Thursday, April 12, 2018

Harmon Rocket, N275JS, owned and operated by the front-seat pilot: Fatal accident occurred January 17, 2017 near Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California
Textron Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Jeff C. Johnson: http://registry.faa.gov/N275JS



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Corona, CA
Accident Number: WPR17LA054
Date & Time: 01/17/2017, 1055 PST
Registration: N275JS
Aircraft: JOHNSON Harmon Rocket
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The private pilot, who was the owner and builder of the experimental amateur-built airplane, and a commercial pilot departed on a local flight and performed three touch-and-go practice takeoffs and landings. During the fourth takeoff, after reaching about 300 ft above the ground, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The airplane made a right turn and collided with terrain about 1,650 ft from the end of the runway. The single-engine airplane was constructed about 7 years before the accident, at which time the private pilot installed a newly-overhauled engine. The airplane had accrued about 100 total hours of time in service. During postaccident examination, the engine would not start but was found to operate normally when a different fuel servo was installed.

The Bendix fuel servo, manufactured in 1977, was designed to meter fuel in relation to the volume of air being consumed by the engine. The metering is accomplished by air and fuel diaphragms inside the unit that are connected by a valve stem that has a regulator ball affixed at its end. A pressure differential across the air diaphragm results in the regulator ball unseating and providing the engine with more fuel. Complete disassembly of the accident fuel servo revealed that the regulator stem was separated from the regulator ball, which would prevent the ball from being able to unseat and would subsequently block fuel from entering the engine, resulting in fuel starvation.

The servo manufacturer stated that the servo's internal components appeared to be original, although those components were required to be replaced every 12 years. There were no maintenance records pertaining to the servo, but its appearance indicated it was likely never overhauled. The maintenance entry for the engine overhaul noted that the airplane was equipped with a "serviceable fuel servo," which, according to a representative from the maintenance facility that performed the overhaul, was likely determined by an engine test run. Because the airframe and engine were classified as amateur-built experimental, the overhaul criteria are not required for airworthiness; however, it is likely that the failure of the regulator valve stem and ball would not have occurred if the servo components had been replaced in accordance with manufacturer specifications.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power during takeoff due to fuel starvation as a result of a failure of internal components of the fuel servo. 

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel control/carburetor - Failure (Cause)
Fuel control/carburetor - Not serviced/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Replacement - Maintenance personnel

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Fuel starvation
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

On January 17, 2017, at 1055 Pacific standard time, an experimental amateur-built Harmon Rocket, N275JS, impacted terrain following a total loss of engine power during the initial climb from Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. The private pilot (seated in the front seat) was fatally injured, and the commercial pilot (seated in the rear seat) sustained serious injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and operated by the front-seat pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which originated from AJO at 1026.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, witnesses reported seeing the airplane initially take off from runway 25. The airplane then landed on runway 07 and immediately departed. After reaching 100-200 ft above ground level (agl), the engine experienced a loss of power. The airplane made a steep turn back toward the airport and collided with terrain, coming to rest on flat, soft vegetation on airport property. The accident site was located about 1,650 ft from the departure end of runway 07.

The airplane was equipped with an Advanced Flight Systems AF-4500sEF multifunction display (MFD) that recorded the flight and engine parameters in 5-second increments. The MFD revealed that the airplane departed at 1026 and circled over Lake Mathews, located about 9 miles to the southeast. Thereafter, the airplane returned to AJO and performed three practice takeoffs and landings on runway 25. The airplane then made a 360o turn to the west of the airport and performed a touch-and-go practice takeoff and landing on runway 07.

The airplane became airborne again at 1052:29 and climbed about 270 ft, to 770 ft mean sea level, at which point the fuel flow dropped from about 20 psi to less than 1 psi. The engine's rpm and exhaust gas temperature values drastically decreased, consistent with the engine experiencing a total loss of power. The airplane began a right turn about 1052:34 and collided with terrain at 1052:49. Figure 1 depicts the takeoff from runway 07 and the remainder of the flight.


Figure 1: Takeoff Prior to Accident

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/05/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 250 hours (Total, this make and model)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:  Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 20000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Front-Seat Pilot

According to the FAA Airman and Medical records, the front-seat pilot, who was the owner and builder of the airplane, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land as well as rotorcraft. He also held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate. The pilot was issued an FAA third-class medical certificate in October 2015, with a limitation that he must wear glasses for near vision.

