Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Cessna 172S, Airlines of Tasmania, VH-PFT: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2014 in Port Arthur, Australia

Family of photographer Tim Jones sues Airlines of Tasmania over fatal crash during Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race


Photographer Tim Jones


Pilot Sam Langford




The family of a photographer killed when a plane crashed during the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race is suing the airline.

Pilot Sam Langford, 29, and respected Hobart photographer Tim Jones, 61, perished when their Cessna 172 crashed into Storm Bay, south of Hobart, as they captured the iconic race in December 2014.

Mr. Jones’s family has launched court action against the plane’s operator, Airlines of Tasmania, under the Fatal Accidents Act.

The Act allows family members to recover damages relating to a death caused by a “wrongful act, neglect or default”.

A directions hearing, closed to the public, was held in the Supreme Court yesterday.

A report by the Australian Transport and Safety Bureau was released last year.

It found the plane entered a spin after a steep climbing turn, for which the pilot had not been trained, stalling the aircraft.

It then nosedived into the sea east of Cape Raoul on the Tasman Peninsula and sank 90m to the ocean floor.

Before the crash, it had just finished a photo run of yacht Mistraal at a height of about 15m.

This was about 45m lower than the airline was allowed to fly.

The report stated a Cessna 172 would need to be flying at a height of least 120m to recover from a spin.

However, the report said the aircraft flying at a height lower than permitted “was not likely to have contributed to the accident” in itself.

While Airlines of Tasmania had been given a dispensation to fly to 45m above obstacles, the safety board found the operator had consistently flown down to 15m for aerial photographs.

The board considered this a risk factor along with the airline’s safety management processes which were insufficient to identify the risks of low-level flying during the Sydney-Hobart race.

At the time, the airline said the report had found that the crash “was not caused by any fault with the aircraft or our operational procedures”.

However, it had stopped low-level photography flights and “extensively changed” its safety management system following the crash.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.couriermail.com.au




Aviation safety investigation report: http://www.atsb.gov.au

What happened:   At 1748 Australian Eastern Daylight-saving Time on 29 December 2014, a Cessna 172S aircraft, registered VH‑PFT, departed Cambridge Airport, Tasmania to photograph yachts participating in the 2014 Sydney Hobart race as they made their way around the southern coast of the Tasman Peninsula. On board the aircraft were the pilot and a photographer.

At about 1815 the aircraft commenced low-level photographic runs on yachts to the east of Cape Raoul. Shortly after completing a run on one yacht at a height of about 50 ft, the aircraft entered a steep climbing turn. The aircraft had almost completed a 180° turn when the upper (right) wing dropped sharply while the aircraft’s nose pitched down to almost vertical. The aircraft impacted the water’s surface in an almost vertical nose down attitude with wings about level. Both aircraft occupants were fatally injured and the aircraft was seriously damaged.

What the ATSB found:  As a result of the steep climbing turn, the aircraft’s upper wing aerodynamically stalled, resulting in a rapid rotation out of the turn. The steep pitch attitude indicated that, because of the stalled upper wing, the aircraft entered a spin. There was insufficient height for the pilot to recover the aircraft. The steep climbing manoeuvre was not in accordance with the pilot’s training for low-level flight. Cessna identified that any C172 type aircraft that enters a stall/spin condition will require significant height to recover.

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority had issued the operator with a dispensation that permitted low-level flight down to 150 ft above obstacles. Low-level photographic operations on yachts conducted by the operator had been consistently flown at heights down to 50 ft. Although the aircraft was being operated at a height lower than that authorized by the dispensation, that in itself was not likely to have contributed to the accident.

The ATSB examined the role of the operators’ Safety Management System (SMS). While it was not established that the safety risk management processes and practices directly contributed to the occurrence, there were aspects that the operator could consider working towards to more effectively identify all key operational risks.

What's been done as a result:  The operator advised that it has ceased low-level photography flights.

NTSB Identification: WPR15WA075
Accident occurred Monday, December 29, 2014 in Port Arthur, Australia, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA 172 - S, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On December 29, 2014, at 1747 local, a Cessna 172S, VH-PFT, collided with water near Port Arthur, Australia during an aerial photography flight. The airplane was operating under the pertinent civil regulations of the government of Australia. The airplane was substantially damaged and the pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. 

