will resume international flights with a flight to Kolkata, India, from September 1 with our 72-seater ATR 72-500 series aircraft. “Soon after the Kolkata flight, we will decide whether to purchase Boeing or Airbus aircraft,” Basnet said, adding: “We will start our international flight from 2020 from Kathmandu and from August, 2021 from Pokhara Regional International Airport.” 

According to officials of Buddha Air, the company will assess management expenses, features, fuel consumption and other technical parts of both Airbus A319 and Boeing 737 Max 8 series aircraft before it makes the choice. Since its establishment, Buddha Air has carried 10 million passengers including both domestic and foreigners to their destinations. It has been carrying more than one million passengers annually.       

The airline company is operating with a fleet of five 72-seater ATR 72-500 aircraft, three ATR 42-320 and two Beechcraft 1900 D series aircraft. With these aircraft, it has been operating around three dozens of domestic flights to Nepalgunj, Bhairahawa, Bharatpur, Simara, Janakpur, Biratnagar, Bhadrapur, Pokhara, Dhangadhi and Tumlingtar every day.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.myrepublica.com

Cessna T310R, VH-JMW, Burley Aircraft Proprietary Limited: Fatal accident occurred October 28, 2017 in Kew, New South Wales, Australia



NTSB Identification: WPR18WA019
Accident occurred Saturday, October 28, 2017 in Kew, New South Wales, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA T310, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 28, 2017, at 1600 local time, a Cessna T310R, VH-JMW, was destroyed when it collided with terrain near Kew, New South Wales, Australia. The airplane was operated under the pertinent civil regulations of the government of Australia. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: +612 6274 6054
Fax: +612 6274 6434



http://www.regosearch.com/VH-JMW

Collision with terrain involving Cessna 310R, VH-JMW, 40 km SSW of Port Macquarie, NSW, on October 28, 2017

Investigation number: AO-2017-105

https://www.atsb.gov.au

On 28 October 2017, a Cessna Aircraft Company T310R, registered VH-JMW, was being operated on a private flight from Toowoomba, Queensland to The Lakes aerodrome, New South Wales. The aircraft had been flown from The Lakes to Toowoomba earlier that day. The aircraft departed Toowoomba at 1434 Eastern Daylight-saving Time (EDT)[1]. The pilot was the owner of the aircraft and there was a passenger in the other front seat.

During the flight, transponders in the aircraft provided flight information indicating that the aircraft flew at 9,500 ft in the cruise. Weather forecasts and observations indicated good weather conditions throughout the flight, with a light easterly wind in the vicinity of the destination.

About half a nautical mile north of The Lakes aerodrome, witnesses driving south on the Pacific Highway observed the aircraft flying just to the west of the highway at low altitude in a southerly direction. The landing gear was extended and the aircraft was descending slowly. The aircraft was then observed to roll left and descend rapidly.

The aircraft collided with terrain at approximately 1555, in a narrow wooded strip of land east of the Pacific Highway, between the highway and the main northern railway line. The accident was 800 m from The Lakes runway 16 threshold, in line with the runway direction (Figure 1). The pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

Aircraft information

VH-JMW was a Cessna T310R, six seat, twin-engine aircraft, powered by two Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-520-NB turbocharged engines (Figure 2). It had six fuel tanks, comprising the main fuel tanks in the wingtip pods, and two auxiliary fuel tanks in each wing.

Wreckage examination

On-site examination of the wreckage, surrounding markings on trees and the ground indicated that the aircraft impacted terrain in a steep nose-down attitude and banked to the left. The aircraft was in a landing configuration.

The left wing had separated outboard of the left engine, and both the wing-tip pods had separated from the wings. The remaining fuel tanks were also breached and no fuel was found, however a smell of aviation fuel was noted by emergency responders at the accident site. There was no evidence of fire.

Examination of the engines and propellers indicated that the left engine was producing no power and the right engine was likely producing low power at the time of the accident.

A number of aircraft components, instruments and electronic devices were recovered from the accident site by the ATSB for further examination.

The aircraft was not equipped with a flight data recorder or a cockpit voice recorder, nor was it required to be.

