Monday, September 18, 2017

Dynamic airline makes progress on customer liabilities, cuts work force by nearly one-third

Dynamic International Airways has made significant progress in reducing its customer financial liabilities since filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, according to a status update Friday.

However, the High Point charter airline has cut its work force by nearly one-third and continues to face legal attempts to force it into liquidation.

Dynamic also reported it has a new chief executive in Ray Lawlor, who has more than 30 years of aviation industry experience. He also serves as senior vice president of cargo sales and marketing for Swift Air LLC.

The company has eliminated 60 of 192 jobs since filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection July 19. It has plans to add eight pilots and 22 flight attendants as part of expanding services through a new flight strategy that began Friday.

Dynamic reported trimming its customer liability debt from $7.98 million to $1.96 million as of Friday. It projects reducing the debt to $323,659 by mid-October.

At the time of the bankruptcy filing, Dynamic’s fleet featured six Boeing 767s serving routes that include New York and Ontario, Calif. International service is to Georgetown, Guyana; Guayaquil, Ecuador; Saipan in Northern Mariana Islands; and Changchun and Nanchang, China. The aircraft can carry 235 passengers using 21 lie-flat business-class seats and 214 economy-class seats.

The airline has ended the Ecuador service because of permitting issue with the Ecuadorian government. It is planning to reduce its service to Guyana from five flights weekly to just one beginning in early October.

Dynamic said its focus will be on an aircraft, crew, maintenance and insurance strategy, known as ACMI, in which it gains business from a third-party vendor that sells flight tickets.

An ACMI carrier receives a flat rate per flight hour. Dynamic said it has agreed to one ACMI contract with Swift Travel Services for flights between Port Au Prince, Haiti, and Santiago, Chile. It is negotiating for a second such contract for flights from Miami to Havana and Santa Clara, Cuba.

Dynamic’s bare-bones filing came after Dynamic lost a legal fight in U.S. District Court for the Middle District.

PMC Aviation LLC of Greensboro is owed $1.19 million, representing an arbitration judgment reached in April that Dynamic disputes. Dynamic says its filing was prompted by recent arbitration judgments against the company that it is challenging under the International Commercial Arbitration Act.

PMC claims in its motion for liquidation that Dynamic “is suffering from millions of dollars of continuing losses. ... The debtor has been grossly mismanaged.”

Dynamic lists between 200 and 999 creditors, assets between $10 million and $50 million, and liabilities between $50 million and $100 million. The company projects funds will be available for distribution to unsecured creditors.

PMC’s motion is being opposed by unsecured creditor Worldwide Flight Services Inc. of Jamaica, N.Y., which is owed $123,773.

Dynamic’s largest unsecured creditor is Air India Inc. at $10.5 million from another arbitration award that Dynamic disputes. B.K.P. Enterprises & Expim International of Greensboro, was awarded a combined $3.49 million arbitration judgment in December that Dynamic also disputes.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.journalnow.com

Zenair STOL CH 701, N61KW, Pragway US Inc: Incident occurred September 18, 2017 in Clearwater Beach, Pinellas County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft force landed on a beach.

Pragway US Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N61KW

Date: 18-SEP-17
Time: 16:50:00Z
Regis#: N61KW
Aircraft Make: CZECH
Aircraft Model: ZENAIR CH701
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CLEARWATER
State: FLORIDA











CLEARWATER (FOX 13) - A small kit-built plane made an emergency landing along the white sands of Clearwater Beach this afternoon.

The Czech Sport Aircraft Zenith STOL CH 701 single-engine plane, described as "experimental" by police, experienced mechanical problems and was forced to land on the beach along Sand Key.

Two people were on board.  Neither were hurt.

Police said the FAA had been notified.

"Not every day you see a plane on the beach at Sand Key," Clearwater police tweeted.

The FAA database shows the plane is registered to a company called  U.S., based out of Delaware.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox13news.com

Navy proposes drone take-off and landing ban near installations

There's a variety of drones with videos cameras available for purchase on the Internet for as little as $50, which makes them more accessible than ever for amateur hobbyists and professional videographers alike to soar over the city and record a bird's-eye view of the waterfront. 

But Naval Base Kitsap officials are concerned some drone pilots might have something in mind other than sightseeing, NBK Commanding Officer Capt. Alan Schrader said.

