Monday, June 8, 2015

Report of plane crash turns out to be 'Jet Truck'



Four ambulances, three Greene County Sheriff's deputies, a couple of Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers, a firetruck and a few more emergency vehicles descended on a farm just east of Springfield on Monday afternoon.

Authorities had received a report of a possible plane crash in the area, so dispatchers — fearing the worst — sent a lot of emergency responders.

But what the callers — who are new to the neighborhood — thought was a plane crash beyond the tree-line south of their property ended up being a bath for Shockwave, the jet-powered semi-truck that tops out at 376 miles per hour.

Shockwave's owner, Neal Darnell, said he raced the vehicle — which looks like a fighter plane and a semi-truck had a baby — on a dirt course last week, so the truck needed to be washed on Monday.

Part of that washing process means firing up the jet engines on the back of the 36,000-horsepower truck, and that makes for some loud noises and a cloud of white smoke outside of Darnell's garage on Farm Road 205.

"We do it from time to time and it will usually generate a couple of 911 calls, but today for some reason it brought out a whole army of emergency vehicles," Darnell said. "And I hate that because they have better things to do than come out here."

The new neighbors said next time they will know that those jet-like noises just mean it's bath time for Darnell's racing truck.

Darnell said he doesn't blame the neighbors for being concerned. Even though the world-renowned jet truck has been featured in magazines and a cable TV show, most people have no idea Shockwave calls Springfield home.

Darnell said he has had Shockwave for about three years and he and his son take the truck to shows all over the country — where they do things like setting stacks of cars on fire or racing fighter planes.

Darnell — who has been drag-racing his whole life — said Shockwave started as a hobby but has now turned into a "crazy business."

The Darnells also have two smaller jet-powered pick-up trucks in the garage.

Darnell showed the first-responders his trucks and gave them fliers for his website (ShockwaveJetTruck.com) on Monday along with his apology for having wasted their time.

A deputy on scene said no citations were issued and the 911 callers were acting in good faith because they genuinely believed someone might be in danger.

Darnell said the deputies and emergency medical technicians were friendly once they found out there weren't any downed planes in his yard — but instead the roaring engines of the fastest jet-powered semi-truck in the world.

"The cops thought it was cool," Darnell said. "They said, 'Boy, we wish we would have been here 25 minutes ago so we would have been able to see it.'"

Story, photo gallery and video:  http://www.news-leader.com

Incident occurred June 08, 2015 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Nevada

RENO, Nev. (MyNews4.com & KRNV) --The small airplane that made an emergency landing at Reno-Stead Airport did catch fire, an airport spokeswoman said.

It's unclear whether the fire was before or after the landing, airport spokeswoman Heidi Jared reports.

The single-engine plane made the emergency landing Monday afternoon.

The pilot and a passenger walked away from the scene and are not hurt, Jared said.

The plane landed on airport property but not on a runaway, said Jared, who is gathering further details.

Firefighters are at the scene.

Circumstances leading to the incident are not immediately known, including the plane's flight plan.

The amount of damage to the plane cannot be confirmed.

The incident was reported a little after 3 p.m.

Sources:  

http://www.ktvn.com

http://www.kolotv.com

http://www.mynews4.com

The Country Life: Passion for flying means living at the airport • Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, Colorado

Dave Elliott recently retired from Frontier Airlines, ending 13 years as an airline pilot. During 40 years of flying, he also served in the Coast Guard, flew corporate planes and taught at the Air Force Academy.

So what's he looking forward to in his retirement?

More flying, of course.

"I can't get enough of it," says Elliott, 63, who plans to do flight instruction and occasional contract corporate flying along with tooling around in the Piper Apache that's parked in a hangar at his house.

Elliott lives at Meadow Lake Estates in Falcon, with a taxiway in his backyard to Meadow Lake Airport. His is one of 41 residential lots with airport access, though of the 30 that are occupied, only about half have airplanes. Elliott, president of the Meadow Lake Airport Association board of directors, has lived at Meadow Lake since 1999.