Ongoing investigation

The investigation is continuing and will include consideration of the:
  • Pilot’s qualifications, experience and medical information
  • Fuel planning for the flight
  • Component examination
  • Witness information
  • Weather information
  • Recovered instruments and available electronic data.
The information contained in this web update is released in accordance with section 25 of the Transport Safety Investigation Act 2003 and is derived from the initial investigation of the occurrence. Readers are cautioned that new evidence will become available as the investigation progresses that will enhance the ATSB's understanding of the accident as outlined in this web update. As such, no analysis or findings are included in this update.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

Cessna A188: Fatal accident occurred October 24, 2017 in São Félix do Xingu, Brazil

NTSB Identification: ERA18WA029
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 24, 2017 in Sao Felix do Xingu, Brazil
Aircraft: CESSNA A188, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Brazil has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Cessna A188 airplane that occurred on October 24, 2017. 

The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Brazil's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Brazil.

Cessna 210L Centurion, VH-HWY, Hunt Aerospace Proprietary Limited / Air Frontier Proprietary Limited: Accident occurred October 23, 2017 near Darwin Airport, Northern Territory, Australia



NTSB Identification: WPR18WA024
Accident occurred Monday, October 23, 2017 near Darwin Aerodrome, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY 210L, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On October 23, 2017, at 1332 local time, a Cessna 210L, VH-HWY, collided with terrain near Darwin Aerodrome, Australia. The airplane was operated under the pertinent civil regulations of the government of Australia. The two occupants were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)

62 Northbourne Avenue
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia
Tel: +612 6274 7439
www.atsb.gov.au 


http://www.regosearch.com/VH-HWY


In-flight breakup involving Cessna 210, VH-HWY, 22 km E of Darwin Airport, Northern Territory, on October 23, 2017

Investigation number: AO-2017-102

https://www.atsb.gov.au

On 23 October 2017, two pilots from Air Frontier were operating a Cessna C210L aircraft, registered VH-HWY (HWY), on a charter flight from Darwin Airport to Elcho Island, Northern Territory. The pilot in the left seat was the pilot in command, under supervision of the right seat pilot and the flight was operating under the visual flight rules (VFR).[1] The pilots had submitted a flight plan to track via ‘VFR route No. 2’ to Castle Point (Figure 1) and then direct to Elcho Island.

The aircraft took off from runway 29 at about 1307 Central Standard Time.[2] Recorded air traffic control (ATC) data showed that as the aircraft climbed through 700 ft, the pilot[3] contacted ATC and was cleared to climb to 7,500 ft and turn onto a heading of 320° (items 1 and 2 in Figure 2). About 5 minutes later, the controller cleared the aircraft to turn right onto a heading of 100° (item 3 in Figure 2).

As the aircraft tracked east and passed through 6,100 ft on climb, the pilot requested clearance to divert 5 miles left or right of track due to weather (item 4 in Figure 2) and to climb to 9,500 ft. Air traffic control advised that left of track was unavailable due to the nearby active restricted airspace (Figure 1) and so was cleared to divert up to 5 NM right of track and to climb to 9,500 ft. Just over 2 minutes later, the controller cleared the aircraft to operate up to 10 NM right of track (item 6 on Figure 2).

At 1325, the aircraft turned north-east and continued to climb for another 4 minutes, to about 10,000 ft. At 1329, the controller recalled seeing the aircraft turn abruptly to the south west. The controller asked the pilot if they required alternate tracking (item 8 on Figure 2). The pilot replied ‘affirm’ and the controller cleared the aircraft to deviate up to 20 NM right of route. The aircraft continued to track south west.

At 1332, the aircraft’s recorded groundspeed increased from 130 kt to 150 kt. Air traffic control radar recorded the aircraft descending and climbing between 9,600 ft and 10,100 ft (see the section titled Recorded data). At 1332:20 while at 10,100 ft and a recorded groundspeed of 100 kt, the aircraft’s altitude (radar mode ‘C’) disappeared from the radar display (item 9 in Figure 2). The controllers immediately assessed the absence of this line as abnormal.

About 10 seconds later, three short transmissions were recorded, resulting from separate ‘push-to-talk’ activations, likely from the aircraft’s radio. At 1332:45, the aircraft’s altitude (mode C) briefly reappeared, recording the aircraft at 5,100 ft and 70 kt groundspeed, and 15 seconds later the controllers reported that the aircraft disappeared from the radar screen. The controllers attempted to make radio contact with the pilot, but were unsuccessful.

Witnesses in the vicinity of Howard Springs (Figure 1) saw the aircraft descend rapidly in a relatively flat attitude with a portion of each wing missing. The main fuselage was found less than 1 NM from the last recorded radar position and both aircraft wings were located about 700 m south-east of that site.

Both pilots were fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed.

Weather and environmental information

On the day of the occurrence, the environment was typical of the Northern Territory early wet season or ‘build‑up’, with unstable conditions, and showers and storms expected.

