Sunday, March 29, 2015

Beechcraft 35 Bonanza, N80462: Accident occurred March 29, 2015 near Cedar Mills Airport (3T0), Gordonville, Grayson County, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA183 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 29, 2015 in Gordonville, TX
Aircraft: BEECH 35, registration: N80462
Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 29, 2015, about 1600 central daylight time, a Beech 35, single-engine airplane, N80462, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain during initial climb at Cedar Mills Airport (3T0), Gordonville, Texas. The pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight which was destined for Tyler Pounds Regional Airport (TYR), Tyler, Texas.

The pilot reported that during his soft field takeoff from the turf runway the airplane had lifted off at an indicated airspeed of 80 mph. As the airplane neared the departure end of the runway the pilot noticed the airplane was not climbing as expected, the indicated airspeed seemed unreliable, and the controls felt mushy and near stall speed. The airplane then impacted trees and the roof of an unoccupied home. The engine separated and fell inside the home which resulted in a structure fire that substantially damaged the home. The airplane impacted terrain about 50 feet from the burning home and came to rest upright after impacting two nearly full propane storage tanks. There was no release of propane and there was no postimpact fire at the location of the main wreckage. Several persons at another nearby home witness the impact and responded immediately to assist the four occupants to exit the wreckage.

http://registry.faa.gov/N80462

KLTV.com-Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville, Texas | ETX News

 GRAYSON COUNTY, TX (KLTV) - The 911 calls have been released surrounding a plane crash over the weekend that injured several Tyler residents. Bob Gentry, his girlfriend, Karen Christian, his daughter, Annie Gentry and her boyfriend, Collin Howell, were all aboard the small single engine Beechcraft 35 plane. It crashed in a backyard near Gordonville, just after taking off from Cedar Mills Airport Sunday afternoon.

Initial Call transcript:

Dispatch: “Grayson County 911. What is your emergency?”

Caller: “We've got a plane crash on Greenbriar in Gordonville. We need an ambulance, please hurry.”

Dispatch: “One sec, let me get you to Whitesboro. Where is it?”

Caller: “In Gordonville.”

Dispatch: “I know, where in Gordonville?”

Caller: “375 Greenbriar.”

Dispatch: “Okay, just a moment. We have an airplane crash 375 Greenbriar. I'm getting it over there. I'm getting you to Whitesboro, okay? Stay on the line. A small plane? How many people? Can you tell?”

Caller: “I don't know. We're running down there right now.”

Dispatch: “Okay.”

Caller: “Please hurry.”

Second call transcript:

Dispatch: “Grayson County 911. What is your emergency?”

Caller: “Yeah, we're in Sherwood Shores ma'am, we need people out here, nobody's showed up.”

Dispatch: “We've got them on the way, sir. They're volunteers and the closest ambulance is Whitesboro. They should be there in just a couple of minutes.”

Caller: “Tell them that we've got a house that's on fire now, too.”

Dispatch: “They realize that. We have transferred the information to Whitesboro. I can give you back to them again, just a moment.”

Caller: “Okay.”

Dispatch: “But they are aware.”

Caller: “We need ambulances bad.”

Dispatch: “We know, sir. We've got air ambulances on hold, too. Just let me get you to Whitesboro, just a moment.”

Caller: “Okay.”

Third call transcript:

Dispatch: “Grayson County 911.”

Caller: “We need the fire department and the ambulance out here to the paramedics out here to Sherwood Shores.”

Dispatch: “Where at?”

Caller: “We're on Greenbriar.”

Dispatch: “Oh, the plane crash?”

Caller: “Yes, ma'am.”

Dispatch: “They're on their way, sir.”

Caller: “Okay, well, we have some people that are injured real severely.”

Dispatch: “I understand that sir. We've got people en route.”

Caller: “Okay, thank you.”

The teens made it out uninjured and both adults are recovering from non-life threatening injuries. The FAA is still investigating the crash. 

The engine and propeller broke off when the plane hit the home, but an FAA spokesperson said that was likely not the cause of the crash. The pilot, Bob Gentry, is described as a highly experienced pilot who earned his commercial license as well as his instrument rating.



GORDONVILLE, TX -- Four people were injured when their plane crashed Sunday afternoon in Grayson County.

The single engine plane clipped a home in the 300 block of Greenbriar Road in Gordonville just after four Sunday afternoon.

It was a typical Sunday afternoon for the Brattain family in the Shady Shores area.

"My father in law had just broken the water meter in front of the house,” said John Brattain. “So we had water spraying everywhere."

When all of the sudden

"I'm looking up over the top of the house and I see a wing or something flash,” said Brattain. “And I hear a crash, a boom."

That boom was a plane landing in the backyard of John Brattain's in laws.

Troopers say it was carrying four people: a man, a woman and two kids.

"I though it was coming through our house,” said Brattain. “It freaked me out."

After seeing his family was not hurt, John quickly sprang into action.

"I started yelling there's people, there's people!” said Brattain, who pulled the male passenger from the wreckage. “Call 911, there's a plane crash, there's people."

The plane had landed in between two propane tanks.

"I saw a guy hanging out the window of the plane,” said Brattain. “He had Plexiglas all over his head and neck. I really thought he wasn't with us."

Brattain's family then joined in and helped all four passengers out of the plane, when yet another problem arose.

