Saturday, January 25, 2020

Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza, N36TT: Fatal accident occurred January 22, 2020 at Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N36TT

Location: Corona, CA
Accident Number: WPR20FA072
Date & Time: 01/22/2020, 1211 PST
Registration: N36TT
Aircraft: Beech B36TC
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 22, 2020 at 1211 Pacific standard time, a Beech B36TC Bonanza, N36TT, collided with an airport perimeter fence during takeoff from the Corona Municipal Airport Corona, California. The right-seated pilot, who additionally owned the airplane, was operating it under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The four occupants, which included the right-seated commercial pilot and left-seated private pilot, were fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed. The personal cross-country flight was originating from Corona, with a planned destination of Torrance, California. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The occupants had departed Torrance earlier that day and had planned to land at Corona to refuel. After entering into the vicinity of the airport, a pilot from the airplane transmitted on the airport's common radio frequency that he was adjoining the downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 25. A witness, who was flying at that time, informed the pilot that the traffic was landing on runway 07. After landing, the airplane taxied to the self-serve fuel tank. At 1130 the left-seated pilot fueled the airplane with the addition of 78.06 gals of fuel. Another witness stated that the passengers went to the restroom and the right-seat pilot used his iPad to circle around the airplane a few times, which he said was in a motion that appeared like he was filming it.

The right-seated pilot paid for the fuel and they departed about 30 minutes later (witnesses reported that they did not see either pilot sump the fuel). A witness observed the occupants board the airplane noting that one passenger was seated in the aft-facing right seat (center row) and the other was in the forward-facing left seat. During the start, the witness then heard the airplane backfire, making a very loud bang followed by puff of black smoke and an arching sound. Thereafter, witnesses observed the airplane depart from runway 07; no witness saw where the airplane started the takeoff roll. As the airplane reached about 1/3 down the runway, the wheels lifted airborne and the airplane assumed a very nose-high attitude. The airplane momentarily became airborne and bounced back down on the runway surface. This occurred several times as it bounced down on the runway in a nose-high attitude.

A review of the recorded security camera footage at the airport revealed that the airplane could be seen midway down the runway (passing by the fuel tanks) and again at the end of the runway. When passing by the fuel tanks, the airplane was in a relatively level pitch attitude and briefly became airborne before touching backdown; the windsock showed an estimated 5 kt tailwind. The airplane remained close to the runway and the wings could be seen rocking back and forth. The airplane then contacted a 6-foot high chain-link airport perimeter fence. The airplane became inverted and travelled over a berm before coming to rest on the east side of the berm; the airplane was engulfed in flames.

The accident site was located in soft dirt about 360 feet from the departure end of runway 25. In character, the terrain was flat, and populated by scattered mature large bush. The main wreckage, consisting of the engine and remains of the fuselage, came to rest inverted near tall brush and had burned the terrain in the surrounding 5 to 10 feet. The wreckage was consumed by post-impact fire and a majority of the fuselage, wings and skin panels were molten metal and ash. The airplane was situated where the fuselage was on a magnetic bearing of about 200 degrees.

The first identified points of contact consisted of disrupted dirt and grass on the flat terrain making up the far west end of the debris field. The markings started as two nearly parallel indentations in the vegetation spaced about 105 inches apart. The indentations continued east a few feet toward the 6-foot fence. Four fence posts were folded over in the direction of the debris field and the stretched fence was still connected up laying onto a berm. A center indentation appeared after the fence posts equally between the right and left indentation. The craters were consistent in size and orientation to that of the landing gear wheels (see picture 01). The indentations were continuous about 20 ft up the berm, which was higher than the surrounding terrain.

Picture 01: Ground Disturbances Leading to Debris Field

The external examination of the Continental Motors TSIO-520-UB revealed no evidence of a catastrophic failure. Investigators removed all cylinders' rocker box covers and noted a light oil film on the rocker arms and valve assemblies. The cylinders' combustion chambers were examined through the upper spark plug holes utilizing a lighted borescope followed by the removal of three cylinders. The combustion chambers remained mechanically undamaged and any evidence of foreign object ingestion appeared to be a result of the intake manifold being broken during the impact sequence. Investigators achieved manual rotation of the crankshaft by rotation of the propeller. Thumb compression was established in all cylinders. The magnetos were removed and the shafts were rotated by a powered drill, during which spark was observed at each post. The turbocharger shaft moved freely upon rotation of the turbine and compressor wheel. A review of the engine logbooks revealed that the last overhaul occurred in 1989, about 2,000 flight hours prior to the accident.