Development at the site of the former McCandlish ranch began 50 years ago by members of the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 72; an initial dirt airstrip, carved from the prairie, opened Jan. 1, 1966. Meadow Lake Airport is unusual in that it is a public use airport, but privately owned. Operations and maintenance are conducted by volunteers and funded by dues paid by the property owners; federal and state grants fund capital improvements. It's Colorado's largest pilot-owned airport.

The airport was designated as a general aviation reliever airport in 1989; it helps ease congestion at Colorado Springs Airport by being a base for smaller planes, so that, as Elliott puts it, "the bug smashers" are out of the way of the military jets and cargo planes and commercial aircraft. Meadow Lake Airport is home to more than 450 aircraft; it also houses more than 100 small businesses.

Don't look for a control tower; Meadow Lake is an "uncontrolled" airport, which means it's up to pilots to keep an eye on the skies and coordinate through a "common traffic advisory frequency" on their radios.

A taxiway basically at your doorstep, a plethora of planes and the companionship of fellow aviators. It seems the perfect home for Elliott, who decided at age 9 that he was going to be a Coast Guard pilot after watching a half-hour TV show about the Coast Guard in Alaska. The show featured "a neat airplane" that could land on ground or water - the Grumman Albatross. Elliott did get to fly the now-retired plane during his 21 years in the Coast Guard.

He hasn't flown his Piper Apache in years - he's been too busy - but is looking forward to getting it up in the sky this summer. "It's just a fun airplane," he said.

So why is flying such a passion for him?

"Oh geez, wow. There's a feeling, an emotion, the thrill, the freedom of movement," he said.

While a cadet at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and then based on a ship for a year and a half after, he learned about the forces of nature and using them to accomplish a goal - flying or sailing from Point A to Point B. He enjoys putting that learning to use, he said.

"I'm a project guy. I would go nuts if I had a 9 to 5 job. I like to get out and explore, and aviation is a good way to do that."

Story and photo gallery:  http://gazette.com

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Incident occurred June 06, 2015 in Churchill County, Nevada



CHURCHILL COUNTY, NV - The Nevada Highway Patrol is reporting that no one was hurt after a small airplane made an emergency landing on the eastbound lanes of I-80 about 70 miles east of Reno on Saturday, June 6, 2015.

The NHP says the airplane, reportedly a Cessna, made an emergency landing after experiencing engine trouble about 5 p.m. 

The plane landed at milepost 81 near the U.S. 95 turnoff.

The NHP says the FAA will assist in the investigation. 

No vehicles were damaged and the highway has since reopened after the plane was moved to the shoulder.

Source:  http://www.kolotv.com

Plane with malfunctioning toilets makes unplanned pit stop at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

LOS ANGELES -- A jet heading from Dallas to Honolulu had to divert to Los Angeles, and land with an unusually heavy load of fuel, when three of the six onboard toilets malfunctioned Sunday.

The plane landed with five hours of fuel in its wings, prompting Los Angeles city firefighters to meet the arriving jet with emergency fire apparatus. Boeing 767s do not have ways to dump extra fuel, pilots have said, and the extra weight from the jet fuel makes such a landing unusual.

LAFD's battalion chief said the plane's flaps and brakes worked normally and the plane slowed properly on Runway 25 Left, the southernmost of the four parallel runways at LAX.

There were 212 passengers and 12 crew members on American Airlines Flight 5, a scheduled nonstop from Dallas-Fort Worth to Honolulu.

An American spokeswoman in Dallas told City News Service that maintenance crews at LAX would look into the issue, and that the flight was expected to resume after about an hour.

Sources:

http://www.ocregister.com

http://www.latimes.com

AeroContractors, Boeing 737-500, 5N-BLE: Incident occurred June 05, 2015 - Lagos, Nigeria

Why Aero Contractors Airplane Almost Crashed After Losing Altitude


More investigations have revealed how an air disaster was averted, when an AeroContractors Boeing 737-500 plane lost altitude 20 minutes into flight. The company has blamed the event on a ‘technical fault’.