"We noticed the house behind us started to catch on fire," said Brattain.

The plane's prop engine had broken off in the nearby building, the wreckage eventually starting a small fire.

Brattain quickly shut off the power and fought the fire with a neighbor until the fire department showed up.

"It didn't hit me how bad the plane was,” said Brattain. “All I saw was people and they were alive. And that's it, I just wanted to get the people out. It's a miracle their alive.”

According to a Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman, the female and male passengers are in serious condition tonight. We're told the two children's injuries are not as severe. 

The names of the victims are not being released. 

According to FAA records, the single engine plane is registered to Robert Gentry of Tyler, Texas.

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.kten.com


 














GORDONVILLE, Texas -- A plane crashed into a house in Gordonville on Sunday, sending the four passengers to the hospital -- two were seriously injured.

It happened just after 4 p.m. a few miles from the Cedar Mills Airport, where the plane had taken off from.

FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said the plane was a Beechcraft B35 aircraft.

The pilot has been identified as Robert Gentry and a passenger as 51-year-old Karen Christian.

The family, whose backyard became the scene of a plane crash, said they were enjoying their Sunday when the incident happened.

What they did next helped save the lives of the four people on board.

"I ran around the side of the house I thought the guy was dead hanging out the window of the plane."

Trooper Mark Tackett said the engine and propeller came off the plane, which struck an unoccupied home before the plane landed in a backyard.

"I looked out the window as it hit right there in my backyard," Rhonda Brogdon said. "I could see the wing hit the ground."

Brogdon and her family jumped into action. Pulling Christian and two teenagers from the plane.

"I jumped on the plane and helped the lady out of the plane," Belinda Burris said. "Her legs were broken and she was pretty beat up and my mom came and helped me get her out of there."

John Bratron, a family member of the homeowner's said he wasn't just worried about injures from the crash, the house the plane hit, had caught fire and the flames were creeping closer to Gentry.

"I had to get them out of it because there was fuel all over the plane," he said.

After everyone was safely outside of the plane, Braton and his family set their sights on the fire.

"I kicked in the front door went in and started spraying water on the fire," Braton said.

Christian was flown to the Medical Center of Plano with serious injures. Gentry was also taken to a nearby hospital with serious injures. The two teenagers had only minor injures.

Burris says without the help of her family things might not have ended the same.

"It wasn't a second guess for them," Burris said. "They just stepped in and made sure that they could do everything they could do, and I just wish that you know if I was ever in an accident that people would be like that for me."

Story and video:  http://www.kxii.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N6842W: Fatal accident occurred March 29, 2015 near Brandywine Airport (KOQN), West Goshen Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA171
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 29, 2015 in West Chester, PA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N6842W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 29, 2015, about 1334 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N6842W, registered to and operated by a private individual, crashed shortly after takeoff from Brandywine Airport (OQN), West Chester, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 CFR Part 91 personal, local flight. The airplane was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire, and the certified flight instructor and private-rated pilot were fatally injured. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The purpose of the flight was a flight review for the airplane owner, who had reportedly not flown since 2011. One witness on the airport reported hearing a rough running engine during a check of one magneto during an engine run-up, but the condition cleared up during a second magneto check after leaving the engine operating at a higher rpm for a period of time.

A takeoff from runway 27 was initiated, but by one witness account, the takeoff was aborted and the airplane was taxied off the runway at the second turn off. The witness did not hear any abnormal engine sounds associated with the aborted takeoff. The airplane was taxied to the approach end of runway 27, and no engine run-up was heard being performed. During takeoff, several witnesses reported hearing sputtering from the engine at a point when the airplane was about midpoint of the runway. The witness descriptions varied likely based on their locations in relation to the airplane whether the airplane was on the runway or just above it when the sputtering occurred. One witness who was located south of the runway described the sputtering as significant, while a second witness described it lasting 3 to 4 seconds while the airplane was only 2 to 3 feet above ground level. The nose of the airplane was observed to lower and engine power was heard to be restored.

The flight continued, and by several witness accounts, the airplane began to climb and the sputtering or popping sounds resumed. The airplane at that time by witness accounts was either ¾ down the runway, or west of the runway over 202. One witness did not observe any smoke trailing the airplane during the second sound of pops, and he could not tell if the engine continued to run. The airplane was observed struggling "to maintain altitude" with one witness stating the airplane never climbed higher than 200 feet. The airplane was observed by several witnesses in a left turn that steepened to what one witness described as wings vertical. The airplane was then observed to pitch nose down, and impacted the back yard of a residence. A postcrash fire began about 10 seconds after impact, which was extinguished by fire rescue.


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Joseph Deal, left, and Richard Poch
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West Goshen police on Wednesday identified the two people killed in Sunday’s small plane crash in the township.

Richard Poch, 67, of West Chester and Joseph Deal, 64, of Drexel Hill, were killed in the crash, police said. Both men held active pilot certifications issued by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Shortly after taking off from the Brandywine Airport and flying over Route 202, the plane crashed into a field behind a residence in the 1000 block of Saunders Lane around 1:34 p.m. Sunday afternoon.

Officials believe the purpose of the flight was to conduct a flight review, which is required of FAA-certified pilots every two years to keep their pilot certificates active. Poch, who was a retired colonel of the U.S. Air Force, was also a certified flight instructor.

