Tuesday, July 09, 2019

Flightstar FC-II, N354AR: Accident occurred June 18, 2019 near Knoxville Downtown Island Airport (KDKX), Knoxville, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N354AR

Location: Knoxville, TN
Accident Number: CEN19LA175
Date & Time: 06/18/2019, 0855 EDT
Registration: N354AR
Aircraft: FLIGHTSTAR FC11
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 19, 2019, about 0855 eastern daylight time, a Flightstar FC11 experimental light sport aircraft, N354AR, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing in water after a loss of engine power near Knoxville, Tennessee. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to the pilot and the local flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated about 0750 from the Sky Ranch Airport (TN98), Knoxville, Tennessee.

After an uneventful local flight, the pilot reported that the engine lost power and he executed a forced landing into the Tennessee River, in close proximity to the Knoxville Downtown Airport (DKX). The pilot exited the aircraft and swam to shore. The aircraft stayed submerged in the water for over 24-hours before its recovery by local authorities. After the accident, the pilot reported that he believed that the engine had some sort of electrical problem. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHTSTAR
Registration: N354AR
Model/Series: FC11
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Odendaal Martin J
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TYS, 979 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 11000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 70°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Knoxville, TN (TN98)
Destination: Knoxville, TN

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.963889, -83.873611 (est)



KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WATE) – Authorities with the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency and Knoxville Police Department have recovered a plane from the Tennessee River after its engine failed on June 18th, 2019.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Martin Odendaal, 62, of Freindsville, was flying his experimental aircraft from Sky Ranch Airport to the Downtown Island Airport  on June 18th when he had to land it in the river.

Knoxville firefighters said they were called to the scene around 8:45 p.m. for a rescue operation, but Odendaal was able to meet them at the shore after swimming from his sunken plane.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Odendaal’s plane is a Flightstar FCII.

Walter Lounsbery, a local pilot, said Odendaal’s plane looked more like an ultralight plane, and possibly flew similar to one as well.

He said those kinds of planes can be easier to land in smaller areas.

“He was flying a very slow aircraft, kind of a ultralight aircraft. Those are wonderful in that they can land in very short spots and if you land in the water it’s normally very safe,” Lounsbery said.

He said that learning how to land in an emergency is a big part of training for a light sport pilot license.

“One of the most crucial things is learning how to divert from your airport to land if you have a mechanical problem. That’s apparently what happened with this pilot. He wasn’t able to make it to Downtown Island Airport, but he could make it into the river which is a lot better than crashing into something,” Lounsbery said.

He said that Odendaal made an excellent landing, compared to the alternatives.

Mitch Bennett, a flight instructor at Sky Ranch, said that pilot training always includes a ditching maneuver.

Bennett agreed that Odendaal executed a textbook ditching maneuver.

According to Bennett, pilots need to look for the safest landing zone closest to them, and in Odendaal’s case that was the water.

He said that then, pilots need to keep calm and accept the fact that their engine failed.

“Without hesitation, (the pilot) immediately pitch(es) for best glide speed as to not stall the aircraft,” Bennett said.

He said then the pilot would head straight for a controlled glide to touch down on the water.

“His training and experience allowed for this to happen for him and the general public. He did a great job landing from the sounds of it. He is alive and safe, nobody else was injured. His training paid off,” Bennett applauded about Odendaal’s landing.

Authorities said that they didn’t have any environmental concerns with leaving the plane in the Tennessee River because the plane used regular fuel, not jet fuel, and it was only carrying about five gallons.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the “crash.”

Story and video ➤ https://www.wate.com



KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — Knoxville emergency crews say a pilot is unharmed after their plane crashed into the Tennessee River near the Island Home airport on June 18th, 2019.

Authorities said it was up to the pilot to get the wreckage out of the water. KPD later said the pilot asked the Blount County Special Operations Response Team to recover the plane, which was completed Wednesday evening.

A team of KPD officers and Knox County deputies used sonar to locate the plane earlier in the day, and the Blount County team confirmed the plane's identity with video technology and a dive at the site before recovering it.

KPD said the preliminary report of the incident has now been handed off the Federal Aviation Administration.

According to Knox County dispatch, crews received a call about a plane that went into the Tennessee River near the South Knoxville airport around 8:45 p.m.

D.J. Corcoran with the Knoxville Fire Department said witnesses reported seeing a plane go into the river just west of the water treatment plant along the north bank and never surfaced.

The Knoxville Police Department later confirmed the crash, saying the sole 62-year-old pilot of that aircraft was found unharmed on the shore after they swam to safety and were pulled from the water by rescue crews.