The pilot's most recent personal flight records were not recovered. On his most recent application for a medical certificate, the pilot reported 2,000 total hours of flight experience.

Aft-Seat Pilot

The commercial pilot, positioned in the aft seat, held ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land; single-engine sea; rotorcraft-helicopter; and instrument airplane. Additionally, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in January 2017 with a limitation that he must have glasses available for near vision.

The pilot's personal flight records were not recovered. On his last application for a medical certificate, the pilot reported 20,000 total hours of flight experience, of which 200 hours was accumulated in the previous 6 months.

It could not be determined who was acting as pilot-in-command at the time of the accident. A witness who knew the owner of the airplane stated that the owner didn't like to fly the airplane without another pilot on board. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: JOHNSON
Registration: N275JS
Model/Series: Harmon Rocket
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0471
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/17/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None 

The Harmon Rocket was a low-wing, single-engine, experimental airplane, constructed by the owner and completed in 2010 with serial number 0471. The last condition inspection was recorded as being preformed by the owner in October 2016 in accordance with 14 CFR Part 43, appendix D. The entry noted a total time in service of 90.71 hours.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540-C4B5 engine, serial number L-5545-48, modified for experimental use only. The last annual inspection logbook entry in October 2016, noted a total engine time of 90.71 hours. The engine was overhauled by Aircraft Engine Specialists, Chandler, Arizona, in May 2009 and shipped to the pilot shortly thereafter for installation on the airplane.

Fuel System

The airplane's fuel system was a gravity-fed design in which fuel flowed from the metal tanks in the inboard section of each wing, through a selector valve, and continued to an electric fuel pump. From the pump, the fuel was routed to a transducer where it was plumbed through the firewall to the gascolator, which contained a fuel screen. Thereafter, the fuel was directed to the engine-driven fuel pump, and then routed under the left cylinders to the fuel servo (located at the forward bottom of the engine). From the servo, the fuel was routed between the Nos. 1 and 3 cylinders to the fuel distribution manifold (i.e., spider) and then to each cylinder's injector.

Fuel Servo

The fuel servo was a Bendix RSA-5AD1 (part number 2524213-1, serial number 6507-T), manufactured in 1977. The major components of the servo include the airflow section, the flow metering section, and the fuel regulator section. Together, these sections are designed to meter fuel in direct ratio to the volume of air being consumed by the engine (see Figure 2).

The regulator assembly contains an air diaphragm, a fuel diaphragm, and regulator stem that has a regulator ball affixed at the end. The air diaphragm senses impact air and compares it to venturi suction. The fuel diaphragm compares metered and unmetered fuel pressure. The diaphragms are connected by the regulator stem, which passes through the center body section of the regulator. The four chambers in the regulator section of the servo act in unison to cause the diaphragms to equalize and regulate the appropriate amount of fuel to the engine when the airflow is altered. When the engine is operating at a constant throttle setting, opposing forces of the fuel and air diaphragms cause the regulator valve stem to unseat to a specific position and an appropriate quantity of fuel is provided to the engine. As the throttle setting is increased, velocity of air through the venturi increases and pressure decreases within the suction side of the air chamber relative to the impact side. This creates a pressure differential across the air diaphragm and causes the regulator valve (ball at the end of the regulator stem) to move toward a more open position. As the regulator valve opens (ball moves off the seat), more fuel is provided to the engine. Once the pressure differential across the fuel diaphragm stabilizes and reaches a force in equilibrium with the air diaphragm, fuel flow is again stabilized.


Figure 2: Drawing of the Fuel Servo (showing regulator valve)


Maintenance

Several pictures of the accident servo were provided to a representative from Precision Airmotive, which purchased Bendix in 1988. He stated that the internal parts appeared to be original to the servo. He stated that all of the parts inside the regulator side are required replacement items at the time of overhaul. At the time of the servo's manufacture, the overhaul requirements were the same as the time between overhaul specified by the engine manufacturer. In 1991, Precision issued a calendar requirement, wherein the servo must be overhauled every 12 years. After overhaul, the servo should have a yellow data plate attached; the accident servo still had the original black data plate.