During a flight review, the pilot under review typically flies the plane, while the certified flight instructor observes and ascertains the pilot’s skills, so it’s assumed that Deal was flying the aircraft when it crashed.

Witnesses at the airport reported hearing the plane’s engine sputtering intermittently, and seeing the plane make a sharp turn before losing sight of it.

The cause of the crash has not yet been determined. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is currently investigating the crash, and a preliminary report is expected to be released next week, said Tim Monville, a senior air safety investigator with the NTSB.

Witnesses at the airport reported hearing the plane’s engine sputtering intermittently, and seeing the plane make a sharp turn before losing sight of it.

A sputtering engine might be caused by a problem in the fuel supply system, but an engine malfunction wouldn’t necessarily result in an aerodynamic loss of control, Monville said.

According to Richard Shaw, a retired certified flight instructor who lives in Chester Springs and used to own a Piper PA-28 Cherokee similar to the one Deal and Poch were flying, that type of plane is known for having problems with the fuel sump. If the sump isn’t pulled out correctly in a secure position, it can cause the engine to suck in air and sputter while flying in a nose-up position, such as during a takeoff, Shaw said.

It is not yet clear who owned the plane that crashed. The plane was almost completely consumed by a post-crash fire, and no registration markings were clearly visible on the plane, officials said.

“Joe was a kind soul and a wonderful man. … His passion for adventure was only outweighed by his love of family and friends, and his dedication to helping others,” Deal’s family said in a statement. “Our hearts and prayers are with the instructor’s family and our sincere gratitude goes out to all the first responders and law enforcement involved.”

Deal was a Delaware County native and a graduate of Drexel University.

Poch’s family was not available for comment. His funeral services were held at Temple Sholom in Broomall at 1 p.m. on Wednesday.

Source:   http://www.dailylocal.com

More than 72 hours after a plane crashed in West Goshen Township, killing its two occupants Sunday afternoon, the Chester County Coroner’s Office has not yet publicly released the identity of the victims. 

Positive identifications of the victims were expected by Tuesday evening, said an employee at the Chester County Coroner’s office. The victims’ families would be notified after positive identifications have been made, but the victims’ names likely wouldn’t be released to the public until sometime on Wednesday, the employee said.

The autopsies of the victim’s bodies were performed Monday afternoon, and forensic dental examinations were expected to be completed by Tuesday evening, said Chief Joseph Gleason of the West Goshen Police Department. Due to the severity of the conditions of the bodies, positive identifications of the victims could not be made without forensic dental examinations, Gleason said.

After the victims’ families had been contacted and notified of their deaths, the West Goshen Police Department, along with the Chester County Coroner’s Office, would issue a press release with the identities of the victims; the press release would also be posted to the township’s website, wgoshen.org, Gleason said. “My priority is that the families are the first to know,” he added.

The National Transportation Safety Board was continuing its investigation into the crash, and investigators were examining the plane’s engine in a garage at the West Goshen Police Department, Gleason said.

The small plane had taken off from the Brandywine Airport and flown over Route 202, before crashing in a field in the 1000 block of Saunders Lane, near the Harrison Hills Apartments senior living complex, at about 1:34 p.m. Sunday.

Officials believe that both victims were pilots, and the purpose of the flight was to conduct a flight review, which is required of FAA-certified pilots every two years to keep their pilot certificates active.

Witnesses at the airport reported hearing the plane’s engine sputtering intermittently, and seeing the plane make a sharp turn before losing sight of it.

A sputtering engine might be caused by a problem in the fuel supply system, but an engine malfunction wouldn’t necessarily result in an aerodynamic loss of control, said Tim Monville, a senior air safety investigator with the NTSB. 

Investigators look for evidence at the scene of a fatal plane crash in the 1000 block of Saunders Lane in West Goshen on Monday.


West Goshen >> While the identities of the two people who died in a plane crash Sunday afternoon have yet to be determined, it’s believed that both victims were pilots, and the purpose of the flight was to conduct a flight review.

Tim Monville, a senior air investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, and Chief Joseph Gleason of the West Goshen Police Department spoke to reporters Monday afternoon in the 1000 block of Saunders Lane near the site of Sunday’s plane crash.

“At this point, we understand that the purpose of the flight was a flight review,” Monville said. Pilots who hold an active U.S. pilot certificate, issued by the Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, are required to undergo a flight review every two years; the flight review, which is commonly referred to as a Biennial Flight Review, or BFR, consists of a minimum of one hour of ground training and one hour of flight training with a certified flight instructor, according to faa.gov.

The small plane had taken off from Brandywine Airport and had flown over Route 202 before crashing in a field, county officials said Sunday. The West Goshen Police Department received a call about the accident at approximately 1:34 p.m. Sunday, Gleason said.

Police officers who initially responded to the crash site were unable to get close to it because it was an active-fire scene, Gleason said. West Chester Good Will and West Whiteland fire companies responded and extinguished the blaze. As a result of the fire, the victims’ identities could not be determined at that time, Gleason added.

Monville, who is assigned to the NTSB’s office in Ashburn, Virginia, said the NTSB was also notified of the accident Sunday afternoon. Monville arrived at the scene of the crash at about 7:10 a.m. Monday morning to begin the investigation, and was assisted by the West Goshen Police Department and representatives of the FAA, he said.