However, the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority has demanded a mandatory occurrence report from AeroContractors Airline, following the technical fault developed by one of its aircraft mid-air on Friday.

The General Manager, Public Affairs of NCAA, Fan Ndubuoke, disclosed this on Saturday in a telephone interview in Lagos.

The AeroContractors Airline flight AJ-181, which was carrying not fewer than 120 passengers from Lagos to Kaduna, had to be diverted to Abuja for emergency landing.

The aircraft was said to have suddenly lost altitude, 20 minutes after it departed the domestic wing of the Murtala Muhammed Airport, Lagos.

A statement by the airline had confirmed, “There was depressurization in the aircraft cabin leading to the dropping of oxygen masks.”

It added that Aero had a maintenance facility in Abuja hence the flight was diverted there to fix the problem.

However, Mr. Ndubuoke said the airline had contacted the NCAA over the incident.

“They have told us what happened but it will not stop us from doing our own investigation,” he said. “NCAA has demanded them to give us a report of what happened.”

The official noted that one of its directors was on the said flight, adding that the whole report had been exaggerated.

He said: “A lot of people said the engine caught fire, but there is no way that an engine will catch fire mid-air and everybody will be spared.

“There was nothing like fire incident on the plane and Aero has issued a statement that the airline lost pressure and was diverted to land in Abuja.

“After landing, they brought another aircraft to take the passengers to Kaduna but some of them were afraid to continue with the trip.”

Mr. Ndubuoke emphasized that the aircraft involved in the incident would not fly until there was a complete investigation and re-certification by the NCAA.

Tunji Oketumbi, spokesperson of the Accident Investigation Bureau, said the bureau would not react to the issue since no accident occurred.

Mr. Oketumbi noted that since it was a technical fault, the NCAA was in a better position to ascertain what really happened and how such incidents could be averted.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.theparadigmng.com

Fatal accident occurred June 07, 2015 in Akasia - South Africa



A 27-year-old student pilot died while flying a microlight west of Akasia on Sunday morning.

Pretoria North police spokesperson Lieutenant Rebecca Phatlhane said the accident occurred at 08:30.

“The pilot a male, was flying alone when he crashed on plot 119, on the R513, just west of Akasia. He was declared dead on the scene.”

She said the student’s flight instructor would notify the family of the accident.

“The cause of the accident is not yet clear, but police are investigating,” said Phatlhane.

Source:  http://rekordnorth.co.za

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, Artic Air Academy, N8525U and Cessna A185E Skywagon, Talkeetna Air Taxi Inc., N1694M: Accident occurred May 31, 2015 at Talkeetna Airport (PATK), Alaska

NTSB Identification: ANC15LA033A
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, May 31, 2015 in Talkeetna, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 185, registration: N1694M
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: ANC15LA033B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 31, 2015 in Talkeetna, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8525U
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 31, 2015, about 1720 Alaska daylight time, a wheel/ski equipped Cessna 185 airplane, N1694M, and tricycle gear equipped Cessna 172 airplane, N8525U, collided midair while landing at Talkeetna Airport, Talkeetna, Alaska. The Cessna 185 was registered to and operated by Talkeetna Air Taxi, Inc., Talkeetna, Alaska as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand commercial air tour, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 135, when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot and three of the four passengers sustained no injuries, with the fourth passenger sustaining minor injuries. The Cessna 172 was registered to Artic's Air Academy, LLC and operated by the student pilot as a VFR cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91. The student pilot and sole occupant of the airplane sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. The Cessna 185 departed Talkeetna Airport about 1456 for a non-stop flight seeing tour around Denali National Park, and a VFR flight plan was on file. The Cessna 172 departed Palmer Airport, Palmer, Alaska, about 1625 destined for Talkeetna airport with no flight plan on file. 

After the collision, both airplanes remained joined together during and after impact with the ground. The debris field was about 460 feet long with the initial fragments located about 62 feet prior to the runway threshold. The main wreckage came to rest about five feet off of the left side of the runway. 

