Wednesday, March 13, 2019

American Airlines, Airbus A319: Incident occurred September 29, 2019 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale

Aircraft struck bird(s) on short final.

Date: 29-SEP-19
Time: 11:57:19Z
Regis#: AAL1688
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: AAL1688
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Ayres S2R-T34 Thrush, N40126: Incident occurred March 12, 2019 in Firebaugh, Fresno County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aircraft impacted terrain during aerial application causing damage to prop, gear and wing.

West Valley Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N40126

Date: 12-MAR-19
Time: 03:00:00Z
Regis#: N40126
Aircraft Make: AYRES
Aircraft Model: S2R-T34R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 137
City: FIREBAUGH
State: CALIFORNIA

Beech B-60 Duke, N71WW: Incident occurred March 12, 2019 in Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft veered off taxiway and prop struck taxi edge light.

https://registry.faa.gov/N71WW

Date: 12-MAR-19
Time: 14:14:00Z
Regis#: N71WW
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE60
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Landing Area Undershoot: Gulfstream IV, N505GF; accident occurred March 09, 2019 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, DeKalb County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N505GF

Location: Chamblee, GA
Accident Number: ERA19TA122
Date & Time: 03/09/2019, 1547 EST
Registration: N505GF
Aircraft: Gulfstream GIV
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area undershoot
Injuries: 14 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Executive/Corporate 

On March 9, 2019, at 1547 eastern standard time, a Gulfstream G-IV, N505GF, was substantially damaged during landing at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK) Chamblee, Georgia. The two airline transport pilots and 12 passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Waffle House Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a corporate flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (BZN), Bozeman, Montana, about 1236.

The crew reported that the enroute portion of the flight was normal. Upon arrival into the Atlanta area, air traffic control advised them runway 34 at PDK, which was 3,967-ft-long, was in use and runway 21L/ 3R, which was 6,001-ft-long, was closed until 1600, which was about 20 minutes from then. The crew requested to hold until the longer runway opened, but shortly thereafter after determining they had the landing performance, advised that they would be able to land on runway 34. The pilot reported that the approach to landing was normal, but during the landing flare, he felt an "unusually hard impact." The landing roll and taxi to the ramp were uneventful.

During a hard landing inspection, substantial damage was found to the fuselage. The flight crew did not report any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane. The pilot flying reported that this was his first landing on runway 34 at PDK

Photographs provided by the airport manager revealed that two tire tracks commenced in the grass about 18 ft prior to the runway 34 threshold, and lose dirt and grass were observed around the threshold.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot flying held an airline transport pilot certificate and was issued a first-class medical certificate in January 2019. He reported a total flight time of 4,920 hours, of which 125 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. The second pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate and was issued a first-class medical certificate in May 2018. He reported a total flight time of 8,139 flight hours, of which 972 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was powered by two turbo-fan Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 engines. The most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was completed in February 2019.

At 1553, the reported weather at PDK included 6 statute miles visibility, haze, a broken cloud layer at 3,700 ft above ground level, variable wind at 4 knots, temperature 17°C, dew point 12°C, and barometric pressure of 30.01 inches of mercury. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/07/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/24/2019
Flight Time:   4920 hours (Total, all aircraft), 125 hours (Total, this make and model), 2800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 36 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/24/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/10/2018
Flight Time:  8139 hours (Total, all aircraft), 972 hours (Total, this make and model), 5789 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 46 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Gulfstream
Registration: N505GF
Model/Series: GIV UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1995
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1275
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 16
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/20/2019, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 75000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time: 14406.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TAY 611-8
Registered Owner: WH Air Inc.
Rated Power: 13850 lbs
Operator: Waffle House Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPDK, 998 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1553 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 332°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3700 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Haze; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Bozeman, MT (BZN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Chamblee, GA (PDK)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1036 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Dekalb-Peachtree (PDK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 998 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: Visual
Runway Length/Width: 3967 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 12 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 14 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.872778, -84.300556 (est)

Location: Chamblee, GA
Accident Number: ERA19TA122
Date & Time: 03/09/2019, 1547 EST
Registration: N505GF
Aircraft: Gulfstream GIV
Injuries: 14 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Executive/Corporate 

On March 9, 2019, at 1547 eastern standard time, a Gulfstream G-IV, N505GF, was substantially damaged during landing at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK) Chamblee, Georgia. The two airline transport pilots and 12 passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Waffle House Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a corporate flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (BZN) Bozeman, Montana, about 1236.