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, Spartan Education LLC, N4148T: Incident occurred April 19, 2017 at Jones Riverside Airport (KRVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma

Spartan Education LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4148T

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway.  

Date: 19-APR-17
Time: 19:43:00Z
Regis#: N4148T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA




TULSA -- Authorities are investigating what caused a plane slide off the runway at the Jones Riverside Airport Wednesday afternoon.

According to officials, two people were inside the plane when the incident took place.

The Spartan School of Aeronautics plane went off the runway during landing. The plane has since been removed and all runways are back open.

No one was injured.

Story and video: http://www.kjrh.com

Denney Kitfox IV, N921RP: Fatal accident occurred June 07, 2016 in De Smet, Kingsbury County, South Dakota



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Randy R. Telkamp: http://registry.faa.gov/N921RP

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA209
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 07, 2016 in De Smet, SD
Aircraft: PRUSS RICHARD S KITFOX IV, registration: N921RP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 7, 2016, about 1020 central daylight time, an amateur-built Kitfox IV single-engine airplane, N921RP, impacted a lake following a loss of control while maneuvering at a low altitude near De Smet, South Dakota. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, the passenger sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed from Lake Preston Municipal Airport (Y34), Lake Preston, South Dakota, about 0929.

According to the passenger, who held a student pilot certificate and was interviewed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot picked him up at Y34 to assist in a search for a boat that sank in Lake Thompson on June 3, 2016. The pilot and passenger spotted the boat and then flew a right "racetrack" pattern about 150 ft above ground level. While maneuvering, the airplane was banked about 45 to 60 degrees at an airspeed of about 50 miles per hour. During one of the turns, the airplane "snapped over" and the pilot told the passenger that the airplane stalled. The airplane spun about 1.5 to 2 rotations, impacted the lake, and sank. The passenger stated the engine operated normally until the impact with the water. 

According to local authorities, the passenger was rescued by persons assisting in the boat recovery. Efforts to rescue the pilot were unsuccessful.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot's most recent third class medical certificate was issued on January 26, 2015, with a limitation for corrective lenses.

A review of the pilot's logbook, noted as "Logbook Number 5", revealed that the first logbook entry was dated February 14, 2015, and the last logbook entry was dated June 5, 2016. According to the information contained in the logbook, at the time of the last logbook entry, the pilot had accumulated 1,179.2 total flight hours, of which 28.7 hours were in the accident airplane. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, high-wing, tail-wheel configured airplane, serial number 1589, was manufactured in 1991. The airplane was powered by a Rotax 582 LC 65-horsepower engine, and was equipped with a composite 3-blade ground-adjustable propeller. The airplane was purchased by the pilot on May 10, 2010. 

The most recent condition inspection was completed on July 11, 2015, at a total airframe and engine time of 432.6 hours. The hour meter reading observed at the accident site was 442.5 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0956, the automated weather observing system at the Brookings Regional Airport (BKX), Brookings, South Dakota, located about 30 miles east of the accident site, recorded the following weather conditions: wind calm, sky clear, temperature 17 degrees Celsius, dew point 7 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was recovered from the lake and examined at a facility near Lake Thompson. Examination of the airplane showed that the fuselage was buckled near the aft cabin bulkhead. The forward fuselage was crushed up and aft. The left wing displayed compression bending aft near the wing root, and the forward wing attachment was fractured. The left flaperon remained attached and its control fitting was fractured. The fracture was consistent with impact damage. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage and sustained minor damage. The right flaperon remained attached.

The empennage was intact with the rudder and elevator attached and minor damage was noted to the bottom of the rudder. The tailwheel remained attached and both main landing gears were separated from the fuselage.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the respective flight control surfaces.

The seat restraints were attached to the fuselage and were found unbuckled. The flap handle was observed in the up or retracted position. The throttle was pulled out about 1.5 inches, and the fuel selector was on.

The engine remained attached to the engine mount and fuselage. The propeller remained attached to the engine, and the propeller was manually rotated. Manual rotation of the propeller revealed compression and mechanical continuity throughout the engine. Two propeller blades were fractured aft near the blade root.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The autopsy of the pilot was performed at the Sanford Health Pathology Clinic, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The cause of death was asphyxia due to drowning during an airplane accident. Toxicology testing by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute was negative for all substances tested.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The SD card from an iFly 700 Adventure Pilot GPS that was recovered from the airplane was submitted to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Division for data recovery. The card was undamaged and data was recovered normally. The data extracted included 164 track logs from February 14, 2009, through June 7, 2016. The accident flight was recorded starting at 0929:12 and ending at 1019:51.

