Sunday, March 14, 2021

$400,000 worth of marijuana seized from inbound flight at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF), Cheektowaga, New York


BUFFALO, New York (WIVB) — Around $400,000 worth of marijuana was seized at Buffalo Niagara International Airport after Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Transit Police were tipped off about an inbound flight.

When the flight arrived, K9 Zev and handler Officer Nesci completed a “free air sniff” of the five suspicious bags. Zev alerted officers to the smell of narcotics in all five bags, according to authorities.

After a warrant was granted, officers found 120 pounds of marijuana across the five bags.

The Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority said one of their officers was given information from law enforcement in Sacramento, California about an inbound flight to Buffalo carrying a large amount of marijuana.

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N407GV: Accident occurred March 12, 2021 at Chevak Airport (PAVA), Alaska

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Grant Aviation

Avion Capital Corporation


Location: Chevak, AK
Accident Number: ANC21LA025
Date & Time: March 12, 2021, 16:46 Local
Registration: N407GV
Aircraft: Cessna 208B 
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Scheduled

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N407GV
Model/Series: 208B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: PACZ,479 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -8°C /-10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 34 knots / 42 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 0.5 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.31 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Chevak, AK 
Destination: Bethel, AK (BET)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 61.537846,-165.60223 (est)






A Grant Aviation plane was damaged near the runway in Chevak. The incident occurred on Friday, March 12 shortly after 5:00 p.m.

“We’re not using the term ‘crash’ just to let you know,” said Grant Aviation Vice President of Operations Dan Knesek. “It is off the side of the runway, and just because it’s off the side, it just tipped a little. It’s tipped onto the one left wing.”

Knesek declined to provide further comment at the time. He said he was in the midst of dealing with the incident’s aftermath.

Chevak Vice Mayor Ulrich Ulroan said that the left wing of the plane is damaged. He said that passengers had already gotten off the plane in Chevak, and the incident occurred as the plane was attempting to take off. He said there were strong crosswinds at the time of takeoff.

Ulroan heard that there were no injuries associated with the incident. It is unclear if there were other passengers in the plane with the pilot at the time the incident occurred.

MercyOne deploys larger, faster helicopter




SIOUX CITY, Iowa -- A new helicopter is transferring patients to MercyOne Siouxland Medical Center.

The new MercyOne Air Med chopper, a two-engine Bell 429 with MercyOne's updated graphics painted on the sides, replaces the former Bell 407. 

The multimillion-dollar helicopter boasts a far more spacious interior, greater speed and a number of other bells and whistles the previous model did not have, including a special light to scare birds away.

"I had never seen this on a helicopter before," Air Med manager Nik Gonzales said of the anti-bird lights. "The safety features are amazing on this."

The MercyOne Air Med program, operated by the helicopter services provider Air Methods, had been flying the Bell 407 for a little more than a year before they received the Bell 429 around Thanksgiving. The MercyOne healthcare system has upgraded its fleet of medical helicopters in Iowa, with a total of five new helicopters -- one in Mason City, one in Knoxville, one in Des Moines, one in Sioux City, plus a spare. 

The Bell 407 was far less roomy than the new 429 -- during a flight in the old helicopter, the crew couldn't reach a patient's legs because of the tight space. 

"We have full access to our patients in our (new) helicopter. Before, we had basically from the chest up, now we have head-to-toe access, we can move around in the helicopter," said MercyOne flight nurse Ethan Neff. "If we have something that needs to be done in the air, we can do that now, instead of having to make sure everything's done on the ground before we head out." 

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The Bell 429 is also considerably faster -- able to reach speeds of around 150 miles per hour -- and is somewhat quieter and more comfortable for the patient. The speed is a key improvement over the previous machine. 

"The goal of ours is to reduce the time out of hospital. So, normally, with ground transport, you're looking at maybe an hour between hospitals, versus flight, it's usually about 15 minutes to a half hour transport," Neff said. "So, reducing that time from one hospital to another, it helps to reduce any kind of chance that something happens." 

