Thursday, April 11, 2019

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N653ND: Incident occurred April 08, 2019 at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Veered off runway.

UND Aerospace Foundation

https://registry.faa.gov/N653ND

Date: 08-APR-19
Time: 23:10:00Z
Regis#: N653ND
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N19369: Incident occurred April 10, 2019 at Van Nuys Airport (KVNY), Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Struck a pole.

BT LTD

https://registry.faa.gov/N19369

Date: 10-APR-19
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: N19369
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: VAN NUYS
State: CALIFORNIA

Cozy, N24DL: Incident occurred April 10, 2019 at Manassas Regional Airport (KHEF), Prince William County, Manassas, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

Nose gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N24DL

Date: 10-APR-19
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: N24DL
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WASHINGTON
State: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

American Airlines, Airbus A321-200, N114NN: Incident occurred April 10, 2019 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York New York

American Airlines flight 300:  Struck runway sign and airport light.  

https://registry.faa.gov/N114NN

Date: 11-APR-19
Time: 00:25:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: 321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: 300
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK




NEW YORK -- An American Airlines flight was forced to return to JFK Airport Wednesday night after it clipped its wing upon departure. 

The FAA says Flight 300 that was bound from New York to Los Angeles landed safely at 9:09 p.m. 

The pilot reported that the Airbus 321 may have collided with an object during departure. Pictures of the damaged wing were taken by passengers on board. 

American Airlines says the flight took off from Kennedy at 8:40 p.m. but returned a short time later. 

After the aircraft landed, workers discovered damage to the left wing, caused by striking a runway sign on departure. 

According to a passenger, the plane went sideways after takeoff and the pilot had to straighten it out. 

"The plane veered left when it hit something and then it took a sharp right turn at takeoff where I was on the right side of the plane and I was looking straight down at the ground," said Scott Laser, a passenger. "I cried the whole way back and many others did also." 

The plane was in the air for about 15 minutes before the pilot announced that they were heading back to JFK. There were 101 passengers and eight crew members aboard at the time of the incident. 

The FAA is investigating. They released a statement saying, "The pilot reported that the Airbus 321 may have collided with an object during departure...workers discovered damage to the left wing, possibly caused by striking a runway sign and airport light departure." 

American Airlines also released the following statement, "American Airlines flight 300 from New York (JFK) to Los Angeles (LAX) returned to JFK this evening after the aircraft struck an object upon departure. 

The flight which took off at 8:40 p.m. ET, landed safely at JFK at 9:09 p.m. ET, and taxied to the gate. There were 101 passengers and 8 crew members on the Airbus A321 aircraft, and no injuries were reported. American is swapping flight 300 to a new aircraft, as our team reviews the incident and inspects the aircraft. We never want to disrupt our customers' travel plans and we are sorry for the inconvenience." 

The Port Authority says the flight may have been slightly off center during takeoff. 

Thursday morning, the rescheduled American Airlines flight 300 took off without incident to Los Angeles. 

Story and video ➤ https://abc7.com

Piper PA-32-260, N3717W: Incident occurred April 10, 2019 at Piedmont Triad International Airport (KGSO), Greensboro, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Bounced on landing resulted in blown tire, prop strike and nose gear damage.

Barrett Flight Services LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N3717W

Date: 10-APR-19
Time: 17:18:00Z
Regis#: N3717W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32 260
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GREENSBORO
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Loss of Control on Ground: Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N92798, accident occurred April 10, 2019 at Sisters Eagle Air Airport (6K5), Deschutes County, Oregon

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N92798



Location: Sisters, OR
Accident Number: GAA19CA202
Date & Time: 04/10/2019, 1030 PDT
Registration: N92798
Aircraft:  Piper PA 12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the approach, the wind velocity increased and became turbulent. He recalled that during the landing roll, "I immediately applied a slight amount of forward stick," but when the tailwheel contacted the surface, "the wind suddenly changed to a tailwind," and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder, both wing lift struts, and the engine mounts.

The nearest METAR was located at an airport 1 mile away from the accident site, and reported that about the time of the accident, the wind was from 290° at 10 knots. The visibility was 10 statute miles, and the clouds were broken at 6,500ft MSL and deteriorating. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 20.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Balloon; Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Glider
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/06/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/28/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 8000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 88, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/01/2003
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/17/2017
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N92798
Model/Series: PA 12 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Other
Serial Number: 12-244
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1771 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: Tailwheel Productions Llc
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: Tailwheel Productions Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPDX, 107 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 311°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: 
Altimeter Setting: 30.42 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Madras, OR (S33)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sisters, OR (65K)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Sisters Eagle Air (6K5)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 3168 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3560 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.588611, -122.596944 (est)



SISTERS, Oregon - Two men sustained minor injuries Wednesday morning when their 73-year-old single-engine plane flipped onto its roof while landing in winds gusting more than 40 mph at Sisters Eagle Airport, Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies said.

A Black Butte Police Department sergeant was driving by the Sisters Eagle Airport around 10:45 a.m. when he saw a plane flip over while trying to land and called for assistance, sheriff’s Sgt. Kevin Dizney said. 

Deputies arrived to find the red and white Piper PA-12 single-engine plane on its top, partly on the paved runway, Dizney said.

