Tuesday, August 10, 2021

North Wing Mustang, Unregistered: Fatal accident occurred July 09, 2021 in Albany, Linn County, Oregon

ZoĆ« Keliher,  Air Safety Investigator 






This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon 

Location: Albany, OR
Accident Number: WPR21FA265
Date & Time: July 9, 2021, 20:51 Local 
Registration: UNREGISTERED
Aircraft: North Wing Mustang
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On July 9, 2021, about 2051 Pacific daylight time, an unregistered experimental, amateur-built North Wing Mustang 3 weight-shift-control trike, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Millersburg, Oregon. The noncertificated pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to family members, the pilot and passenger departed from the pilot’s home airport in Albany, Oregon. After overflying the pilot’s home, located about 4,000 ft north of the airport, the flight continued northeast for about 3.3 miles. The aircraft then turned left and overflew close to the passenger’s home see picture 1).



Several witnesses on the ground recorded the airplane maneuvering on their mobile phone devices. A review of those videos disclosed that the airplane banked to the left to a near 90° turn. The left wing continued to drop down and the aircraft descended toward the ground as the turn tightened. The aircraft impacted the terrain in a left-wing low attitude (see picture 2).



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: North Wing 
Registration: UNREGISTERED 
Model/Series: Mustang 3
Aircraft Category: Weight-shift
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLE,201 ft msl
Observation Time: 20:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clea
r Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 290°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Albany, OR (S21) 
Destination: Albany, OR

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 44.695371,-123.08215 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Charles “Chuck” Kizer, 57

Matthew Irish, 49


A well-known ultralight pilot and local handyman along with a close friend of Albany Mayor Alex Johnson II were killed when their aircraft crashed into a field in Millersburg  on Friday evening.

Charles “Chuck” Kizer, 57, was piloting the ultralight when witnesses said it went into a steep dive and crashed into a cut grass seed field south of Deciduous Avenue. Kizer and his passenger, Matthew Irish, 49, were both pronounced dead at the scene shortly after first responders arrived at about 8:52 p.m., said the Linn County Sheriff’s Office. 

"We lost two great people," Mayor Johnson said.  "I hope the community embraces, hugs and wraps the family in their love."

Johnson said he became quick friends with Irish after meeting him at a social event 8 years ago. 

"He was a great man," Johnson said. "I loved him dearly, I am going to miss him."

Irish and Kizer's wives were former business partners who until recently co-owned an adult care facility, Johnson said. Over the years he was able to get to know both of the men. 

Elizabeth Irish, Matt's wife, was Mayor Johnson's campaign manager.  Matthew Irish officiated high school football for a couple of seasons with Johnson. 

Both Kizer and his wife, Jennifer, have been active in community service in Albany.  Kizer was on the  Airport Advisory committee and Jennifer is a member of the Albany Planning Commission.

"Chuck was a community servant," summed up Johnson. 

Friday evening Johnson was called to be with the family at the Irish's Millersburg home after the accident.  

The crash happened within 200 yards of the Irish's home. "Elizabeth witnessed  the crash," Johnson said. 

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Also witnessing the crash were the  Andersen family who were walking in their neighborhood on Sedona Road when they saw the blue and white aircraft fly over them heading east to west. 

“We were on a walk,” said John Andersen, Millersburg resident and executive director of the Albany Girls & Boys Club.  “My kids saw the hang glider flying overhead so they were waving at that person.”

“As they were making a turn all we heard was this decline,” Andersen said. “And we heard a loud thud.”

Andersen and his wife sprinted to the corner of Sonora Drive and Woods Road, where Andersen’s wife ran across the street and several hundred yards through the harvested grass seed field to render aid while Andersen stayed with his children and called 911. 

A witness standing across the street from the Andersen family said she saw the craft plunge nose first into the ground. It crashed in the field between high tension power lines to the south and a housing development to the north. 

Albany and Jefferson Fire Departments and the Linn County Sheriff’s office responded to the scene. 

By mid-morning Saturday investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board with the assistance of Linn County Sheriff's deputies combed through the wreckage taking photos and examining portions of the aircraft. The ultralight came to rest with its wheels up 400 feet from the end of Barker Street in the Wood Estate subdivision. 

Visible on the ultralight's crumpled wing were the words Mustang 3-15. A web search indicates that the Mustang 3-15 is an ultralight aircraft manufactured by North Wing in East Wenatchee, Washington. No word was available on possible causes for the crash.

Kizer also operated  Handyman Xtreme, a business that specializes in decks, fences, pavers and yard maintenance, according to his Facebook page. 


Charles “Chuck” Kizer

A well-known ultralight pilot and local handyman along with a close friend of Albany Mayor Alex Johnson II were killed when their aircraft crashed into a field in Millersburg on Friday evening.