The airplane was equipped with a vernier-style push-pull throttle (black), propeller (blue), and mixture (red) control, which were located on the control console below the control wheel column and subpanel. The control knobs were designed to be repositioned by pushing a button on the face of the knob. With the button extended, fine adjustments could be accomplished by rotating the knob, clockwise to increase and counterclockwise to decrease. The knobs were all found full forward, but it could not be determined if this was the setting at the time of impact because the engine was displaced from the mounts and the cables could have been pulled forward (see picture 02). The throttle and mixture arms were attached to the throttle body with their respective cable attach fittings secured; the cables were thermally consumed. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was caged in the "off" position. The flaps lever was in the 0-degree position; the landing gear lever was in the extended position.

Picture 02: Engine Controls

Control continuity was established onsite. The control cables were continuous to molten bellcranks and portions of the airframe. The airplane was equipped with a dual control yoke, but only the left yoke remained; the right yoke was consumed by fire. The elevator trim tabs were found in the full down position (full nose up trim) and the actuators measured about 2 inches which equated to 27 degrees tab down (maximum travel limit per the FAA type certificate data sheet). There was damage to the left elevator trim tab skin at the hinge area, which appeared to have paint over that area, consistent with prior damage. Additionally, the leading edge of the left horizontal stabilizer was deformed and had the appearance of being painted over (see picture 03). The logbooks revealed no history of damage to the tail section.

Picture 03: Left Stabilizer and Elevator 

Airmen Information

It is not possible to definitely determine who was pilot-in-command at the time of the accident; the seat positions are preliminary and based on witness statements. The presumed right-seated pilot owned the airplane and according to the airplane logbooks, the pilot had amassed over 650 hours in the airplane, of which about 5 hours was in 2019, 0 hours in 2018, 5 hours in 2017. His personal logbooks were not located, but at his last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical examination in December 2017 he reported having a total time of 4,800 hours. The presumed left-seated pilot reported having 1,700 hours total time at his last medical examination in February 2018. His personal notebook was found in the wreckage which indicated he had amassed about 45 hours in the past year where he had flown about 80 days that year. It is estimated that he had acquired 3.7 hours in the accident airplane over the course of 3 flights, the last of which was in April 2019; it is unknown if he acted as pilot-in-command during any of those flights. He owned and regularly flew a 1978 Piper PA-28-161 Warrior II (equipped with a Lycoming O-320 engine and a lever-type throttle quadrant). 

Weight and Balance 

Weight and balance computations were made for the accident takeoff and based on the airplane's empty weight, total moment, and center of gravity that were obtained from the maintenance records. The last weight record was from 1998 (in the same time frame the pilot purchased the airplane) and showed an empty weight of 2,662 lbs. The takeoff condition was calculated for a full fuel tank condition and at 85 gals, which was computed from 78 gals added at the fuel tank and 7 gals in the tanks at the time of landing. The occupant weights and seating positions were obtained from witnesses, the coroner, FAA medical records and the families.

The gross weight at 85 gals of fuel was 3,813 lbs and the center of gravity was 82.6 inches. The gross weight at 102 gals of fuel was 3,915 lbs and the center of gravity was 83.1 inches. The maximum authorized gross takeoff weight was 3,850 pounds with the center of gravity range at that weight between 80 and 87.7 inches forward and aft, respectively.

Review of the Beech Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) for the airplane disclosed that with the flaps in the retracted position, at the maximum gross weight, with a tailwind at 5 kts and at a temperature of 18°C, the takeoff distance required at maximum effort was about 1,400 ft (see picture 04).


Picture 04: Takeoff Performance Chart

Runway

Corona Municipal Airport (AJO) was an uncontrolled airport located about 3 miles northwest of the town of Corona, California. The airport's elevation was 533 feet mean sea level (msl), and was equipped with 1 runway: Runway 07/25 was 3,200 ft by 60 ft comprised of asphalt with a 0.32 degree uphill slope. The runway had an approximate 200-ft displaced threshold and a windsock located about 1,600 ft from that threshold (see picture 05).