"It's an issue of national security," Schrader said. "These drones can be used for a whole series of nefarious activities."

Schrader and NBK Community Planning Liaison Officer Lynn Wall presented a proposed ordinance before the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners on Monday that would prohibit the launching and landing of unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly known as drones, near the base's five military installations.

NBK officials said drone flights continue over Navy installations despite Federal Aviation Administration regulations that prohibit such action, but they would not disclose any specific incidents.

The base's security concerns from drone overflight include "unauthorized surveillance, unauthorized access to or disclosure of classified or otherwise lawfully protected information; disruption of or damage to a communication system; interference or disruption of a Navy mission; or in worst cases UAS (unmanned aircraft systems) may be used for delivery or carriage of weapons, explosives, or other hazardous materials for criminal activities," according to a list of talking points released by the Navy.  

Although the county does not have the jurisdiction to directly govern drone flight itself in the proposed buffer zones, NBK officials said an indirect approach to prohibit drone take-offs and landings in the buffer-zone areas would effectively do so and would legally fall under the county's purview. 

"It's not saying you can't fly, but technically you can't launch or land, so you're not flying in that area," Wall said. 

The ban would extend 3,000 feet from the fence lines of each installation, including the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center at Keyport, Naval Hospital Bremerton and the fuel depot at Manchester.

NBK officials and the county are seeking to coordinate efforts with the city of Bremerton to develop a uniform ordinance so the law would be the same across the city and county jurisdictions.

The proposed buffer around PSNS would encompass the downtown Bremerton area and the waterfront. It would run south across the Sinclair Inlet almost to Port Orchard and north to 11th Street. To the west, it would run to Highway 3 and encompass Navy Yard City and then span east with a boundary of almost the entire length of the Manette bridge.

"Obviously this is going to have an impact on a number of individuals, the folks who are private citizens who live in whatever radius is selected," Schrader said, in addition to those who wish to operate drones in the open public lands that fall within the barrier.

In a special circumstance, the buffer zones wouldn't be the final say on using a drone to film footage in the area. The county discussed developing an exemption that would allow the use of a drone to film a special event, such as a wedding or a party, with an approved application and "reminders and restrictions that they will not be able to go over across the base lines," Kitsap County Sheriff Gary Simpson said.

All types of unmanned aircraft would fall under the take-off and landing ban within the buffer zones. 

"The simplicity of enforcement is if it's all [of them], it's anything and everything," Simpson said. "If it's it's defined as 'this, this and this,' then it's always up for interpretation."

The proposal did not identify what sort of penalty violators of the buffer zone would face if they were caught operating a drone in the banned area, ranging from whether it could be a civil fine to a misdemeanor violation that could result in jail time. 

"There has to be some kind of balance there," Simpson said. "If we don't make it serious enough, then it will just be laughed upon."

NBK's proposal is modeled after a similar ordinance passed in St. Marys, Georgia, near the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, in December 2016. 

County officials will be writing a draft ordinance in the next week, considering enforcement mechanisms and developing a community outreach effort for a public conversation on the proposed buffer areas. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kitsapsun.com

Yeager Airport (KCRW) to host 70th Anniversary Air Show



CHARLESTON, WV (WCHS/WVAH) — Charleston's Yeager Airport and the West Virginia Air National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing will celebrate their 70th anniversary with an air show Sept. 30 and Oct. 1.

According to the Charleston Convention and Visitors Bureau, the event will feature flying demonstrations, aircraft displays and tours and rides on a World War II-era aircraft.

The event will feature several examples of aircraft associated with the airport during its early years, including a Curtiss C-46 Commando transport plane. The Curtiss C-46 Commando was the first aircraft assigned to the West Virginia Air Guard's 130th Airlift Wing. It will also feature an American Airlines DC-3, the first commercial aircraft to operate at the Kanawha Airport during its 1947 debut.

Part of the "Rise Above" traveling exhibit detailing the history of the Tuskegee Airman will feature a World War II-era P-51 fighter plane. The Tuskegee Airman were the first two squadrons of black fighter pilots allowed to serve in the U.S. military.

Other aircraft featured in the show will include a World War II-era B-17 Flying Fortress and B-25 Mitchell bombers and a C-47 Sktrain transport from the Yankee Air Museum in Michigan. Also scheduled to appear are a World War I-era Curtiss JN-4 Jenny biplane, a Stinson L-5 "Flying Jeep" single engine observation plane, a T-6 Texan fighter pilot training aircraft and a World War II-era Grumman TMB Avenger torpedo bomber.

