Monday, July 27, 2015

Cessna 195A, N195AP: Accident occurred July 26, 2015 near Iuka Airport (15M), Tishomingo County, Mississippi

TUPELO AERONAUTICS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N195AP

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Jackson FSDO-31

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA283 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Iuka, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/11/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 195A, registration: N195AP
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot reported that he had just departed on a long cross-country flight. He said that the takeoff was normal until the airplane reached an altitude of between about 600 and 800 ft above the ground, at which point he looked at the engine monitor and saw an exhaust gas temperature “drop.” The engine then started to run roughly, and the pilot immediately turned the airplane back to the airport. Shortly after, the engine suddenly stopped, and the pilot subsequently made a forced landing to a narrow road adjacent to the airport. 
During postaccident examinations, no mechanical anomalies were observed with the engine and fuel system that would have precluded normal operation. Although a small amount of water was found in the airframe fuel filter, no evidence of water was found in the fuel lines. The reason for the total loss of engine power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because a postaccident examination of the engine and fuel system found no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On July 26, 2015, at 1520 central daylight time, N195AP, a Cessna 195A, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power on takeoff from the Iuka Airport (15M), Iuka, Mississippi. The airline transport pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. A visual flight rules flight plan was field for the flight that was destined for Mesquite Metro Airport (HQZ), Mesquite, Texas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that he had landed at 15M and purchased 64 gallons of 100LL fuel. He then departed for Texas. The pilot said the takeoff was normal until he reached an altitude of about 600 to 800-ft above the ground. At that point, he looked down at his engine monitor and saw one of the EGT bars "drop." The pilot said the engine "felt a little rough" and he made an immediate turn back to the airport. Shortly after, the engine suddenly stopped producing power and the pilot made a forced landing to a narrow road adjacent to the airport. The airplane landed hard resulting in substantial damage to both wings, the firewall, and the right horizontal stabilizer. The landing gear and propeller were also damaged.

A postaccident examination of the airplane and engine revealed that the right-hand lower engine mount was broken in two places and the engine had pushed up and back causing the starter to be forced back thru the firewall. The fuel supply hose bushing that screwed into the inlet side of the engine driven fuel pump was also fractured at the back of the pump. The fuel pump was removed and the fuel pump drive was undamaged. Continuity was then established to the fuel drive by manual rotation of the propeller. An electric drill was then used to turn the engine driven fuel pump as fuel was poured into the pump. The pump forced fuel out of the pump as designed. The engine driven fuel pump was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's Materials Lab and the fractured section of the supply hose bushing was examined. The examination revealed the brass bushing failed due to overload stresses and no pre-exisiting anomalies were noted.

The fuel servo was not damaged and a sample of fuel was taken from the main fuel supply. The sample was absent of water and debris. Continuity of the fuel selector valve was confirmed thru the left, right and off positions. The electric boost pump was tested and operated normally. The fuel line that would normally run to the inlet side of the engine driven fuel pump was then attached to the fuel servo and all but one of the fuel injector lines were disconnected. When the electric fuel boost pump was turned on, fuel spray was observed coming from each injector. The airframe fuel filter was removed and a small amount of water was observed in the bowl. A visual inspection of the spark plugs found no anomalies. The distributor was turned on and the engine was rotated with the starter and spark was observed on several leads. No mechanical discrepancies were observed that would have precluded normal operation of the engine.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot rating for airplane single and multi-engine land. He reported a total of 12,000 total flight hours, of which, 1,500 hours were in the accident airplane. The pilot's last Federal Aviation Administration second class medical was issued on July 14, 2014.



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA283
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Iuka, MS
Aircraft: CESSNA 195A, registration: N195AP
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2015, at 1520 central daylight time, N195AP, a Cessna 195A, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power on takeoff from the Iuka Airport (15M), Iuka, Mississippi. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries and the passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. A visual flight rules flight plan was field for the flight that was destined for Mesquite Metro Airport (HQZ), Mesquite, Texas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that he had landed at 15M and purchased 64 gallons of 100LL fuel. He then departed for Texas. The pilot said the takeoff was normal until he reached an altitude of about 600 to 800-feet above the ground. At that point, he looked down at his engine monitor and saw one of the EGT bars "drop." The pilot said the engine "felt a little rough" and he made an immediate turn back to the airport. Shortly after, the engine suddenly stopped producing power and the pilot made a forced landing to a narrow road adjacent to the airport. The airplane landed hard resulting in substantial damage to both wings and the right horizontal stabilizer. The landing gear and propeller were also damaged.

The airplane was moved to a local hangar for further examination.





IUKA, Miss. (WTVA) --Tishomingo County Sheriff Glenn Whitlock is among those who responded to a plane crash Sunday afternoon.

"This wing was up on this side and that wing was down in the ground there where it actually came to rest," said Whitlock.

Pilot Aubie Pearman and a passenger were planning to fly to Dallas, but something went terribly wrong after takeoff from the Iuka Airport.

"Evidently the engine just didn't make it and they had to make this emergency landing in the roadway here,” added Sheriff Whitlock.

The pilot managed to avoid power lines and tall trees, which is amazing to all those who see the crash site for themselves.

"I'm not a pilot, but I think that the pilot did a great job of being able to put the plane down in this area,” said Whitlock.

The area was examined by the pilot, passenger and an investigator with the Federal Aviation Administration on Monday.

Prior to the site visit, the Cessna 195 was looked over. Investigators look at aircraft records, the last time the plane was fueled and pilot credentials.

"We'll gather the information and we'll turn it over to the NTSB investigator who is in charge. They will take information and make a determination and cause,” said Federal Aviation Administration Investigator Robert Mahaffey.

The pilot declined to be interviewed for this story simply saying for right now, he just can't.

Story and video: http://www.wtva.com

St Croix, St Thomas Seaplane Terminals Getting Free Wi-Fi



Wi-Fi is coming to the US Virgin Islands’ seaplane terminals.

The Virgin Islands Next Generation Network (viNGN) and Seaborne Airlines have announced a new partnership to bring Wi-Fi to travelers in the USVI.

All Seaborne Seaplane passengers traveling between St Croix and St Thomas will now have access to free and fast internet from viNGN’s hotspots locations at Seaplane terminals.

“We believe that the transformational power of viNGN resides in its ability to make daily life easier and more convenient for Virgin Islanders,” said Dr Tonjia S. Coverdale, President and Chief Executive Officer of viNGN. “Our partnership with Seaborne allows us to assist commuter, leisure, and other travelers to stay connected whether it is for business or pleasure…and at superfast speeds. This is the real power of technology, its ability to transform lives, and we have that power right here at home in the US Virgin Islands.

Travelers can access the internet for personal and business use by selecting the “viNGN_Hotspot” network on their computers and mobile devices.

“Seaborne Airlines and the Virgin Islands Next Generation Network (viNGN) are both privileged to work in one of the most important and honorable undertakings – that of connecting people,” said Gary Foss, President and Chief Executive Officer of Seaborne.

Source:  http://caribjournal.com

Michelle Skomars: Air traffic manager revels in her aviation careers

Michelle Skomars has been in charge of air traffic at Spokane International Airport for five years.