The GPS data parameters recorded were the following: date, time, latitude, longitude, GPS speed, true course, and GPS altitude.

According to the data, the flight departed Y34 at 0929, turned southwest, and climbed to about 2,300 feet GPS altitude. As the airplane approached Lake Thompson, it descended to between 2,000 and 2,100 feet mean sea level (msl); Lake Thompson is at 1,700 feet msl. The airplane began flying a north/south pattern with 3.5 to 4 nautical mile legs. At 1007, the airplane began circling a point towards the western side of the lake. The last recorded data point was at 1019:51 at a GPS altitude of 1,955 feet and a ground speed of 34 knots. Due to data buffering on the GPS unit, the data recording may have ended before the airplane impacted the lake.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA209
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 07, 2016 in De Smet, SD
Aircraft: PRUSS RICHARD S KITFOX IV, registration: N921RP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 7, 2016, at 1000 central daylight time, a Pruss Kitfox IV single-engine airplane, N921RP, impacted a lake following a loss of control while maneuvering at a low altitude near De Smet, South Dakota. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, the passenger sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed a private airstrip about 0930.

According to the passenger, who was interviewed by the Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the pilot picked up the passenger at a private airstrip to assist in a search for a boat that sank in Lake Thompson on June 3rd. The pilot and passenger spotted the boat and then flew a right turn "racetrack" pattern about 150 feet above ground level. While maneuvering, the airplane was banked about 45 to 60 degrees at an airspeed about 50 miles per hour. During a turn, the airplane "snapped over" and the pilot stated the airplane stalled. The airplane spun about 1.5 to 2 rotations, impacted the lake, and sank. The passenger stated the engine operated normally until the impact with the water. 

According to local authorities, the passenger was rescued by persons assisting in the boat recovery. Efforts to rescue the pilot were unsuccessful.

The airplane was recovered from the lake and examined at a facility near Lake Thompson. Examination of the airplane showed the fuselage was buckled near the aft cabin bulkhead. The forward fuselage was crushed up and aft. The left wing displayed compression bending aft near the wing root, and the forward wing attachment was fractured. 

At 0956, the Brookings Regional Airport (BKX), Brookings, South Dakota, automated weather observing system, located approximately 30 miles east of the accident site, reported the wind calm, sky clear, temperature 17 degrees Celsius, dew point 7 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury.







DE SMET — The passenger in a fatal June 2016 plane crash near De Smet said the engine "operated normally" until impact with Lake Thompson, but the pilot told him it stalled mid air.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) final accident report released this week, passenger and Aurora resident Bruce Bortnem told authorities the Kitfox IV airplane's engine had normal functionality when it crashed, with the cause of the crash defined as a loss of control in flight. The crash killed 59-year-old pilot Randall Telkamp, of Brookings, who died from "asphyxia due to drowning" in the submerged plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration says loss of control is the top cause of fatal aviation crashes, and occur when a "flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and may quickly develop into a stall or spin." Common causes include poor judgement, failure to recognize a stall and execute corrective action, failure to maintain airspeed or use of prescription or illegal drugs. Telkamp tested negative for drug use, according to the final report.

The crash occurred while Telkamp and Bortnem were assisting Douglas Kahler and Jeff Hallin, joined by his 12-year-old step-son, search for a wrecked boat in the 12,455-acre lake. And according to Hallin's statement released this week, the three men narrowly avoided being struck by the crashing aircraft.

"Suddenly I heard the planes (sic) RPM go up and looked over my shoulder in time to see the plane nosedive into the water about 150 yards away from us," Hallin wrote.

Kahler concurred, stating the aircraft nosed into the water and flipped on its top, submerging instantly.

Shortly after the crash, Kahler pulled Bortnem out of the water.

"I just started the boat and gunned it towards the wreck was (sic) at the wreck site in under one minute," Kahler wrote. "By the time I was three quarters the way there Bruce popped out of the wreckage and I put Bruce from water immediately."

Hallin dove underwater using dive gear to search for the wreckage multiple times, ultimately finding Telkamp "either still strapped in or entangled in debri(s)." Hallin attempted to remove Telkamp, but was unable.