A review of maintenance records and invoices showed that the maintenance entry for the engine overhaul was dated May 2009 and noted that the airplane was equipped with a "serviceable fuel servo RSA-5AD1, pn 252-4213-1, sn 6507-T." A representative from the maintenance facility that performed the overhaul stated that "serviceability appears to have been determined by a functional check during the test run of the complete engine." There were no other maintenance records found regarding the servo. Because the airframe and engine were classified as amateur-built experimental, the overhaul criteria are not required for airworthiness.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AJO
Observation Time: 1856 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 110°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Corona, CA (AJO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Corona, CA (AJO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: CORONA MUNI (AJO)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 533 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  33.895278, -117.594167 (est)

Medical And Pathological Information

The front-seat pilot survived the impact but died in the hospital later that day. The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of specimens from the pilot. The testing revealed 0.006 (ug/ml, ug/g) tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), an inactive metabolite of the primary psychoactive drug in marijuana tetrahydrocannabinol, detected in blood. Additionally, the report documented Midazolam, a potent anesthetic used during emergency treatment, consistent with postaccident medical intervention. The presence of trace amounts of THC-COOH in femoral blood is consistent with past use of marijuana, but blood testing did not identify the impairing drug marijuana. 

Tests And Research

The front seat had a control quadrant on the left side; the levers were all bent and folded over to the right. The throttle was positioned in a mid-range position and the fuel mixture and propeller controls were full forward.

Both wings remained attached to the airframe; the left fuel tank was breached. Fuel was recovered from both wing tanks. The fuel selector valve was found in the "OFF" position, but witnesses reported that first responders had repositioned the selector. The fuel selector was removed and, when operated, turned smoothly and displayed proper valve function. The fuel pump was removed and investigators connected it to a power source. The pump clicked and air egressed from the outlet. The transducer was removed and disassembled; the wheel was intact and no anomalies were found. The gascolator contained trace amounts of fuel and was free of debris. The upper housing of the fuel manifold was removed; there was no evidence of fuel and the diaphragm was dry.

The engine was mounted on a test stand and fuel was plumbed to the fuel pump; the fuel flowed freely and there was no evidence of blockage. Fuel was then plumbed to the fuel servo and investigators were unable to obtain flow to the outlet. The fuel servo was then removed and replaced with a similar model and fuel ran freely.

The fuel source was then attached to the mechanical fuel pump inlet and the system was reconnected with the exemplar servo. The propeller, damaged from the accident, was removed from the engine and a club propeller was installed. The engine was successfully started and ran for over 5 minutes at various power settings from idle to about 2,700 rpm. A magneto check was conducted on the left and right magnetos with a minimal rpm drop per magneto; no anomalies were found during the engine run.


Figure 3: Fuel Servo's Valve Stem Separated from the Regulator Ball


Fuel Servo

The fuel servo was completely disassembled. The safety wire on the regulator housing had a crimp with a stamp that read "AKB." Upon disassembly of the regulator, investigators noted that the valve stem was separated from the regulator valve (ball) as shown in Figure 3. The accident servo was reassembled and investigators affixed the exemplar servo's regulator section. A fuel source was connected and fuel flowed normally through the servo. The accident regulator section was installed on the exemplar servo and tested; the fuel would not flow. The complete examination notes with pictures are contained in the public docket for this accident.



NTSB Identification: WPR17LA054
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 17, 2017 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: JOHNSON Harmon Rocket, registration: N275JS
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 17, 2017, about 1055 Pacific standard time, an experimental Johnson Harmon Rocket, N275JS, collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Corona Municipal Airport, Corona, California. The private pilot, who was the owner and builder, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The private pilot and certified flight instructor (CFI) were fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight originated from Corona about 1040. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed.

Witnesses reported observing the airplane initially taking off from runway 25. The airplane then landed on runway 07 and immediately departed. After reaching about 100 to 200 ft, the engine experienced a loss of power. The airplane made a steep turn back toward the airport and collided with terrain. The airplane came to rest on the airport property about 2,000 ft southwest of the end of the runway surface. The airplane was recovered for further examination.

North American Navion, N8849H: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2016 (and) Incident occurred December 12, 2015 at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Warren County, New Jersey

Samuel Singer
~


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8849H


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Blairstown, NJ
Accident Number: ERA17LA042
Date & Time: 11/10/2016, 0915 EST
Registration: N8849H
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

Analysis

The private pilot had not flown the accident airplane for almost 1 year while it underwent repairs following a gear-up landing. The purpose of the accident flight was to ferry the airplane to a nearby airport to receive an annual inspection after completion of the repairs. On the morning of the accident, a mechanic taxied the airplane and performed an engine run-up; he did not note any anomalies. The pilot fueled the airplane and started the engine for the flight. Upon starting, the engine went immediately to full power, where it remained as the airplane taxied at high speed about 1,000 ft into a tree. Witnesses reported that the pilot was awake and alert after the accident; thus, there was no evidence of pilot incapacitation. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies. Based on the positions of the throttle and mixture control, and the high speed taxi after engine start, it is likely that the pilot started the engine with the throttle lever accidently in the full-forward position. After the engine started, the pilot could have reduced or ceased engine power by retracting the throttle, retracting the mixture, or turning the magnetos off.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper engine start procedure, which resulted in a loss of control on the ground and collision with a tree. 