It’s believed that the two victims of the crash, who have not yet been identified, were FAA-certified pilots, Monville said. Autopsies of the bodies were scheduled for 4:30 p.m. Monday, and the identities of the victims will likely be released Tuesday, Gleason said.

The plane was almost completely consumed by a post-crash fire, making it difficult to identify the plane and who owns it, Monville said. “I’ve not even seen an airplane data plate yet that would give a serial number yet, and there is no obvious registration marking on it (the plane),” he added.

“With respect to both occupants, we will be getting their backgrounds, along with investigating the maintenance of the airplane, who maintained it last,” Monville said.

Monville said he would be meeting with representatives of the airplane and engine manufacturers as part of the investigation, which the NTSB will be in charge of.

Upon completion of an investigation, the NTSB can issue safety recommendations but has no legal authority to implement those recommendations, Monville said.

According to a witness account, an engine run-up was performed by the pilot to conduct safety checks prior to takeoff, and the plane became airborne at the midpoint of the runway, Monville said. Another witness reported hearing the plane’s engine sputtering, and then regaining power before sputtering again, and observing the plane bank left before losing sight of it.

“Based on the accounts of a sputtering engine, we’re going to check the fuel supply system,” Monville said.

Although it’s believed that the plane’s engine was malfunctioning, that doesn’t necessarily mean the crash was caused by a stalled engine; more radar data would need to be gathered to determine that, Monville said.

“An engine malfunction, whether catastrophic or a minor power loss, does not equate to an aerodynamic loss of control,” he said. “As long as you maintain a certain airspeed, depending on the bank angle, the airplane will still be capable, should be capable of flying.”

The site of the crash is less than half a mile from the western edge of the runway; the plane went down near Harrison Hills Apartments, a 55-plus senior living complex.

There is no information available about the plane’s flight plan yet, but the FAA is looking into that, Monville said.

The NTSB will be investigating the site of the crash for the next several days, and a preliminary report will likely be issued next week, Monville said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.dailylocal.com



West Goshen Township Police Chief Joseph Gleason, left, and Tim Monville, senior air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, walk from the site of a fatal plane crash in 1000 block of Saunders Lane in West Goshen on Monday. The plane crash, which occurred Sunday afternoon, killed the two people on board the plane. 



Investigators look for evidence at the scene of a fatal plane crash in the 1000 block of Saunders Lane in West Goshen on Monday. The crash, which occurred Sunday afternoon, killed the two people on board the plane.






WEST GOSHEN TWP. -- Two people are dead after a small plane crashed in West Goshen Township. It happened around 1:40 p.m. on Sunday after the aircraft took off from the Brandywine Airport. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, it was a Piper PA-28 aircraft that crashed at the intersection of Saunders Lane and Andrew Drive. The FAA says the aircraft departed from the Brandywine Airport. 

Federal Investigators are on the scene along with West Goshen Township police.  Authorities have confirmed that the pilot and a passenger, both males, are dead. According to local authorities, the plane sputtered in the air before losing control and crashing down. The cause is not yet clear.

"I didn't see anything but I did hear a bang earlier-- I guess when it happened. I looked up and I saw a pick-up truck coming up this road and then I saw three people get out and run into that yard--apparently a plane crash," a witness told FOX 29.

 FOX 29 reached out to the Brandywine Airport, West Goshen and Chester County officials; however, the identities of the victims have not yet been released.

The FAA is on the scene interviewing neighbors as part of the investigation.

This is a developing story, please stay with FOX 29 for updates.



FOX 29 News Philadelphia | WTXF-TV

 WEST GOSHEN TWP. -- Two people are dead after a small plane crashed in West Goshen Township. It happened around 1:40 p.m. on Sunday after the aircraft took off from the Brandywine Airport. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, it was a Piper PA-28 aircraft that crashed at the intersection of Saunders Lane and Andrew Drive. The FAA says the aircraft departed from the Brandywine Airport. 

Federal Investigators are on the scene along with West Goshen Township police.  Authorities have confirmed that the pilot and a passenger are dead. According to local authorities, the plane sputtered in the air before losing control and crashing down. The cause is not yet clear.

"I didn't see anything but I did hear a bang earlier-- I guess when it happened. I looked up and I saw a pick-up truck coming up this road and then I saw three people get out and run into that yard--apparently a plane crash," a witness told FOX 29.

 FOX 29 reached out to the Brandywine Airport, West Goshen and Chester County officials; however, the identities of the victims have not yet been released.

The FAA is on the scene interviewing neighbors as part of the investigation.



Two people were killed when a small plane plummeted to the ground near a suburban Philadelphia airport Sunday afternoon, police said.

The plane -- a Piper -- crashed into a wooded area near Saunders Lane and Andrews Drive in West Goshen, Chester County killing both people on board around 1:45 p.m., officials confirmed.


It had taken off a short time earlier from the Brandywine Airport, which is roughly two miles from the crash site, police said.


Witnesses on the ground heard the plane's engine stuttering moments after it was in the air and then the plane crashed and burst into flames, investigators said.


Fire crews rushed to the scene and extinguished the blaze. 


The identities of the victims have not been released and it's unknown at this time what caused the plane to crash.


Local authorities are investigating and the National Transportation and Safety Board is expected to take part in the probe.