The event is free and open to the public. It begins at 9 a.m. Saturday.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wvah.com

Ameren Illinois utilizing drones for quicker fixes



Ameren Illinois customers will no longer simply see employees and trucks when the company is repairing downed lines. They also may see a high-tech drone hovering above.

Ameren demonstrated the capabilities of its new drones Friday at its facility on West Lafayette Avenue. The company’s drone program launched roughly two years ago and now is active throughout the state, including in Morgan County.

“We can use drones to decrease the time of an outage if there is an outage, especially in an off-road area,” said Riley Adams, manager of electric initiatives for Ameren Illinois. “In the past, we would send several people to walk through there and see what’s wrong. That takes hours sometimes. It could be a line by a tree way down there. If we have a drone with a pilot locally that understood what they were looking at, we could go down to that area in 15 minutes and find out what’s wrong.”

Each of Ameren’s drones is assigned to a “pilot.” Instead of workers driving around until they find the problem, a pilot can fly a drone along power lines, taking photos and videos, if necessary. Once the problem is identified, workers can plot the quickest route to get there.

This came in handy a couple months ago in Beardstown, when workers had to troubleshoot a damaged line in a swamp, said Kyle Maxwell, supervisor of electric operations for Ameren Illinois.

Walking the area is not possible and a boat is used to patrol the lines, Maxwell said.




Using a drone, the area was quickly mapped out and the problem identified within 5 minutes. Workers then got to work and got the power going again, he said.

“Before, we’d be idling down the line using a boat motor and using binoculars to find the problem,” Maxwell said. “Labor intensive and not the safest way to do it.”

Safety is a big plus when it comes to drones, Adams said.

“When we send people walking down a line like that, there’s a lot of hazards,” Adams said. “There’s creeks, there’s beehives, there’s wires down, and it’s a hazard for employees. This eliminates those hazards. We can identify the safest way to get down there, identify what the problem is, what tools we need and get down there a lot quicker.”

Ameren’s drone pilots must get a remote pilot certificate through the Federal Aviation Administration and take a two-day training course at Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s aviation school. Then they return home for further training through Ameren’s internal training program.

Aside from the obvious uses during storms and power outages, Maxwell said the drones will have a large role in day-to-day operations. For example, drones can be used for pole inspections, saving engineers time.

Maxwell also anticipates the company soon will be able to attach thermal cameras to the drones to help detect gas leaks.

The use of drones comes at no additional cost to Ameren customers, Adams said. The new technology will roll out across the state as new pilots are trained.

“We’re a 100-year-old company,” Adams said. “You don’t want to stay sitting in the past. You want to look to the future and see what’s out there. Once it gets fully developed, it’s going to be a benefit for the customer.”

Original article ➤ http://www.myjournalcourier.com

Sexual assaults on airliners a growing problem

You expect for safety to be the top priority every time you board a flight, but there are growing concerns about sexual assaults against passengers on commercial airlines. A local woman who says she was sexually assaulted on a flight last year has launched campaign to raise awareness about the issue in hopes of getting the government and airlines to take notice and address it.

Allison Dvaladze travels regularly for work and says nothing seemed out of the ordinary on her flight to Uganda in February 2016. As she started to fall asleep, though, she says the passenger next to her grabbed her crotch. “I was disoriented, yelled and hit his hand and almost immediately he grabbed me again.” Allison says she fought him off, but he grabbed her and second and third time before she was able to get out of her seat and contact the flight crew. “The crew was very supportive. They were very understanding. What came out to me right away, what became apparent, was that they don’t have training in how to handle the situation. One of the things they asked me right away was, "What do you want us to do?' And my response was, 'What are you supposed to do?' ”

That experience led Allison to share her story and start a Facebook page for her campaign: “Protect Airline Passengers From Sexual Assault Now.” The page began as a place to share articles about similar cases. Allison began getting messages from around the world from people who say they’d also been sexually assaulted on commercial flights.

The problem of sexual assaults on flights is one not commonly talked about, but reports are growing more frequent.