Five facts
• Joined FAA: 1989
• Became air traffic manager: 2010
• Employees: 30
• Coverage area: Spokane and Missoula airspace below 12,000 feet
• More information: www.faa.gov/jobs/


Dirty shorts and cleats aren’t typical attire when applying for a job.

But Michelle Skomars is anything but typical. And the job application was an impulse.

“I’d just finished playing in a softball tournament and was going to meet the rest of the gals to celebrate our win,” Skomars recalled, “when I happened to walk by the federal building in Savannah, Georgia, and noticed a sign that said, ‘Come take the air traffic controller test.’

“That was not on my radar – no pun intended. But I had my ID on me and the test was in 15 minutes, so I called ahead and told my friends I’d be a little late.

“I went in. Took the test. Maxed it. They had an extra-credit section for pilots, so I walked out of a 100-point test with a score of 110.

“When they asked, ‘Where do you want to go?’ I said Alaska, and that’s where I spent the next 13 years.”

Today, Skomars is air traffic manager at Spokane International Airport, and provides radar service for Fairchild Air Force Base.

“We’re called an up/down facility, meaning we have both a tower and TRACON, or terminal radar approach control.

“We also provide approach control services into Missoula. Our radar here and at Missoula scans roughly 30 miles around the airports, and we go up to 12,000 feet,” she explained. “Seattle and Salt Lake handle everything above 12,000.”

During a recent interview, Skomars discussed what skills air traffic controllers need, and why the Federal Aviation Administration is seeking applicants.

S-R: Where did you grow up?

Skomars: I was a military brat and an airline brat. The first few years, my dad was an air traffic controller, which I didn’t know until I became one. I was more enthralled with the fact that he was an Air Force jet jockey. Later, he was a captain for Pan Am. I claim Maine as home because that’s where I spent the bulk of my time from age 11 on.

S-R: What were your interests back then?

Skomars: I did darn near everything. I grew up on a gentleman’s farm and was the only person raising beefalo east of the Mississippi. That’s how I paid for part of college.

S-R: What school did you attend?

Skomars: The University of Southern Maine. I double-majored in fine arts and history. By the end of my sophomore year I had enough credits to graduate, so I joined ROTC and stayed an extra year working on a master’s. But by that point I realized I didn’t want to be a graphic arts designer. I wanted to be something a little more – I’m going to say “real,” but that’s probably not the right word. I wanted to make a tangible difference.

S-R: What spurred your sense of duty?

Skomars: When I was a kid in the ’70s and my dad was flying for Pan Am, there was a rash of hijackings. I told my dad, “That’s ridiculous. You would just punch them out and throw them off the plane.” And I remember my dad turning to me and saying, “I would do whatever it took to keep my people safe.” Suddenly I realized there was a whole world out there where things really mattered.

S-R: And?

Skomars: I ended up going into the military. I wanted to fly. The Air Force felt I was too old for their program, but the Army said, “Sure, we’ll take you.”

S-R: How long was your Army career?

Skomars: Six years. I was a helicopter pilot, and also trained in field artillery. Women had to be tough to make it, so I decided, “I’ll just be better than all of the men.” Turned out I was a very good helicopter pilot.

S-R: Then what?

Skomars: When I left the military, I thought about working for an airline. My dad had a job lined up for me with a Pan Am shuttle in Europe, but I wanted to make it on my own. Then I took the air traffic controller test and found a new career.

S-R: Why did you get into management?

Skomars: Once you’re an officer, you’re always an officer, and you look for ways to make things better. My mantra is, “Give me someone who knows how to be, and I’ll teach them what to do.” I look for people who hold themselves accountable and have a clear head about their skills. I don’t want a controller who is incapable of saying, “I need help.”

S-R: Air traffic controlling has a reputation for being stressful, with long hours and quick shift turnarounds.

Skomars: All that is true. This job isn’t for everyone. If I’m not using my eyes, if I’m not listening intently, if I’m not speaking clearly, if I’m not thinking, then I’m no good and I’m going to hurt somebody. It comes down to wanting everyone to know it’s safe to fly because we’re watching.

S-R: How long have you been in Spokane?

Skomars: Five years.

S-R: During that time, have there been incidents where things went wrong?

Skomars: There are always things that go wrong, because we’re dealing with people on both sides of the radio and their skill levels are different. Pilots and controllers are going through a massive training push right now. People my age are going out the door. Of my 30 employees, roughly one-third is in training.

S-R: Why are you losing people?

Skomars: Controllers have an age limit. Most commercial pilots do, too. For controllers it’s 56, and for the airlines it’s usually the early 60s. I’ll be 56 in November, but as a manager I can stay because I’m no longer actually working air traffic.

S-R: How much do rookie controllers make?

Skomars: Around $67,000. And all you need is a high school diploma. That’s a lot of money to just show up for the first two or three years and have me train you.

S-R: Why aren’t you swamped with applications?

Skomars: A lot of people don’t know we exist. I can’t count the number of calls I’ve gotten from travelers asking where their baggage is. People assume we work for the airport. I don’t work for the airport. I work for you. I’m federal infrastructure.

S-R: How has the job evolved since you started in 1989?

Skomars: Back then, radar was all analog, and didn’t register things like air speed. Now it’s digital. And by this time next year we’ll be operating under a more automated system called STARS (Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System), which will greatly reduce gaps in our radar coverage.

S-R: Will air traffic control ever be totally automated?

Skomars: I certainly hope not. There are so many variables, and a lot of what we do involves human factors. If a pilot sounds like he’s a little bit behind the airplane, no computer system is going to figure that out.

S-R: “Behind the airplane”?

Skomars: When you’re flying, you should always be ahead of the airplane. It’s like driving down the highway. If you’re traveling 100 miles per hour, generally you’re behind the car, because most people are not used to traveling that speed. Same deal in an airplane. If a guy upgrades from a Piper Cub to a Mooney, now he’s going 150 miles per hour faster than he’s even been before, and the term is “behind the airplane” because the airplane is moving faster than he can project his actions.

S-R: Have you saved people’s lives?

Skomars: Yes.

S-R: Have you lost people?

Skomars: Yes. I think I’m the only controller in this building who’s had people die on their frequency.

S-R: What happened?

Skomars: The commander of all military forces in Alaska was doing aerobatics in his own private plane, and crashed.

S-R: Is there a limit on how many hours controllers can work?

Skomars: Absolutely. This is a 24/7 facility, but controllers can only work 10 hours a day, and there are rules about break periods and time off between shifts.

S-R: Do people ever fall asleep?

Skomars: No. (pause) But we know they do. Circadian rhythm is what it is. In my day, we did jumping jacks. Now we allow a controller to take a power nap when there’s no traffic, as long as other controllers remain on position during that time.

S-R: How about pressure, such as working during a blizzard?

Skomars: It’s actually easier to work when the weather gets worse, because there are fewer flights, and for the most part the people flying then are highly skilled.

S-R: What do you like most about controlling air traffic?