Sources: 


http://www.myfoxphilly.com

http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

http://6abc.com

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com























Child, pilot killed in hang gliding accident near Jean, Nevada, ID'd

 JEAN, NV (FOX5) - Las Vegas Metro police reported two people were killed in a hang gliding accident Friday afternoon near Jean, which is located about 30 miles south of Las Vegas.

Police said about 2:50 p.m. they responded to a call concerning an accident, which occurred at Jean Lake, a small dry lake located about three miles east of Jean. 

According to police, one of the victims is an 11-year-old boy. 

Police said the child and an unidentified pilot were in a glider that was being towed by a truck. The driver of the truck, police said, thought the pair in the glider had been released and made a turn. However, the pair was still tethered to the truck and crashed. 

"The glider was supposed to release the tether from the truck itself. Apparently, that tether release did not occur. So what occurred is when the truck turned around thinking the tether was released, the glider itself plummeted straight to the ground," said Capt. Peter Boffelli with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. 

The driver of the truck took the boy from the scene for help.

"There was an attempt at resuscitation here on the side of the road, but they were not successful," Boffelli said.  

The FAA is aware of the crash, but because the accident involved a motorized vehicle towing a non-motorized glider, Metro is the lead investigating agency. 

The Clark County Coroner's Office has identified the pilot as 55 year-old John Harrison of Kamuela, HI. The young boy has been identified as 11-year-old Aryas Moorhead, of Farmington, NM. 

Police said that Harrison was an experienced pilot and instructor who was doing a tandem glide with Moorhead when the hang glider crashed into the Jean dry lake bed east of State Route 604, near mile marker nine. 

Story, video, photo and comments: http://www.fox5vegas.com


State used its private plane to fly lawmaker to Topeka for vote on school finance

TOPEKA, KANSAS — State Rep. Virgil Peck is defending his use of the state’s private plane to fly back to Topeka for an important vote on school finance earlier this month, despite the fact that he arrived too late to cast a vote.

Peck, a Republican from Montgomery County, was away from Topeka attending events in his district with Gov. Sam Brownback on Friday, March 13, when the House voted on final passage of a bill repealing the existing school finance formula and replacing it with a system of block grants for the next two years.

He had gone back home Thursday night, March 12, after the bill narrowly advanced to final action, in order to attend several public events in Coffeyville and Independence with Gov. Sam Brownback.

When the final action vote was taken Friday morning, there were initially only 62 votes in favor, one short of the 63 votes needed for passage. Peck was one of three Republicans known to support the bill who were absent, and so a “call of the House” was ordered at 8:15 a.m. to force those back to the chamber to vote.

The House held the roll open for two hours, waiting for the absent members to return.

“I could have left in my car,” Peck said. “It would have taken three hours. I was told to wait for the plane.”

Brownback's press secretary Eileen Hawley said the plane used that day was a King Air that seats up to nine passengers.

According to the plane’s logs, which were obtained from the Kansas Highway Patrol through an open records request, the plane arrived in Coffeyville carrying Brownback and one aide at 9:12 a.m., nearly an hour after the call was ordered.

The logs show the plane left Coffeyville, carrying Peck as a passenger, about half an hour after that, at 9:43 a.m. and landed in Topeka at 10:15.

By the time it landed, however, the two other absent Republicans had just returned and cast their votes. The roll was closed and the final vote was tallied at 10:17 a.m., according to House records, and the bill passed, 64-57.

At 11:06 a.m., according to the flight logs, the plane left Topeka en route back to Coffeyville. Peck was listed as the only passenger on each leg of those flights.

Hawley had estimated the cost of each flight at $205. She said the Highway Patrol, which owns and operates the plane, typically sends a bill to the governor’s office for the cost of its flights.

Peck said he attended five events in Montgomery County that day, including three in Coffeyville and two in Independence.

Story and comments:   http://www2.ljworld.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser, N32396, Skyline Aviation Services: Fatal accident occurred March 29, 2015 near Orange County Airport (KOMH), Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N32396 

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 29, 2015 in Orange, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/27/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-140, registration: N32396
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was departing on a solo cross-country flight. Witnesses reported that they observed the airplane taking off and that it appeared to be "abnormally slow" and did not seem to be gaining altitude. They also reported observing a trail of "smoke" or "exhaust" emanating from the engine. When the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level, its nose pitched up abruptly, the left wing dropped, and the airplane impacted terrain about 1,300 ft from the departure end of the runway. Ground scars and damage to the airplane were consistent with a near-vertical impact.

Postaccident examination of the airframe revealed no anomalies, and there was no evidence of fuel contamination. Engine powertrain and valve train continuity was established, and borescope examination of the cylinders revealed no anomalies. The spark plugs were removed, and all of them exhibited significant carbon-fouling. During testing, three of the eight plugs displayed weak and intermittent spark. Flow testing revealed that, throughout all power settings, the carburetor produced a fuel flow that was richer than the maximum acceptable limits prescribed by the manufacturer. Review of the airplane's maintenance logbooks indicated that the carburetor was last serviced about 2 years (300 flight hours) before the accident. The condition of the spark plugs, as well as the witness accounts of smoke/exhaust, was consistent with the engine operating in an overly rich fuel/air mixture condition; however, the investigation could not determine how long the engine had been experiencing this condition. 