Charles “Chuck” Kizer, 57, was piloting the ultralight when witnesses said it went into a steep dive and crashed into a cut grass seed field south of Deciduous Avenue. Kizer and his passenger, Matthew Irish, 49, were both pronounced dead at the scene shortly after first responders arrived at about 8:52 p.m., said the Linn County Sheriff’s Office. 

"We lost two great people," Mayor Johnson said.  "I hope the community embraces, hugs and wraps the family in their love."

Johnson said he became quick friends with Irish after meeting him at a social event 8 years ago. 

"He was a great man," Johnson said. "I loved him dearly, I am going to miss him."

Irish and Kizer's wives were former business partners who until recently co-owned an adult care facility, Johnson said. Over the years he was able to get to know both of the men. 

Elizabeth Irish, Matt's wife, was Mayor Johnson's campaign manager.  Matthew Irish officiated high school football for a couple of seasons with Johnson. 

Both Kizer and his wife, Jennifer, have been active in community service in Albany.  Kizer was on the  Airport Advisory committee and Jensifer is a member of the Albany Planning Commission.

"Chuck was a community servant," summed up Johnson. 

Friday evening Johnson was called to be with the family at the Irish's Millersburg home after the accident.  

The crash happened within 200 yards of the Irish's home. "Elizabeth witnessed  the crash," Johnson said. 

Also witnessing the crash were the  Andersen family who were walking in their neighborhood on Sedona Road when they saw the blue and white aircraft fly over them heading east to west. 

“We were on a walk,” said John Andersen, Millersburg resident and executive director of the Albany Girls & Boys Club.  “My kids saw the hang glider flying overhead so they were waving at that person.”

“As they were making a turn all we heard was this decline,” Andersen said. “And we heard a loud thud.”

Andersen and his wife sprinted to the corner of Sonora Drive and Woods Road, where Andersen’s wife ran across the street and several hundred yards through the harvested grass seed field to render aid while Andersen stayed with his children and called 911. 

A witness standing across the street from the Andersen family said she saw the craft plunge nose first into the ground. It crashed in the field between high tension power lines to the south and a housing development to the north. 

Albany and Jefferson Fire Departments and the Linn County Sheriff’s office responded to the scene. 

By mid-morning Saturday investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board with the assistance of Linn County Sheriff's deputies combed through the wreckage taking photos and examining portions of the aircraft. The ultralight came to rest with its wheels up 400 feet from the end of Barker Street in the Wood Estate subdivision. 

Visible on the ultralight's crumpled wing were the words Mustang 3-15. A web search indicates that the Mustang 3-15 is an ultralight aircraft manufactured by North Wing in East Wenatchee, Washington. No word was available on possible causes for the crash.

Kizer also operated  Handyman Xtreme, a business that specializes in decks, fences, pavers and yard maintenance, according to his Facebook page. 

SilverLight Aviation Delta Jet-II, N314SL: Accident occurred August 10, 2021 at South Lakeland Airport (X49), Mulberry, Polk County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

Location: Mulberry, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA325
Date & Time: August 10, 2021, 08:00 Local 
Registration: N314SL
Aircraft: SILVERLIGHT AVIATION LLC DELTA JET-II 
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SILVERLIGHT AVIATION LLC
Registration: N314SL
Model/Series: DELTA JET-II 
Aircraft Category: Weight-shift
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLAL,142 ft msl
Observation Time: 07:50 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /26°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 27.931049,-82.041565 (est)
 

TAMPA, Florida (WFLA) — Two people suffered minor injuries after an ultralight aircraft crashed in Mulberry Tuesday morning, officials said.

The incident occurred in the area of U.S. Highway 60 and Coronet Road.

A Polk County Sheriff’s Office said the two people on board suffered “slight injuries,” but were okay.


This morning (Tuesday, August 10, 2021) around 8:00 a.m., PCSO received calls about an aircraft crash alongside Coronet Road in Mulberry, and deputies along with Polk County Fire Rescue responded to the scene.

The pilot of the SilverLight Aviation Delta Jet-II, 71-year-old Charles McLochlin of Lake Placid, was conducting “touch and go” landings on the grassy runway that parallels Coronet, when on his fourth “touch and go” the front wheel collapsed upon landing, causing the nose of the craft to collide with the ground, and then rotate and come to a stop in a ditch.

Cessna 210H Centurion, N5940F: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2021 near Melbourne Municipal Airport (42A), Izard County, Arkansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas
Cessna; Wichita, Kansas

Rodger D Langster


Location: Melbourne, AR 
Accident Number: CEN21FA364
Date & Time: August 9, 2021, 11:15 Local 
Registration: N5940F
Aircraft: Cessna 210H
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On August 9, 2021, about 1115 central daylight time (CDT), a Cessna 210H airplane, N5940F, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Melbourne, Arkansas. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries. The personal cross-country flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Federal Code of Regulations Part 91.