According to Knoxville Fire Department, the pilot was flying in from Skyranch Airport off Alcoa Highway in Knoxville -- a small airport for sports and hobbyist flyers.

Knoxville Fire Department said the pilot crashed while trying to land the plane, saying the plane's engines had failed at around 2,000 feet and they crashed just shy of the airport.

The pilot reportedly had 5 gallons of fuel on board the Flightstar FC-II, according to Knoxville Fire Department. The plane is still submerged under 15 feet of water, and it will be up to the plane's owner to hire a wrecker company to get it out.

Officials have determined that the wreckage does not interfere with water traffic.

The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified to conduct a full crash investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wbir.com


A Knoxville Police boat near where a small plane crashed into the Tennessee river near the Knoxville Downtown Island Airport on June 18th, 2019. 

Fog covers the water near where a small plane crashed into the Tennessee river near the Knoxville Downtown Island Airport on June 18th, 2019. 


A small plane crashed into the Tennessee River on Tuesday night near the Knoxville Downtown Island Airport. 

At about 8:45 p.m., the Knoxville Fire Department received a call that a plane had gone down in the river. A department spokesman said eyewitnesses saw the plane go down near the north bank.

Firefighters launched a rescue boat, and the pilot was spotted and pulled from the water.

The 62-year-old pilot, who is uninjured and was the only person on board, had flown out of Skyranch Airport in Knoxville before his engine failed just shy of Island Home Airport.

The pilot was flying a Flightstar FC-II. It is submerged in 15 feet of water, the fire department said in a press release.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.knoxnews.com

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N9448B: Accident occurred July 08, 2019 at Bethel Airport (PABE), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Denali CMO; Anchorage, Alaska
Grant Aviation Inc; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9448B

Location: Bethel, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA031
Date & Time: 07/08/2019, 1505 AKD
Registration: N9448B
Aircraft: Cessna 208
Injuries: 6 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Scheduled 

On July 8, 2019, about 1505 Alaska daylight time, Grant Aviation flight GV262, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B airplane, N9448B, was destroyed by a post-crash fire after impacting terrain during a go-around maneuver at the Bethel Airport (BET), Bethel, Alaska. The commercial pilot and five passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Avion Capital Corp., and operated under visual flight rules by Grant Aviation, Inc, Anchorage, Alaska, as a scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed the Newtok Airport (EWU), Newtok, Alaska, about 1430.

The pilot stated that after contacting the Bethel Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) about 10 miles west of the airport, he offered to use runway 12, because it was a more expeditious arrival from the west, and he wanted to "make it easier" for the tower controller who was very busy with arrivals of other airplanes using runways 1L and 1R. The pilot reported that, about 4 miles southwest of the airport, the tower controller cleared him to land on runway 12. Shortly thereafter, the tower controller asked the pilot to "square off" his approach. The pilot stated that he selected a higher than normal traffic pattern altitude, due to the limited visibility and terrain located on the west side of the airport. He conducted a visual approach to runway 12, with an increased rate of descent and full flaps. During the landing flare, the airplane floated down the runway, and the pilot executed a go-around, due to insufficient runway distance remaining. He advanced the throttle to maximum (red line), and retracted the flaps to 20°, while increasing the airplane's pitch attitude. As the airplane climbed out, the pilot transmitted on the tower frequency that he was going around. The pilot recalled that the tower controller urgently instructed him twice to "turn left immediately." He said that as he initiated the turn to the left, the airplane suddenly stalled, rolled right and descended, impacting the ground in a right wing low attitude.

The airplane came to rest on its right side in the grass covered drainage ditch between runways 1L and 1R. The pilot stated that he saw fire through the right window, and immediately went to the back of the airplane to help with the evacuation of the two children and three adult passengers through the left cargo door before the airplane was consumed by fire. Witnesses, the BET Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) crews and the Bethel Fire Department responded.

A preliminary review of archived, Federal Aviation Administration BET ATCT audio files, revealed that, as the pilot was making his radio transmission of intent to go around, the tower controller interrupted and instructed the pilot to immediately make a left turn, which he quickly repeated.

Runway 12 at BET is a 1,858 ft long asphalt and gravel runway which does not intersect with runway 1L or 1R. Refer to figure 1.