During a preliminary review of FAA Flight Service Station recordings of the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), 123.6, both airplanes can be heard transmitting position reports in relation to the airport traffic pattern.

The closest weather reporting facility is Talkeetna Airport. At 1653, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Talkeetna, Alaska, reported in part: wind, 350 at 4 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, clear; temperature, 78 degrees F; dewpoint, 39 degrees F; altimeter 29.76 inHG.

A detailed wreckage examination is pending.

FAA FSDO: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03 

ARTICS AIR ACADEMY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8525U 

TALKEETNA AIR TAXI INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1694M


ANCHORAGE -

The National Transportation Safety Board says both of the aircraft which collided over the Talkeetna Airport last weekend, injuring two people, were transmitting position updates until the crash.

A preliminary NTSB report on the midair crash, which took place at about 6 p.m. on May 31, said the student pilot and sole occupant of a Cessna 172 -- identified by Alaska State Troopers as 32-year-old Anchorage man Antonio Benavides -- was seriously injured in the collision. One of the four passengers on board a Talkeetna Air Taxi Cessna 185, flown by 27-year-old Cole Hagge of Eagle River, reported minor injuries after the crash.

According to the NTSB, Benavides didn’t have a flight plan but left the Palmer Airport for Talkeetna at about 4:25 p.m. Hagge took off from the Talkeetna Airport just before 5 p.m., on a flight plan for a flightseeing trip over Denali National Park. Troopers said last week that the planes had collided at an altitude of roughly 100 feet over the runway.

“After the collision, both airplanes remained joined together during and after impact with the ground,” NTSB officials wrote. “The debris field was about 460 feet long with the initial fragments located about 62 feet prior to the runway threshold. The main wreckage came to rest about five feet off of the left side of the runway.”

Weather conditions reported by the Talkeetna Airport just before 5 p.m. that evening included clear skies with 10 miles of visibility, and winds from the north at 4 knots. Radio traffic included calls from Benavides and Hagge.

“During a preliminary review of FAA Flight Service Station recordings of the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), 123.6, both airplanes can be heard transmitting position reports in relation to the airport traffic pattern,” NTSB officials wrote.

Clint Johnson, the NTSB’s chief Alaska investigator, said Sunday that little additional information is available on the collision, pending further investigation.

“They’ve got a couple of folks who actually saw it that they’re trying to track down, but that about sums it up,” Johnson said.

Investigators have yet to examine the wreckage from the crash in greater detail.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ktuu.com



Frequency of general aviation accidents still troubling for National Transportation Safety Board

WASHINGTON — Transportation safety has been generally improving across the board except in one area: general aviation.

“We’re troubled that the general aviation safety trend has been flat for few years,” NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart told WTOP. “When you break out the personal flying from the business flying, the business flying is improving which means the personal flying is getting worse which is troubling.”

Hart addressed the topic with attendees of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) Homecoming Fly-in Saturday morning in Frederick.

“We are the accident investigators, so we are there when something goes wrong,” Hart explained.  “That’s why we inform the process of improvement is because we see what actually went wrong as opposed to what might go wrong.  We’ve seen it and been there up close and personal with what really did go wrong.”

The NTSB investigates about 1,500 general aviation accidents every year, whereas the agency can go years at a time without a commercial aviation accident.  The biggest cause of death in general aviation crashes is from loss of control, generally some form of aerodynamic stall.

“It basically comes down to the familiarity of the pilot with the machine, the situation, and being ready for the unexpected,” noted Hart.

The NTSB chairman also said there are other factors that pilots need to consider to understand their risk when they takeoff.

“How current are you, how long has it been since you last flew, how good is your training, are you ready to go into that weather you are expecting to encounter, do you even know what the weather is you expect to encounter?”

Hart said that pilots need to know the weather conditions, whether that is thunderstorms rumbling through in the summer or ice in the winter, to help reduce their risk of a crash.  He also recommended shoulder belts for all on board rather than lap belts to reduce the chance of death just in case something does go wrong.