Picture 05: Corona Municipal Airport Runway Information 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N36TT
Model/Series: B36TC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: , 533 ft msl
Observation Time: 1215 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Corona, CA (AJO)
Destination: Torrance, CA (TOA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.896111, -117.602222 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Paula Mitchell, 61, of La Mirada, Daniel Rodriguez, 70, of Whittier, and Teresa Rodriguez, 63, of Whittier, died in an airplane crash at Corona Municipal Airport on January 22nd, 2020. 





















It’s not clear who was flying the airplane that crashed in Corona on Wednesday, killing four people, but friends and relatives of the two licensed pilots who were onboard the Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza asserted Friday that both were excellent flyers.

Joseph Zingali, 85, of Torrance; Teresa Rodriguez, 63, of Whittier; husband Daniel Rodriguez, 70, of Whittier; and Paula Mitchell, 61, of La Mirada, were identified as the victims by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office late Thursday.

The National Transportation Safety Board had not yet announced Friday who was flying the plane when it crashed. The NTSB confirmed that the single-engine B36TC airplane belonged to Zingali, who is licensed as a commercial pilot with ratings for single- and multi-engine airplanes and instrument flying, according to Federal Aviation Administration records. Daniel Rodriguez has a private pilot license with ratings for single-engine airplanes and helicopters.

Witnesses said the plane briefly lifted off from Corona Municipal Airport about 12:10 p.m. in clear conditions but then fell back to the runway. The pilot then appeared to gun the engine for more speed, rather than aborting the takeoff. The plane didn’t get more than 3 feet off the ground before it struck a low fence, flipped and overturned into a ditch, where it caught fire and burned quickly.

“It wasn’t my father taking off,” Gerry Zingali, Joseph Zingali’s daughter, said in a telephone interview Friday. “My father was an expert flyer. My father would have aborted that.”

She struggled to talk about her dad. “My father was the greatest man I’ve ever known,” she said, sobbing.

Eddie Rodriguez described his brother Daniel Rodriguez as a safety-first pilot.

“There’s takeoff checklists he goes through every time,” Eddie Rodriguez said Friday. “He was a fanatic for safety. He would criticize other people who were not as safety-conscious as he was.”

Explanations for the crash could include being overweight, engine trouble and attempting to take off with a tailwind, all of which could limit a plane’s lift, said Walt Snyder, a veteran pilot who was at the airport Wednesday. The Corona Fire Department said the pilot had just added 80 gallons of fuel. Specifications for the plane say it can carry 102 gallons.

Eddie Rodriguez said the plane had taken off at Zamperini Field in Torrance and landed in Corona to refuel. The quartet was then going to fly around Southern California before returning to Torrance. Rodriguez said he initially was going to take part in the flight but had to cancel because of a meeting. Mitchell was invited to take his place.

Daniel Rodriguez served as a Los Angeles Police Department officer for 27 years, mostly in the Harbor and Southwest divisions.

“He cared about people’s safety and he was very strict in his thoughts and his life, morally,” said his brother, an LAPD officer for 29 years. “But he was a kind person. He went out of his way to help people in need.”

The brothers had lately become closer and would fly together, often heading from Compton/Woodley Airport to Corona Municipal, where they would fuel both the airplane and their stomachs at breakfast.

Teresa Rodriguez worked for the U.S. Postal Service for 30 years, finishing her career at the La Mirada post office.

“She had a beautiful personality, very nice, very cordial. Everybody who frequented the post office knew her,” Rodriguez said.

Teresa and Daniel married about nine years ago. “He took her to swap meets and took her flying, and he was adventurous in a mild way, and they hit it off,” he said. “She was beautiful, and he was handsome.”

Despite differences in their religions — she was Mormon and her husband was Catholic — they attended each other’s services.

Rodriguez said Mitchell worked even longer at the La Mirada post office — 41 years — than his sister-in-law.

“I knew her and she was a good friend of Teresa’s,” he said.

Rodriguez said he had never met Joseph Zingali.