The intent of the flight was to fly about 60-miles from Melbourne Municipal Airport (42A), Melbourne, Arkansas, to Heber Springs Municipal Airport (HBZ), Heber Springs, Arkansas. The pilot was returning to his home base in Heber Springs after conducting business in Melbourne. A witness, who was located at the airport, reported that he observed the pilot preflight the airplane and taxi to runway 21 for takeoff. The witness observed the airplane on its takeoff roll and the airplane went out of his sight after liftoff near the departure end of the runway. He stated that the airplane seemed to have an extended takeoff roll. A few minutes later, first responders responded to a 911 call of an airplane accident about ¾-miles to the southwest of the departure end of runway 21.

There were no radio or distress calls heard from the pilot, although the airport’s UNICOM radio receiver was not manned or recorded at the time of the accident.

Automated Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that the airplane lifted off the departure end of runway 21. The data did not show the flight path to the accident site, which was located about 3,500-ft from the departure end of the runway, on a magnetic bearing of 188-degrees. Witnesses, who were located beyond the departure end of the runway, reported that the airplane was flying low and seemed to be turning.

First responders reported that the airplane was engulfed in fire upon their arrival. Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane impacted several large 80-ft-tall trees prior to coming to rest on the ground. Pieces of the right elevator and right horizontal stabilizer were found embedded in tree branches, about 20-ft above the ground. The fuselage, wings, and engine were laying on the ground, adjacent to a large tree. Most of the airframe was consumed by a post-impact fire. The engine was found separated from the fuselage, was mostly intact, and had minor fire damage. Several cut branches were observed in the trees, consistent with propeller blade strikes. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all control surfaces to the cockpit. The flap actuator was found in the fully extended flaps position (30-degrees). The elevator trim actuator was measured at a 2” extension, which equates to a 20-degrees nose down position. The engine was examined and no pre-impact anomalies were found.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5940F
Model/Series: 210H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBVX,463 ft msl
Observation Time: 10:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C /24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2600 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Melbourne, AR
Destination: Heber Springs, AR (HBZ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 36.056675,-91.835556 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Dr. Rodger Dean Langster
~

On Monday, August 9, 2021 Rodger Dean Langster (aka: RD, Rodger Dean, Rodg, or the good Dr. Langster) took off in his beloved Cessna 210 for the last time. While we may never understand why, his plane went down and he did not come home. Rodger leaves behind a trail of people in his wake whose lives are happier, healthier, and more fulfilled for having known him. His many interests and talents caused him to be exposed to a vast variety of people. He was a pilot, a farmer, a mechanic, a hunter, a fisherman, a motorcycle rider, a lake lover, a musician, an emergency medicine physician, and a family man. He was kind and smart and he loved to have fun. His absence brings significant sadness and a large empty hole in the hearts of all who knew and loved him.

Rodger Dean Langster was born Monday, Oct. 5, 1964 in Conway, to his loving parents Rodger Dale and Loretta Faye (Querry) Langster. Two years later he was honored to become a big brother to his twin sisters Rhonda Langster (Greg Lynch) and Rachelle Evans (Chad). As a student at Heber Springs School District, Rodger had many friends, excellent grades, and success on the football field as a receiver for the Panthers. After graduating from Hendrix College in Conway, he attended UAMS Medical School in Little Rock, AR and graduated as an MD in 1992. Following an emergency medicine residency in Detroit, Michigan, he accepted his first position in the emergency room at Memorial Medical Center in Springfield, IL where he assisted with the development of the trauma center. This is also where he met his future wife and life-partner, Holly, who he married April 27, 2002. While blessed with two nieces, Erica Evans and Morgan O'Neill (Nicholas) who he loved immeasurably, he found his life was most complete when he had a child of his own. Lucas Dale Langster was born July 28, 2004. Words cannot express how very much he loved his son. Rodger and Holly returned to Heber Springs in 2003 where he worked at Baptist Health Medical Center – Heber Springs for a short time before joining the ER physician group at Conway Regional Medical Center where he worked until 2017 when he joined the ER physician group at Unity Health in Searcy. Rodger was a lifelong member of Calvary Missionary Baptist Church in Heber Springs where he served in the music ministry.

Rodger leaves behind all of the aforementioned immediate family along with many cousins, aunts, uncles and his grandmother, Montine Langster. He also leaves behind friends from every place he ever lived and every place he'd ever gone. His kind and gentle spirit drew people to him and is part of what made him a wonderful attending physician to the residents he mentored and an exceptional physician to the patients he served. He will be missed by so many. He was a one-of-a-kind man.




MELBOURNE, Arkansas (KAIT) - Izard County officials say one person died Monday when their plane crashed in a fiery explosion.

Gary Dickerson, director of the emergency management office, said the crash happened around 11:15 a.m. Aug. 9, about a quarter of a mile west of the John E. Miller Field/Melbourne Municipal Airport on Caney Springs Road.