Original article can be found here:  http://wtop.com

Saturday, June 6, 2015

St. Clair Regional Airport (K39) May Get Another Tenant

It appears the city of St. Clair soon will have an additional tenant at its airport.

Mark Saunders, who lives just outside the city limits, appeared before the St. Clair Board of Aldermen on Monday for the third time requesting he be allowed to rent hangar space at the facility.

That third time may, indeed, be the charm.

Saunders presented the board, Mayor Ron Blum and City Administrator Travis Dierker with information from the Federal Aviation Administration indicating it has proof that Saunders is “the lawful owner of a Challenger aircraft.”

The city has been waiting for proof that Saunders actually owns an airplane before renting hangar space to him. During previous meetings, he had not been able to establish that proof.

“I’m only asking for one hangar at this time,” Saunders told the board and administration on Monday.

He said he may ask for more space later as he intends to purchase additional planes.

However, before the lease agreement is signed by the city, Saunders must receive an “N” number for his aircraft.

According to online information, the “N” number is the official registration number for a plane that identifies a civil aircraft in similar fashion to a licence plate on an automobile. In accordance with the Convention on International Civil Aviation, all aircraft must be registered with a national aviation authority and they must carry proof of this registration in the form of a legal document called a Certificate of Registration at all times when in operation.

In the United States, the registration number is commonly referred to as an “N” number because all aircraft registered have a number starting with the letter N.

An alphanumeric system is used because of the large number of aircraft registered in the country. An “N” number may only consist of one to five characters, must start with a digit other than zero, and cannot end in a run of more than two letters. In addition, “N” numbers may not contain the letters “I” or “O” because of their similarities with the numerals 1 and 0.

“It’s our prerogative to verify an ‘N’ number with the FAA,” Blum told Saunders at the meeting. “Once we get that number, we’ll get you a hangar.”

Dierker said he has spoken with Raymond J. Monier, who works for the regional FAA office in Kansas City.

“Once the paperwork is complete you will get assigned a temporary ‘N’ number,” Dierker told Saunders. “Then, we can proceed.”

The information Saunders gave the city on Monday included a memo from Monier indicating the FAA had its proof that Saunders does now own an aircraft.

It stated that the craft previously had no “N” number because it never was registered with the FAA.

“It may take several weeks to complete this (‘N’ number) process,” Monier wrote. “However, I can assure you the process has been put in place for this to occur. When the ‘N’ number is received, the aircraft will undergo a thorough inspection from an FAA maintenance inspector or an FAA designated maintenance inspector.”

The memo goes on to say that, “As a result of this inspection process it would be in the best interest of all parties involved if the aircraft could be in a hangar to expedite this process.”

According to information Saunders presented at the meeting, he purchased a Challenger ultralight aircraft in late May. It was built from a kit in 1995.

“I show us sending this without an engine,” information concerning the transaction states. “I assume he bought one at another source.”

Information also states that the purchaser’s name is Ivan Yoder from Villa Ridge.

A bill of sale from May 29 indicates Saunders bought the aircraft from Yoder.

In April, Saunders had told the board of aldermen, “I have two planes.”

He added at the time that he is in a “desperate situation” to put them somewhere.

He requested renting two hangars.

Blum told him in April that if he fills out the application and provides proof of ownership of the aircraft, the city would rent him hangar space at the airport.

Rent is $175 per month per space.

Saunders said during that April meeting that he understood there has been a law signed by President Barack Obama that allows the facility to close. On Monday, he again said he knew about the closure law.

There currently are five hangar tenants. Pilots will be given 30 days’ notice that they have to vacate the property.