A thunderstorm to the north of Darwin, combined with the north-west sea breeze, triggered a convective cell to develop rapidly between 1300 and 1330 between Howard Springs and Koolpinyah (19 km to the north east). Based on the cloud top temperature, the top of the cell was around 6,000–7,000 ft at 1300, 9,000 ft at 1320, 13,000–14,000 ft at 1330, and around 14,000 ft at 1340. The developing cumulus clouds may have produced strong updrafts or downdrafts.

The air traffic controller and supervisor reported that their observations of the weather radar, using the Bureau of Meteorology internet website, indicated a cell (painted yellow, indicating rain) but not one that was indicative of a thunderstorm.

Witnesses reported seeing a large cumulus cell form over the Howard Springs area, which they described as a regular occurrence in the build-up season in Darwin. Some reported that the cloud went ‘very black’ at the time of the accident, and that starting about 10 minutes after the accident, it rained heavily for about an hour.




Recorded data

The aircraft was not equipped with a flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder, nor was it required to be.

The aircraft’s altitude and groundspeed were recorded by the Darwin ATC radar for the last 6 minutes of the flight (Figure 3).

The aircraft’s airspeed was not recorded. The forecast wind at 10,000 ft was 10 kt from 190°, so the aircraft’s airspeed may have been up to 10 kt higher than the recorded groundspeed in the last few minutes of the flight. However, the actual airspeed cannot be accurately determined, given the likelihood of wind shear and turbulence in the air mass.

Maneuvering speed

The maneuvering speed was specified by the aircraft’s manufacturer as 118 kt at the aircraft’s maximum take-off weight, shown as a dotted line in Figure 3. At airspeeds above the maneuvering speed, control inputs or turbulence may produce wing loading that can damage the aircraft’s structure. At airspeeds above about 145 kt, this loading can result in failure of the aircraft structure.

The graph shows that shortly after the aircraft climbed to 10,000 ft, the aircraft’s groundspeed exceeded the manoeuvring speed. The groundspeed remained above the maneuvering speed, increasing to a maximum of 150 kt in the final minute of the flight. During the same timeframe, the aircraft’s recorded altitude varied between 9,700 ft and 10,000 ft, above the cleared altitude of 9,500 ft.

Aircraft information

The Cessna Aircraft Company 210L is a six-seat, high cantilever wing, single-engine aircraft equipped with retractable tricycle landing gear and was designed for general utility purposes. The aircraft was powered by a Teledyne Continental IO-550P engine.

HWY was manufactured in the United States in 1974 and was first registered in Australia in 1988. The aircraft was operated in the charter category.

In 2012 the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2012‑10-04 Wing main spar lower cap inspection. This AD was applicable to HWY and required an inspection of the left and right wing lower main spar caps for cracks. Aircraft technical documentation identified this AD was completed in June 2012 with no defects found. During scheduled maintenance completed in March 2016, the wing main spar carry through was replaced with a serviceable item due to corrosion. HWY was then operated by Air Frontier and maintained under an approved system of maintenance from March 2017.

A periodic inspection of the aircraft was completed on 26 September 2017 and a new maintenance release was issued, which was still current at the time of the occurrence. In addition, a scheduled 50 hourly inspection was completed on 23 October 2017. The maintenance release was current at the time of the occurrence and it was reported there were no concerns with aircraft serviceability prior to departure from Darwin Airport. In addition, the pilots did not advise ATC of any aircraft-related issues.

Wreckage and impact information

Examination of the aircraft wreckage indicated that the aircraft impacted terrain from a vertical descent, right side slightly down, in an almost level attitude. The wings were located about 24 m apart and about 740 m south-southeast of the fuselage, consistent with an in-flight breakup (Figure 4). There was no evidence of fire. Various aircraft components were located between the fuselage and an area about 70 m beyond the wings, over 810 m in total.

Both wings had separated between 0.5 and 1.5 m outboard from the wing-to-fuselage attachment. The wing spars had fractured in over-stress, and exhibited bending deformation consistent with forces acting upwards and rearwards on the wings. Examination of the wings showed no evidence of pre-existing defects.

On-site examination of the severely impact-damaged fuselage (Figure 5), engine and propeller did not identify any pre‑existing faults or anomalies with the aircraft that could have contributed to the accident. However, a number of aircraft components were retained for further examination and testing. The propeller did not exhibit any evidence of rotation at impact, consistent with fuel exhaustion resulting from the ruptured integral wing-fuel tanks.