Skomars: This is one of the most intimate jobs in the world. You wear an earpiece and hear voices in your head. And it’s the sweetest feeling when you have a sky full of airplanes and you’re moving them along nice and safe, and you can cope with anything that comes up. There’s nothing like a really good team working together, and I have a fantastic group of people who seem to like how I run the ship.

S-R: What do you like least?

Skomars: That we know how to execute our job, but sometimes are not given the right tools.

S-R: Do you miss being an air traffic controller?

Skomars: Oh gosh, yeah. I hang out with them when we’re a little short-staffed – answer the phone, keep an eye out and offer comments. But this is a skill that requires practice. I could still do it if I had to, but it wouldn’t be pretty.

S-R: When you’re on an airline flight and hear the pilot start talking, what goes through your mind?

Skomars: Sometimes “Oh my gosh, I’m so old.”

S-R: Do you ever interact with the pilots?

Skomars: Yes. I was on a fun flight the other day that had to go around. I could tell the pilot was behind the aircraft the whole way in – we were much too fast and not where we needed to be. So after we landed, I went up to the cockpit and asked what went on.

S-R: Did you go up as a passenger or as air traffic manager?

Skomars: As air traffic manager. Just to approach the cockpit I have to show ID. And I said, “We went around, and this is my facility. I’d like to talk to the air crew and see what went awry.”

S-R: How did the conversation go?

Skomars: In that instance, both parties weren’t perfect in their execution. My least favorite phrase is “safety wasn’t compromised.” Let’s be realistic – were we born with wings? Every flight involves some measure of risk. We do a great job of mitigating those risks. In this instance, everyone got a little bit behind, elected to go back around, and everything worked out hunky-dory.

S-R: How about when you’re the pilot flying into an unfamiliar airport, and you hear some 22-year-old controller on the radio?

Skomars: It depends on their presence and how they convey their information. Ideally they project a sense that they know the situation, they see what’s going on, they have a plan, and if I execute their plan, all will be wonderful.

S-R: What’s the career outlook for air traffic controllers?

Skomars: This is a fantastic career, and we’re on a huge hiring push. Go to faa.gov/jobs/, type “air traffic controller,” hit search and – bingo – you’re cruising along.

This interview has been edited and condensed. 

Story and photo: http://www.spokesman.com

Planes, Berries, and Handbags: Homeless woman arrested at Immokalee Regional Airport (KIMM) in Collier County, Florida

Christina McClellan



Picking berries on airport property is far from the usual evening hobby, and that fabricated storyline is what led an officer to question his odd confrontation at the Immokalee Regional Airport on Sunday, according to police reports.

As a Collier County Sheriff’s Office Deputy piloted his way around the Immokalee airport to conduct a standard security check of the premises, he spotted three men and a woman hovered around a red sedan on what is privately owned territory, according to reports.

Their claim to being there: They wanted to pick Palmetto Berries, which preserves an extract that was traditionally used for alternative herbal medicinal purposes.

Ironically, Heroin was discovered to be the chief therapeutic agent in high demand, according to the officer’s findings.

Christina McClellan, 36, who was declared homeless, was subjected to a more intensive search after the officer found a syringe and a metal spoon tucked away in the rear pocket of the vehicle’s passenger side seat. Upon searching the men individually, unable to locate any more traces of drugs or paraphernalia on them, the officer proceeded further into the investigation.

The identifier: A gray purse that withheld a pink and black zipper bag inside of it, reports said.

Within the cloth handbag was four syringes, a black plastic spoon, cotton balls, and caps that belonged to the syringes, which led the search right back to McClellan. While searching the lone woman, a plastic baggie was uncovered in her pocket, and McClellan then claimed ownership to the purse that stocked the illegal possessions, according to reports.

The culprit was handcuffed and placed under arrest for possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia, and lab tests conclusively turned out to be positive for Heroin, Collier County Sheriff’s Office records indicated.

Story and photo:  http://naplesherald.com

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Beech 35 Bonanza, N988RH: Fatal accident occurred July 26, 2015 near Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL), California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Riverside, California
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

KEITH C. DAVIS:  http://registry.faa.govN988RH

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA222 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Riverside, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: BEECH F35, registration: N988RH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was receiving vectors for an instrument landing system approach during daytime visual flight rules conditions when he advised the controller that the engine had lost power and that he needed to land at a nearby airport located northeast of his position. The controller responded with the distance and direction from the airport and asked the pilot if he had the airport in sight, which he acknowledged. The controller advised the pilot to proceed inbound to the airport, told him that he could land on the runway of his discretion, and asked him to tell him which runway he was going to use; however, the pilot only responded that he was going to land into the wind. The controller repeated that the runway was at his discretion and the pilot repeated that he was going to land into the wind. Shortly after, the controller provided the pilot with the current weather conditions at the airport, which included wind from 280° at 12 knots gusting to 18 knots, and he then cleared the pilot to land on runway 27. Subsequently, the pilot responded that he was not going to make it to the airport. No further radio communications were received from the pilot.

Review of recorded radar data revealed that, when the pilot initially reported the loss of engine power, the airplane was about 1,644 ft above ground level; traveling on a heading of about 094°; and about 1.65 nautical miles (nm) west-southwest from the approach end of runway 34, 1.74 nm southwest of the approach end of runway 9, and 2.3 miles southwest of the approach end of runway 27. The radar data showed the flight track of the airplane continued on an easterly heading until it was about 0.96 nm south of runway 27 and about 653 ft above ground level. The airplane then turned left to a northerly heading while continuing to descend until radar contact was lost.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the landing gear were in the extended position and that the wing flaps were extended to about 20°. A postimpact fire and impact damage precluded a determination of the fuel quantities in all three fuel tanks. The engine test run did not reveal evidence of any preexisting anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

The Pilot's Operating Handbook for the accident airplane states that the maximum glide configuration includes landing gear and flaps up, cowl flaps closed, propeller low rpm, with an airspeed of 105 knots. With this configuration, the glide distance is about 1.7 nm per 1,000 ft of altitude above the terrain. It is likely that, if the airplane had been properly configured for a maximum glide distance and if the pilot decided to turn directly toward runway 34 or runway 9, for a downwind or crosswind landing, the airplane would have been able to reach either of those runways.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination of the airplane and engine. Also causal to the accident was the pilot's decision to attempt to reach the farthest runway and land into the wind instead of conducting a crosswind or downwind landing at a closer runway following the loss of engine power.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 26, 2015, about 1704 Pacific daylight time, a Beech F35, N988RH, was destroyed when it impacted a power pole and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Riverside Municipal Airport (RAL), Riverside, California. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the airport about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from Brackett Field Airport, La Verne, California, about 1619.

Review of air traffic control (ATC) audio recordings and transcripts provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that a Southern California Terminal Radar Approach Control (SoCal TRACON) controller was providing the pilot vectors for the instrument landing system 26R instrument approach at the Chino Municipal Airport, Chino, California. The SoCal TRACON controller issued the pilot a heading change from 070° to 350°. Shortly after, the pilot responded that he had lost engine power and needed to land at RAL. The controller responded with the distance and direction to RAL and asked the pilot if he had the airport in sight, which the pilot acknowledged. The controller advised the pilot to proceed inbound to RAL, told him that he could land on the runway of his discretion, and asked him to tell him which runway he was going to use. The pilot responded that he was going to land into the wind, and the controller repeated that the runway was at his discretion and asked how many people were on board. The pilot responded that he was the only person onboard and repeated that he was going to land into the wind.