A preliminary National Transportation Safety Board report on the crash will likely be published in the next several days. A report explaining the cause of the crash is not expected to be ready for at least a year.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.pe.com

Luscombe 8A, N1591K: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 in Bakersfield, Kern County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aircraft crossed the hold line, struck a runway sign causing the aircraft to tilt onto the propeller.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1591K

Date: 23-JAN-20
Time: 00:50:00Z
Regis#: N1591K
Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Aircraft Model: 8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: BAKERSFIELD
State: CALIFORNIA

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, N6108S: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 near Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport (KSJC), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aircraft struck a bird on final.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6108S

Date: 22-JAN-20
Time: 17:27:00Z
Regis#: N6108S
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: SAN JOSE
State: CALIFORNIA

Boeing B75N1, N14GC: Accident occurred January 22, 2020 at Nut Tree Airport (KVCB), Vacaville, Solano County, California

Airplane Came to rest Upside down. 

Damage to Lower Wing. 

Damage to Lower Wing Wingtip. 



Damage to Rudder. 


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N14GC


Location: Vacaville, CA

Accident Number: WPR20CA073
Date & Time: 01/22/2020, 1410 PST
Registration: N14GC
Aircraft: Stearman B75N1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The private pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to practice stop-and-go landings. The airplane took off and made a standard traffic pattern to land. The airplane touched down on the numbers with both main wheels. When the tailwheel touched down, the pilot felt a gust of wind from the east which tipped the left wing down. He attempted to correct with right aileron, but when the wings became level the right wheel exited the runway surface and sunk into the mud. The airplane nosed over substantially damaging the rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/19/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:12/26/2019 
Flight Time:  214 hours (Total, all aircraft), 39 hours (Total, this make and model), 112 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stearman
Registration: N14GC
Model/Series: B75N1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1942
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Aerobatic
Serial Number: 75-6503
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/08/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 14 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R-680
Registered Owner: Jr Stearman LLC
Rated Power: 225 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VCB, 117 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 PST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 40°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Vacaville, CA (VCB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Vacaville, CA (VCB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1408 PST
Type of Airspace: Air Traffic Control

Airport Information

Airport: Nut Tree Airport (VCB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 117 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4700 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 38.373611, -121.956667 (est)

Learjet 35A, N108JN: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft taxiing and went off taxiway.

Hangar 32 LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N108JN

Date: 22-JAN-20
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N108JN
Aircraft Make: LEARJET
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 135
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Lancair Evolution, N13PF: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 at Crystal Airport (KMIC), Hennepin County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.


Odyssey Entertainment Inc


https://registry.faa.gov/N13PF


Date: 22-JAN-20

Time: 08:00:00Z
Regis#: N13PF
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: EVOLUTION
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MINNESOTA

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N5465S: Incident occurred December 19, 2019 at St. Charles County Smartt Airport (KSET), Missouri

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis, Missouri

Aircraft landed gear up resulting in propeller strike.

https://registry.faa.gov/N5465S

Date: 19-DEC-19
Time: 19:03:00Z
Regis#: N5465S
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: R182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ST CHARLES
State: MISSOURI

Piper PA-18 Super Cub-Replica, N944KM: Accident occurred January 22, 2020 in Jean, Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

https://registry.faa.gov/N944KM

NTSB Identification: WPR20CA074
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 22, 2020 in Jean, NV
Aircraft: PIPER PA-18 REPLICA, registration: N944KM

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft practicing touch and goes at a dry lake and nosed over.

Date: 22-JAN-20
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N944KM
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JEAN
State: NEVADA

Cessna 525A CitationJet CJ2+, N490RM: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 at Northeast Ohio Regional Airport (KHZY), Ashtabula County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aircraft landed and struck a deer.

DD Sparkplug LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N490RM

Date: 22-JAN-20
Time: 22:50:00Z
Regis#: N490RM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ASHTABULA
State: OHIO

Piper PA-34-220T, N9295N: Incident occurred January 22, 2020 at Ohio State University Airport (KOSU), Columbus, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aircraft aborted takeoff and rolled into the overrun past the end of the runway.

S D Jackson Enterprises LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9295N

Date: 22-JAN-20
Time: 15:04:00Z
Regis#: N9295N
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: COLUMBUS
State: OHIO

Lockheed EC-130Q Hercules, N134CG: Fatal accident occurred January 22, 2020 in Cooma, New South Wales, Australia


Fallen Heroes: Captain Ian McBeth, First Officer Paul Clyde Hudson and Flight Engineer Rick DeMorgan Jr.