(You can read about those incidents here. And here. Also here. And here. )

“It never occurred to me while flying on a plane that these things happen,” Allison noted, which is why she reached out to U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. “When someone like Allison calls and says something happened to me and you think, 'That’s not right.' "

Murray’s office sent letters signed by 22 other senators to the Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of Justice, highlighting Allison’s story and urging the need for standards, training and protocol when it comes to addressing, reporting and preventing sexual assaults on flights. “I think the most important thing is that if you are getting on an airplane, you know that if something bad happens to you, sexual assault in this case, it will be reported so it won’t happen again,” says Murray.

Currently, there are no federal requirements for airlines to train cabin crews on how to handle sexual assaults, and no federal agency tracks the issue. The FBI records only airline sexual assaults that have been reported and investigated. Those numbers have increased from 40 in 2015 to 57 in 2016. The Department of Transportation tracks airline complaints in a monthly report. It includes complaints about things like lost baggage and delayed flights. However, there is no category to cover sexual assaults. Any complaints related to that issue would most likely fall under the category “other” and the subcategory “others not categorized above.”

KOMO News reached out to 14 airlines to ask how they track sexual assaults and train their crews to handle them: American, Delta, United, Alaska, British Airways, JetBlue, Southwest, Spirit, Lufthansa, Air Canada, Hawaiian, Emirates, Korean Air & All Nippon Airways. Seven airlines either either didn’t respond or refused to comment. Of those that did, Hawaiian, American and Southwest airlines confirmed they keep records of reported assaults, but do not release them. Only Hawaiian and Alaska Airlines specifically mentioned assault or sexual assault in their response about flight crew training. The more common response is that airline crews are taught how to respond to “unruly” or “disruptive” passengers by separating them and notifying the captain. (You can see all the airlines responses at the bottom of this story.)

Allison points out: “Responding to a disruptive passenger and responding to a victim of sexual assault are two entirely different issues that require totally different responses.”

The Association Of Flight Attendants represents 50,000 people worldwide. The union and its President Sara Nelson support expanding training to include how to respond to sexual assaults. “We find that sexual assault is a unique crime that needs to be identified as a unique crime and that everyone at the airline needs to understand it’s happening and that it needs to be reported.” Earlier this year, the AFA sent a seven-question survey out to its membership about sexual assaults on flights. From the nearly 2,000 responses they learned:

-- 1 in 5 flight attendants has experienced a report of a mid-flight sexual assault between passengers

-- Law enforcement was contacted or met the plane only 40 percent of the time

-- 56 percent respondents report no knowledge of any written guidance or training on dealing with sexual assaults available through their airline

"Across the board, our members told us even when the written guidelines are there in their manual, they are not aware of them, so there needs to be a heightened awareness for the flight crew, for responders on the ground,” Nelson says. If a flight attendant does report a sexual assault to the pilot, the pilot would then report it to controllers on the ground, who is then supposed to contact law enforcement to meet the plane. “If anyone of those people along the line either become too busy, makes a judgment call about whether or not law enforcement should be called, that can fail then to be reported and responded to.”

In Allison’s case, she eventually learned the flight crew never filed a report, and after pressing the airline for more information, she received a final response: “We actually have no record of anything on your flight, so we consider this a closed issue.”

There are many theories about why mid-flight sexual assaults are being reported more often. Dvaladze, Murray and Nelson all mention the shrinking size of seats as something providing more opportunity for would-be offenders. With airlines attempting to get more people on flights, passengers are put closer together. A passenger-advocacy group “Flyers Rights” is currently suing the FAA over the shrinking sizes of airline seats, claiming it can also be a health hazard. The group's research says seat sizes have reduced from an average of 18.5 inches in the early 2000s to just 17 inches, and sometimes even less. Nelson says this change also make it more difficult for flight attendants to keep a clear line of sight on all passengers and spot potential red flags.

There is a growing effort to address mid-flight sexual assaults. In a written response to Sen. Murray’s letter last fall, the Department Of Justice says it is working with several other government agencies to identify and develop best practices to address sexual assaults on commercial flights. Murray is also among 20 U.S. lawmakers who are co-sponsoring the “SAFE Act,” or “Stopping Assault While Flying Enforcement” Act, which was introduced in July. Murray says the goal is “to require training for employees to know what to do, to require reporting, which currently doesn’t happen which is surprising, and to require consistency so all airlines are following the same regulations.”