Shortly after, the controller relayed the current weather conditions at RAL, which included wind from 280° at 12 knots gusting to 18 knots, and cleared the pilot to land on runway 27. Subsequently, the pilot responded that he was "not going to make it." No further radio communications were received from the pilot.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 52, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, which was issued February 2, 2013. He was issued a first-class airman medical certificate on April 1, 2014, with the limitation that he "must have available glasses for near vision."

Review of the pilot's personal logbook revealed that, as of the most recent entry, dated June 19, 2015, he had accumulated a total flight time of 443.9 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial number D-4131, was manufactured in 1955. It was powered by a 225-horsepower Continental Motors E225-8 engine, serial number 30406-D-4-8. The airplane was equipped with a Hartzell model HC-A2V20-4A1, 2-bladed, constant-speed propeller, serial number AK1334.

Review of the airframe and engine maintenance logbook records revealed that the most recent annual and 100-hour inspections were completed on October 5, 2014, at a tachometer time of 609.40 hours and total time since major overhaul of 606.4 hours. The engine was overhauled on April 5, 1999, at a total engine time of 4,428.6 hours and subsequently installed on the airframe on May 12, 1999, at a tachometer time of 3 hours. The most recent maintenance performed on the engine was the replacement of a carburetor valve door assembly, alternate air door spring, and induction filter on May 29, 2015, at a tachometer time of 729.9 hours.

The pilot operating handbook for the F35, section III, Emergency Procedures, page 3-6 states in part:

"MAXIMUM GLIDE CONFIGURATION
Landing Gear – UP
Flaps – UP
Cowl Flaps – CLOSED
Propeller – LO RPM
Airspeed – 105 Knots/121 MPH

Glide distance is approximately 1.7 nautical miles (2 statute miles) per 1,000 feet of altitude above terrain."

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1653, the RAL automated weather observation station, located about 0.50 mile north of the accident site, reported wind from 290° at 12 knots, gusts to 19 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 30° C, dew point 16° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.87 inches of Mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck a power pole and power lines about 0.50 mile south of the approach end of runway 27. The first identified point of impact was a power pole, which exhibited a downed wire and impact marks about 40 ft above ground level. Portions of the right flap and ruddervator were located immediately adjacent to the power pole. The right wing was located about 40 ft beyond the power pole in the middle of a residential street. The main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, and left ruddervator, was located about 89 ft from the power pole. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a magnetic heading of about 045°.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the right wing was separated outboard of the right main landing gear. The wing exhibited fire damage to both separated areas. The aileron remained attached via all its mounts. The right flap was separated into two sections, which were located near the first identified point of impact. The right main landing gear was observed in the extended position. The right main fuel tank was mostly intact. The fuel line fitting at the root of the fuel tank was separated. About 6 gallons of 100-low-lead fuel was drained from the fuel tank. The right auxiliary tank was consumed by fire.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage and exhibited fire damage throughout. The inboard portion of the wing from the flap aileron junction was mostly consumed by fire. The outboard portion of the left flap remained attached to the wing; however, the inboard portion was consumed by fire. Both the left main and auxiliary fuel tanks were consumed by fire. The aileron remained attached via all of its mounts and exhibited fire damage. The left main landing gear was observed in the extended position.

The flap actuator was measured and was found to be in a position consistent with 20° flaps.

The fuselage came to rest inverted and exhibited extensive fire damage. A majority of the bottom of the fuselage forward of the baggage compartment was consumed by fire. Oil residue was observed on the aft area of the fuselage structure. The instrument panel was consumed by fire and exhibited multiple instrument displacement. The radio panel was fire damaged. The throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were found in the full-forward position and were fire damaged. The fuel selector valve was heavily fire damaged. The fuel screen was free of debris, and the selector valve was found in a position consistent with the auxiliary position.

The empennage was mostly intact. The right ruddervator was separated and severed into two pieces. A circular impact mark, consistent with the size of the power pole, was observed and extended to the spar.

Both propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub. One propeller blade was bent aft about 90° midspan. The opposing propeller blade was bent aft slightly midspan and exhibited a slight forward bend about 5 inches inboard from the blade tip.

The engine remained attached to the engine mount via all its mounts. All of the engine accessories remained attached to the engine. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. The propeller was moved by hand and rotated about 1/2 inch. Throttle, mixture, and propeller control continuity was established from the cockpit to the engine. The throttle and mixture control cables were separated from their respective control arms, consistent with impact damage. The engine was removed from the airframe and was shipped to the Continental Motors Inc., facility for further examination.
The engine was examined on November 16 and 17, 2015. To facilitate an engine run, the propeller governor was removed, and a blanking plate was installed. The oil sump was impact damaged with multiple holes noted. The oil cooler exhibited impact marks, consistent with striking the left magneto. Engine-to-magneto timing was 30° for the right magneto and 19° for the left magneto. Scrape marks were observed on the mounting flange of the left magneto, consistent with impact from the oil cooler. The left magneto was adjusted to an area where the scrape marks originated, and timing was verified at 25°. A test propeller was installed along with various fuel lines and control cables to facilitate an engine test run. The engine was installed on an engine test stand and run at various power settings uneventfully until being shut off using the mixture.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Riverside County Coroner conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The medical examiner determined that the cause of death was "massive blunt force injuries to torso."

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) performed toxicology tests on specimens from the pilot. According to CAMI's report, the results were negative for carbon monoxide, volatiles, and all screened drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Review of FAA radar data and ATC transcripts revealed that, when the pilot initially reported the loss of engine power, the airplane was about 2,425 ft mean sea level (msl), or about 1,644 ft above ground level (agl); traveling on a heading of about 094°; and about 1.65 nm west southwest from the approach end of runway 34 at RAL, 1.74 nm southwest of the approach end of runway 9, and 2.3 nm from the approach end of runway 27. The radar data depicted the flight track of the airplane continuing on an easterly heading until it was about 0.96 nm south of runway 27 at an altitude of about 1,400 ft msl or about 653 ft agl. The airplane then turned left to a northerly heading while continuing to descend. The last radar target was located about 0.1 nm west of the accident site at an altitude of 775 ft msl.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA222 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Riverside, CA
Aircraft: BEECH F35, registration: N988RH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2015, about 1704 Pacific daylight time, a Beech F-35, N988RH, was destroyed when it impacted a power pole and ground during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near the Riverside Municipal Airport (RAL), Riverside, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. There were no reported ground injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The local flight originated from Brackett Field Airport (POC), La Verne, California, about 1619.