Cessna 650 Citation III, N220CM: Accident occurred March 14, 2019 at Orlando Sanford International Airport (KSFB), Orange County, Florida







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

RP Sales and Leasing Inc


Location: Sanford, FL
Accident Number: ERA19TA133
Date & Time: 03/14/2019, 2215 EDT
Registration: N220CM
Aircraft: Cessna 650
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot stated that after landing the airplane at night, the taxiway that he normally used was occupied, so he taxied toward the ramp via an alternate taxiway. As he approached the ramp, there were four or five airplanes on the ramp, and the pilot asked the copilot if the area was clear on the right side. The pilot was referring to the ground path, but the copilot thought he was referring to the other airplanes. When the copilot replied that they were clear, the pilot turned right. The airplane then exited the taxiway onto grass and the nosewheel struck concrete, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage structure above the nose landing gear. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the airplane.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to keep the airplane on the taxiway while taxiing at night. Contributing to the accident was a miscommunication between the flight crewmembers about the position of the airplane.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Personnel issues Interpretation/understanding - Flight crew
Aircraft Heading/course - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

On March 14, 2019, about 2215 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 650, N220CM, was substantially damaged during taxi at Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida. The two airline transport pilots and two passengers were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions
prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Yeager Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia, about 2100.

The pilot stated that after landing, the taxiway that he normally used had an airplane on it, so he taxied toward the ramp via an alternate taxiway. As he approached the ramp, there were four or five airplanes on the ramp and the pilot asked the copilot if the area was clear on the right side. The pilot was referring to the ground and the copilot thought he was referring to the other airplanes. When the copilot replied that they were clear, the pilot turned right. The airplane then exited the taxiway on to grass and the nosewheel struck concrete before the airplane came to rest. The pilot added that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the airplane.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed damage to the structure above the nose landing gear and the pressure bulkhead.

History of Flight

Taxi-from runway Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)
Taxi-from runway Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 83, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/31/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/02/2019
Flight Time:  30000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4000 hours (Total, this make and model), 29000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 75 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/25/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/04/2019
Flight Time:  4353 hours (Total, all aircraft), 261 hours (Total, this make and model), 3640 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 86 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N220CM
Model/Series: 650 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1988
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 650-0160
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 10
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 22200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time: 9655 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Honeywell
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TFE-731
Registered Owner: Rp Sales And Leasing Inc
Rated Power:
Operator: Rp Sales And Leasing Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: SFB, 54 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 110°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Charleston, WV (CRW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Sanford, FL (SFB)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 2100 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Orlando Sanford International (SFB)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 55 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  28.776944, -81.235000 (est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 182D Skylane, N8905X; accident occurred March 13, 2019 near Transylvania Community Airport (3NR3), Brevard, North Carolina

 












Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Brevard, North Carolina 
Accident Number: ERA19LA131
Date & Time: March 13, 2019, 18:10 Local
Registration: N8905X
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot performed a preflight inspection after the airplane had undergone maintenance and no anomalies were noted. He boarded the airplane, adjusted the seat, and then verified that it was locked in position. Shortly after beginning the takeoff roll, his seat slid backward. He was unable to reach the rudder pedals, and the airplane departed the left side of the runway, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. Examination revealed that the pilot seat’s left front roller housing was disengaged from the seat rail. The seat rail exhibited scoring on top of the rail, which likely occurred during the accident sequence. No scoring was noted on the sides of the rail. The roller housing was not splayed or damaged, indicating that it did not pull off the rail during the accident sequence. Although the seat rail holes were slightly worn, the pin did not exhibit any anomalies.