Source:  http://www.emissourian.com

Flight Design CTSW, registered to KT Aviation LLC and operated by a private individual, N535CT: Accident occurred June 06, 2015 near Haskell Airport (2K9), Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
BFU Germany; Braunschweig
National Transportation Safety Board; Denver, Colorado 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N535CT

Location: Haskell, OK
Accident Number: CEN15LA258
Date & Time: 06/06/2015, 1258 CDT
Registration: N535CT
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 6, 2015, about 1258 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW, light-sport airplane, N535CT, preformed a forced landing shortly after departing the Haskell Airport (2K9), Haskell, Oklahoma. The pilot and a passenger received minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the off-airport landing. The airplane was registered to KT Aviation LLC, of Wagoner, Oklahoma, and was operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated from 2K9 and was destined for Hefner-Easley Airport (H68), Wagoner, Oklahoma, at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that they had flown from H68 to 2K9 earlier in the day. Prior to departing H68, he did a normal preflight inspection, with no discrepancies noted and about 28 gallons of automotive fuel.

After starting engine at 2K9, the pilot noticed the engine gauges were normal, but the charging system had an inadequate output, so he shut down the engine. After consulting a mechanic, he restarted the engine about 1245, with normal engine and charging indications.

During the initial climb from 2K9 about 500 to 600 feet above ground level, the engine starting "sputtering". The engine continued to run but not enough to maintain altitude. The pilot selected a field for the forced landing; various throttle settings failed to restore engine power and the choke was off. The airplane touched down in a muddy field and came to rest inverted.

An on-scene wreckage examination found substantial damage to the airplane's fuselage and damage to the airplane's landing gear. Fuel quality checks of the on-board fuel and the fuel facility were satisfactory. The wreckage was moved to a different location and a post-accident examination of the engine was conducted. Further examination revealed no water or debris were noted in the gascolator, the engine's left and right carburetor float bowls contained clean fuel, the sparkplugs appeared normal, and ignition spark was verified. A test run of the engine was conducted. The engine was started and run at idle before running up to power; no problems were noted during the engine examination or test run.

The airplane's EFIS (Electronic Fight Information System) and EMS (Engine Monitoring System), were removed for extraction of volatile memory (NVM). The memory in the EFIS was corrupted and no useful information could be obtained. The EMS contained an eight-minute recording of engine parameters for the accident flight. A review of the EMS data revealed the engine acceleration to high power, followed by fluctuations and a reduction in the engine rpms.

The NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division's full factual report is located in the public docket for this case.

The closest weather reporting station was located at the Okmulgee Regional Airport Okmulgee, Oklahoma, about 17 miles southwest from the accident site. At 1255, the station recorded wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,700 ft agl, temperature 88° F, dew point 70° F, and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice formation at glide power settings.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 56
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 303 hours (Total, all aircraft), 254 hours (Total, this make and model), 254 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/01/1980
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/01/1980
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 150 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH
Registration: N535CT
Model/Series: CTSW
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 07-05-01
Landing Gear Type: Unknown
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/14/2014, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 30 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 543 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: ROTAX
ELT:  C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: KT5 AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 80 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOKM, 720 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1755 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 234°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Haskell, OK (2K9)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: WAGONER, OK (H68)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1258 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: HASKELL (2K9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 588 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3710 ft / 30 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.834167, -95.665833 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA258

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 06, 2015 in Haskell, OK
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW, registration: N535CT
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 6, 2015, about 1258 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW, light-sport airplane, N535CT, impacted terrain and was substantially damaged during an off-airport forced landing at Haskell Airport (2K9), Haskell, Oklahoma. The pilot and a passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to KT Aviation LLC, of Wagoner, Oklahoma, and was operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing from 2K9, and was destined for Hefner-Easley Airport (H68), Wagoner, Oklahoma.

The pilot reported that during initial climb, while about 500 to 600 feet above ground level (agl), there was a sudden partial loss of engine power. The pilot was on left downwind leg when he executed a forced landing to a muddy field. The airplane came to rest inverted and the impact resulted in the almost complete separation of the empennage. There was a postimpact fuel spill, but there was no postimpact fire. Both occupants exited without assistance.

An on-scene wreckage examination showed adequate fuel was on-board. Fuel quality checks of the on-board fuel and of the fuel facility were satisfactory. The wreckage was moved to a different location and a postaccident test run of the engine was satisfactory. Several avionics components containing non-volatile memory (NVM), including engine performance data, were removed from the wreckage for examination and an extraction of useful data is expected.