Charley Melton, the Chief Deputy with the Izard County Sheriff’s Office says the plane took off from the Melbourne Municipal Airport and was possibly headed to Heber Springs.

“Deputies responded along with Melbourne Fire department personnel. We found the plane fully engulfed in flames. At that time, they extinguished the fire and we discovered one body inside the plane,” said Melton.

The body has been sent to the Arkansas State Crime Lab for identification. There is also an investigation underway on what caused the crash.

People on the ground heard a loud boom then saw the plane go into the tree line where it exploded into flames.

Only one person was on board at the time, Dickerson said. He confirmed that one person died.

Super Drifter, N905JS: Accident occurred August 09, 2021 in Winter Haven, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Location: Winter Haven, FL
Accident Number: ERA21LA323
Date & Time: August 9, 2021, 15:35 Local 
Registration: N905JS
Aircraft: MIAMI ADVENTURE TOURS LLC SUPER DRIFTER 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MIAMI ADVENTURE TOURS LLC
Registration: N905JS
Model/Series: SUPER DRIFTER 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGIF, 146 ft msl
Observation Time: 18:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3800 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8500 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Winter Haven, FL (GIF)
Destination: Winter Haven, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 28.062168,-81.688418 (est)

Pitts Model 12, N112JH: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2021 in Ocklawaha, Marion County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Joseph M Hutton Jr


Location: Ocklawaha, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21FA318
Date & Time: August 9, 2021, 13:35 Local
Registration: N112JH
Aircraft: Pitts 12
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On August 9, 2021, about 1335 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Pitts Model 12, N112JH, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Ocklawaha, Florida. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot and passenger were friends, and the purpose of the flight was a local aerobatic flight. A witness who recorded video of the airplane on her cell phone, stated the airplane had been performing loops and rolls over the lake. The recorded video showed the airplane in an inverted flat spin, followed by a nose down spin to water contact. The pilot and passenger were wearing parachutes. The pilot was observed exiting the airplane at a low altitude. The video did not capture the parachute deploying before water contact; however, witnesses stated that the parachute was open and floating in the water.

Examination of wreckage revealed that the wood and fabric wings were destroyed by impact with the water. The fuselage remained intact and was impact damaged. The rudder and elevator remained attached to the fuselage. The left elevators were displaced down 90°. Flight control continuity was established from the rudder and elevator to the control stick in the cockpit. The throttle control was full forward, and the propeller control was mid-range. About 6 ft of the upper wing remained attached by cables and was impact damaged, the aileron remained attached to the wing and the control rod was fractured. Other wing pieces were found floating in a large debris field.

The engine was impact damaged and remained attached to the airframe by cables and wires. The front spark plugs in the radial engine were fractured, the rear spark plugs were removed and showed normal wear signatures. Several push rods were impact separated. The rear accessory case was impact damaged and several components were separated. The propeller remained attached to the engine; however, all three propeller blades were separated at the hub. The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller flange; it rotated smoothly, and continuity was established throughout the engine. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pitts
Registration: N112JH
Model/Series: 12
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LEE,75 ft msl
Observation Time: 13:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C /24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ocala, FL (FC04)
Destination: Ocklawaha, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 29.025393,-81.947834 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Scott "Scotty" Bingham

Scott "Scotty" Bingham
~

Ocala, Florida - Bingham, Scott ("Scotty"), formerly of Miami, passed away Monday, August 9, 2021 at the age of 72, in Ocala, Florida.

Scott was a loving husband to his Miami Killian High sweetheart of 48 years, Judy Bingham (Sofge) and a wonderful father to their daughter Becky, whom he dearly loved. He shared a special bond with his son-in-law Brian and thoroughly enjoyed being "Pop Pop" to his darling granddaughter, Grace.

Scott's love for aviation began at an early age flying control line airplanes with his father. He earned his glider rating by the age of 14 and obtained his license for private powered aircraft by 17. Scott attended Miami Dade and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University where he pursued a career in aviation and became a corporate pilot for Southeast Banks and Florida Power and Light.

Scott was also a certified flight instructor in aircraft, helicopters and gliders. He enjoyed teaching aspiring pilots of all ages and sharing his love for all things "aviation".

Scott is preceded in death by his father, Captain Harold D. Bingham and mother, Elizabeth. He is survived by his wife, Judy; daughter, Becky Becker (Brian) and granddaughter, Grace; his sisters, Debbie Neely (Ken) and Carol Maggiore (Kevin), along with niece and nephews, Chris and Jeff Neely, Mike, Michele and Anthony Maggiore.

A private family service will be held September 4th at Hiers-Baxley Funeral Home, 910 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, FL. Regretfully, due to Covid concerns, a Celebration of Life has been postponed and may be possible at a future date.
In lieu of flowers, donations to SSA.org (Junior Soaring scholarship), angelflightse.org., proclaimaviation.org. or a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

Joseph Morgan Hutton Jr.