The mechanic stated that he did not remove the pilot's seat to perform the maintenance that he completed before the accident flight; however, given the lack of side damage to the rails and the fact that the left front seat roller housing was not splayed, it is likely that the roller housing came off the rails during the maintenance and went unnoticed by both the mechanic and the pilot, which resulted in the seat sliding backward during takeoff.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The mechanic's failure to notice that the left front seat left front roller housing disengaged from the seat rail during recent maintenance, and the pilot's failure to detect the disengaged roller housing during the preflight inspection, which resulted in the seat sliding backward during takeoff and a subsequent loss of airplane directional control.

Findings

Personnel issues Replacement - Maintenance personnel
Personnel issues Preflight inspection - Pilot
Aircraft Seat/cargo attach fitting - Incorrect service/maintenance
Aircraft Directional control - Attain/maintain not possible
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot

Factual Information

On March 13, 2019, about 1810 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182D, N8905X, was substantially damaged after it impacted terrain during takeoff from Transylvania Community Airport (3NR3), Brevard, North Carolina. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was originating at the time of the accident. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he completed a preflight inspection with no anomalies noted. When he boarded the airplane, the pilot seat was in its aft most position, since that was how he would typically exit the airplane. The pilot then slid the seat forward until he "could see 3 holes" in the rail, which was his typical seating position. He then "rocked the seat back and forth" to verify it was locked in position, and then proceeded to start the engine, taxi, and perform an engine runup. He then taxied onto the runway and began the takeoff roll. About 4-5 seconds into the takeoff roll, his seat slid backwards. At that point, he was unable to reach the rudder pedals, and the airplane departed the left side of the runway, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who responded to the accident location, the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 1961 and registered to the pilot in January 2019. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on August 18, 2018, at a total time of 4,251.8 hours. In addition, the annual inspection maintenance log entry indicated that an inspection in accordance with airworthiness directive (AD) 2011-10-09, associated with a seat rail inspection, had been completed. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 4,265 total hours.

In an interview with the FAA inspector, a mechanic was working on the airplane the day before the accident to replace the transponder. He stated that sometimes he does have to remove the front seats to perform the work, however, he did not have the left front seat out of the airplane during the maintenance work, he only had the right front seat out of the airplane.

An examination of the left front seat rails revealed that the housings remained engaged on the seat rails except the left forward roller housing, which was disengaged from the seat rail. The housing tangs were not worn, distorted, or splayed. The pin that engaged into the track had no anomalies, the pin spring had positive engaging forces, and the holes were slightly worn. The seat rail was not damaged along the sides of the rail; however, the top of the rail had scoring marks.

According to the airplane owner's manual, the before engine start checklist stated, "Adjust seat to a comfortable position, check to see the seat locking mechanism is secure, and fasten safety belt."

History of Flight

Takeoff Miscellaneous/other
Takeoff Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: July 6, 2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: April 18, 2018
Flight Time: 294 hours (Total, all aircraft), 294 hours (Total, this make and model), 240 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N8905X
Model/Series: 182 D 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 18253305
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 18, 2018 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hrs
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4265 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 230 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AVL,2162 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 17:54 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 45°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 140° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brevard, NC (3NR3) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Asheville, NC (AVL) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 18:10 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Transylvania Community 3NR3 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2110 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27 IFR 
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2903 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 35.269721,-82.643608(est)

Birdstrike: Hughes TH-55, N8045H; accident occurred March 13, 2019 near Dillant-Hopkins Airport (KEEN), Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Keene, NH
Accident Number: GAA19CA168
Date & Time: 03/13/2019, 1800 EDT
Registration: N8045H
Aircraft: Hughes TH 55
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The helicopter pilot reported that, while en route, about 2 miles northeast from his destination airport and about 500 ft above ground level and 60 knots, he heard a loud "thud" from a possible bird strike, and the upper right windscreen/canopy shattered, with pieces going into the main rotor disc and cabin. He continued to the airport and landed without further incident.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor blades.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The helicopter's collision with a bird during cruise flight.