Captain McBeth, 44, was a member of the Air National Guard. Mr. Hudson, 42, spent 20 years as a United States Marine, flying C-130s and receiving many decorations as he reached the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Mr. DeMorgan, 43, spent 18 years in the United States Air Force as a flight engineer on C-130s with extensive combat experience.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft crashed while conducting fire bombing operations. 


https://registry.faa.gov/N134CG


Date: 22-JAN-20

Time: 01:07:00Z
Regis#: N134CG
Aircraft Make: LOCKHEED
Aircraft Model: EC130
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 3 
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
COOMA, QUEENSLAND






Air crash investigators have recovered the cockpit voice recorder from the charred wreckage of a water bomber that crashed while fighting bushfires in southern NSW, and are hoping it will reveal what occurred during the flight's final moments.

New vision of the hillside where the Lockheed EC-130Q Hercules crashed at Peak View was released on Saturday morning as investigators gained access to the site, revealing twisted wreckage spread over hundreds of metres of charred bushland.

The entire crew - United States nationals captain Ian McBeth, first officer Paul Clyde Hudson and flight engineer Rick DeMorgan jnr - were killed in Thursday's crash. Their bodies were recovered from the site on Friday night as their families prepared to fly to Australia.

The wreckage of the aircraft is barely recognizable, with only the tail left intact. Aerial footage of the crash site appears to show the plane ploughed through an open hillside, before disintegrating into a treeline at Peak View.

Air Transport Safety Bureau investigators began their meticulous analysis of the large crash site at first light on Saturday morning. They found the plane's cockpit voice recorder near the tail, Air Transport Safety Bureau chief commissioner Greg Hood said.

"Without knowing what exactly happened, we don’t know how useful that piece of equipment is, but we remain hopeful that it will assist us in the investigation," he told reporters near the scene on Saturday afternoon.

The voice recorder has been taken to the Air Transport Safety Bureau facilities in Canberra, where its data will be analyzed.

Air crash investigators believe the plane had delivered its load of fire retardant to an out-of-control bushfire nearby in the moments before the crash.

Mr. Hood has described the site as "particularly complicated". He added that the men had died in the "selfless pursuit of the prevention of loss of life and property".

Emergency services were seen combing through the blackened crash site, where a bushfire had swept through in the moments before the crash.

Executives of Coulson Aviation, the company that owned the C-130, which was on loan to Australia for the bushfire season, landed in Sydney on Saturday morning, and were expected to meet local authorities.

Mr. Hood said the Air Transport Safety Bureau would undertake 3D mapping of the crash site on Sunday and also planned to take eyewitness accounts from several firefighters who saw the crash.

As authorities work to piece together how the deadly incident unfolded, the professionalism and bravery of the airmen was lauded across Australia and the US.

Former C-130 crew member Bob Maddern, said Coulson Aviation pilots were "by far the most professional and safest to fly with".

The flight engineer said the crews he flew with were "trained for the untrainable".

"The crew I flew with were United States military and never once gave me cause for concern as to their capabilities," he said.

"While we had a lot of humor in our conversations into and out of the drop areas, once there, they were absolutely totally professional in every way."

Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons described the deadly crash as "a body blow" to the firefighting fraternity.

The investigation into the tragic crash comes as the latest victim of Australia's bushfire crisis was identified as 59-year-old Michael Clarke.

Mr. Clarke's body was found in his burnt-out home near Bodalla on Friday, after fire swept through the South Coast region on Thursday, less than 60 kilometres from the C-130 crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.smh.com.au

Bellanca 14-19-3 Cruisair Senior, N1290R: Incident occurred January 23, 2020 at Brackett Field Airport (KPOC), La Verne, Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1290R

Date: 24-JAN-20
Time: 01:42:00Z
Regis#: N1290R
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 14
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LA VERNE
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-28R-200, N9470N: Incident occurred January 23, 2020 at Tri-Cities Airport (KPSC), Pasco, Franklin County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed.