The crew reported that after a normal en route flight, upon arrival into the Atlanta area, air traffic control advised them runway 34, which was 3,967-ft-long was in use, and runway 21L/ 3R, which was 6,001-ft-long was closed until 1600, which was about 20 minutes from then. The crew requested to hold until the longer runway opened, but shortly thereafter, they advised that they would be able to land on runway 34. The pilot reported that the approach to landing was normal, but during the landing flare, he felt an "unusually hard impact." The landing roll and taxi to the ramp were uneventful. During a hard landing inspection, substantial damage was found to the fuselage. The crew did not report any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane.

Photographs provided by the airport manager revealed that two tire tracks commenced in the grass about 5-10 ft prior to the runway 34 threshold, and lose dirt and grass was observed around the threshold.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot flying held an airline transport pilot certificate and was issued a first-class medical certificate in January 2019. He reported a total flight time of 4,920 hours, with 125 hours in the accident make and model airplane. The second pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate and was issued a first-class medical certificate in May 2018. He reported a total flight time of 8,139 flight hours, with 972 hours in the accident make and model airplane.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was powered by two turbo-fan Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 engines. The most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was completed in February 2019.

At 1553, the reported weather at PDK included 6 statute miles visibility, haze, a broken cloud layer at 3,700 ft above ground level, variable wind at 4 knots, temperature 17°C, dew point 12°C, and barometric pressure of 30.01 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Gulfstream
Registration: N505GF
Model/Series: GIV UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Waffle House Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPDK, 998 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3700 ft agl
Visibility:  6 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Bozeman, MT (BZN)
Destination: Chamblee, GA (PDK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 12 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 14 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.872778, -84.300556 (est)

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 737-800: Incident occurred March 11, 2019 at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

DAL1068 (738) was taxiing behind DAL2777 (B753) holding short of runway 26L. The wing of DAL1068 (738) struck the tail of DAL2777 (B753). Both aircraft were damaged.

Date: 11-MAR-19
Time: 01:21:00Z
Regis#: DAL1068
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 738
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, registered to and operated by private individuals under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N750R: Accident occurred March 12, 2019 in Waterloo, Monroe County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N750R

Location: Waterloo, IL
Accident Number: CEN19LA098
Date & Time: 03/12/2019, 1440 CDT
Registration: N750R
Aircraft: Piper PA32R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 12, 2019, about 1440 central daylight time, a Piper PA32R-300 airplane, N750R, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Waterloo, Illinois. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from Mobile Downtown Airport (BFM), Mobile, Alabama, at 1118. The intended destination was the St. Louis Downtown Airport (CPS), Cahokia, Illinois.

The airplane came to rest inverted on the grass shoulder along a road near a road intersection. The airframe sustained damage to the nose and forward fuselage, both wings, and empennage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N750R
Model/Series: PA32R 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CPS, 413 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / -1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 12000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 150°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Mobile, AL (BFM)
Destination: Cahokia, IL (CPS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  38.362778, -90.100000 (est)



Three people, including a toddler, were pulled from the wreckage of a small plane, which crashed Tuesday afternoon northeast of Waterloo.

A woman and child were pulled from the wreckage. A man later was freed.

Emergency responders were on the scene where the plane carrying the three people crashed at the intersection of Floraville and Gilmore Lake roads. The plane was upside down when it came to a rest.

Monroe County Sheriff’s Department Major Jim Lansing said injuries sustained are not life-threatening and added that the adult female and male were taken to Barnes-Jewish Hospital and the boy was taken to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

He described the man and woman as being in their mid-50s and said the boy was 4 years old. All three individuals were responsive and talking after being pulled from the wreckage.