Both pilots were secured in their seats prior to impact. Notwithstanding the severe disruption to the airframe, examination identified both pilot seats were about mid-travel with one locator pin on each seat still engaged in the seat rails.

Related occurrences

ATSB investigation AO-2011-160 involved a Cessna 210M aircraft, VH-WBZ, which broke up in flight. Although the precise circumstances were not known, a combination of aircraft airspeed with turbulence and/or control inputs generated stresses that exceeded the design limits of the aircraft structure.

The United States National Transportation Safety Board investigated seven in-flight breakups of Cessna 210 aircraft since 2000. All those occurrences involved flight into thunderstorms or associated turbulence, a loss of control following inadvertent flight into instrument meteorological conditions or a combination of both.

Continuing investigation

The investigation is continuing and will include examination of the following:
  • Recovered components and available electronic data
  • Aircraft and site survey data collected
  • Further interviews with a number of witnesses and involved parties
  • Weather conditions and its effect on the flight
  • Pilot qualifications and experience
  • The aircraft’s maintenance and operational records
  • The operator’s training and professional development programs
  • Previous research and similar occurrences.
The information contained in this web update is released in accordance with section 25 of the Transport Safety Investigation Act 2003 and is derived from the initial investigation of the occurrence. Readers are cautioned that new evidence will become available as the investigation progresses that will enhance the ATSB's understanding of the accident as outlined in this web update. As such, no analysis or findings are included in this update.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

Cessna 210N Centurion II, PT-ORU, operated by a private individual: Fatal accident occurred October 22, 2017 in Itaituba, Brazil





NTSB Identification: ERA18WA017
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, October 22, 2017 in Itaituba, Brazil
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration:
Injuries: 5 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 22, 2017, about 2105 universal coordinated time, a Cessna 210N, Brazilian registration PT-ORU, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it collided with terrain following a low altitude maneuver near Itaituba, Brazil. The two foreign certificated pilots and three passengers were fatally injured. The personal flight departed from Itaituba Airport (SBIH), Itaituba, Brazil and was operated under Brazilian flight regulations.

This investigation is under jurisdiction of the Government of Brazil. Any further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Aeronautical Accident Prevention and Investigation Center
Investigation Division
SHIS - QI 05-VI Comar
Brasilia-DF, Brazil 71.615-600
Telephone: (55-61) 3364-8800
Fax: (55-61) 3365-1004
dipaa.spai@cenipa.aer.mil.br

This report is for informational purposes, and contains only information released by the Government of Brazil.

Beechcraft 200C Super King Air, OB-2077-P, Air Majoro: Accident occurred October 19, 2017 in Pucallpa, Peru



NTSB Identification: ERA18WA052
14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier Air Majoro
Accident occurred Thursday, October 19, 2017 in Pucallpa, Peru
Aircraft: BEECH B200, registration:
Injuries: 1 Serious, 12 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Peru has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Beech B200C airplane that occurred on October 19, 2017. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Peru's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Peru.

Avid Mark IV , F-JAGB: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2017 in Jüterborg, Germany




NTSB Identification: CEN18WA016
Accident occurred Monday, October 16, 2017 in Jüterborg, Germany
Aircraft: AVID MARK IV, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 16, 2017, about 1123 UTC, an amateur-built Avid Mark IV airplane, French registration F-JAGB, owned and operated by a private individual, crashed during a test flight near Jüterborg, Germany. The pilot on board was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The personal local flight originated from the pilot's private airstrip near Jüterborg, Germany.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction of the government of Germany. Any further information regarding the investigation can be obtained from:

The German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation
Bundesstelle fur Flugenfallensuchung (BFU)
Herman-Blenk Strasse 16
38108 Braunschweig
Germany
Telephone: +49 5 31-35 48-0
Facsimile: +49 5 31-35 48-246
E-Mail: ops@bfu-web.de

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the BFU of Germany.

Beechcraft E33A Bonanza, PT-DDB: Fatal accident occurred October 09, 2017 in São José do Rio Preto, Brazil


 


NTSB Identification: ERA18WA014
Accident occurred Monday, October 09, 2017 in São José do Rio Preto, Brazil
Aircraft: BEECH AIRCRAFT E33A, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On September 10, 2017, about 1525 coordinated universal time, a Beechcraft E33-A, Brazilian registration PT-DDB, struck a residence while conducting a go around near São José do Rio Preto State Airport (SBSR), Brazil. The airplane was substantially damaged, and the pilot and 2 passengers were fatally injured. The flight originated from Tangará da Serra Airport (SWTS), Mato Grosso, Brazil.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Brazil. Further information can be obtained from:

Aeronautical Accident Prevention and Investigation Center
Investigation Division
CENIPA-SERIPA IV
Santana - São Paulo/ SP
CEP: 02022-901
Telephone: (55-11) 2221-5635
Fax: (55-11) 2221-5637
seripa4@fab.mil.br

This report is for informational purposes and contains only information released by the Government of Brazil.