Findings

Aircraft
Surface speed/braking - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Incorrect action selection - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Standing-engine(s) start-up
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Taxi
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned personal flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, last flew the accident airplane in December 2015; it was damaged during a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired the damage. The repairs were completed, and another pilot had planned to ferry the airplane to CXY for an annual inspection the day before the accident, but the flight was postponed due to poor weather. The other pilot was not available on the day of the accident, and the owner elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

On the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During the taxi, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completing a preflight inspection, the pilot started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied about 1,000 ft at high speed into a tree. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2015
Flight Time: 1478 hours (Total, all aircraft), 422 hours (Total, this make and model), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours. The most recent entry in the pilot's logbook was dated February 1, 2016. According to the logbook, the pilot had accrued a total flight experience of about 1,478 hours. The pilot reported 422 hours in the accident airplane make and model on his most recent insurance application. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: NORTH AMERICAN
Registration: N8849H
Model/Series: NAVION UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: NAV-4-849
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/21/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2850 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 14 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2066 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours between the time of the last inspection and the accident. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 305°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1200 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 310°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Harrisburg, PA (CXY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EST
Type of Airspace: 

Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO), Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania, was located about 15 miles northwest of the accident site. The 0853 recorded weather at MPO included wind from 310° at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 1,200 ft; temperature 3°C; dew point -1°C; altimeter 30.02 inches Hg. 

Airport Information

Airport: Blairstown (1N7)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 371 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used:  N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:  None 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.971111, -74.997500 (est) 

Examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full-forward position. Additionally, the engine had separated forward of the airframe during the collision with the tree.

The wreckage was examined again by an NTSB investigator after recovery. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft and all three blades exhibited rotational signatures, such as torn blade tips, chordwise scrapes, and leading edge gouges. The throttle body/fuel metering unit was separated from the engine and remained attached to the induction system inlet and wye plenum, which were also separated from the airplane. The throttle and mixture control levers were fractured and their respective shafts were bent. The fractured control lever ends remained attached to the control cable rod ends. Examination of the throttle body/fuel metering unit revealed that the throttle lever was loose on the throttle control shaft; however, it was displaced and bent. No preaccident anomalies were noted with the unit.

The airplane was equipped with push-button Vernier throttle, mixture, and propeller controls. The propeller control knob was fractured and its cable was cut. Examination of the throttle control knob in the cockpit revealed that it was stuck in the full forward position and could not be pulled aft by depressing the push-button release. Examination of the mixture control revealed that it was also in the full forward position. Manual manipulation of the mixture control (both the push-button rapid adjustment mode, and the rotational fine adjustment mode) resulted in normal movement of the control knob with no anomalies noted. The throttle and mixture control knobs and cables were removed from the airplane and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC.

Computed Tomography (CT) scanning of the throttle and mixture controls revealed that the outer sleeve within the throttle control did not appear to be fully seated within the knob, consistent with the throttle cable being pulled forward during engine separation in the accident sequence (for more information, see Computed Tomography Specialist's Factual Report in the public docket for this investigation). 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Morris County Medical Examiner, Morristown, New Jersey, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries."

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the toxicology report revealed:

5.172 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Urine
2.634 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
1.834 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Urine
0.736 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
Midazolam detected in Blood (Cavity)
Naproxen detected in Urine

Katamine, Norketamin, and Midazolam were consistent with emergency medical treatment that the pilot received after the accident. Naproxen is a non-sedating analgesic and not considered impairing. Additionally, according to an ambulance report, the pilot was awake and alert after the accident. 