Lansing said the woman in the plane told authorities that a warning light went off and oil was spewing onto the windshield, and they couldn’t see anymore. The engine also may have died, he said, but he wasn’t sure.

The pilot circled a few times and may have been trying to land on the road. The plane clipped a tree on its descent, Lansing said.

The plane crashed into Trin Daws’ yard. He’s a Waterloo police sergeant who was off-duty at the time. He said he got home right after the plane crashed and ran to it.

Daws said he and another unidentified man heard a young boy screaming. The two broke the windows of the plane with a fire extinguisher that had ejected from the plane.

“It was really disturbing to hear a child screaming in there,” Daws said.

The boy was in a child car seat when Daws and the other man pulled him from the wreckage. The empty car seat sat at the scene after he had been taken to a hospital.

A preliminary statement from the Federal Aviation Association said the fixed wing single-engine Piper PA-32 was on its way to St. Louis Downtown Airport in Cahokia.

“It breaks my heart there’s a baby seat over there,” said Lynn Kalbfleisch, who lives nearby the crash site.

The plane is registered to an individual from Fairhope, Alabama. FAA investigators were on the scene of the crash site, and the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.

An Arch Rescue helicopter responded to the crash site and airlifted the male pilot, Lansing said.

Daws said it was luck that he and others were able to be on the scene so quickly.

“A lot of us were in the right place,” Daws said.

Sherry Evans, of Columbia, saw the plane before it crashed Tuesday as she drove to Waterloo to pick up her daughter from school. She said that area will often see small “crop dusters” overhead, but the way the plane was flying Tuesday was “abnormal,” according to Evans.

It was flying low and slow, and Evans said she saw it turn to the left sharply before she lost sight of it below the treeline. She didn’t witness the crash, but she did see the aftermath as she drove by.

“It was very alarming because it just looked like a pile of metal,” she said. “It was upside down, compacted.”

She started praying.

“There’s no words to see something like that, let alone be someone going through something like that. By the grace of God, it went a lot better than one would assume by looking at the wreckage,” Evans said.

Story and video ➤ https://www.bnd.com












The FAA and NTSB are investigating a small plane crash that occurred Tuesday afternoon in rural Waterloo.

The Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance flying from Alabama to Cahokia, was carrying three people ­— pilot Michael Stodard, 62, of Fairhope, Ala., his wife Angel, 61, and their 4-year-old grandson. All survived.

At about 2:45 p.m., local residents Kyle Blanchard and Ross Goessling were heading south toward Waterloo. At the same time, off-duty Waterloo Police Department Sgt. Trin Daws was headed north toward his home at Gilmore Lake and Floraville roads, where his wife, Cathy, was outside raking leaves. Tom Falk was out in his Waterloo Lumber delivery truck and Mark Fortman was poking around for deer antlers.

“I saw the plane and it looked like it was flying low and gliding,” Daws said. “I lost sight of it and when I came around the corner on Gilmore Lake Road I saw it had crashed and was upside down.”

Goessling and Blanchard were heading to their respective homes in Maesytown after finishing up their work day in Smithton.

“I saw the plane and I said, ‘That plane’s way too low,’” Blanchard said. “It looked like it was trying to land on the road. When we made a left turn on Waterloo Road we could see it upside down right by the road.”

The Dawses, Blanchard and Goessling were all on the scene within a minute of the crash. Goessling and Cathy Daws called 911. Blanchard and Daws ran toward the plane. That’s when they heard a baby’s cries.

“When we heard the child crying, we busted two windows out of the side of the plane,” Daws said.

Falk, who had been driving past in a Waterloo Lumber Co. truck with a forklift on it, quickly unloaded to lift and drove it to the plane. Blanchard crawled in and used his shoulder to push up on the little boy to he could unbuckle him from his carseat.

“I let him fall onto me and handed him to (Trin),” he said.

Falk used the forklift to lift the wing just enough for the men to get the baby out. Trin Daws passed the 4-year-old to his wife.

The pilot was airlifted by Survival Flight medical helicopter to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and the passenger was transported there by ambulance. A second ambulance took the toddler to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

The wreckage was left overnight on the Daws property, awaiting arrival of investigators and a reclamation team.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.republictimes.net



MONROE COUNTY • Rescuers pulled three family members, including a toddler, from a small plane crash in rural Monroe County on Tuesday afternoon.