None of the witnesses reported rough engine operation or a loss of power before the accident, and each of the witness observations was consistent with an aerodynamic stall/spin. Although the effect of the fouled spark plugs and overly rich fuel/air mixture on the engine operation could not be determined, it is possible that the engine's performance was degraded during the takeoff, which would likely have been a source of distraction for the student pilot and may have contributed to the loss of control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed after takeoff, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT


On March 29, 2015, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N32396, impacted terrain during takeoff from Orange County Airport (OMH), Orange, Virginia. The airplane was substantially damaged, and the student pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorologi
cal conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was operated by Skyline Aviation Services. The solo instructional flight was destined for Farmville Regional Airport (FVX), Farmville, Virginia, and was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

The owner of the flight school was also a flight instructor (CFI) who had flown with the student on several occasions. She stated that the student was departing on his first solo cross-country flight when the accident occurred. The morning of the accident, she reviewed his preflight planning, endorsed his logbook for the flight, and assisted him in a preflight inspection of the airplane and engine run-up check. She stated that she observed no anomalies with the airplane. The pilot then taxied the airplane to the other side of the airport to obtain fuel, then performed a second engine run-up and departed from runway 08. She stated that the takeoff appeared normal, but the pilot initiated a left turn to the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern earlier than was customary. As the airplane turned left, its nose pitched up abruptly, and it rolled sharply left and descended to ground contact. The CFI immediately called 911 and responded to the accident site to render assistance.

Two pilot-rated witnesses located on the north side of the airport observed the airplane during the takeoff and provided written statements to local law enforcement. They remarked to each other that the airplane appeared "abnormally slow" and stated that it did not seem to be gaining altitude. Both individuals also reported viewing a thin trail of "smoke" or "brown exhaust" from the airplane's engine. The witnesses observed the airplane make a sharp left turn from an altitude about 150 feet above ground level, and descend steeply to ground contact. One of the witnesses reported that the wind at the time of the accident was light and variable from the north and east. In subsequent, separate telephone interviews, both witnesses stated that they did not observe any birds in the vicinity of the airport at the time of the accident. Additionally, neither of the witnesses perceived any changes or abnormalities in the airplane's engine noise during the takeoff, though one of the witnesses reported that the engine sounded "quieter than it should be."

Another witness reported that he was driving parallel to the runway at OMH. He reported seeing the accident airplane accelerate down the runway, and stated that it "looked like it was having trouble" shortly after it became airborne. He observed the airplane's nose pitch up twice, and also observed a trail of black smoke that extended the length of the airplane. He stated that the airplane appeared to "level out," then made a "hard" left turn as the nose dropped. The airplane then disappeared from his view behind trees and terrain. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate, which was issued on January 20, 2015. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated 30.6 total hours of flight experience, of which about 18 hours were in the accident airplane, and 2.7 hours were solo. 

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1974, and was originally equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series, 150 hp reciprocating engine. In 2002, the engine was overhauled and equipped with a Penn Yan Aero RAM160 supplemental type certificate, which resulted in an increase to 160 hp. Review of maintenance logs indicated that the airplane's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on February 20, 2015, at a total airframe time of 5,156 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued 5,187.6 hours in operation. 

According to the owner of the flight school, the school had operated the accident airplane under a lease agreement for about 18 months prior to the accident, and had purchased the airplane about 3 weeks prior to the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0935 weather observation at OMH included wind from 040 degrees at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 0 degrees C, dew point -12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest upright in a field located about 1,330 feet northeast of the departure end of runway 08, with the wreckage oriented on a heading of about 170 degrees magnetic. The initial impact point was identified by a ground scar about 30 feet south of the main wreckage that contained pieces of the left wing navigation light. Areas of disturbed soil extended north from the initial impact point about 15 feet toward a large impact crater about 6 feet in length and 3 feet in width, which contained pieces of the propeller spinner and ground scars consistent with propeller contact. 

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange and one blade exhibited slight forward bending. Both blades displayed chordwise scratching and leading edge gouging. The engine remained attached to the fuselage by its bottom mounts. The fuselage displayed significant aft crushing from the engine firewall to the rear cabin seats, and was displaced to the left just aft of the baggage area.

Both left and right wings displayed significant aft crushing of their leading edges. The left wing was separated from the fuselage at its root and the fuel tank was breached. Residual fuel was found inside, and the fuel tank cap was in place and secure. The left aileron remained attached at its hinge points. Control continuity was established from the aileron to the cockpit area through cable breaks at the wing root that displayed signatures consistent with overstress failure.

The right wing remained attached to the fuselage at its root. The outboard approximate 4 feet was bent upward about 45 degrees. The right fuel tank was breached and leaking fuel; the right fuel tank cap was in place and secure. The right aileron remained attached at its hinge points and control continuity was established from the aileron to the cockpit area. The wing flaps were fully retracted.

The empennage was intact and displayed minor impact damage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer at its hinge points, and the stabilator remained attached at its mounting blocks. Rudder and stabilator control continuity was established to the cockpit area. The stabilator trim screw indicated a trim position between neutral and full nose-up trim. The windscreen and left cabin window were destroyed upon impact, and pieces of each were distributed along the wreckage path and around the main wreckage. Examination of the wings, empennage, and windscreen pieces did not reveal any evidence of a bird strike. 