The incident drew several law enforcement agencies and first responders to the lake, but the lake remained open to boaters throughout the day. Shortly after the crash, Bortnem was said to be in "fair condition."

Original article can be found here: http://www.mitchellrepublic.com

Aviat S-2C, DLS Holdings Inc, N360BF: Accident occurred April 18, 2017 in Waxahachie, Ellis County, Texas

DLS Holdings Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N360BF

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas, Texas

Aircraft while force landing in a field, struck a pole.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 23:48:00Z
Regis#: N360BF
Aircraft Make: AVIAT
Aircraft Model: S2C
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WAXAHACHIE
State: TEXAS

Maule M-6-235, N790PR: Incident occurred April 18, 2017 in Rome, Oneida County, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N790PR

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aircraft nose over on runway.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 17:01:00Z
Regis#: N790PR
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M6
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROME
State: NEW YORK

DragonFly, N37X: Incident occurred April 18, 2017 at Martin State Airport (KMTN), Middle River, Baltimore County, Maryland

http://registry.faa.gov/N37X

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft on landing, struck the propeller.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 17:20:00Z
Regis#: N37X
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL DRAGONFLY
Aircraft Model: DRAGONFLY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIDDLE RIVER
State: MARYLAND

Brantly B-2B, N2198U: Accident occurred April 18, 2017 in Earl Park, Richland Township, Benton County, Indiana



http://registry.faa.gov/N2198U

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana 

Rotorcraft force landed in a field.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 14:20:00Z
Regis#: N2198U
Aircraft Make: BRANTLY ROTORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: B2B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: EARL PARK
State: INDIANA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, American Aviation Inc, N472SP: Incident occurred April 18, 2017 near Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (KBKV), Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida

American Aviation Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/aN472SP

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

Aircraft on approach, struck a bird.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 17:55:00Z
Regis#: N472SP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: BROOKSVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-42-720 Cheyenne III, Itapara Sport Fishing LTDA-ME, PP-EPB: Fatal accident occurred March 31, 2017 near Barra Do Garcas Airport (SBBW), Sorocaba, Brazil




NTSB Identification: ERA17WA147
Nonscheduled 14 CFR
Accident occurred Friday, March 31, 2017 in Sorocaba, Brazil
Aircraft: PIPER AIRCRAFT PA-42, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On March 31, 2017, about 1745 coordinated universal time (1445 local time), a Piper PA-42, Brazilian registration PP-EPB, operated by a private individual, was destroyed after it impacted the ground while on approach to Barra Do Garcas Airport (SBBW), Sorocaba, Brazil. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Brazil. Further information can be obtained from:


Aeronautical Accident Prevention and Investigation Center

Investigation Division
SHIS-QI 05-VI COMAR
Brasilia-DF, Brazil 71.615-600
Tel: (55-61) 3364-8812
Email: dac.saai@cenipa.aer.mil.br

This report is for informational purposes and contains only information released by the Government of Brazil.


O piloto da aeronave bimotor Piper Aircraft modelo PA-42 e uma mulher morreram em um acidente ocorrido nesta sexta-feira (31), às 14H42, na rua Teresinha Trois Giraldi, no bairro Novo Horizonte, em Sorocaba. Segundo o Corpo de Bombeiros, o voo teria partido de Manaus e, no momento da queda do avião, não houve explosão.

O avião caiu perto de residências e a uma distância de aproximadamente 1 quilômetro do aeroporto de Sorocaba, onde passaria por manutenção. Após a queda, pessoas saquearam o interior da aeronave.

As identidades das vítimas não foram divulgadas. Foi informado apenas que a passageira tinha 28 anos de idade.

De acordo com Wesley Pires da Silva Belo, testemunha do acidente, ele teria percebido o esforço do piloto para desviar das casas. A área foi cercada pela Polícia Militar para o trabalho de perícia e remoção dos corpos.

No sistema RAB da Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil (Anac), a matrícula do avião Piper Aircraft modelo PA-42 é PPEPB. Consta que a aeronave pertence à Itapara Sport Fishing LTDA-ME e a sua situação está regularizada pelos órgãos responsáveis.