The closest official NWS reporting location was about 17 miles southwest from the accident site at Okmulgee Regional Airport (OKM) Okmulgee, Oklahoma. At 1255 the Automated Surface Observation System at OKM reported wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,700 feet agl, temperature 31 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 21 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.





HASKELL, Okla. —  A small plane has crashed in a field east of the Haskell Airport.

Two people were on board, and both made it out of the aircraft without sustaining major injuries.

Oklahoma Highway Patrol reports that a plane went down in a field east of the Haskell Airport. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft crashed off the field, and it is believed that engine problems caused the crash.

There were two people onboard, and both sustained only minor injuries.

The amount of damage is unknown at this time, and someone from the FAA will be sure to investigate.

Source:  http://www.fox23.com

Kimberly Gibbs: Curious change of Mile-Hi Skydiving plane routes on day of judge's visit

By Kimberly Gibbs

Ten years ago, if you had asked my opinion about skydiving or airplane noise I would have replied with complete indifference. All that changed about five years ago when I began to notice planes flying constantly over my neighborhood, about 8 miles from the airport. I later learned that they were skydiving jump planes — climbing steeply and noisily, circling constantly yet never going anywhere. After joining with other concerned citizens throughout Boulder County, our efforts to reduce the community noise impact eventually led to a lawsuit against the skydiving company. That lawsuit, Citizens For Quiet Skies et al. vs Mile-Hi Skydiving concluded on May 21, with Judge LaBuda ruling in favor of Mile-Hi.

A critical juncture in the trial involved the judge's site visit to observe Mile-Hi's flights, which are conducted within an established "flight box." The flight box encompasses an 85-square-mile area south of the Longmont airport and includes Hygiene, Niwot and Gunbarrel. In the days leading up to the site visit, Mile-Hi was observed dramatically changing its flight patterns and flying far outside the box, even though the owner testified that they must remain inside it at all times. As we suspected, during the site visit the plane flew several miles outside the box, all the way to Hall Ranch near Lyons, completely bypassing the Gunbarrel observation site. The flight tracks can be viewed on WebTrak (webtrak5.bksv.com/den3 beacon code 0331) at 3:35 p.m. May 2, 2015. If Mile-Hi was not concerned about the level of noise from their operation, then why would they make such an effort to avoid flying anywhere near the judge?

Confident in their victory following the whisper-quiet site visit flights, Mile-Hi embarked on a curious journey that same evening at about 7:25 pm, circling repeatedly around a plaintiff's home near Prairie Fire Circle (also on webtrak). This abusive conduct was completely in line with the credible testimony presented by a Mile-Hi pilot who claimed that the owner, Frank Casares, had personally directed him to buzz the home of a plaintiff and purposely create excessive noise.

Contrary to statements made by Mile-Hi's public relations firm, Mile-Hi has shown no interest in being a good neighbor — in fact, just the opposite. Since the trial's conclusion, Mile-Hi has significantly increased their activities, flying as many as 3 noisy turboprop jump planes concurrently. They are starting earlier in the morning and continuing later into the evening. The community noise impact will only increase unless their operation is regulated. And finally, in an effort to silence me, they have threatened a libel action for sharing this completely accurate information via social media (details on Facebook).

There is a solution to this important quality of life issue — we must regain local control over skydiving operations and noise regulation. If this is an important issue for you, we invite you to learn more at CitizensForQuietSkies.org.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.timescall.com/columnists/opinion

Incident occurred June 05, 2015 in Laredo, Texas

U.S. and Mexican authorities are seeking suspects after a U.S. Border Patrol helicopter was fired upon and forced to make an emergency landing in Laredo.  

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter was shot at Friday evening near La Bota Ranch, Webb County Sheriff Martin Cuellar said.

Cuellar said that out of the five shots, two were confirmed to have hit the helicopter.

Border Patrol spokesperson Sara Melendez said the helicopter landed safely and no injuries were reported.

It has not been confirmed if the shots were fired on the U.S. or Mexico side.