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that the airplane was receiving vectors for the instrument landing system (ILS) 26R instrument approach at the Chino Municipal Airport (CNO), by Southern California Terminal Radar Approach Control (SoCal TRACON). Review of the recorded communication between the pilot and SoCal TRACON revealed that the pilot was issued a heading change to 350 degrees by the controller. The pilot responded shortly after that he had lost the engine, and needed to land at Riverside. The controller responded with the location of RAL, and asked if the pilot had the airport in sight, which the pilot acknowledged. The controller advised the pilot to proceed inbound to RAL and that he could land on the runway of his discretion. The pilot responded that he was going to land into the wind, and the controller repeated that the runway was his discretion, and asked how many people were on board. The pilot responded that he was the only person onboard and that he was going to land into the wind.

Shortly after, the controller relayed the current weather conditions at RAL, which included reported wind from 280 degrees at 12 knots, gusting to 18 knots, and cleared the pilot to land on runway 27. Subsequently, the pilot responded that he was not going to make it. No further radio communication was received from the pilot.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck a power pole and power lines about .50 miles south of the approach end of runway 27. The first identified point of contact was a power pole, which exhibited a downed wire and impact marks about 40 feet above ground level. Portions of the right flap and right ruddervator were located adjacent to the power pole. The right wing was located about 40 feet beyond the power pole, in the middle of a residential street. The main wreckage was located about 89 feet from the power pole, in a residential yard and consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, left ruddervator, and a downed street light pole. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 045 degrees magnetic. All major structural components were located within the debris path. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.
============

The pilot who died Sunday after crashing his plane in a Riverside neighborhood has been identified by his mother as Keith C. Davis of Claremont.

Yvonne Davis said there must have been a malfunction in her son's plane before he tried to make an emergency landing along Adams Street.

The younger Davis, 52, was recognized by the Federal Aviation Administration in 2013 for achieving the highest standard for pilots of air carriers and commercial planes. It's unclear whether Davis was employed by a commercial airline.

On Sunday, Davis' small plane barreled through power lines and hit a light pole before coming to rest upside-down on the fence that borders two houses along Adams Street, just south of Riverside Municipal Airport, according to Joshua Cawthra, aviation investigator for the National Transportation Safety Board.

"He was trying to either land on the street or in that field," said Riverside Fire Department Capt. Tim Odebralski, motioning to the soccer field at Adams Elementary School across the street from the wreckage.

The single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was built in 1955, according to the FAA registry.

The plane burst into flames upon impact, but the Fire Department quickly extinguished the blaze before it spread. Despite the massive explosion, nearby homes were not damaged; only a fence was destroyed.

Davis was the only occupant of the plane. No one on the ground was injured.

The plane departed at 4:19 p.m. out of Brackett Field Airport in La Verne, about 22 miles northwest of where it crashed.

After experiencing engine problems, the pilot radioed his intentions of landing at the Riverside Municipal Airport.

“I don't think I'm going to make it,” Davis said in his final radio transmission, according to Odebralski.

The crash occurred moments after 5 p.m., about a quarter-mile from the airstrip. Some reported seeing smoke billowing from the engine just before the crash landing, Odebralski said.

"We're not sure yet if some of the fire started in the sky," Odebralski added.

Officials with NTSB are investigating the cause of the crash. It could take up to a week before additional details are released, Cawthra said.

On Monday morning, the airplane was still in the backyard where it crashed, but officials planned to move it later in the day.

Source:  http://www.pe.com










 












A small plane crashed and burst into flames in a residential area of Riverside on Sunday, killing the pilot, a fire official said. 

The air traffic control tower at Riverside Municipal Airport about 5 p.m. received a distress call from a Beech 35 Bonanza, according to Capt. Tim Odebralski of the Riverside Fire Department.

The pilot reported having engine trouble and requested an emergency landing at the airport. Shortly afterward, “the pilot stated that he didn’t think he was going to make it and that’s the last transmission,” Odebralski told KTLA.

The plane then crashed in the 4500 block of Adams Street, coming to a stop on a sidewalk and through a fence in the backyard of a single-story home, the Fire Department said. The location is across from the campus of Adams Elementary School and less than half a mile from the nearest runway at the airport.

“We were coming down the street and I heard my daughter yell at my husband and there was literally a fireball,” said witness Shanene Romero, who was in a vehicle with her family. Her husband then swerved to avoid falling debris, she said.

“It was intense heat and then we heard a terrific crash,” she added.

In an interview, Catherine Burke said her aging parents were inside their home when the plane slammed through the rear fence.

“While they were eating, they looked up and saw a lot of smoke and dirt in the air,” she said, “and then flames.”

The couple called 911, initially unaware of what exactly had happened. Meanwhile, according to Romero, neighbors used a garden hose and fire extinguisher in an attempt to knock down the blaze and help the pilot.

“Another gentleman,” she said, “was yelling in the plane and saying, ‘Are you OK? Are you OK?”

Firefighters from the department’s airport station arrived at the scene and quickly extinguished the flames, Odebralski said.

The unidentified pilot, the plane’s only occupant, was pronounced dead at the scene, he said, adding that no one on the ground was injured.

The aircraft’s tail number was indecipherable in the wreckage. It was unclear where the plane had taken off from, but a Fire Department official said the flight had not originated from Riverside Municipal Airport.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators were en route to the crash site.

“I’m sure with everyone else, I feel for the pilot and his family and what they’re having to go through,” Burke said.

Source:  http://ktla.com 



A pilot died Sunday during the fiery crash of a single-engine plane near Riverside Municipal Airport, narrowly missing two houses. 

The pilot radioed the airport shortly before the 5:03 p.m. crash, telling of engine trouble and a plane to make an emergency landing at the airport, said Riverside Fire Capt. Tim Odebralski.

“I don’t think I’m going to make it,” the pilot said in his final radio transmission, according to Odebralski.

The pilot was the only person aboard the plane. The body remained inside the wreckage until after dark and had not been identified.

No one on the ground was hurt.

The white and blue Beech 35 Bonanza landed upside-down in the backyard of a house on the southeast corner of Adams Street and San Vicente Avenue, just south of Arlington Avenue.

Richard and Doris Godfrey have lived in that house for more than 55 years.

“They were just sitting down to have dinner,” said son-in-law Keith Burke. “There was a crash, and the backyard was engulfed in flames – lots and lots of smoke.”

Doris immediately called 911.

“Before she even got through ... the Fire Department was here and extinguishing the flames,” Burke said.

The plane landed squarely in the couple’s backyard. Neither their house nor their neighbors’, about 40 feet away, was damaged by the plane or the flames. Only the Godfreys’ backyard fence was destroyed.

The Godfreys were grateful they escaped injury, but uncertain how they avoided it.

“Either skillful flying ... or just luck,” Burke suggested.

“Our heart goes out to the family of the pilot and the loss they suffered this evening,” he said.

While most of the wreckage ended up in the Godfreys‘ yard, small pieces were strewn against the perimeter fence of Adams Elementary School, across the street from the house.

Power lines bordering the elementary school lay coiled on the ground, apparently snapped during the crash.

A one-block stretch of Adams was closed between San Vicente and Brunswick Avenue for several hours after the crash.