O último acidente aéreo registrado em Sorocaba havia ocorrido em 29 de maio de 2013. Na ocasião, piloto e copiloto morreram com a queda de um avião monomotor no Jardim São Guilherme, em Sorocaba. O acidente ocorreu por volta das 15h40, na ruaBelmiro Moreira Soares, altura do número 1.189.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.jornalcruzeiro.com.br

Rutan Long-EZ, EI-CPI: Fatal accident occurred March 27, 2017 in Cloncoskoran, Ireland




NTSB Identification: CEN17WA142
Accident occurred Monday, March 27, 2017 in Cloncoskoran, Ireland
Aircraft: RUTAN LONGEZ, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On March 27, 2017, at 1514 coordinated universal time, a Rutan Long-Ez, Irish registration EI-CPI, collided with terrain in Cloncoskoran, Waterford, Ireland, following a loss of engine power. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The local flight originated from the Waterford Airport (EIWF), Waterford, Ireland.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Irish government. This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Irish government. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Air Accident Investigation Unit

Dept. of Transport, Tourism & Sport
Leeson Lane
Dublin
D02 TR60
+353 1 604 1292
Info@aaiu.ie


An investigation has been launched after a man was killed when the light aircraft he was piloting crashed into a field in Co Waterford.

It is understood the man, the only occupant of the craft, had left Waterford Airport yesterday afternoon with the intention of flying to Dungarvan and back.

The pilot, aged in his early 80s, was named locally as Dave Ryan, a former member of Waterford Aero Club.

He issued a mayday call just before 4.30pm and attempted to land his single-seater aircraft in a field but crashed into trees close to the well-known Bridgie Terrie's pub and restaurant.

The incident happened near the N25, in the Knocknagranagh area outside Dungarvan, and is not far from the scene of another fatal light aircraft collision which claimed the life of a veteran pilot in 2015.

It is understood a Coast Guard helicopter crew picked up Mr Ryan's mayday message while they were flying on a training mission in the region and proceeded directly to the location of the crash.

The R117 search and rescue helicopter arrived at the crash site, which is also close to Dungarvan Golf Club, within minutes but it is understood the man was fatally injured and could not be resuscitated by that time.

Gardaí said it appeared the man was killed instantly when the aircraft hit the ground.

The nearby road was closed to traffic while fire engines, ambulances and gardaí attended the scene and diversions were put in place for several hours. Members of the Air Accident Investigation Unit were deployed from Dublin to the scene and were working at the crash scene last night.

"The likelihood is that we will recover the aircraft wreckage over the next day and hopefully we can recover the wreckage back to our facility," AAIU chief investigator Jurgen Whyte said.

Mr. Whyte was speaking last night near the scene of the fatal R116 crash at Blacksod Bay in Co Mayo.

A woman in Bridgie Terrie's pub said the crash happened "just across the fields from us."

The location is close to the area where well-known and experienced pilot Howard Cox (67) was killed in July 2015 when on his way from Waterford Airport to an air show in Foynes.

Story and video:  http://www.independent.ie

ATR 42: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 in Coari Municipality, Brazil

NTSB Identification: ENG17WA018
Incident occurred Monday, March 20, 2017 in Coari Municipality, Brazil, Brazil
Aircraft: ATR ATR42, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 20, 2017, an ATR42, powered by a pair of Pratt & Whitney Canada PW100/105 turboprops engines and Hamilton Standard propellers, departure the runway after landing at the Coari Municipality, State of Amazonas, Brazil Airport (SBUY). The Brazil CENIPA is investigating the event and the NTSB is participating as the State of Manufacturer of the propellers in the Brazilian Annex 13 investigation.

Bell 206, F-GPPH: Fatal accident occurred March 15, 2017 in Figeac, France



NTSB Identification: CEN17WA130
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 15, 2017 in Figeac, France
Aircraft: BELL 206, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 15, 2017, about 2100 universal coordinated time (UTC), a Bell 206 helicopter, F-GPPH, impacted terrain near Figeac, France. The pilot was fatally injured and the helicopter was destroyed. The flight originated from Poiters Biard (LFBI), France, and was en route to Mouret, France.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of France. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the government of France. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau
Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses
Zone Sud
200 rue de Paris
Aêroport du Bourget
93350 Le Bourget Cedex
France

Saab 340B: Incident occurred March 17, 2017 in Sydney, Australia

NTSB Identification: ENG17WA016
Incident occurred Friday, March 17, 2017 in Sydney, Australia
Aircraft: SAAB 340, registration:
Injuries: 19 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has notified the NTSB of an incident involving a Saab 340B which occurred on March 17, 2017. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the ATSB investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of design and manufacture of the airplane engines.