Findings

Environmental issues Animal(s)/bird(s) - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Animal(s)/bird(s) - Ability to respond/compensate

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute Birdstrike (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 35, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/26/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/06/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 550 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25 hours (Total, this make and model), 415 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 44 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hughes
Registration: N8045H
Model/Series: TH 55 269A
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 65-18240
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/15/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1670 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5317.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-B1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLEB, 570 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1156 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 189°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -10°C / -11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Keene, NH
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Keene, NH (EEN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1745 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: DILLANT-HOPKINS (EEN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 488 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Precautionary Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.898333, -72.270833 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Piper PA-28R-200, N33305; accident occurred March 13, 2019 in Easton, Talbot County, Maryland








Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Aquila Aviation LLC


Location: Easton, Maryland 
Accident Number: ERA19LA160
Date & Time: March 13, 2019, 17:40 Local
Registration: N33305
Aircraft: Piper PA28R 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total) 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor and pilot were on a flight to resume the pilot's instrument training. After performing maneuvers and several touch-and-go landings, the pilots elected to perform a practice instrument approach to the destination airport. While on the approach, they configured the airplane for landing. The flight instructor noted that the airplane was below the glideslope and asked the pilot to increase engine power; however, the engine did not respond to the throttle input. The flight instructor took the controls and attempted to restore engine power without success. The propeller continued to windmill, the pilot switched fuel tanks, and the engine did not restart. The flight instructor performed a forced landing in a nearby field, during which the fuselage was substantially damaged. During recovery from the field, fuel was drained from both fuel tanks, and no water or debris was noted in the fuel. An examination of the engine revealed crankshaft and valvetrain continuity throughout the engine. The propeller was rotated through 360° of motion, and compression and suction were noted on all cylinders. In addition, fuel was plumbed into the engine, and the engine was started and ran smoothly without hesitation. The engine power was decreased to idle power, and then the engine was shut down. There were no mechanical malfunctions or failures noted with the engine that would have precluded normal operation before the accident. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident engine examination and testing revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Findings

Not determined (general) - Unknown/Not determined

Factual Information

On March 13, 2019, about 1740 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-200, N33305, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field near Easton, Maryland. The flight instructor and the private pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight that departed from the Cambridge-Dorchester Regional Airport (CGE), Cambridge, Maryland, about 1720. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Easton/Newnam Field (ESN), Easton, Maryland.

According to the flight instructor, the purpose of the flight was to reacquaint the pilot with the airplane and resume his instrument flight training. They departed Lee Airport (ANP), Annapolis, Maryland, about 1630, and flew to CGE and performed two landings. Then, they departed CGE and were cleared for the "ILS Rwy 4" approach with a circle to land clearance for runway 22 at ESN. While descending on the approach, they configured the airplane for landing by reducing engine power, moving the propeller control to the full forward position, setting the mixture to full rich, turning the electric fuel pump on, moving the landing gear selector to the down position, and extending the flaps "one notch." The airplane descended below the glideslope and the flight instructor told the pilot to add engine power, however, while advancing the throttle, the engine did not respond. The flight instructor took the controls and attempted to get the engine to respond without success. The propeller continued to windmill, the pilot switched the fuel tanks, and again, the engine did not restart. The flight instructor looked for a place to land and found a nearby field. They were about 1,000 ft mean sea level, so he extended the flaps, elected to retract the landing gear, and performed a forced landing to the muddy field. The airplane came to rest in the field, the two occupants turned "everything off" and egressed the airplane.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 1975. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming IO-360-C1C, 200-horsepower engine. According to the engine maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was completed on March 5, 2019, at 1,567.6 hours since major overhaul.

An examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed that a fuselage rib was substantially damaged during the accident sequence. Fuel was noted in both fuel tanks and during recovery was drained using the electric fuel pump, which pumped fuel into exterior containers. No water or contaminates were noted in the fuel. An examination of the fuel selector revealed that it moved smoothly, and it could be clearly felt when the selector was in each respective detent.