The carburetor heat control was in the "off" position, and the engine primer was in and locked. The fuel selector was in the right tank position, and could not be manipulated due to impact damage. 

The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand at the propeller hub and continuity of the valve and powertrains was confirmed. The spark plugs were removed and displayed black carbon fouling. The #1 and #3 cylinder bottom plugs were oil-covered; consistent with the engine's postimpact orientation. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders, and borescope examination of the cylinders revealed no anomalies. The carburetor inlet screen was absent of debris. The carburetor was removed and the bowl was opened. The floats were intact, and the bowl contained fuel consistent with the color and odor of 100 low lead aviation fuel and was absent of contamination. The magnetos remained secured to their mounts, and were removed and actuated by hand. Each magneto produced spark at all of its terminal leads. 

The airplane was examined at a secure storage facility on April 29, 2015. The pilot's seat was secure on the track, and the seat position adjustment lever functioned properly when manipulated. Neither the seat track nor the locking pins displayed any abnormal or excessive wear. The spark plugs were tested for operation. Three of the eight plugs produced weak and intermittent spark. One plug produced no spark; however, this plug was likely damaged during postaccident removal from the engine.

The stall warning switch was removed for testing and electrical continuity was confirmed when the switch was manipulated. 

MEDICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner Northern Virginia District, Manassas, Virginia. The cause of death was identified as blunt trauma. Toxicological testing was performed by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all tested-for drugs and their metabolites.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Carburetor Testing

The carburetor was examined and tested at the manufacturer's facility on May 26, 2015, with an FAA inspector present. Initial flow testing revealed that the main gasket and float were misaligned; likely due to the disassembly and reassembly performed on-scene. The floats appeared to be in good condition and the arms were not damaged. The floats were aligned properly, and the carburetor was flow tested a second time at four different power settings. Throughout all power settings, the carburetor produced a fuel flow that was between 9.3% and 12.1% richer than the master unit, and between 2.5% and 7.5% richer than the maximum acceptable limits prescribed by the manufacturer. 

Further review of the airplane's maintenance logs revealed that the airplane did not undergo any inspections or maintenance between December 2010, at a total airframe time of 4,876.7 hours, and an annual inspection in May 2013, at a total time of 4,887.4 hours. Review of work orders indicated that in February 2013, all four engine cylinders were disassembled, cleaned, inspected, and returned to service limits. In April 2013, the carburetor was "repaired as necessary;" the work order also indicated compliance with a manufacturer service bulletin that called for the replacement of hollow floats with solid, epoxy floats. 

Stall and Spin Awareness

FAA Advisory Circular 61-67C, "Stall and Spin Awareness Training," stated, "Stalls resulting from improper airspeed management are most likely to occur when the pilot is distracted by one or more tasks, such as locating a checklist or attempting a restart after an engine failure; flying a traffic pattern on a windy day; reading a chart or making fuel and/or distance calculations; or attempting to retrieve items from the floor, backseat, or glove compartment. Pilots at all skill levels should be aware of the increased risk of entering into an inadvertent stall or spin while performing tasks that are secondary to controlling the aircraft." 

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 29, 2015 in Orange, VA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-140, registration: N32396
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 29, 2015, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28-140, N32396, impacted terrain after takeoff from Orange County Airport (OMH), Orange, Virginia. The student pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was destined for Farmville Regional Airport (FVX), Farmville, Virginia. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

The owner of the flight school that operated the airplane stated that the student was departing on his first solo cross-country flight when the accident occurred. After reviewing his preflight planning and assisting him in a preflight inspection of the airplane and engine run-up check, she observed as the pilot taxied to the terminal to obtain fuel. The pilot then performed a second engine run-up and departed from runway 08. She stated that the takeoff appeared normal, but that the pilot appeared to initiate a left turn to the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern earlier than was customary. As the airplane turned left, she watched as its nose pitched upward before it rolled sharply left and descended to ground contact. 

Two pilot-rated witnesses located on the north side of the airport observed the airplane during the takeoff. They remarked to each other that it appeared "abnormally slow" and stated that it did not seem to be gaining altitude. Both individuals also reported viewing a thin trail of "smoke" or "brown exhaust" from the airplane's engine. The witnesses observed the airplane make a sharp left turn and descend steeply to ground contact. One of the witnesses reported that the winds were light and variable from the north and east. 

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate, which was issued on January 20, 2015. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated 30.6 total hours of flight experience, of which about 18 hours were in the accident airplane, and 2.7 hours were solo. 

The 0935 weather observation at OMH included wind from 040 degrees at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 0 degrees C, dew point -12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury. 

The airplane came to rest upright in a field located about 1,330 feet northeast of the departure end of runway 08, with the wreckage oriented on a heading of about 170 degrees magnetic. The initial impact point was identified by a ground scar about 30 feet south of the main wreckage that contained pieces of the left wing navigation light. Areas of disturbed soil extended north from the initial impact point about 15 feet toward a large impact crater about 6 feet in length and 3 feet in width, which contained pieces of the propeller spinner and ground scars consistent with propeller contact. 