Figure 1. Bethel Airport runways and accident site

The closest weather reporting facility is BET. At 1453, a METAR from BET was reporting in part: wind, light and variable at 3 knots; visibility, 3 statute miles in haze; sky condition, clear; temperature, 88° F; dew point 66° F; and an altimeter setting of 29.84 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9448B
Model/Series: 208 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: GRANT AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: ENHA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PABE, 128 ft msl
Observation Time: 2253 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  3 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Newtok, AK (EWU)
Destination: Bethel, AK (BET)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 5 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 60.776667, -161.838611 (est)

Rutan VariEze, N112EZ: Accident occurred July 08, 2019 in Aurora, Kane County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration; Des Plaines, Illinois

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois


https://registry.faa.gov/N112EZ


Location: Kaneville, IL
Accident Number: CEN19LA216
Date & Time: 07/08/2019, 1600 CDT
Registration: N112EZ
Aircraft: Rutan VARIEZE
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 8, 2019, at 1600 central daylight time, a Knight-Wilcox Varieze experimental airplane, N112EZ, made a forced landing to an interstate and collided with a vehicle near Kaneville, Illinois. The pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The vehicle occupant was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions near the accident site and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had not been filed. The flight departed Waukegan National Airport (UGN), Waukegan, Illinois, at 1537, and was en route to Aurora Municipal Airport (ARR), Aurora, Illinois.

After the accident the pilot stated that he was descending toward the destination airport and contacted the ARR air traffic control (ATC) tower. The controller advised the pilot that the ARR airspace was operating under instrument flight rules (IFR) due to low visibility and haze. The pilot remained north of the ARR airspace and requested a special VFR clearance, which was denied by ATC due to an inbound IFR flight. While holding outside of ARR airspace with a reduced power setting, the pilot stated that he reduced the mixture control about one inch of travel and the engine experienced a total loss of power; also, the propeller completely stopped rotating. While about 1,600 ft above ground level (agl), the pilot initiated a steep dive to increase airspeed and allow the propeller to rotate and the engine to restart. During the maneuver the propeller would not rotate so he pulled out of the dive about 300 ft agl and determined the interstate was the best place for a forced landing. After aligning with the west bound lane, he glided the airplane over several cars and maneuvered for an opening in the traffic where he could land the airplane. During the forced landing the right wing contacted a pickup truck in the far right lane and the pilot was unable to maintain directional control of the airplane. The airplane rotated 360° and came to rest in the grass median – see figure 1.


Figure 1 – Airplane in grass median 
(Courtesy of Chicago WGN9)

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane was moved to a local hangar where an engine functional test was conducted. The functional test was successful and no engine anomalies were noted. The test was unable to determine why the propeller would not rotate during the steep dive.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Rutan
Registration: N112EZ
Model/Series: VARIEZE No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: 
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 1552 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:  30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Chicago/Waukegan, IL (UGN)
Destination: Chicago/Aurora, IL (ARR) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 41.868611, -88.579722








A small plane crashed on the Reagan Memorial Tollway near Kaneville and clipped a truck during its landing Monday, police said.

The small, fixed-wing plane was en route from Waukegan to Aurora when the pilot reported engine trouble, according to a news release from Illinois State Police. The pilot attempted an emergency landing in the westbound lanes of the tollway near Watson Road about 4 p.m., police said.

While the plane was landing, it clipped a gray GMC Canyon before it landed in the grass median, police said.

The pilot was taken by the Kaneville Fire Department to the hospital with nonlife-threatening injuries. The driver of the truck wasn't injured, and the vehicle sustained minor damage.

One lane of traffic was blocked as a result of the crash.

The crash investigation continues. Police said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailyherald.com

Continental Copters El Tomcat Mk VI-C, N41830: Accident occurred July 08, 2019 in Franklin, Simpson County, Kentucky

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N41830

Location: Franklin, KY
Accident Number: ERA19TA213
Date & Time: 07/08/2019, 1112 CDT
Registration: N41830
Aircraft: CONTINENTAL COPTERS INC TOMCAT MK6C
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On July 8, 2019, about 1112 central daylight time, a Continental Copters Tomcat MK6C, N41830, was substantially damaged while maneuvering near Franklin, Kentucky. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries. The local aerial application flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed a field near Franklin, Kentucky, about 1110.