All investigative information will be released by the ATSB.

MD Helicopters MD530, Policía Estatal Preventiva (PEP), XC-PEP: Fatal accident occurred March 13, 2017 in Mexicali, Mexico




NTSB Identification: CEN17WA129
Accident occurred Monday, March 13, 2017 in Mexicali, Mexico
Aircraft: MD HELICOPTER 369, registration:
Injuries: 5 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 13, 2017, about 1600 hours pacific daylight time, a MD Helicopters model 369FF single-engine helicopter, serial number 0079FF, Mexican registration XC-PEP, collided with high-voltage power lines while maneuvering near Mexicali, Mexico. The pilot and 4 passengers were fatally injured. The local flight departed General Rodolfo Sánchez Taboada International Airport (MMML), near Mexicali, Mexico.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of the Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC)
Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes
Boulevard Adolfo López Mateos
No. 1990, piso 4
Colonia Los Alpes, Tlacopac
Delegación Álvaro Obregón
Codigo Postal 01010
Ciudad de México
México
Telephone: (55) 5011-6413
E-mail: cidaiac@sct.gob.mx
Website: http://www.sct.gob.mx/transporte-y-medicina-preventiva/aeronautica-civil/inicio/

Piper PA-25-235 Pawnee, XB-FHP: Fatal accident occurred March 12, 2017 in Etchoropo, Sonora, Mexico

NTSB Identification: CEN17WA128
Accident occurred Sunday, March 12, 2017 in Etchoropo, Sonora, Mexico
Aircraft: PIPER PA25, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 12, 2017, at 2050 hours universal coordinated time, a Piper PA25-235 airplane, Mexican registration XB-FHP, impacted terrain near Etchoropo, Sonora, Mexico. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC)
Secretariat of Communications and Transportation
Blvd. Adolfo López Mateos 1990, piso 4
Col. Los Alpes Tlacopac, Del. Álvaro Obregón
Codigo Postal 01010
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Sikorsky S-92A, CHC Ireland / Irish Coast Guard, EI-ICR: Fatal accident occurred March 14, 2017 in Blacksod Bay, Ireland

The crash claimed the life of Paul Ormsby, Mark Duffy, Captain Dara Fitzpatrick and Ciaran Smith. 



Air Accident Investigation Unit - Ireland - Preliminary Report: http://www.aaiu.ie/pdf 

NTSB Identification: CEN17RA131
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Blacksod Bay, Ireland
Aircraft: SIKORSKY S92, registration:
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On March 14, 2017, about 1719 universal coordinated time (UTC), a Sikorsky S-92 helicopter, Irish registration EI-ICR, crashed offshore near Blackrock Island West of Blacksod Bay, Ireland. There were 4 occupants. The pilot was fatally injured and 3 crewmembers are presumed fatal. The flight originated from Dublin, Ireland, and was enroute to Blacksod Bay Helipad Co. Mayo, Ireland.


The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of Ireland. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the government of Ireland. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) Lesson Lane Dublin 2 Ireland D02TR60 www.aaiu.ie +353 (0) 1 604 1293 





The probe into the loss of Coast Guard Rescue 116 helicopter is currently centring on whether "electrical failure" on the helicopter caused the crash.

Investigators have also looked into the possibility the helicopter collided with the lighthouse at Blackrock, six miles off the coast of Mayo.

However, this theory is now discounted as there was no evidence of a collision with the rock and there was no wreckage around the lighthouse.

"There was no paint or debris on the lighthouse. There are 100 theories going around," a senior source involved in the investigation said.

Newstalk Breakfast reports that the Defence Forces confirmed in a statement that they were initially asked to provide top cover for this mission.

However, the request was denied due to the fact it was outside normal hours and there was a lack of "experienced personnel" available.

The request was logged at 10:06pm and the Air Corps was not able to carry out the mission as the fixed wing aircraft was unavailable.

Rescue 116 was subsequently dispatched instead.

The statement further added "plans are in place to deal with the shortages in personnel being experienced by the Air Corps."