Joseph Morgan Hutton Jr., age 64, of Ocala, Florida passed away on Monday, August 9, 2021. Joseph was born August 25, 1956.



Marion County Sheriff's Office - 
 
At approximately 1 p.m. on Monday, August 9, 2021, Marion County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) deputies responded to Carney Island Park located at 13275 SE 115th Avenue in Ocklawaha, off of Lake Weir, in reference to a plane crash. 

When deputies arrived, they located citizens who had pulled the pilot, Joseph Hutton (DOB: 8/25/1956), from the water after they witnessed him jump from the falling plane.  

Marion County Fire Rescue (MCFR) responded and pronounced Hutton deceased. 

The MCSO Underwater Recovery Team began a search of the submerged aircraft for other victims. 

Divers located the second victim, Scott Bingham (DOB: 7/30/1949), deceased inside the wreckage.  

MCSO Major Crimes detectives will be conducting a death investigation and officials with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are investigating the cause of the crash.



OCALA, Florida (WCJB) - The Underwater Recovery team with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office spent several hours Monday night searching Lake Weir after a plane crashed into the water.

Tuesday morning the destroyed yellow plane was taken from the park.

It has been confirmed that the pilot, 65-year-old Joseph Hutton and his passenger, 72-year-old Scott Bingham both died as a result of the crash.

Both were Marion County residents.

Hutton was ejected from the plane before impact and received help first, but divers didn’t make it to Bingham until much later.

“This plane was sitting in about 21 feet of water so visibility from my understanding from the divers I spoke to, anywhere from six inches to a foot, and so once they get down there and things get stirred up, visibility was down to zero so it’s by touch,” MCSO Public Relations Director Sgt. Paul Bloom said.

Detectives said after speaking with family, both of these men died doing something that they loved.

During this flight officials said they were just out enjoying the day.

The Underwater Recovery team stayed at Lake Weir until just before midnight searching.

“They made the decision from a safety stand point for the diver’s safety, to bring the whole plane up with the body of the second victim still strapped inside,” Bloom added.

MCSO will investigate the deaths of the two men, while the investigation on how the plane went down will be left to the federal agencies, with the National Transportation Safety Board is taking the lead.

A NTSB representative told TV20, one of the first things investigators will do is document the scene and examine the aircraft which is expected to begin Wednesday.

The aircraft has been recovered one of the investigator’s priorities will be to begin the process of documenting the scene and examining the aircraft. This is expected to begin tomorrow.

It is extremely early in the investigation and part of the investigation will be to request radar data, weather information, air traffic control communication, airplane maintenance records and the pilot’s medical records.

At this early stage of an investigation, NTSB does not state a cause but will only provide factual information when available.

For information about the victims, you may want to check with the local authorities to see if they have information to release. The NTSB does not release identities or other personal information about those involved in accident investigations.

In about 12 business days, it’s likely a preliminary report will be available and posted to the NTSB’s website. It can take 12-24 months before a probable cause and final report is issued and posted to the website.

You can also follow on Twitter @NTSB_newsroom for additional information regarding the ongoing investigation that will be released as it becomes available. 




Authorities have identified the two people killed in a small plane crash on Lake Weir on Monday.

Joseph Hutton Jr., 64, and Scott Bingham, 72, both died after Hutton’s Pitts Model 12 plane crashed in the northeast section of the lake just before 1 p.m.

Both Hutton and Bingham lived at Leeward Air Ranch and were next-door neighbors in the fly-in community.

Hutton was piloting the aircraft during the crash.

Records show he registered the plane, which was built in 2002, in March.

Online tracking of the flight shows the plane approach Lake Weir from the east just before 12:45 p.m. The plane flies over the southern end of the lake before circling back and making a series of maneuvers over the lake. The plane then flies along the west end of the lake before turning west and flying over land to near the 5800 block of SE 132nd Street Road. There, the plane makes a sharp turn back east toward the lake. Near the lake, the plane veers north and flies over the Carney Island Recreation and Conservation Area before turning east over the lake. The tracking ends in the northeast part of the lake at 12:56 p.m.

The plane’s altitude ranged from between 3,400 feet to 4,600 during the flight, which, according to witnesses, included some aerobatic maneuvers. The Pitt Model 12 is a high-performance aerobatic biplane.

Just before the crash, however, the plane made a steep climb to about 5,400 feet.

That’s when witnesses said the plane began to nosedive, and they saw Hutton jump from the plane. Boaters pulled Hutton from the water and brought him to shore. He was pronounced dead by Marion County Fire Rescue.