Murray credits people like Allison who are willing to share their story to bring attention to a serious problem: “It’s those personal stories that really make a difference that bring it to attention, people willing to stand up, tell a story that’s not fun, to tell that can make changes for everyone.” Allison hopes it encourages others to step up, “If you see someone who’s trying to make a different, make a change, support them, encourage them, they’re doing something not just for them, but for everybody.”

KOMO News reached out to 14 airlines for this story. These are their responses:

Southwest Airlines:

We take the protections of our Customers very seriously, and Safety is at the forefront of everything we do at Southwest Airlines. Our Flight Attendants are trained to take care of a wide range of sensitive Customer issues.

Our Crews are trained on self-defense tactics for various types of assaults. Depending on the situation, our protocols do include separating individuals and providing the proper notifications.

We do not release this information. (regarding tracking sexual assaults)

Southwest Airlines Flight Attendants receive self-defense training that prepares them to handle various types of assault. The flight Crew is immediately notified if an assault occurs and necessary training and resources are used to protect everyone onboard.

Delta Airlines:

Delta takes reports of harassment very seriously. When we become aware of incidents onboard, we always investigate so appropriate action may be taken, coordinating with local law enforcement when requested by the customer and crew. Our crews are trained for situational awareness. If an incident results in harassment of any kind toward another customer, flight attendants will immediately find another seat for the customer and conduct an investigation.

Alaska Airlines:

Yes, this is part of recurrent training. (regarding whether crew is trained on how to prevent, identify, react to sexual assaults)

Alaska has a robust training curriculum supporting threat management. The objectives cover how to identify, remain safe and manage multiple scenarios (e.g. disruptive passengers, suspicious behaviors, including assault.) The training content covers de-escalation techniques, personal protective measures. Alaska is proud of the mock-up training equipment we use to ensure our Flight Attendants have realistic learning environment to role play and build their skills in these rare circumstances.

Alaska’s Inflight Training team works closely with multiple agencies including the TSA’s Federal Air Marshall Service and local law enforcement to maintain a level of expertise in line with current events.

Hawaiian Airlines:

We take allegations of any abuse in flight very seriously. For physical abuse allegations, including sexual assault, our flight attendants are trained, on a range of scenarios, to protect the passengers and crew and keep them safe. In the event of an allegation of any physical assault in flight including sexual assault, the crew would immediately separate the parties and simultaneously report the matter to the Captain. The crew are also required to prepare and submit a written incident report within 24 hours of landing. The ground security coordinator who meets the plane with the local law enforcement officers is also required to submit an incident report. As part of our standard protocol, for flights involving reported allegations of any physical abuse including sexual assault, local law enforcement officers are called ahead to meet the plane.

Lufthansa Airline:

Our crews are fundamentally trained to deal with "unruly" passengers. Statistics are not maintained. The relevant reports are handed over to the authorities.

American Airlines:

If our crews – flight attendants and/or pilots – discover or are told about any alleged illegal misconduct that may occur on the aircraft, law enforcement is contacted and will meet the aircraft upon arrival. In all cases of misconduct between two passengers, we will immediately separate them, and request law enforcement meet the aircraft.

Spirit Airlines: No Response

Emirates Airlines: No comment

JetBlue: No Comment

Air Canada: No Response

United Airlines: No Response

British Airways: No Response

All Nippon Airways: No Comment

Korean Airlines: No Response

Airlines For America (trade association & lobbying group):

The safety and security of our passengers and crewmembers are our highest priority. Airlines have processes and procedures in place for crewmembers to report observed and/or reported criminal activity that occurs on board the aircraft to the FAA and appropriate law enforcement authorities, who are responsible for recording such incidents and pursuing the arrest and prosecution of offenders.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://komonews.com

Rotorway Exec 162F, N123XZ, North Indiana Rotor LLC: Accident occurred September 16, 2017 in Plymouth, Marshall County, Indiana



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

Rotorcraft force landed in a field.

North Indiana Rotor LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N123XZ

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 22:16:00Z
Regis#: N123XZ
Aircraft Make: ROTORWAY
Aircraft Model: EXEC 162
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: PLYMOUTH
State: INDIANA

Prior accident occurred February 26, 2015 in Plymouth, Indiana

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Bend; Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15CA155
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, February 26, 2015 in Plymouth, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/11/2015
Aircraft: GADDIS MICHAEL EXEC 162 F, registration: N123XZ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight the engine RPM of the helicopter suddenly increased to the point where the rev limiter activated. At this point the helicopter was about 700 ft above ground level and the pilot performed an autorotation to a baseball field. During the forced landing, the helicopter sustained substantial damage to its fuselage. Subsequent examination of the helicopter revealed that the main drive belt that transmitted engine power to the rotor system had failed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the helicopter's main drive belt resulting in the pilot performing a forced landing, during which the helicopter's fuselage was substantially damage.