The crash was sometime before 3 p.m. at Gilmore Lake Road and Floraville Road, northeast of Waterloo. On board were a 4-year-old boy along with his grandmother and grandfather, who was flying the plane, said Maj. Jim Lansing of the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office. All three were taken to a hospital. They were all talking and conscious, Lansing said.

The woman on board told authorities a warning light came on in the plane and oil began covering the windshield so that the pilot couldn’t see, Lansing said.

The plane clipped a tree before it nose-dived into the ground and flipped, according to the sheriff’s office.

After the crash, a neighbor pulled the toddler out of the wreckage, Lansing said.

The plane seen in images of the crash left an airport near Mobile, Ala., at 11:18 a.m. and was set to arrive at St. Louis Downtown Airport in Cahokia on Tuesday afternoon, according to online flight tracking site FlightAware.

The plane is a Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration was called to the scene to investigate the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.stltoday.com

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7433Y: Incident occurred March 12, 2019 at Newark-Heath Airport (KVTA), Newark, Licking County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Gear either not extended or collapsed on landing. 

https://registry.faa.gov/N7433Y

Date: 12-MAR-19
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N7433Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 30
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NEWARK
State: OHIO

Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey LSA, N23GK: Incident occurred March 12, 2019

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida

During landing roll out the tail wheel separated from the aircraft.

Aviation Transport Sales & Training LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N23GK

Date: 12-MAR-19
Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N23GK
Aircraft Make: PROGRESSIVE AERODYNE INC
Aircraft Model: SEARAY LSA
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON

Piper PA-28-140, N1097T: Incident occurred March 12, 2019 in Mount Pleasant, Charleston County, South Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina

Aircraft landed and ran off end of runway into a marsh.

ALM-RBM Property LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N1097T

Date: 12-MAR-19
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N1097T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MOUNT PLEASANT
State: SOUTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain, operated by Marc Inc under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a commercial aerial surveying flight, N400JM: Fatal accident occurred March 12, 2019 in Madeira, Hamilton County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Hartzell; Piqua, Ohio 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N400JM

Location: Madeira, OH
Accident Number: ERA19FA124
Date & Time: 03/12/2019, 1516 EDT
Registration: N400JM
Aircraft: Piper PA31
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On March 12, 2019, at 1516 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31-350, N400JM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Madeira, Ohio. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by Marc, Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a commercial aerial surveying flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated from Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field (LUK), Cincinnati, Ohio, at 1051.

Review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) preliminary air traffic control (ATC) and radar data revealed that the airplane flew several surveying tracks outside of Cincinnati before proceeding north to fly tracks near Dayton. The pilot reported to ATC that he was having a fuel problem and requested "direct" to LUK and a lower altitude. The controller provided the position of Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), which was located 8 miles ahead. The pilot reported MGY in sight but requested to continue to LUK. When the pilot checked in with the subsequent ATC facility, he reported that the fuel issue was resolved. Seven miles north of LUK, the pilot established radio contact with the LUK tower controller. He advised the controller that the airplane was experiencing a fuel problem and he did not think it was going to reach the airport. The airplane slowed to a groundspeed of 80 knots before the air traffic controller noted a simultaneous loss of radar and radio contact about 5 nautical miles north of LUK.

A relative of the pilot reported that the pilot told him the airplane "had a fuel leak and it was killing his sinuses" about 1 week prior to the accident. A company employee revealed that the airplane had a fuel leak in the left wing, and that the airplane was due to be exchanged with another company PA-31-350 the week before the accident occurred so that the fuel leak could be isolated and repaired. The accident airplane remained parked for a few days, was not exchanged, and then the accident pilot was brought in to continue flying the airplane.