Examination of the engine revealed that there was no damage to the crankcase. Crankshaft and valvetrain continuity were confirmed. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders. The magneto timing was checked, the magnetos were sparked, and no anomalies were noted. The airbox was examined and not obstructed. Engine control cable continuity was confirmed from the propeller, mixture, and throttle control cables to their respective connections on the engine.

Later, the airplane was secured, fuel was plumbed into to the engine, and the engine was started. It ran smoothly, without hesitation, the engine power was decreased to idle power, and then the engine was shutdown. There were no anomalies noted with the engine.

History of Flight

Approach-circling (IFR) Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)
Emergency descent Off-field or emergency landing
Landing-flare/touchdown Collision during takeoff/land

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor; Private
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: January 4, 2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes Last Flight Review or Equivalent: January 26, 2019
Flight Time: 855 hours (Total, all aircraft), 158 hours (Total, this make and model), 814 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 198 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 67 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: July 24, 2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: October 26, 2018
Flight Time: 263 hours (Total, all aircraft), 21 hours (Total, this make and model), 190 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N33305
Model/Series: PA28R 200
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 28R-7535131
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 5, 2019 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4537.6 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-C1C
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 200
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ESN,72 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 17:57 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 31°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 160° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Cambridge, MD (CGE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Easton, MD (ESN) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 17:20 Local 
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Easton/Newnam Field ESN
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 72 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 04
IFR Approach: ILS
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.779724,-76.088058(est)

Landing Gear Not Configured: Beech E-55 Baron, N15VK; accident occurred March 13, 2019 at Albert Whitted Airport ( KSPG), St Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida











Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: St. Petersburg, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA19TA129
Date & Time: March 13, 2019, 16:17 Local 
Registration: N15VK
Aircraft: Beech E55
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot stated that he became distracted and did not extend the landing gear before landing at the airport. The airplane slid on the runway, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing's rear spar. Although the airplane was equipped with a gear warning horn, both the pilot and the passenger said the horn did not sound. The gear warning horn had been functionally checked during the last annual inspection and was also tested after the accident with no anomalies noted; thus, the investigation could not determine why the pilot and passenger were unable to hear the horn.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to extend the landing gear, which resulted in a gear-up landing.

Findings

Aircraft Main landing gear - Not used/operated
Personnel issues Forgotten action/omission - Pilot
Aircraft Gear position and warning - Inoperative

Factual Information

On March 13, 2019, at 1617 eastern daylight time, a Beech E55, N15VK, sustained substantial damage during a gear-up landing at the Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida. The commercial pilot and the passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that departed Lakeland Linder International Airport (LAL) Lakeland, Florida, at 1515.

The pilot stated that became distracted and did not extend the landing gear before landing. The airplane slid on the runway resulting in substantial damage to the left wing's rear spar. The propellers and flaps were also damaged.

According the airplane's Pilot Operating Handbook (POH), page 6-10, "If either or both throttles are retarded below an engine setting sufficient to sustain flight with the landing gear retracted, a warning horn will sound intermittently." The airplane was equipped with a gear warning horn; however, both the pilot and the passenger said the horn did not sound. The horn was functionally checked during the last annual inspection with no deficiencies noted. The horn was also tested after the accident and it worked as designed.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and sea, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a certified flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot's last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on February 11, 2019. He reported a total of 3,706 hours, of which, 1,217 hours were in multi-engine aircraft.

Weather reported at SPG at 1653 included wind from 090° at 11 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies.

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Landing gear not configured (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor; Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: February 11, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 18, 2018
Flight Time: 3706 hours (Total, all aircraft), 590 hours (Total, this make and model), 3504 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N15VK
Model/Series: E55 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1970
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: TE-805
Landing Gear Type: 
Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: September 1, 2018 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3996.6 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-C7B
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 285 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SPG, 6 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 16:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 90°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lakeland, FL (LAL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: St. Petersburg, FL (SPG) 
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 15:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Albert Whitted SPG 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 6 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2864 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27,-82(est)