Dizney said the plane “had been attempting to land and due to the gusty winds we’re experiencing had some complications and flipped over onto its roof.”

Pilot Brian Lansburgh, 73, of Sisters, and his passenger, John Watson, 88, of Bend, were able to climb out of the overturned plane with minor, non-life-threatening injuries that didn’t require transport from the scene, the sergeant said.

Deputies determined Lansburgh was trying to land in gusty winds, using the dirt beside the runway to help in the landing, Dizney said.

“Wind appears to be the only factor causing this crash at this time,” Dizney said in a news release.

He later told NewsChannel 21 that both men are pilots and they had taken off earlier from the Sisters airport.

The National Weather Service observation site in Sisters was recording west-southwest winds of 30 mph, gusting to 41 mph around the time the plane landed.

Federal Aviation Administration records indicate the plane was built in 1946 and is owned by Tailwheel Productions LLC of Sisters.

The runway was closed for about 90 minutes during the crash investigation and for airport staff to take the plane to a storage location. The plane “sustained moderate damage but remained in one piece,” Dizney said in a news release.

Dizney said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were contacted by phone for assistance and will be completing their investigation in the coming days.

Lansburgh is a flight instructor who specializes in “tailwheel” instruction, the type of plane that has a “tailwheel” at the rear to support the tail of the plane.  He started the Tailwheeler’s Journal and was nominated for an Academy Award in 1976 for the short film “Dawn Flight,” according to the Tailwheeler’s Journal website.

Lansburgh previously was the manager and pilot of Sunriver Soaring and managed the Sunriver Airport for a time. Previously, he was a pilot for L3 Wescam, flying aerial photography planes across the U.S. and Canada, and also was a comedy stunt pilot for air shows.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ktvz.com




A single-engine airplane flipped over after having to land on a dirt strip parallel to the runway at Sisters Eagle Airport on Wednesday morning, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office.

The pilot, identified as Brian Lansburgh, 73, of Sisters, was attempting to land at 10:43 a.m., but hit a cross wind and ended up landing off the runway, which caused the plane to flip on its top, said Sgt. William Bailey, sheriff’s spokesman. Also on board was passenger John Watson, 88, of Bend.

Lansburgh and Watson were able to get out of the plane on their own and suffered minor injuries.

The single-engine Piper PA12, which was built in 1946, is registered to Tailwheel Productions LLC in Sisters, according to a Federal Aviation Administration database.

Lansburgh is the founder of The Tailwheeler’s Journal and a flight instructor who produces flying videos, according to the company website. It states he was former manager of Sunriver Soaring and ran the Sunriver Airport for a while.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and are investigating the crash.

Wind appears to be the only factor in the crash, according to sheriff’s Sgt. K. Dizney.

“Deputies determined the pilot, Brian Lansburgh, was attempting to land the plane in gusty winds using the adjacent dirt along the runway to assist him in making the landing,” Dizney said in a press release. “As the airplane touched down and began to slow, winds began to gust again and caused the plane to flip over onto its top.”

Also Wednesday, a flight from San Francisco arriving at Redmond Airport blew four tires on its main landing gear, said Zach Bass, airport manager. United Airlines Flight 5879, a CRJ-200 flown by SkyWest Airlines, blew the tires as it landed on Runway 29.

None of the 28 people on board was injured, the FAA said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.bendbulletin.com

SkyWest Airlines, Bombardier CRJ-200ER, N472CA: Incident occurred April 10, 2019 at Redmond Municipal Airport (KRDM), Deschutes County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

SkyWest flight 5879: Blew all main tires during landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N472CA

Date: 10-APR-19
Time: 14:10:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ2
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: SKY WEST
Flight Number: 5879
City: REDMOND
State: OREGON





REDMOND, Oregon -  All main tires tires on a United Express flight from San Francisco to Redmond blew out upon landing at Redmond Municipal Airport Wednesday morning, causing no injuries but prompting a call-out of emergency crews. officials said.

An airport representative said the incident involved United Flight 5879, which landed at Redmond Municipal Airport shortly before 10 a.m. 

The passengers were taken by bus to the airport terminal, the representative said, and the plane's return flight to San Francisco, Flight 5541, was delayed until 1:26 p.m.

SkyWest Airlines operates the United Express flights into and out of Redmond Municipal Airport.

SkyWest issued a brief statement indicating the flight "experienced a tire issue upon safely landing in Redmond" and said the 27 passengers disembarked through the main cabin door and were taken to the terminal. The plane had three crew members, the airline added.

Airport Manager Zachary Bass told NewsChannel 21 the incident did not close the runway and other flight arrivals and departures were proceeding without delay.

Two passengers told NewsChannel 21 they didn't hear a pop or a bang, but it was a somewhat rough landing, with an abrupt stop.

Passenger Georgina Wenick said, “I was like, ‘Wow, that's really weird.' I've never had that experience. The brakes hit, and we started to slow down like normal. But then within a few seconds, it was just like the whole airplane just stopped."

Another passenger, Chris Bogue, said he “didn't really think much about it, and we didn't know we blew tires until the captain told us.”

“But we were sitting on the runway and I looked over and saw one of those emergency vehicles coming out of the garage where they keep them in the airport fire department, and I thought, 'Oh, something's going on.'"

Story and video ➤ https://www.ktvz.com