Van's RV-8, N248DF and Trudel GP-4, C-GTPX: Accident occurred September 17, 2017 at Reno Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N248DF

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA209B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 17, 2017 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: FARNSWORTH RV-8, registration: N248DF
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2017, about 0820 Pacific daylight time, a Trudel GP 4, C-GTPX and a Farnsworth RV-8, N248DF, collided in midair about 1 mile southeast of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The GP 4's airline transport pilot and the RV-8's airline transport pilot were not injured. The GP 4 sustained minor damage to the propeller; the RV-8 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and aileron. The GP 4 was registered to a private individual and was operated as Race 96. The RV-8 was registered to the pilot and was operated as Race 26. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either flight, which originated from RTS about 5 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot of the RV-8 reported that he was positioned in the number 7 slot of a line abreast formation during the start sequence for the sport medallion race. As the flight was descending toward the race course, prior to the pace airplane pilot releasing the formation to start the race, he heard a loud noise followed by an immediate roll to the left. The pilot stated that he was able to level the airplane and landed uneventfully on runway 32.

The pilot of the GP 4 reported that he was positioned in the number 8 slot of the formation, located to the right of the RV-8. As the flight descended toward the race course, he saw the RV-8 "pop down quickly" and he attempted to "rudder right" while reducing power to avoid the RV-8 and another airplane to his right. The pilot stated that shortly after, his airplane collided with the RV-8. Following the collision, he pitched upward and rolled to the right to avoid the surrounding airplanes. Subsequently, the pilot landed uneventfully on runway 26.

Expressjet / Delta Airlines, Canadair CRJ-200, N857AS: Incident occurred September 15, 2017 at Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL) , Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Flight EV-5474 / DL-5474:  Aircraft on landing, struck a light with left main gear. No injuries. Damage unknown.

http://registry.faa.gov/N857AS

Date: 15-SEP-17
Time: 23:02:00Z
Regis#: ASQ5474
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ2
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMUTER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: EXPRESS JET
Flight Number: ASQ5474
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Piper PA-28-161, N515VT, Bud E Aero Inc: Incident occurred September 16, 2017 at Republic Airport (KFRG), Farmingdale, Nassau County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aircraft on takeoff, struck a bird and the propeller separated from the fuselage. Returned and landed without incident.

Bud E Aero Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N515VT

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 18:25:00Z
Regis#: N515VT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: FARMINGDALE
State: NEW YORK

Beech 35 Bonanza, N3187V, Ronin Aero Group LLC: Incident occurred September 16, 2017 in Marathon, Monroe County, Florida



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft force landed in the water ten (10) miles off the coast. The two (2) persons on board were rescued.

Ronin Aero Group LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3187V

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 13:00:00Z
Regis#: N3187V
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MARATHON
State: FLORIDA

On Sept. 16th 2017 at approximately 9:30 am FWC responded to a single-engine aircraft crashed into the water approximately four miles north of the west end of the 7 Mile Bridge.

The pilot contacted MCSO 911 who transferred him to FWC. FWC dispatched officers out of Marathon and Bahia Honda and the USCG sent a vessel from USCG Station Marathon.

The aircraft was completely submerged. The pilot and the passenger were able to leave the aircraft and hold onto two commercial trap buoys for flotation.

Coordinates were relayed from the pilot to FWC and the both the pilot and the passenger were pulled from the water in good condition.


The position of the aircraft was documented and FWC will complete an incident report to be turned over to the FAA. They were taking aerial photos of the hurricane damage.

Cessna 177B Cardinal, N35170: Accident occurred September 17, 2017 in London, Madison County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N35170


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA358
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 17, 2017 in London, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 177B, registration: N35170
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2017, about 1600 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 177B airplane, N35170, Sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a complete loss of engine power near London, Ohio. The flight instructor and student pilot were not injured. The airplane's right wing spar was bent and the fuselage wrinkled aft of the cabin. The aircraft was registered to an individual and operated by an the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Madison County Airport (UYF), London, Ohio, about 1415, performed a landing at the Lima Allen County Airport (AOH), Lima, Ohio, and was returning to UYF when the accident occurred.