Rossell Holdings LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9470N

Date: 23-JAN-20
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N9470N
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PASCO
State: WASHINGTON

Cirrus SR22, N972JM: Incident occurred January 23, 2020 in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft struck a bird.

https://registry.faa.gov/N972JM

Date: 23-JAN-20
Time: 20:06:00Z
Regis#: N972JM
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: TAMPA
State: FLORIDA

He pointed a laser at airplanes landing at Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (KSRQ) - they were not his only target


Charlie James Chapman Jr., 42
PROVIDED MANATEE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE


SARASOTA, Florida (WWSB) - Deputies have arrested 41-year-old Charlie Chapman Jr. after he allegedly pointed lasers at pilots as they attempted to land planes at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport.

Airport police said two airplanes were struck by the laser as they landed.

The first was a Cessna 172 Skyhawk that was struck multiple times just before 7:30 p.m. The student pilot who was practicing at the time told deputies that the laser hit him directly in the eyes and caused temporary blindness and that he still felt that his eyesight was blurry from the laser.

The second pilot was hit less than an hour later, but this time, it was a commercial United plane that can carry 150 passengers.

“The affect of that laser light, hitting inside the cockpit and temporarily disorienting them or causing temporary vision impairment, which impedes upon their ability to safely land that aircraft,” said SRQ Airport Police Chief Ted Kohuth of how dangerous this can be.

Thankfully, both planes landed safely, but this is a severe issue that officials said is only becoming more frequent.

“Over the past few years there has been an uptick in the reports of individuals intentionally pointing a laser at an aircraft," explained Chief Kohuth. "During calendar year 2020, now we’re only a few weeks into calendar year 2020, we’ve had five reports, including the two last night of an aircraft being intentionally struck by a laser.”

Deputies said that they found Chapman in the 8200 block of 25th Court East in Sarasota. This location is a cinder block company within close proximity to the airport.

In helicopter video released by deputies, it appears Chapman also points the laser at the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) helicopter when they were searching for him. Deputies said after he pointed the laser at them, he then began throwing rocks into the air towards the helicopter.

According to deputies on the ground, when they made contact with Chapman, he grabbed a hammer and made a striking motion towards them. Deputies said they tased Chapman twice to stop him.

Reports from law enforcement state a laser pointer was found in his right pants pocket. Chapman was taken to the Lakewood Ranch Medical Center and after he was cleared, he was transported to the Manatee County Jail.

Deputies said they later learned that Chapman shot his laser pointer on a fixed wing plane four times and one time at the MCSO helicopter.

Chapman remains in the Manatee County Jail where deputies said he is being charged with aggravated assault on an officer, pointing laser at pilot with injury, pointing laser at pilot without injury, and resisting without violence.

Story and video ➤ https://www.mysuncoast.com



A 42-year-old Manatee County man was arrested after he pointed a laser light at airplanes that were landing at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport, according to the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies, including those in the sheriff’s office helicopter, responded to the airport about 7:15 p.m. Wednesday. The suspect, later identified as Charlie James Chapman Jr., pointed the laser light at the helicopter, the sheriff’s office said.

Video shot from the helicopter shows the laser light hitting the chopper. Chapman is then seen picking something up from the ground — more than once — and making a throwing motion at the helicopter, according to the sheriff’s office.

Deputies on the ground were directed to Chapman’s location where he was arrested, but not without further incident.

Deputies say Chapman grabbed a hammer and “made a striking motion,” as they approached.

Chapman was struck with a taser, which put him on the ground. Deputies say they found the laser pointer in his pocket.

“One of the pilots advised that the laser hit him directly in the eyes, causing temporary blindness,” the sheriff’s office reported.

Chapman was booked into the Manatee County jail on charges of aggravated assault on an officer, pointing a laser at pilot with injury, pointing a laser at pilot without injury and resisting arrest without violence.

SRQ Police Chief Ted Kohuth sent out a prepared statement following the arrest, noting that a Cessna Skyhawk was struck multiple times by the laser between 7:25 p.m. and 8:17 p.m. as the pilot was practicing takeoff and landing.

Just before 9 p.m., an inbound United Airbus A320 reported an “intentional laser strike,” and described by the pilot as “intense.”

“Aiming a laser at an aircraft is a serious safety risk and violates state and federal law,” Kohuth said. “Many high-powered lasers can completely incapacitate pilots who are responsible to fly safely to their destinations and may be carrying hundreds of passengers.”

Story and video ➤ https://www.bradenton.com