According to witnesses, the airplane flew "very low" and the engine sputtered before making two loud "pop" or "back-fire" sounds. One witness reported that after sputtering, the airplane "was on its left side flying crooked." Another witness reported that the "unusual banking" made the airplane appear to be flying "like a stunt in an airshow." Two additional witnesses reported that the airplane was flying 100-120 ft above ground level in a southerly direction before it turned to the left and "nosedived." Another witness reported that he could see the entire belly of the airplane and the airplane nose was pointing down toward the ground just prior to the airplane impacting a tree. A witness from an adjacent residence reported that there was a "whitish gray smoke coming from the left engine" after the accident, and that a small flame began rising" from that area when he was on the phone with 9-1-1 about 3 minutes after the accident.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane and a ground instructor certificate. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued November 8, 2018. Examination of pilot's logbooks revealed 6,392 total hours of flight experience as of February 19, 2019, including 1,364 hours in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent logged flight review was completed January 31, 2017.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the twin-engine airplane was manufactured in 1981. It was powered by two Lycoming, 350-horsepower engines, which drove two 3-bladed, constant-speed, counter-rotating propellers.

Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the airplane impacted a tree and private residence before it came to rest upright on a 335° heading. All major portions of the airplane were located on site.

The fuselage was substantially damaged. The instrument panel was fragmented and destroyed. The engine control levers were fire damaged and all levers were in the full forward position. Control continuity was established from the flight controls to the flight control surfaces except for one elevator cable attachment, which exhibited a tensile overload fracture. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The outboard leading edge of the left wing was crushed upward and aft, and the inboard section displayed thermal and impact damage. The right wing outboard of the right nacelle was impact separated, and a section of the right wing came to rest on the roof of the home. The leading edge of the right wing section displayed a semi-circular crush area about 1 ft in diameter. The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were dented. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were bet upward at the tip. Measurement of the rudder trim barrel revealed a nose-right trim setting.

Both engines remained attached to their respective wings. The left engine remained attached at the mount, however the mount was bent and fractured in multiple locations. The engine was angled upward about 75°. All but 4 inches of the left propeller was buried and located at initial ground impact point, which was about 13 ft from the left engine. The right engine was found attached to the right wing and its respective engine mounts, however the engine mounts were fractured in multiple locations. All but 6 inches of the right propeller was buried and located at the initial ground impact point, which was about 18 ft from the right engine.

The left engine crankshaft would not rotate upon initial examination. Impact damage was visible to ignition harness leads on both sides of the engine. Both magnetos remained secured and produced sparks at all leads when tested. Less than 2 ounces of fuel was observed within the fuel inlet of the fuel servo upon removal of the servo. The sample tested negative for water. The fuel servo was disassembled and both diaphragms were present and damage free with no signs of tears. The fuel inlet screen was found unobstructed. Rotation of the engine crankshaft was achieved through the vacuum pump drive after the removal of impact damaged pushrods. Spark plugs showed coloration consistent with normal operation and electrodes remained mechanically undamaged. A borescope inspection of all cylinders did not reveal any anomalies. The oil filter was opened, inspected, and no debris was noted. Fuel injectors were removed and unobstructed. Residual or no fuel was found during the examination and removal of components such as fuel lines, injector lines and the fuel pump.

The right engine crankshaft would not rotate upon initial examination. Minor impact damage was visible to ignition harness leads. Cylinder Nos. 2, 4, and 6 displayed varying degrees of impact damage to their top sides. The alternator mount was found fractured and the alternator was not present at the time of engine examination. Spark plugs showed coloration consistent with normal operation and electrodes remained mechanically undamaged. Both magnetos produced sparks at all leads when tested. The fuel servo was dissembled and both diaphragms were present and free of damage with no signs of tears. Engine crankshaft rotation was achieved through the vacuum pump drive after the removal of impact damaged pushrods. A borescope inspection of all cylinders did not reveal any anomalies. The oil filter was opened, inspected and no debris was noted. Fuel injectors were removed and were unobstructed. The oil suction screen was found unobstructed but contained nonferrous pieces of material. Fuel was found during examination of the right engine fuel lines, injector lines, and the fuel pump.