The sheriff’s dive team later recovered Bingham’s body from the submerged plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the crash.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N5412D: Accident occurred August 06, 2021 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

L & W Aircraft Investment LLC


Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: ERA21LA320
Date & Time: August 6, 2021, 11:30 Local
Registration: N5412D
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5412D
Model/Series: 172N 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB,10 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C /24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3600 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Miami, FL 
Destination: Miami, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 25.643451,-80.427943 (est)

Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza, N236BC: Fatal accident occurred March 15, 2021 near North Perry Airport (KHWO), Hollywood, Broward County, Florida

Megan Bishop was driving with her 4-year-old son Taylor on a residential road next to the North Perry Airport in Pembroke Pines one afternoon last March when a single-engine airplane suddenly dropped out of the sky soon after takeoff and broadsided her SUV. The crash killed the two men who were aboard, both of them licensed pilots. Bishop escaped her vehicle with a severe facial laceration, broken ribs, and a cracked spine. But her son became trapped in the wreckage. He was pulled out by first responders and taken to Memorial Regional Hospital, where he died less than an hour after the accident.

More than four months have passed, but the grieving mother “constantly lives with violent images of Taylor Bishop’s traumatic death.” She has described her memory of the day as “living in a nightmare.” Last month she filed a wrongful-death lawsuit in Broward County court against the pilots' estates and a group of defendants who had allegedly inspected or serviced the plane, a Beech Bonanza aircraft, which documents obtained by New Times reveal had been purchased from an owner in South Africa in late 2020.

The lawsuit claims the plane should have been grounded in light of mechanical problems it exhibited before the March 15 flight and raises the larger question of whether there ought to be more oversight in the private aircraft-resale industry.

"The general-aviation market space — sometimes it has a tendency of becoming the Wild, Wild West," says a Broward County pilot who works at the North Perry Airport and spoke to New Times on the condition that his name not be published, for fear of repercussions on his aviation business.

"People hide behind certifications, and the minute that an airplane is handed over to the eventual end user, you're done and it's hands-off," the pilot says. "It's like a used-car dealership. Get an airplane, patch it up, and resell it."

A lack of oversight of general-aviation aircraft maintenance and assembly is accompanied by a disproportionately high rate of crashes among private planes versus commercial airliners: The fatal-accident rate for general aviation has hovered around 1 per 100,000 flight hours in recent years, while commercial airliners have racked up millions of flight hours without a fatal incident.

As for the Beech Bonanza, the unnamed North Perry pilot says it was shipped from South Africa and reassembled upon arrival in South Florida. Though the plane underwent an airworthiness certification process in order to fly in the United States, he believes regulators need to scrutinize the private aircraft-resale industry more closely, saying that it's not uncommon for plane buildouts and maintenance to be rushed when an aircraft is going up for sale.

Documents obtained by New Times show that the Beech Bonanza plane went through its airworthiness certification process only a few weeks before the crash. The mandatory process, which involved inspections and a review of the plane's maintenance history, concluded on March 6, nine days before the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board, whose investigation into the crash is still underway, released a preliminary report noting that the Beech Bonanza's engine was backfiring on March 15 during the preflight runup, a procedure pilots run through to ensure all is right with their engines before takeoff. One witness said the engine was "sputtering" on the taxiway.

"He heard cycling of the propeller 'a few times' and the engine backfired when power was increased during each sequence," the NTSB report states.

Bishop's attorney, Nicole Martell of DiPietro Partners, claims that because the plane was showing signs of engine trouble at the airport on March 15, it should never have been allowed to take off. The attorney suspects mechanical problems with the plane were already evident six days before the crash — when, she says, a post-certification flight was quickly terminated.

Pilot Yaacov Nahom, whose company FL Eagle Aviation owned the plane (along with several others), died in the crash alongside Grant Hustad, Jr., also a registered pilot. Nahom was in the primary pilot's seat while Hustad was in the first officer's seat to Nahom's right, according to the court records. The unnamed North Perry pilot says Nahom was in the business of buying and reselling planes, and that the team of mechanics who worked for him was known at the airport as a "Band-Aid crew" for their stock-in-trade: quickly patching up aircraft for resale.

FAA records show that both Nahom and Hustad were experienced pilots. Hustad, 71, had a commercial pilot license that was issued in 2012; Nahom, 63, was registered as a private pilot; his license dated back to 2017. In the aftermath of the crash, a Minnesota publisher who'd flown with Hustad told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Hustad was an “extremely careful pilot."

Bishop's lawsuit lists Ryan Bivens, Patrick Coulton, and Charles Mente as additional defendants. Bivens was a Federal Aviation Administration designee who signed off on the Beech Bonanza's airworthiness certificate. (Designees are not FAA employees but are authorized to issue airworthiness certificates on the agency's behalf.)

Reached on the phone by New Times, Bivens explained that his work on the aircraft was procedural, largely limited to a conformity inspection to ensure the aircraft met "type-design" — meaning, for example, that the plane was equipped with the proper propeller and parts. Ensuring the integrity of its mechanical aspects was not his responsibility, he said.