The pilot stated that after 50 gallons of chemical and 5 gallons of fuel were added to the helicopter, he departed from a rooftop helipad of a truck in light and variable wind, to spray a field. As the helicopter turned, descended and leveled off to spray the field, the pilot realized that the main rotor rpm began to decay. He increased throttle, lowered the collective, and applied aft cyclic to increase rotor rpm, however, the tailboom contacted the ground and the helicopter to roll inverted. The pilot added that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the helicopter.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed damage to the main rotor blades, tailrotor, fuselage, and tailboom.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CONTINENTAL COPTERS INC
Registration: N41830
Model/Series: TOMCAT MK6C
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As: Tri State Helicopters Inc
Operator Designator Code: TCSG 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BWG, 547 ft msl
Observation Time: 1104 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2100 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Franklin, KY
Destination: Franklin, KY

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 36.681111, -86.631111





BOWLING GREEN, Kentucky – Franklin-Simpson Fire and Rescue was called to a helicopter crash on Kummer Road in Simpson County just before 11 a.m. Monday morning.

“I’d say it’s probably 75 to 100 feet off the end of this water way,” said Robert Palmer, director of Simpson County Emergency Management.

The chopper was dusting crops when it went down.

“The helicopter’s destroyed,” added Palmer. “It’s crumpled up. The pilot’s seat is kind of sitting out in the open facing when you walk in there. The helicopter’s completely destroyed.”

With the help of drones, emergency crews searched the area for well over an hour before finding the wreckage in a tall field of corn, which posed a huge challenge in finding the crash site.

“Finding out for sure where it was at and then dealing with eight to ten foot tall corn and the heat,” said Palmer. “The heat’s the big deal today.”

First responders were notified of the crash when the pilot showed up at an emergency room at Medical Center of Franklin and told medical personnel there he had crashed the aircraft, Palmer said.

Kentucky State Police identified Anthonie Christoffel Vos, 35, of Sevierville, Tennessee, as the pilot of the Continental Copters El Tomcat Mk VI-C, according to a release from KSP. He was crop dusting in the Kummer and Schweizer Roads area.

Vos was treated for minor injuries and released.

“I can tell you he’s lucky,” said Palmer. “He went in pretty hard, pretty short.”

There is no worry of any extra environmental damage due to the crash.

“I would say the environmental impact is zero to almost nothing,” Palmer said. “What’s out there was supposed to go on the crops anyway. It’s not gonna go anywhere from there.”

State police contacted the Federal Aviation Administration for further investigation of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wnky.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N9919V: Accident occurred July 08, 2019 near Newport Municipal Airport (KONP), Lincoln County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9919V

Location: Newport, OR
Accident Number: ANC19LA032
Date & Time: 07/08/2019, 1710 PDT
Registration: N9919V
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 8, 2019, at about 1710 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N9919V, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power while in cruise flight near Newport, Oregon. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and one passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Newport Municipal Airport (KONP), Newport, Oregon for a local whale watching flight.

According to the pilot, after locating and circling a pod of whales for viewing, they had decided to return to Newport. While in level cruise flight at an altitude of about 1,200 ft the engine began to surge with the rpm fluctuating between 2,100 and 2,600 rpm. In an effort to correct for the surging engine, the pilot switched fuel tanks, enrichened the fuel mixture and applied full throttle, to no avail. Unable to maintain altitude, and in an effort to avoid undue harm to persons on the ground, he selected an area of hilly, sand covered terrain for an emergency landing. During the emergency landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery.

The closest weather reporting facility is Newport Municipal Airport (KONP), Newport, Oregon. At 1750, a METAR from KONP was reporting in part: wind, 310 at 8 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, clear; temperature, 62° F; dew point 57° F; and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9919V
Model/Series: 172 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 0050 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Newport, OR
Destination: Newport, OR 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  44.580278, -124.058056 (est)







NEWPORT, Oregon (KPTV) - The current Mayor of Newport has been identified by Oregon State Police as the pilot of a plane that crashed Monday evening.

The crash occurred at around 5:10 p.m. near South Beach State Park.

Oregon State Police said an investigation determined Dean Sawyer, 66, departed from the Newport Municipal Airport in a Cessna 172M Skyhawk and flew around the Depoe Bay area.

Two passengers were in the plane with Sawyer and were identified as Deborah Reasoner, 61, and a 7-year-old juvenile, both from Molalla. Oregon State Police said the relationship between Reasoner and the juvenile is unknown.

As he was flying near Newport, Oregon State Police said Sawyer noticed there was a mechanical problem and attempted to return to the airport.

According to Oregon State Police, the plane did not have enough altitude to fly to the airport, so Sawyer planned for an emergency landing and was able to land on the beach north of the Jetty.

All three passengers were taken to Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital. Sawyer and the juvenile received minor injuries and have been released.

Oregon State Police said Reasoner sustained serious injuries and was lifeflighted to a Portland hospital.