Source:  http://www.pe.com



RIVERSIDE, Calif. (KABC) -- A small plane crashed into a yard of a home near the intersection of Arlington Avenue and Adams Street in Riverside Sunday afternoon, killing the aircraft's pilot. 

The pilot of the Beech 35 Bonanza reported a loss of engine power at about 5 p.m. before crashing about a half-mile east of Riverside Municipal Airport, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

"They were requesting an emergency landing at the Riverside [Municipal] Airport. Shortly thereafter, they received an additional distress call saying that he didn't think that he was going to make it to the airport, and then several calls came in right after that for a plane crash," city fire Capt. Tim Odebralski said.

The plane narrowly missed two houses and landed upside down in Dick and Doris Godfrey's backyard.

"They were having dinner, eating their salad, and they looked up, and all of a sudden they saw smoke and a lot of dust, and then the plane burst into flames," their daughter, Catherine Burke, said.

The pilot was pronounced dead at the scene. He was not immediately identified.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash, which initially left 350 people in the area without power, according to Riverside Public Utilities.

Power was restored at about 8:50 p.m. Nobody on the ground was injured, Odebralski said.

"Knowing that the person called mayday, he knew something was wrong, he did the best he could. No other life had to be taken," witness Jessica Aviles said.


 Source: http://abc7.com

Beech V35B Bonanza, N252G, Avprop, LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 26, 2015 in Colbert, Bryan County, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/12/2017
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was in level cruise flight on the second leg of a cross-country flight when the engine lost power. The pilot declared an emergency with air traffic control (ATC) and requested the nearest airport. As the airplane was descending through 8,360 ft mean sea level (msl), the ATC controller told him that there was an airport (Airport A) at his 12-o'clock position and about 15 nautical miles (nm) away. However, there was another airport (Airport B) that was about 7.5 nm away that the controller did not tell the pilot about at this time.

The pilot responded that he had partial power and would see if he could make it to Airport A. He then asked for and received a vector to Airport A. About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 6,023 ft msl, the pilot asked the controller if there was something closer, and the controller told him that there was another airport (Airport B) at his 3- to 4-o'clock position and 10 nm away. The pilot requested a turn toward Airport B, the controller told the pilot to turn right and proceed direct, and the airplane turned 90° right toward Airport B. Airport B was actually about 8.2 nm away.

About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 4,260 ft msl, the controller advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip about 1 mile behind him. The airstrip was actually 10 nm away. The pilot replied, "wish I knew where that was ..." The controller then provided the pilot with runway information for Airport B. The pilot responded, "where's that private strip?" The controller responded, "it's not close enough for you to get to." As the airplane descended through 3,370 ft msl, the controller then gave the pilot his position and distance to Airports A and B. There were no further transmissions from the pilot.

Radar data showed that the airplane made a 180° right turn to the south. About 2 minutes later, the airplane made a 270° left turn and rolled out on a westerly heading. At the last radar contact, the airplane was westbound at 700 ft msl. The terrain elevation in the area was about 660 ft msl. The airplane impacted trees and then the ground. The site was surrounded by fields suitable for a forced landing, and it is likely that if the pilot had selected one of these fields as his landing site, the damage to the airplane and severity of injuries to the occupants would have been minimized.

Postaccident examination revealed that the left fuel tank was full, and the fuel quantity in the right tank could not be determined due to impact damage. The fuel selector valve handle was positioned between the left and right tank detent positions. Fuel selector continuity was established for each detent by blowing air through the valve. No air flowed through the valve when the fuel selector was positioned as found between the right and left tank detents. No preimpact failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine were found that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot's autopsy revealed that he had severe coronary heart disease including atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. The posterior descending coronary artery was found to have about 90% stenosis and the left main, left anterior descending, and right coronary arteries had about 25% stenosis. Given that there was active radio contact between the pilot and ATC and no mention by the pilot of chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness, or palpitations, it is unlikely that his heart disease contributed to the accident.

Toxicology tests showed the pilot used rosuvastatin, a prescription medication in the class of medications called statin antilipemic agents that is used to reduce blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The rosuvastatin was found in the pilot's urine but not in his blood.

It is likely that while switching tanks during cruise flight, the pilot inadvertently moved the fuel selector to the as-found intermediate position such that it blocked fuel to the engine, which resulted in fuel starvation and a loss of engine power. The Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) listed "Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT OTHER TANK (Check to feel detent)" as the first item in the emergency procedure for an engine failure. Thus, it is likely that, when the engine lost power, the pilot failed to properly position the selector so that fuel could be restored and a restart possible.

At the time that the pilot reported the engine failure to ATC, the airplane was 15.8 nm from Airport A, 7.5 nm from Airport B, and 6.2 nm from the private airstrip. According to radar data, the airplane traveled a total distance of about 7.9 nm from the point at which the pilot reported the engine failure to the accident site. The POH states that, with the landing gear and flaps retracted, cowl flaps closed, propeller at low rpm, and maintaining an airspeed of 105 kts, the airplane's glide distance is about 1.7 nm per 1,000 ft of altitude above the terrain. If the controller had provided accurate information to the pilot about the location of the nearest airports as required by Federal Aviation Administration ATC procedures and if the pilot had immediately acted on that information, based on the radar data, the pilot might have been able to glide to and land at Airport B or the private airstrip.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to properly position the fuel selector, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. Contributing to the severity of the accident was the pilot's failure to select an appropriate location for a forced landing, which resulted in the airplane impacting trees. Contributing to the accident was the air traffic controller's failure to provide the pilot accurate information on nearby emergency airport and airfields and the pilot's failure to properly follow the airplane's emergency procedures in the Pilot's Operating Handbook that would have led him to properly position the fuel selector and restore fuel flow to the engine.

Steve and Vicki Fehr were both 64 years old. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Avprop, LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N252G

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 26, 2015, at 1513 central daylight time, a Beechcraft V35B airplane, N252G, struck trees and impacted terrain during a forced landing near Colbert, Oklahoma. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured and died 2 days later. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Avprop, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Springfield-Branson National Airport (SGF), Springfield, Missouri, at 1317.

The pilot and his wife were returning to Fort Worth, Texas, from Jackson, Michigan. Earlier in the day, the couple departed from Jackson County-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan, and flew to SGF where they landed and refueled, taking on 45 gallons of aviation gasoline. A fuel receipt showed a time of 1252:47. GPS data showed that the airplane took off to the west-northwest and then turned southwest toward Fort Worth. The airplane climbed to and maintained 11,000 ft. mean seal level (msl).

About 1501, the pilot contacted the Fort Worth Air Traffic Control Center (ZFW) and declared an emergency reporting that the airplane had lost engine power and that he needed to "get to an airport right away." As the airplane was descending through 8,360 ft. msl, the ZFW air traffic controller told the pilot that the North Texas Regional Airport (GYI), Sherman/Denison, Texas, was at his 12 o'clock and about 15 miles. The pilot responded that he had partial power and would see if he could make it to GYI. The pilot asked the controller for a vector to GYI; the controller instructed the pilot to turn to a heading of 245°. About 2 minutes later, as the airplane descended through 6,023 ft. msl, the pilot asked the ZFW controller if there was something closer. The controller told him that the Durant Regional Airport (DUA), Durant, Oklahoma, was at the pilot's 3 to 4 o'clock and 10 miles. The pilot requested a turn toward DUA; the controller told the pilot to turn right direct DUA. Radar data showed that the airplane made a right 90° turn to about a 360° heading.