Both propellers were separated from the engine mounting flanges. Examination of the right propeller revealed that all blades exhibited aft bending and bending opposite rotation, twisting leading edge down, and chordwise rotational scoring on both face and camber sides. Examination of the left propeller revealed that two blades exhibited aft bending with no remarkable twist or leading-edge damage. One blade exhibited no remarkable bending or twisting. All three blades exhibited mild chordwise/rotational abrasion.

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N400JM
Model/Series: PA31 350
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: MARC, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: MARC, Inc.
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LUK, 490 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cincinnati, OH (LUK)
Destination: Cincinnati, OH (LUK) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.179444, -84.380278

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


David Sapp

NTSB investigator Todd Gunther





MADEIRA, Ohio —  Nation Transportation Safety Board investigators said they will have to rely on evidence at the scene and witnesses to determine what caused a Piper 31 PA to crash into a Madeira neighborhood Tuesday.

“About two miles north of Lunken, there was a simultaneous loss of radar and radar contact with the aircraft,” NTSB investigator Todd Gunther said. “There was no distress call.”

Gunther said there are no flight recorders on the plane, so they won’t get details about what was happening with the systems on board.

At the scene, investigators have started to put together the final moments of the flight.

“The airplane struck a tree somewhere above ground level with the right wing first, spun approximately 180 degrees, as it came down on top of a house and came to rest in the opposite direction of what it’s flight path was,” Gunther said.

The pilot was David Sapp, 62.

His sister, who didn’t want to be identified, said he was a father and a grandfather.

“He loved playing hockey. He loved everything athletic. In Arizona, he was a big brother,” the sister said.

She said he was from Cleveland originally, but moved to Phoenix and considered that home unless he was flying.

“He said that was his second home,” his sister said.

Sapp’s sister also said they believe there was a problem with the plane.

“He had concerns, when he spoke to his wife, about the plane acting up,” the sister said.

The NTSB will have a team of four members in the area through the weekend.


Story and video ➤ https://www.wlwt.com






A Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain plane crashed into a house in Madeira on Tuesday as it was heading back to Lunken Airport, killing the pilot, officials said.

Officials identified the pilot as 62-year-old David Sapp.

A man who lives behind the site of the wreckage said the sound of splintering wood was so intense, he thought his own home had been struck.

Carter Waide ran outside, toward the wreckage in his neighbor's yard. The front end of the plane was obliterated, he said, adding "anybody that would have been in the first two seats didn’t have a chance."

The plane burst into flames.

Waide alerted authorities, sickened by the scene.

"It was so strange to see a plane," Waide said. "Felt sick cause you knew it was really bad. I said a quick prayer and tried to help but nothing (could) be done."

No other fatalities were being reported Tuesday evening. Ohio State Highway Patrol did not specify how Sapp died or where he was from. 

The plane, which fire officials said had been gathering images for maps and geographic information systems (GIS), went down at about 3:18 p.m. It hit the addition on the back of the house, knocking part of the addition down, said Madeira/Indian Hill Fire Chief Stephen Ashbrock.

A neighbor said no one was at home at the time of the crash, and two dogs were rescued. 

The house is on Rollymeade Avenue, near Kenwood and Shawnee Run roads, just east of the Kenwood Country Club. It's a neighborhood filled with children. The streets are lined with single-family brick homes with big front yards and some large mature trees.

Other neighbors described hearing a thud, but not a violent explosion, when the plane struck the home.

Jenny Brock, who lives near the crash scene, has grown accustomed to the sound of airplanes passing overhead because the neighborhood is directly on the flight path to Lunken.

"I just heard a good three seconds of what sounded like an engine failure, then a loud bang," Brock said.

Judith Lampe, who also lives nearby, said the plane "made a terrible noise."

The back of the house, Lampe said, was "pretty much open to the elements." 

Officials with the FBI, Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board responded or were en route to the scene, Ashbrock said.

The FAA released the following statement:

"A twin-engine Piper PA-31 crashed into a home… near Madeira, Ohio. FAA investigators are on their way to the crash site, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation. The FAA and NTSB do not release names of pilots or passengers."

Radarbox24.com, which tracks the movement of planes, shows the Piper left Lunken Airport and then flew north to Springfield, Ohio. The Piper made at least six passes over the Springfield area, then went south and made at least four passes between Middletown and Mason. It then headed south, in the direction of Lunken, which is about five miles south-southwest of the crash site.