Robinson R44 Raven I, YL-HBH: Fatal accident occurred October 08, 2017 in Gramzda, Latvia





NTSB Identification: CEN18WA007
Accident occurred Sunday, October 08, 2017 in Gramzda, Latvia
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 8, 2017, about 1014 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), a Robinson R44 helicopter, YL-HBH, impacted a powerline after takeoff near Gramzda, Latvia. One passenger was fatally injured and the pilot and two other passengers on board were seriously injured.

The incident is being investigated by the Transport Accident and Incident Investigation Bureau (TAIIB) of the Republic of Latvia.

Inquiries regarding this incident should be directed to:

Transport Accident and Incident Investigation Bureau
58 Brivibas Street
Riga, LV-1011
Latvia

Robinson R44 Raven I, OO-FLY, registered to Lore Helicopters and operated by Best in the Sky: Accident occurred October 08, 2017 in Namur, Belgium








NTSB Identification: CEN18WA029
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, October 08, 2017 in Namur, Belgium
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 4 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 8, 2017, at 1037 UTC (coordinated universal time), a Robinson R44 Raven 1 helicopter, Belgium registration OO-FLY, collided with the ground after lifting off from Namur-Suarlee Airport (EBNM), Namur, Belgium. The private pilot and three passengers received minor injuries. The helicopter was substantially damaged. The helicopter was registered to Lore Helicopters, and operated by Best in the Sky, a private contractor. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The accident is under the jurisdiction and control of the Belgium government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Belgium government. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport
Air Accident Investigation Unit
City Atrium
Rue du Progres 56
1210 Brussels

Cessna 152, N417CB: Accident occurred November 30, 2017 at Fullerton Municipal Airport (KFUL), Orange County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N417CB


Location: Fullerton, CA
Accident Number: GAA18CA076
Date & Time: 11/30/2017, 1140 PST
Registration: N417CB
Aircraft: CESSNA 152
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The flight instructor reported that, during the student pilot's solo flight in the traffic pattern, after completing a series of takeoffs and landings, the student decided to practice a soft field takeoff. During the takeoff, the student applied back pressure and full throttle; however, he did not add sufficient right rudder. Subsequently, the airplane veered off the runway to the left, struck the Precision Approach Path Indicator lights, and came to rest off the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and engine mount.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/28/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 35 hours (Total, all aircraft), 35 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N417CB
Model/Series: 152 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 15281010
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1670 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235 SERIES
Registered Owner:  BILL W. GRIGGS JR
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFUL, 96 ft msl
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 248°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 5°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fullerton, CA (FUL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fullerton, CA (FUL)
Type of Clearance:  VFR
Departure Time: 1140 PST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: FULLERTON MUNI (FUL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 96 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3121 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.872500, -117.977500 (est)

Robinson R44 II, N744WT, New Orleans Helicopters LLC: Accident occurred November 29, 2017 at Lakefront Airport (KNEW), New Orleans, Louisiana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New Orleans, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

New Orleans Helicopters LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N744WT

Location: New Orleans, LA

Accident Number: GAA18CA066
Date & Time: 11/29/2017, 1630 CST
Registration: N744WT
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

The helicopter pilot reported that, while positioning the helicopter on a trailer for maintenance, the helicopter landed on the trailer with the left skid off the platform and the tail rotor struck the ground. The pilot added that the helicopter climbed about 50 ft. and he reduced power. During the descent, the main rotor blade struck the tail boom and the helicopter impacted the pavement.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, tail boom, and main rotor blades.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/04/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4670 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3200 hours (Total, this make and model), 4445 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 120 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 43 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
Registration: N744WT
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11489
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:  LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: Kevin Contraery
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Certificate of Authorization or Waiver (COA) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNEW, 9 ft msl
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 328°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  7 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 100°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: New Orleans, LA (NEW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: New Orleans, LA (NEW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: LAKEFRONT (NEW)
Runway Surface Type: Metal/Wood
Airport Elevation: 7 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.040000, -90.022500 (est)