The full-scale search is now homing in on an area near the lighthouse where the black box is now believed to be located.

The crash claimed the life of Paul Ormsby, Mark Duffy, Captain Dara Fitzpatrick and  Ciaran Smith.

Officials believe there was no mayday call because of a "catastrophic failure" on board.

"It takes two seconds to press the mayday button. The fact they did not press the button shows the suddenness of the impact. They only had seconds before the crash," a source said.

Coast Guard officials also point to the impeccable safety record of Captain Fitzpatrick.

"She would never leave a stone unturned," they added.

The scale of the debris field from the downed helicopter has led to fears it may have disintegrated on impact with the sea or suffered a catastrophic collision around 1pm on Tuesday.

The revelation came as an underwater signal was successfully detected from the 'black box' of the downed Rescue 116 Sikorsky S-92A helicopter shortly after 4pm yesterday.

Rescuers detected the signal from the Multi Purpose Flight Recorder (MPFR) in water some 40 metres deep and just 60 metres from Blackrock Lighthouse.
The location is around 12km offshore from Blacksod Bay where the helicopter had planned to refuel early on Tuesday morning.

Naval Service and Irish Coast Guard officials hope the main fuselage of the helicopter is at the same spot.

The failure to locate the missing men on the sea surface has led to fears the trio may not have been able to escape the fuselage of the helicopter before it sank.
Locating a signal from the MPFR is described as a critical breakthrough in the investigation and recovery effort.

Weather permitting, divers will attempt to examine the debris field identified today.

Jurgen Whyte, chief inspector of the Air Investigation Unit, said the signal was coming from an area of difficult water with a 40m depth.

"Its hugely significant, other investigation authorities have spent months literally trying to do the same thing and we've been very lucky that, within less than 36 hours we've picked up with what is a signal.

"That means that the recorder has activated its beacon and we're now using sophisticated scanning equipment to home in on this signal itself," Mr Whyte said.

Meanwhile the Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) will also liaise with the helicopter manufacturer, Sikorsky, to determine precisely what caused the worst tragedy in the history of the specialised search and rescue model.

US aviation engineers will assist AAIU inspectors in solving the mystery of what brought down an aircraft designed to defy the elements and to operate in the toughest flying conditions. One aviation source admitted the Rescue 116 tragedy is "baffling".

The last available flight record showed the helicopter heading in the general direction of the lighthouse at 90 knots (167kmh) around 12.45am en route to refuel at Blacksod.

The Commissioners of Irish Lights, which operates the Blackrock facility, will be one of a number of agencies now assisting the AAIU with its investigation.

CIL official Captain Robert McCabe confirmed all aids to navigation on the lighthouse were fully operational at the time.

Story and video:  http://www.independent.ie

Robinson R44 II, G-DORM: Accident occurred March 12, 2017 in Carlingford, Ireland



https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/DORM

NTSB Identification: CEN17WA125
Accident occurred Sunday, March 12, 2017 in Carlingford, Ireland
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER CO INC ROBINSON R44 II, registration:
Injuries: 2 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 12, 2017, about 1715 coordinated universal time (UTC), a Robinson Helicopter Company Inc. R44 II helicopter, G-DORM, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during an approach to landing near Carlingford, County Louth, Ireland. The pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Irish Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU). This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the AAIU. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU)
Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport
Leeson Lane
Dublin 2, Ireland
D02 TR60

Sikorsky S-76C++, Swan Aviation, TC-HEZ: Fatal accident occurred March 10, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey



NTSB Identification: ERA17WA127
14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Accident occurred Friday, March 10, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey
Aircraft: SIKORSKY S76, registration:
Injuries: 7 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 10, 2017, at 0821 coordinated universal time, a Sikorsky S-76C++ helicopter, Turkish registration TC-HEZ, was destroyed shortly after takeoff from the Istanbul Ataturk Airport (LTBA), Istanbul, Turkey. The two pilots and the five passengers were fatally injured. The flight was destined for Bozoyuk, Turkey.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Turkish Government. Any further information pertaining to the accident can be obtained from:

Ministry of Transport Maritime Affairs and Communications
Accident Investigation Board
Hanimeli S. No. 7
06430 Sihhiye
AnkaraTurkey

Tel.: (90) 312 203-1431
Fax: (90) 312 229-7289

This report is for informational purposes and contains only information released by the Turkish Government.