December 12, 2015 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date:     12-DEC-15
Time:     15:45:00Z
Regis#:     N8849H
Aircraft Make:     NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model:     NAVION
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Minor
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
City:     BLAIRSTOWN
State:     New Jersey


























NTSB Identification: ERA17LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION, registration: N8849H
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot/owner last flew the accident airplane in December 2015, when it experienced a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired damage from the gear-up landing. The repairs were completed and the airplane was supposed to be ferried to CXY for an annual inspection during the day prior to the accident. A different pilot was going to ferry the airplane, but poor weather postponed the flight. That pilot was not available on the day of the accident and the owner/pilot elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

During the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During which, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies with the airplane. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completion of a preflight inspection, the pilot/owner started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied at high speed into a tree.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full forward position. The hydraulic and alternate air controls were in the retracted position. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot/owner, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-849, was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours from the time of the last inspection, until the accident.

Piper PA-24 Comanche, N7386P: Accident occurred April 12, 2018 at New Braunfels Regional Airport (KBAZ), Guadalupe County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N7386P


Location: New Braunfels, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA138
Date & Time: 04/12/2018, 1500 CDT
Registration: N7386P
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On April 12, 2018, about 1500 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24 airplane, N7386P, conducted a forced landing near New Braunfels, Texas. The flight instructor and pilot receiving instruction received minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 training flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported that he was preparing for his commercial pilot check ride with an instructor. He added that they had been in the traffic pattern for some time and was on the last landing. He configured the airplane for the landing and felt and heard what seemed like the engine smoothly retarding to idle. He informed the instructor that the engine had lost power. He added that they checked the emergency checklist; made sure the fuel pump was on, the mixture was full rich, propeller lever was full forward, fuel selector was on the proper tank, and the carburetor heat was selected.

The flight instructor reported that she heard the engine power decrease and thought the pilot had reduced the power. However, the pilot stated that he lost throttle authority. She then grabbed the throttle and pumped it from idle to full throttle several times, with no response from the engine. She added that both of them, verified the sure the fuel pump was on, the mixture was full rich, propeller lever was full forward, fuel selector was on the proper tank, and the carburetor heat was selected.

Unable to make the runway, the instructor informed the tower controller that they were making a forced landing to a field. The airplane came to a stop after colliding with a fence.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector noted fuel was available in both wing fuel tanks, the airplane's landing gear had collapsed and there was substantial damage to the fuselage. The inspector noted that the pilots stated that the fuel selector was on the right-side fuel tank. The inspector conducted an initial test of the fuel system on site, which indicated that fuel would not flow when the right tank was selected.

During recovery, the airplane was placed on stands, with the NTSB Investigator in Charge (IIC), FAA inspectors, and the owner's representative present, the fuel line was disconnected near the engine and the fuel test conducted again. This time, fuel was able when each tank was selected. The airplane was then partially dissembled and transported to a salvage facility.

On April 15, 2018, the NTSB IIC conducted an engine run on the accident airplane. The fuselage, with the wings removed for transport, was placed on a flat bed trailer. In order to run the engine, the damaged 3-bladed propeller and the carburetor air box were replaced. The exhaust pipe was crushed near the tip, so about an 8-inch section of the exhaust pipe was cut off. A fuel can was attached to the fuel line, near the right-wing root location. The engine was primed via the electric boost pump. The engine was then started and run to power. The fuel line was then disconnected and attached to the left side fuel line; the engine test was then repeated. The engine operated without any anomalies noted.

An access cover plate, located on the root end of the right wing, was removed. The fuel tank bladder was opened to allow access into the fuel tank. The fuel line pickup screen was clear of any blockage and no foreign material was seen in the fuel tank.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice accumulation at glide power settings. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 28
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/21/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 25
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  318.6 hours (Total, all aircraft), 13.6 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N7386P
Model/Series: PA 24 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24-2567
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/18/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2551 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1271.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBAZ
Observation Time: 1451 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.83 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: New Braunfels, TX (KBAZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: New Braunfels, TX (KBAZ)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: New Braunfels Regional Airport (KBAZ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 658 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Vegetation
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5364 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Touch and Go

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.702222, -98.027222





NEW BRAUNFELS, Texas - Two people were not injured after a small airplane made an emergency crash landing Thursday afternoon in a field near the New Braunfels Regional Airport.

Authorities were called to the regional airport on FM 758 at about 3 p.m. Thursday for reports of a small airplane making a forced landing in a field nearby. Emergency crews found a man and woman inside the plane that crashed at the 3000 block of Westmeyer Road in Guadalupe County.

The occupants told authorities the plane had mechanical problems during the flight. Neither person was injured in the crash, officials said.

The Texas Department of Public Safety and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://cbsaustin.com