The plane was built in 1980, FAA records show. A plane with the same tail number was involved in an accident in 2002, according to documents on AviationDB.Net. The plane hit power lines during a landing at Front Range Airport in Colorado about 20 miles east of Denver. The pilot couldn't see through the windshield because of a window heater failure.

The plane currently is owned by Marc Inc., which a company website describes as "North America's largest provider of contract aircraft and flight crews for airborne GIS survey and surveillance projects." Marc bought the Piper in 2007, FAA records show.

The company's owner, Billy H. Miller, said he was not aware of the crash and directed requests for information to the company's office, which is based at John Bell Williams Airport in Bolton, Mississippi. The airport is owned by Hinds Community College. The company, which owns and operates its own fleet, referred all questions to their attorney, Thomas Bryson, who was not available for comment.

Madeira resident Bill Heckle had been out flying Tuesday, testing his plane’s radio gear. He described the conditions as clear with little wind.

When Heckle landed at Lunken Airport, he noticed that his wife had been calling his cellphone. They live down the street from the crash scene.

She was worried because she knew he would have been flying in the area.

“She was pretty distraught when I called,” Heckle said. “She was concerned that it might have been me.”


Story and video ➤ https://www.cincinnati.com


Mandatory credit: Carter Waide
  A body is removed from the site of a plane crash on Rollymeade Avenue, March 12th, 2019, in Madeira, Ohio. Authorities say a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain has crashed into a house in a suburban Cincinnati community, killing the pilot.






MADEIRA, Ohio (FOX19) - The pilot killed in a plane crash in a northeastern Cincinnati suburb Tuesday had a current commercial flying license, according to online federal aviation records.

David J. Sapp, 62, is from Sun City in Maricopa County, Arizona, said troopers with the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Hamilton County post in Blue Ash.

Sapp’s commercial pilot license was issued Jan. 9, 2018, according to online Federal Aviation Administration records.

It’s unclear how long Sapp was a licensed pilot.

We have a call and email into FAA corporate officials for more information.

He was qualified to fly the plane he was in, but the company that owns the Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain is dissolved, according to online records with the Mississippi Secretary of State’s Office.

We also are checking with the Mississippi Secretary of State’s Office to see why the company that owns the plane is dissolved.

The plane has no prior incidents, according to online federal aviation records.

The National Transportation Safety Board is expected to arrive at the crash scene Wednesday morning as the investigation continues, troopers said.

The plane crashed at 3:18 p.m. Tuesday on Rollymeade Avenue and caught fire after it struck a remodeled portion of a home, said Madeira & Indian Hill Joint Fire District Fire Chief Stephen Ashbrock.

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox19.com












MADEIRA, Ohio (WKRC) -- A Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain crashed into a Madeira home Tuesday afternoon, killing the pilot who was the only person on board.

As first responders rushed to the scene, neighbors also rushed to help.

Carter Waide didn’t have to go far, the plane crash happened in the yard right next to his.

“The flames started and 911 said don't go near it. It was engulfed in flames pretty fast,” said Waide. He says he couldn’t see inside the cockpit and it didn’t look good as parts of the plane's top were missing.

Waide says he spoke to some other neighbors who saw the plane crash.

“They said they both saw that it was coming in very loud. We get a lot of planes going overhead that land at Lunken but they both said it was very low.

The left wing dipped, banked sharply, spun around and went into that house and entered the ground,” said Waide.

The neighborhood sits in the flight path of Lunken Airport, where the pilot was heading when he crashed.

Bill Heckle lives in the neighborhood and is also a pilot. Heckle was flying at the time and says his phone kept ringing, but he didn’t answer it. It was his wife calling.

"She was a bit distraught when I called her because she couldn’t get a hold of me,” said Heckle. “She was concerned that the plane that crashed could have been mine.”

The pilot has been identified as David Sapp, 62, of Glendale, Arizona.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be in Madeira Wednesday morning to investigate.

Story and video ➤ https://local12.com