At 1505, as the airplane descended through 4,260 ft. msl, the controller advised the pilot that there was a private airfield about a mile behind him. The pilot replied, "wish I knew where that was …" The controller then provided the pilot runway information for DUA, and said that the minimum instrument flight rules altitude for the area was 2,700 ft. msl. The pilot responded, "where's that private strip …?" The controller responded, "it's not close enough for you to get to … there is GYI at your 2 to 3 o'clock 10 miles, Durant is at your 6 to 7 o'clock and 10 miles." There was no response. The ZFW controller made several attempts to contact the pilot, but there were no further transmissions from the pilot.

Radar data showed that about 1506, the airplane made a right 180° turn to the south. The airplane descended through 3,370 ft. msl. About 2 minutes later, the airplane made a left 270° turn and rolled out on a westerly heading. At the last radar contact, the airplane was about 5 miles southeast of Colbert, at 700 ft. msl. The terrain elevation in the area was about 660 ft. msl.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with single-engine land airplane and instrument ratings. On April 14, 2015, he received a special issuance third-class medical certificate limited by a requirement for corrective lenses and marked, "not valid for any class after 04/30/2016."

The pilot's logbook showed that he had flown 1,491.0 total hours, 21.9 hours of which were in the 30 days before the accident. The logbook also showed that the pilot successfully completed a flight review and instrument proficiency check in the accident airplane make and model on May 14, 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-place, single-engine, V-tail airplane, serial number D-10266, was registered to a corporation and used by the pilot for both business and pleasure. It was equipped with two 32-gallon fuel tanks and powered by a 285 horsepower Continental Motors IO-520-BB engine, serial number 836904-R.

A review of the airframe and engine records revealed that the airplane had undergone a 100-hour inspection on January 14, 2015, at an airframe time of 3,841.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1155, the automated weather observation station at DUA, located 9 nautical miles north-northeast of the accident site recorded wind 190° at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 36° C, dew point 19° C, and altimeter setting 29.93 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a wooded area along the east side of a road about 5 miles southeast of Colbert. The site was surrounded by fields suitable for a forced landing. The airplane came to rest upright and was oriented on a south-south westerly heading. The airplane initially impacted some pine trees about 100 ft. east-northeast of the wreckage. Several tree branches in the immediate vicinity of the airplane were broken and showed marks consistent with impact marks on the airplane's wings and fuselage. The debris path was on a bearing of about 200° from the initial tree impact. About 40 ft. east of the airplane was an impact crater that measured about 25 ft. wide and 20 ft. long. Airplane debris and dirt fanned out from the crater toward the airplane wreckage.

Within the debris field were pieces from the engine cowling, forward fuselage, windscreen, and fuel system. Also within the debris field were luggage and broken branches.

The main wreckage consisted of the cabin, fuselage, engine, propeller, left and right wings, and empennage. (See Figure 1 for a photograph showing the accident site and main wreckage.)

Figure 1. A photograph showing the accident site and main wreckage.

The cowling, engine, and engine mounts were broken downward and twisted right 15°. The nose gear was in the retracted position. The nose gear wheel well and nose gear doors were crushed upward. The front cabin floor and front seats were broken downward and canted right about 10°. The instrument panel, control yoke and glareshield were broken forward and down. The front windscreen was broken out and fragmented. The rear cabin, baggage compartment and aft fuselage showed upward crushing. The empennage showed minor damage.

The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft flange. The spinner was dented inward. Two of the three propeller blades were intact and undamaged. The third propeller blade was bent aft about 45° and located under the lower engine cowling, and showed no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches.

The airplane's left wing was intact. The forward leading edge showed dents and fractures along its entire span. The left main fuel tank remained intact and 32 gallons of fuel were recovered from it. The left main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were crushed upward. The left flap and aileron were intact.


The airplane's right wing was broken aft longitudinally at mid-span. The right fuel tank was broken open. The smell of fuel was prevalent. The right main landing gear was in the retracted position and the gear doors were crushed upward. The right flap was in the retracted position and showed minor damage. The right outboard wing section and right aileron were located immediately right of the inboard section. The wing section was broken upward and crushed aft. The leading edge showed impact marks consistent with striking trees. Tree debris was found in several of the dents and skin tears. The right aileron was broken out and bent in several locations along its span. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the left and right ailerons and the V-tail stabilators.

An examination of the engine revealed no anomalies. An examination of the fuel system showed the fuel selector valve handle positioned between the left and right tank positions. Fuel selector continuity was established for each detent by blowing air through the valve. No air flowed through the valve when the fuel selector was in the intermediate position between the left and right tanks. No other anomalies were found with the airplane.

A J. P. Instruments EDM-700 engine data monitor, Garmin Aera 560 GPS, and a Horizon Instruments P1000 tachometer were retained and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Electronic Devices

The Horizon Instruments P1000 tachometer was capable of displaying engine rpm and storing tachometer time to non-volatile memory. The unit powered on normally and a tachometer time of 3,886 hours was observed.

Data extracted from the Garmin Aera 560 GPS produced 37 logs from January 22, 2014, through July 28, 2015. Two logs associated with the day of the accident were identified by recorded date and time; the first starting at 0809:50 CDT and ending at 1226:02 CDT, and the second starting at 1318:52 and ending at 1507:47 CDT.

Engine performance data was extracted from the J. P. Instruments EDM-700 engine data monitor memory chips. Engine parameters monitored and recorded by the unit included:

exhaust gas temperature (EGT),

cylinder head temperature (CHT),

fuel flow,

fuel used, and

voltage.

The EDM recorded about 11,375 data points over 11 flight logs. Two logs associated with the day of the accident were identified by recorded date and time; the first starting at 0816:02 and ending at 1234:34, and the second starting at 1315:49 and ending at 1513:30. The data points were recorded every 6 seconds.

A noticeable drop in EGT and CHT for all 6 cylinders occurred 9 minutes before the last recorded data point. The EGTs dropped from about 1,500°F to 400°F, and then to about 100°F. The CHTs dropped from about 380°F to about 115°F.

Air Traffic Control

The ZFW controller was a developmental controller and was on duty with an instructor. After the pilot declared an emergency and requested the closest airport, the controller gave the pilot runway information for GYI and gave the location as 15 miles straight ahead. The controller issued the pilot a vector to the airport, but did not obtain any further information from the pilot about the emergency. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Joint Order 7110.65, Air Traffic Control, paragraph 10-1-2 states in part that a controller should obtain enough information to handle an emergency intelligently and should base his or her decision as to what type assistance is needed on information and requests received from the pilot because the pilot is authorized by 14 CFR Part 91 to determine a course of action.