Source:  http://www.lmtonline.com

Incident occurred June 06, 2015 on the Ottawa River

A small float plane made an emergency landing on the Ottawa River early Saturday afternoon and its two occupants escaped with minor injuries, Gatineau firefighters say.

The emergency landing happened at about 12:30 p.m. on the Ottawa River.

The two people inside the plane were helped to shore by boaters who were nearby at the time.

The people in the plane suffered minor injuries and were taken to hospital, Gatineau police said.

On the Ontario side of the river, the scene was just east of Cumberland, Ont., near Canaan Road. On the Quebec side of the river, where the occupants of the plane were taken to, the scene was off du Fer à Cheval Road.

Source:  http://www.cbc.ca

Zenith 601XLB, N274AJ: Accident occurred June 06, 2015 near Alpine-Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N274AJ


Location: Alpine, TX
Accident Number: CEN15LA263
Date & Time: 06/06/2015, 0815 CDT
Registration: N274AJ
Aircraft: BELCHER CH601XLB
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test

Analysis 

The pilot/builder, an airframe and powerplant mechanic, stated that the engine had been experiencing low oil pressure and that he performed work on the oil system the day before the accident. On the day of the accident, he taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes and did not observe any anomalies. He then departed on a postmaintenance test flight. A few minutes after takeoff, the engine sputtered and experienced a total loss of power. The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path and attempted to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into a carport alongside a residence.

The pilot reported that he examined the engine after the accident. He stated that he failed to adjust the fuel flow after installing a high-pressure fuel pump, which resulted in insufficient fuel flow to the engine. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot/builder's failure to properly adjust the fuel flow, which resulted in reduced flow to the engine and a subsequent total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel pump - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Replacement - Owner/builder (Cause)

Factual Information

On June 6, 2015, at 0815 central daylight time, an amateur-built Belcher CH601XLB, N274AJ, collided with a residential carport following a loss of engine power in Alpine, Texas. The private pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a post-maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Alpine Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas, about 0810.

The pilot, who is an airframe and powerplant mechanic, built the aircraft. He stated the engine was experiencing low oil pressure and he worked on the oil system the day prior to the accident. On the day of the accident, he taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes and the engine operated normally during the taxi tests. He took off on the post maintenance test flight and the engine performed normally during the takeoff. A few minutes later, the engine started to sputter and lost all power.

The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path, so he elected to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into a residential carport.

The pilot reported that he examined the engine after the accident. He reported that he failed to adjust the fuel flow when he installed a high pressure fuel pump on the engine which resulted in insufficient fuel to the engine. 

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/30/2006
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/04/2014
Flight Time:  1366 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9 hours (Total, this make and model), 1272 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BELCHER
Registration: N274AJ
Model/Series: CH601XLB
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 6-7410
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/20/2014, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8.8 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-200
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: E38, 4514 ft msl
Observation Time: 0815 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Alpine, TX (E38)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Alpine, TX (E38)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0810 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Alpine Casparis Municipal (E38)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 4514 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.367500, -103.683611 (est)






NTSB Identification: CEN15LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 06, 2015 in Alpine, TX
Aircraft: BELCHER JIM B ZENITH 601XLB, registration: N274AJ
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 6, 2015, at 0820 central daylight time, an amateur-built Zenith 601XLB, N274AJ, collided with a residential carport in Alpine, Texas, following a loss of engine power during cruise flight. The sport pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a post maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Alpine Casparis Municipal Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas, about 0810.

The pilot, who is also an airframe and powerplant mechanic and the aircraft builder, stated the engine was experiencing low oil pressure. He stated he worked on the oil system the day prior to the accident and taxied the airplane for about 20 minutes. The engine operated normally during the taxi tests. The following day he took off on the post maintenance test flight and everything operated normally. About 10 minutes after takeoff, the engine started to sputter then lost all power. 

The pilot selected a small open area in which to land. During the forced landing approach, the pilot saw wires across the flight path, so he elected to fly under them. The airplane contacted the lowest wire and the airplane nosed down into the carport alongside a residence.