New Times could not reach Coulton or Mente through employers listed on their professional profiles. Coulton also did not respond to a request for comment via a social-media account he maintains. The two are listed in FAA documents as technicians who worked on the plane.

Orlando-based pilot and attorney Guy Haggard tells New Times the investigation into the crash is in its early stages and could take more than a year to be completed. He cautions that the engine backfiring on the taxiway was not necessarily an indication of imminent disaster.

"Sometimes when you test the magnetos, you can get an engine backfire or a rough engine because there is carbon buildup on the spark plugs," explained Haggard, who is not involved in the lawsuit or the NTSB inquiry.

Haggard added that NTSB investigators will likely be looking into the March 9 flight records to see what, if any, mechanical problems surfaced that day.

In a separate court case, Endurance Assurance, Nahom's insurer, contends it has no obligation to cover Bishop's claim over the accident because the Beech Bonanza was not one of the planes listed in Nahom's insurance policy, which offers $1 million in liability coverage, with a $100,000 limit for each passenger.

According to the Dallas Business Journal, Florida has no general law that requires private aircraft operators to maintain liability insurance.

The case is pending in the Southern District of Florida.

"This is an unimaginable tragedy. Ms. Bishop, with the support of her family, has taken time to focus on her healing and treasure Taylor's memory," says Martell, Bishop's attorney. "He was a sweet, funny, and smart boy. And he had an incredible family behind him."


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Continental Aerospace Technologies; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

FL Eagle Aviation Inc


Location: Pembroke Pines, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21FA154
Date & Time: March 15, 2021, 14:59 Local 
Registration: N236BC
Aircraft: Beech B36TC
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On March 15, 2021, about 1459 eastern daylight time, a Beech B36TC, N236BC, was destroyed when it collided with a vehicle and the ground after takeoff from North Perry Airport (HWO), Pembroke Pines, Florida. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger in the airplane and a passenger in the vehicle were fatally injured. The driver of the vehicle sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

A witness at HWO reported that he heard an engine run-up being performed near taxiway Bravo before the airplane’s departure. He stated that the engine was sputtering, “like rough idle.” He heard cycling of the propeller “a few times” and the engine backfired when power was increased during each sequence. He further reported that the engine rpm sounded “…high, very high. From low to full rpm repeatedly which was more than a normal run-up. He was doing it fast.” The witness did not observe the airplane’s takeoff.

According to recorded air traffic control communications, the airplane was cleared for takeoff from runway 10L and the pilot was instructed to enter the left downwind leg of the traffic pattern, which was acknowledged. There were no distress calls received from the airplane during the flight.

A pilot-rated witness who was located about 775 ft and 307° from the departure end of runway 10L reported that he observed the airplane in a very low climb at a “very slow rate.” He attributed the takeoff to be a soft field takeoff. The witness had diverted his attention when he heard the airplane suddenly experience a total loss of engine power, adding that it “failed completely.” At that time the airplane was about 100 to 200 ft past the departure end of the runway and at an altitude “definitely lower than 300 ft above ground level.” The airplane remained at the same attitude for 1 to 2 seconds, then started a “gentle” right bank while maintaining same pitch attitude. The airplane then “stalled,” spun, and pitched nose down. He heard a bang sound and noted an explosion.

Several video recordings located around the accident site captured the impact sequence. One of the videos revealed the airplane’s right wing impacted the ground while nearly simultaneously impacting the side of the vehicle. The engine separated during the impacted sequence and a postcrash fire began about 2 seconds after the right wing contacted the ground.

The airplane was recovered and retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N236BC
Model/Series: B36TC NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HWO,9 ft msl 
Observation Time: 14:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0.52 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3900 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 100°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Pembroke Pines, FL 
Destination: Pembroke Pines, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 25.998414,-80.231454 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N7483L: Incident occurred August 09, 2021 at North Palm Beach County General Aviation Airport (F45), West Palm Beach, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft ran off the departure end of Runway 9R.


Date: 09-AUG-21
Time: 16:40:00Z
Regis#: N7483L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-18-150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172G Skyhawk, N5735R: Accident occurred August 09, 2021 near Reno/Tahoe International Airport (KRNO), Washoe County, Nevada

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada


Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR21LA308
Date & Time: August 9, 2021, 10:05 Local 
Registration: N5735R
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5735R
Model/Series: 172
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.429325,-119.66219





Washoe County Sheriff’s Office deputies along with Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District are working a plane crash in the hills several miles east of Damonte Ranch High School. 

The pilot states the plane stalled and he set it down for a hard landing. Shortly thereafter the plane rolled and crashed. 

All three of the occupants walked away from this incident, and they hiked for several hours to reach the intersection of Tellurium Mine Dr. and Mine Shaft Dr.

Reno first responders were the first to take the call, and further investigation determined the crash occurred in County jurisdiction.