According to Oregon State Police, Sawyer has had a pilot's license for 40 years and has been flying the plane that crashed for over 30 years.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kptv.com

Piper PA-14 Family Cruiser, N1423P: Incident occurred July 05, 2019 at Dillingham Airport (PADL), Alaska -and- accident occurred May 19, 2018 at Vashon Municipal Airport (2S1), King County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

July 05, 2019:  Aircraft landed hard.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1423P

Date: 05-JUL-19
Time: 18:29:00Z
Regis#: N1423P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA14
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DILLINGHAM
State: ALASKA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N1423P


Location: Vashon, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA290
Date & Time: 05/19/2018, 2000 PDT
Registration: N1423P
Aircraft: PIPER PA 14
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, his right foot inadvertently applied pressure to both rudder pedals during the takeoff roll. The airplane exited the left side of the runway, and the left wing struck a tree. The airplane ground looped to the left, and the right wingtip struck the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing, elevator, and rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control of the airplane during the takeoff roll due to his right foot inadvertently applying pressure to both rudder pedals.

Findings

Aircraft
Rudder control system - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Miscellaneous/other
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Runway excursion
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/25/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/12/2016
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 868.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 167 hours (Total, this make and model), 868.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N1423P
Model/Series: PA 14 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1423
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1935 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: KANAKANAK FISHERIES INC.
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: KANAKANAK FISHERIES INC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSEA, 434 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 97°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Vashon, WA (2S1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Vashon, WA (2S1)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2000 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: VASHON MUNI (2S1)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 316 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet 
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2001 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 47.458611, -122.476944 (est)

Piper PA-32-260 Cherokee Six, N3556W: Accident occurred July 06, 2019 near Seldovia Airport (PASO), Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N3556W

Location: Seldovia, AK
Accident Number: GAA19CA387
Date & Time: 07/06/2019, 1905 AKD
Registration: N3556W
Aircraft: Piper PA32
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that the airplane's takeoff gross weight was 300 pounds less than the maximum. He performed a short-field takeoff from the 1,800ft gravel surface, and the initial climb continued as he expected. He recalled that the climb performance degraded and became insufficient to clear the 80ft tall trees located about 1,000ft from the departure end of the runway. The manufacturer's Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) stated that, short field takeoff's that require obstacle clearance will, after breaking ground accelerate to best angle of climb speed, 95 MPH and climb past obstacles. The airplane collided with treetops, descended and subsequently impacted the lake and became submerged.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the stabilator.

Additionally, the POH denotes that the minimum runway distance required for the airplane to takeoff over a 50ft barrier was 1,360ft. According to the manufacturer, the minimum runway distance of 1,360ft represents a takeoff from a hard surface runway.

Further, the POH specifies the use of a soft-field, obstacle clearance takeoff, as the increase flap setting of 25°, airspeed acceleration and pull nose gear off the ground as soon as possible and at the lowest possible airspeed. Accelerate just above the ground to best angle of climb speed, 95 MPH to climb past obstacle clearance height. Continue to climb while accelerating to best rate of climb, 105 MPH while slowly retracting flaps.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/03/2018
Flight Time:  1229 hours (Total, all aircraft), 671 hours (Total, this make and model), 1194 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N3556W
Model/Series: PA32 260
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32-444
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/01/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6643.47 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540-E4B5
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASO, 29 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Seldovia, AK (ASP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Wasilla, AK (AWS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0705 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Seldovia (SOV)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 29 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1845 ft / 80 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None
Latitude, Longitude: 59.443889, -151.705000 (est)



A small private airplane crashed near the Seldovia airport Saturday evening. Seldovia’s police chief Paul Cushman says five people were on board the aircraft but no one was injured.

He adds that the plane crashed almost immediately after it took off:

“They were taking off from the Seldovia airport and everything was normal but they just didn’t quite have enough power to clear some trees,” he said. “They ended up kind of clipping the tops of those trees, which then caused them to obviously lose even more power and they kind of crashed landed into a little body of water here.”

He says a resident who lives near the lagoon where the plane crashed helped assist those on board and called local authorities. Cushman says no one from the plane requested medical help.

“They were obviously very fortunate,” he said. “About as miraculous as a plane crash as you can have. If it would've been another minute into the flight or so, they would have actually crashed into the ocean, versus where they did.”

Cushman notes that the plane’s passengers were just visiting Seldovia and have since left the city via other transportation. But he says the plane sustained significant damage and is still there.

The National Transportation Safety Board says they are still deciding whether to investigate the crash, depending on the level of damage to the airplane and other variables. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kbbi.org