Cessna T210N, N5391A: Accident occurred September 15, 2017 at Watsonville Municipal Airport (KWVI), Santa Cruz County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5391A

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA204
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in Watsonville, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N5391A
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 15, 2017, about 1300 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T210N, N5391A, was substantially damaged during landing on runway 20 at the Watsonville Municipal Airport (WVI), Watsonville, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane's nose landing gear separated and the aft fuselage was punctured and torn. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from Livermore Municipal Airport (LVK), Livermore, California at an unknown time.

A postaccident examination of the accident site revealed impact marks on the approach end of runway 20. Wreckage debris was found near the impact marks and the nose landing gear was found further down the runway. The airplane came to rest on the left side of the runway.

During a telephone interview with the pilot, he stated there were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane and that the approach and landing was normal. He further stated he didn't know how the nose landing gear separation happened.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot stated that he had about 150 hours total flight experience, including about 30 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

The 1253 automated weather observation from WVI, variable winds at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 21 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Piper PA-46-500TP, N464C, Private Flight II LLC: Incident occurred September 15, 2017 at Wiley Post Airport (KPWA), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on approach, struck a bird, landed without incident.

Private Flight II LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N464C

Date: 15-SEP-17
Time: 20:42:00Z
Regis#: N464C
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: OKLAHOMA

Cessna 172E Skyhawk, N5506T: Incident occurred September 16, 2017 in Pea Ridge, Benton County, Arkansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aircraft force landed in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N5506T

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 16:26:00Z
Regis#: N5506T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PEA RIDGE
State: ARKANSAS

Cessna 172S, N1743L, Cheyenne LLC: Incident occurred September 16, 2017 at Allegheny County Airport (KAGC), West Mifflin, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aircraft on landing sustained a tailstrike.

Cheyenne LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1743L

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N1743L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WEST MIFFLIN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cessna 208B, N786WW, registered to and operated by Westwind Aviation Inc: Accident occurred September 16, 2017 at Sedona Airport (KSEZ), Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Westwind Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N786WW

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA207
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, September 16, 2017 in Sedona, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration: N786WW
Injuries: 9 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 16, 2017, about 1430 mountain standard time, a Cessna 208B, N786WW, collided with a light pole while taxiing after landing at the Sedona Airport (SEZ), Sedona, Arizona. The pilot and eight passengers were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by West Wind Aviation, Inc., as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 on-demand air taxi flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The flight departed Grand Canyon West Airport, Peach Springs, Arizona at 1322.


According to the pilot, after an uneventful landing on runway 3, he taxied the airplane from taxiway A2 to taxiway A and waited for further instructions from ground control at SEZ. A Fly-in & Car Show event was taking place at the time, and several areas on the ramp were occupied by the show. The pilot was then instructed by ground control to follow a truck on A6 taxiway to transient parking. The transient parking was moved to the east side of the ramp and was only accessible by taxiway A6 during the event. The pilot stated that as he followed the truck, he noticed several airplanes that were parked to the right side and their wings overhung into the taxiway near to the centerline. As he approached the airplanes he steered left of centerline to maintain clearance to his right. He had one ground personnel to the right side clearing the airplane's right wing and no one on the left side to clear the left wing. The pilot advanced the throttle after he was clear of the airplanes to his right and subsequently impacted a light pole with the left wing. The light pole was positioned about 65ft from the centerline of taxiway A6.



The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the pilot held a commercial and private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine and multiengine land rating. The pilot reported that he had about 915 hours total flight experience, including about 102 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

Learjet 45, N745KD: Incident occurred September 15, 2017 at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport (TJSJ), San Juan, Puerto Rico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Juan, Puerto Rico

Aircraft on final to land, struck a bird at the number one engine. Landed without incident.

http://registry.faa.gov/N745KD

Date: 15-SEP-17
Time: 18:50:00Z
Regis#: N745KD
Aircraft Make: LEARJET
Aircraft Model: 45
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: SAN JUAN
State: PUERTO RICO

Cessna T210J, N2296R: Incident occurred September 16, 2017 at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA), Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2296R

Date: 16-SEP-17
Time: 17:10:00Z
Regis#: N2296R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MESA
State: ARIZONA