When the controller issued the vector to GYI, the airport was about 15.8 nautical miles (nm) straight ahead; DUA was located 7.5 nm to the north. The instructor did not offer the controller a correction or suggestion that DUA was a more appropriate choice for diversion. According to radar data, the airplane traveled a total distance of 7.9 nm from the point at which the pilot reported the engine failure to the accident site.

A short time after the controller issued the initial vector to GYI, the pilot asked for a closer airport. The controller provided the location of DUA as 3 to 4 o'clock and 10 miles. By that time, however, DUA was at 4 o'clock and about 8.2 nm. At 1505:31, the controller advised the pilot of a private airstrip 1 nm behind the airplane. The pilot transmitted "wish I knew where that was for ..." The airstrip was actually about 10 nm away and the instructor did not correct the developmental controller. Interviews with other controllers assisting with the emergency revealed that they had used a visual flight rules (VFR) sectional chart when they suggested the private airstrip was 1 nm behind the airplane. The private airstrip was not depicted on the radar display and there were no identifying features on the display to allow a precise assessment of the direction and distance to the private airstrip.

At 1506:12, when the airplane was 7 nm from DUA, the pilot initiated a 180° right turn to the south. The pilot again asked for the location of the private airstrip. About a minute later, the controller advised the pilot that the private airstrip was too far away and repeated the locations of GYI and DUA. Radar contact was lost shortly after.

FAA traffic management software continually monitors predicted and actual traffic levels in various sectors as a means of tracking controller workload and sector staffing needs. Monitor Alert Parameters (MAP) are established as a workload benchmark to assist supervisors and controllers-in-charge (CIC) in recognizing high-workload situations. Traffic counts above 18 would be a reason for workload concern, even with training in progress. At 1500, the predicted traffic load for the developmental controller was 24 aircraft and expected to remain above the MAP until 1530, when it was expected to drop back down to 15 aircraft. The CIC had developed a plan to split the combined sector into individual sectors based on the increased MAP levels, but delayed its implementation. The emergency had already begun, adding workload to the already busy sector.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Board of Medicolegal Investigations, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The pilot's death was attributed to "multiple blunt force injuries." In addition, significant heart disease was identified that included atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. The posterior descending coronary artery was found to have about 90% stenosis, and the left main, left anterior descending, and right coronary arteries had about 25% stenosis.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research laboratory conducted toxicology testing on the pilot's specimens. The tests detected rosuvastatin in the pilot's urine but not in his blood. Rosuvastatin is a prescription medication in the class of medications called statin antilipemic agents. It is used to reduce blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and it is not impairing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Raytheon Beech Hawker Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) for the model V35B airplane provides emergency procedures in the event of an engine failure after takeoff or while in flight. The first item in the emergency procedure states, "Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT OTHER TANK (Check to feel detent)."

Additionally, the POH provides an emergency checklist for maximum glide configuration that states that with the landing gear and flaps retracted, cowl flaps closed, propeller at low rpm, and maintaining an airspeed of 105 kts, the airplane's glide distance is approximately 1.7 nm per 1,000 ft. of altitude above the terrain.


An after-market laminated checklist found in the airplane wreckage, under ENGINE FAILURE INFLIGHT, showed the fourth item as "FUEL SELECTOR … FULLEST TANK/OTHER."

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA316 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 26, 2015 in Colbert, OK
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N252G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 26, 2015, about 1500 central daylight time, a Beechcraft V35B airplane, N252G, sustained substantial damage following loss of engine power in flight and subsequent impact with the ground in Colbert, Oklahoma. The instrument rated private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Avprop, LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and an instrument flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at Jackson County-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan.


FORT WORTH, TEXAS — Charles S. (Stephen) Fehr, former chief executive officer and current board member of Fehr Foods (now known as AbiMar Foods), died in a plane crash on July 26. His wife, Vicki W. Fehr, 64, was injured in the crash, which occurred after Mr. Fehr reported losing engine power, according to an article in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Mr. Fehr was 64 years old.

Lynn Lunsford, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that Mr. and Mrs. Fehr were headed from Springfield, Mo., to Fort Worth’s Spinks Airport when the plane crashed five miles southeast of Colbert, Okla.

The single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza was found in a wooded area near a country road, Mr. Lunsford said.

Fehr Foods was founded in Abilene, Texas, in 1992, and was sold to Grupo Nacional de Chocolates S.A. (G.N.C.H.), Medellin, Colombia, for $84 million in 2010. The company subsequently was renamed AbiMar Foods, Inc. The company makes cookies primarily under the Lil’ Dutch Maid, Sun Valley and Tru-Blue brands, and operates production facilities in Texas and Oklahoma. 

The pilot of a single-engine plane bound for Fort Worth Spinks Airport was killed when the plane crashed around 3 p.m. Sunday near Winnet Road, approximately five miles southeast of Colbert. 

According to authorities, Charles Fehr, 64, was dead at the scene. His wife, Vicki, also 64, was not wearing a seat belt and suffered head, arm, trunk external and internal injuries. She was flown to a hospital in Plano, Texas. Her condition was unknown.

The Fehrs reportedly were heading home to Westover Hills, Texas, from Michigan. Their last stop had been in Springfield, Mo. The 1979 Beechcraft Bonanza plane had just passed over Colbert when it went down just feet from the county road.

Engine failure is listed as the probable cause of the crash, but officials are expected at the scene today to continue their investigation. At 3:11 p.m. Sunday, Fehr reported that his engine lost power.

Just moments before the plane went down, witnesses heard what they explained as a “boom” and noises unlike what a normal plane flying over would make. A plane manual was found in the debris. It reportedly was opened to the page explaining about engine failure.

The pilot was also reportedly texting his son just seconds before the crash.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol secured the location and crash debris until the National Transportation Safety Board could arrive Monday to begin its investigation. OHP Trooper Steve Nabors was assisted by Trooper Kyle Ince on location.

The Bryan County Sheriff’s Office, and Colbert, Achille and Cartwright fire departments worked the crash.




COLBERT, Okla. -- A plane crashed around 3 p.m. Sunday in Colbert, Okla., killing one, and injuring another.

Vicki Fehr, 64, and Charles Fehr's plane went down along Winnett Road, near Colbert. According to Oklahoma Highway Patrol spokespersons, the couple was traveling from Springfield, Mo. to Fort Worth.

Vicki Fehr was taken by helicopter to the Medical Center of Plano in critical condition. Charles Fehr was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the pilot reported losing engine power shortly before the crash.

"Just heard this loud bang, turned around and saw just this big cloud of smoke," Charles Montgomery, who witnessed the crash, said.

That's when Montgomery said he called 911. "I rushed over to see what had happened and all I could see was the pilot," Montgomery said.

The plane flew right over Jose Oagan's house.

"I was so scared, I never saw anything like that before," Oagan said.

The cause of the crash has not been released. OHP troopers, the Bryan County Sheriff's Office and Colbert agencies all responded.

"We're securing the scene, doing our investigation that we're required to by Oklahoma state law and we have notified the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) and the FAA, and they will be having representatives sent to our location and we will go from there," Trooper Steve Nabors, said.  The NTSB is expected to start investigating the scene Monday afternoon.