For more details regarding this incident please reach out to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Diamond DA42 Twin Star, N906ER: Accident occurred August 09, 2021 in Hiddenite, Alexander County, North Carolina

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Heavy Metal Air LLC



Location: Hiddenite, NC 
Accident Number: ERA21LA322
Date & Time: August 9, 2021, 13:35 Local
Registration: N906ER
Aircraft: Diamond DA42 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On August 9, 2021, about 1335 eastern daylight time, a Diamond DA-42-L360 airplane, N906ER, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hiddenite, North Carolina. The flight instructor and a private pilot were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The flight instructor and private pilot had completed several maneuvers and simulated emergency procedures during the multi-engine instructional flight. Following a simulated single-engine approach and landing to Wilkes County Airport (UKF), North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, the instructor attempted to simulate a right-engine failure during takeoff roll; however, the engine lost power. The instructor restarted the right engine and performed a “quick run up” on the runway in which “everything was functioning normally.” The private pilot then continued the takeoff and climb.

Upon reaching 5,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the private pilot performed an emergency descent maneuver while also simulating a left engine fire. As part of the simulated left engine fire, the left engine was shut down with the full reduction of the throttle, propeller, and mixture. During the maneuver after descending about 500-1000 ft, the Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) failed, and the flight instructor directed the private pilot to recover “gradually and easily” at 3,500 ft msl and maintain 90 knots. The AHRS displayed a message that it was aligning/calibrating and to keep the wings level.

The flight instructor subsequently noticed that the airspeed had increased through 100 knots and altitude had decreased to about 3,000 ft, and about this time, the private pilot stated, “I can’t pitch up” and then the sole operating right engine began to sputter. 

The flight instructor took the flight controls, applied full-forward mixture, propeller, and throttle to both engines, and ensured the landing gear and flaps were up; however, he was unable to increase the pitch and stop the descent. The flight instructor noted that the manual elevator trim was near the takeoff position, and he did not adjust the trim throughout the descent.

The flight instructor reported that “it felt as if we were unable to fully pull the control stick back, as if it were restricted preventing full movement.” He added that both engines regained power, however, it felt as if they “were not producing normal operation power.” The airspeed increased to over 100 knots during the descent, so he reduced engine power, and turned toward an open field. The flight instructor further reported that as the airplane descended, “We both were pulling back as hard as we could but could not get the nose to come up.” About 500 ft above ground level, the flight instructor kept his hands on the control stick and the private pilot lowered the landing gear and added full flaps for landing. Subsequently, the airplane touched down nose low in a soybean field, impacted a ditch, and skidded to a stop.

Initial examination of the airplane at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the nose landing gear had collapsed, and the right wing sustained substantial damage. Flight control continuity was established from the flight controls to each control surface, which moved freely and correctly through the full range of motion. The manual elevator trim wheel indicated a slight nose down setting. The autopilot circuit breaker was found pulled and collared. Both wing tanks contained fuel and no oil spray was observed on the engine cowling or fuselage.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Diamond 
Registration: N906ER
Model/Series: DA42 L360 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SVH,965 ft msl
Observation Time: 13:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: North Wilkesboro, NC (UKF)
Destination: Gastonia, NC (KAKH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 35.944915,-81.079957 




ALEXANDER COUNTY, North Carolina — Authorities are investigating after a small plane crashed in an Alexander County soybean field on Monday.

Firefighters and the Highway Patrol responded to the scene in Hiddenite.

Firefighters said the pilot lost an engine during a training flight that started in Gastonia.

No one was hurt during the crash landing.

This is an ongoing investigation. 

No other details have been released at this point.




A small single-engine aircraft crash-landed in an Eastern Alexander County soybean field Monday afternoon.

The plane went down around 1:30 off Sulphur Springs Road. The pilot and a passenger were able to walk away from the wreckage and relate their harrowing experience.

The four-seat aircraft never lost power according to the pilot but he said the plane would no longer respond when he tried to climb it out of the path downward. He said “I couldn’t get it to respond, I had power but was unable to steer.”

Alexander EMS, Alexander Rescue responded along with Alexander County Emergency Services, the Sheriff’s Office and Taylorsville Police. Hiddenite first responders were also on the scene.

The pilot indicated the aircraft had left Wilkesboro enroute to Hickory

The crash is under investigation.

Piper PA-28-161 Warrior II, N2846A: Incidents occurred August 09, 2021 and October 19, 2018

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

August 09, 2021:  Aircraft made an emergency landing due to a rough running engine 15 miles NW of David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Houston, Texas

Up And Up Aviation LLC


Date: 09-AUG-21
Time: 21:09:00Z
Regis#: N2846A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-28-161
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

October 19, 2018:  Landed in a field in Pinehurst, Montgomery County, Texas.

Up and Up Aviation LLC

Date: 19-OCT-18
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N2846A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 161
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PINEHURST
State: TEXAS


October 19, 2018

October 19, 2018