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange and one blade exhibited slight forward bending. Both blades displayed chordwise scratching and leading edge gouging. The engine remained attached to the fuselage by its bottom mounts. The fuselage displayed significant aft crushing from the engine firewall to the rear cabin seats, and was displaced to the left just aft of the baggage area. Both left and right wings displayed significant aft crushing of their leading edges. The left wing was separated from the fuselage at its root and the fuel tank was breached. Residual fuel was found inside, and the fuel tank cap was in place and secure. The left aileron remained attached at its hinge points. Control continuity was established from the aileron to the cockpit area through cable breaks at the wing root that displayed signatures consistent with overstress failure. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage at its root. The outboard approximate 4 feet was bent upward about 45 degrees. The right fuel tank was breached and leaking fuel; the right fuel tank cap was in place and secure. The right aileron remained attached at its hinge points and control continuity was established from the aileron to the cockpit area. The wing flaps were fully retracted. The empennage was intact and displayed minor impact damage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer at its hinge points, and the stabilator remained attached at its mounting blocks. Rudder and stabilator control continuity was established to the cockpit area. The windscreen and left cabin window were destroyed upon impact and pieces of each were distributed along the wreckage path and around the main wreckage. Examination of the wings, empennage, and windscreen pieces did not reveal any evidence of a bird strike. 

The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand at the propeller hub and continuity of the valve and powertrains was confirmed. The spark plugs were removed and displayed black carbon fouling. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders, and borescope examination of the cylinders revealed no anomalies. The carburetor inlet screen was absent of debris. The carburetor was removed and the bowl was opened. The floats were intact, and the bowl contained fuel consistent with the color and odor of 100 low lead aviation fuel and was absent of contamination. The magnetos remained secured to their mounts, and were removed and actuated by hand. Each magneto produced spark at all of its terminal leads.










ORANGE COUNTY, Va (WVIR) - The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are in Orange County investigating a fatal plane crash that killed 16-year-old pilot Ryan McCall of Spotsylvania Sunday. 

 According to police, the 1974 Piper single-engine, fixed-wing plane, piloted by McCall, crashed Sunday morning in a field east of the Orange County Airport.

Virginia State Police released photos of the plane Monday afternoon. The wreckage is supposed to be moved Monday night from its location.

McCall's remains are now at the medical examiner's office. He was the only person on board.

McCall's family released the following statement:


"The family of Ryan McCall appreciates the thoughts and prayers of all our family and friends as we mourn the passing of our beloved son and brother. Ryan died on Sunday, March 29th while piloting a small plane.

Ryan was our beloved middle son, a typical teenager whom we loved so much and who himself had such a passion for flying that he had already earned his license to pilot at the young age of 16.

The family requests privacy at this time as they mourn the passing of their vibrant, intelligent, and compassionate son, who at 16, knew his heart and his passion so young in life."

The NTSB says its preliminary report should be available within five to ten business days.

Virginia State Police Statement:

Virginia State Police, FAA and NTSB returned this morning (Monday) to the crash scene in Orange County to continue their investigations into the cause and circumstances surrounding the incident. Investigators will remain on scene through much of the day before the wreckage is removed.

The crash occurred around 9:45 a.m. Sunday, March 30, when the 1974 Piper single-engine, fixed-wing plane crashed in a field east of the Orange County Airport. The aircraft's only occupant and pilot, Ryan L. McCall, 16, of Spotsylvania, Va., died at the scene. McCall's remains were transported to the Office of the Medical Examiner for examination and autopsy.

Story, photos and video:  http://www.nbc29.com


ORANGE — A 16-year-old flight school student died Sunday in a plane crash near the Orange County Airport on Route 20. 

Virginia State Police spokesman Les Tyler identified Ryan Lee McCall of Spotsylvania as the only aircraft occupant at the time of the crash.

The 1974 single-engine, fixed-wing Piper plane crashed in a field just east of the airport near a heavily wooded area around 9:45 a.m.

Reached by phone Sunday, an airport lineman said the aircraft was privately owned by the Skyline Aviation Services flight school. State police identified the owner as William Rushing III of Springfield.

A Skydive Orange employee, who arrived third on the scene, said he saw the downed plane leaking fuel and “possibly crashed nose down.”

“When I got there, the body was in an unnatural position,” said the Skydive Orange employee, who didn’t want to be identified.

Witnesses said they believe the flight school student pilot was trying to land the plane before it crashed.

Flight instructor Chris Russell with Skyline Aviation Services flight school said he has about 25 students and they range in ages between 16 and 70. Russell confirmed that McCall was a student at the flight school, which employs three veteran instructors.

State police Trooper S.E. Nelson and representatives from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are processing the scene to determine the cause of the deadly crash. Orange County Sheriff’s Office deputies and emergency services assisted the state police in responding to the crash.

Tyler said the state police will not be releasing any more details until Monday.

Earlier:  Virginia State Police investigators are searching for a single-engine plane that reportedly crashed near the Orange County Airport close to Route 20 Sunday morning.

State police spokesman Sgt. Les Tyler said the plane went down around 9:30 a.m. and that the incident is under investigation.

Reached by phone Sunday, airport lineman Corey Noble said the aircraft was privately owned by the Skyline Aviation Services flight school.

“It’s not on the airport property,” said Noble, who explained that the crash occurred in the vicinity of the airport.

Noble said a flight school student was operating the aircraft before the crash.

Source: http://www.dailyprogress.com