Saturday, August 6, 2016

Naval Aircraft Factory N3N-3, W J R Enterprises Inc., N61072: Incident occurred August 06, 2016 near Cottage Grove State Airport (61S), Lane County, Oregon

W J R ENTERPISES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N61072

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09

Date: 06-AUG-16
Time: 21:35:00Z
Regis#: N61072
Aircraft Make: NAVAL AIRCRAFT
Aircraft Model: N3N
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: COTTAGE GROVE
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT STRUCK POWERLINES AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, COTTAGE GROVE, OREGON.


COTTAGE GROVE — More than 5,500 utility customers lost electrical service mid-afternoon Saturday possibly caused by an airplane near Jim Wright Field, also known the Cottage Grove State Airport, that have clipped a transmission line.

The incident disrupted power and caused a small grass fire that was extinguished quickly without property damage.

Tom Gauntt, a spokesman for Pacific Power, said at 4:15 p.m. that most of the power in the Cottage Grove area had been restored by switching service to other available transmission lines, but that about 1,600 customers in the Goshen area remained without power at that hour.

Gauntt said Pacific Power expected all outages to be repaired by 6 p.m. Saturday.

Davena Amick-Elder, spokeswoman for the Oregon Aviation Historical Society, said no injuries resulted from the incident but that she could not discuss any details.

A dispatcher at the Cottage Grove Police Department verified that an incident involving a biplane had occurred and said that the Federal Aviation Administration probably would be assigned to carry out further investigation.

Source:   http://registerguard.com

Incident occurred August 06, 2016 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada

A flight headed for London made its way back to McCarran Airport after an emergency in the air.

Virgin Atlantic flight 44 departed from McCarran Airport at 3:45 p.m. and was headed for London when a fire indicator in the wheel well caused the flight to turn around and head back to Las Vegas around 4 p.m., airport spokeswoman Melissa Nunnery said.

The plane did a fly-by near the air traffic control tower so crew members could check the plane visually; no one spotted anything, Nunnery said. The plane then circled around a few times to dump some fuel to prevent a heavy landing, she added.

The flight landed safely at McCarran Airport at 4:46 p.m. and the fire alert has ended.

There were 359 passengers on the flight and no injuries have been reported.

Source:  http://www.reviewjournal.com

De Havilland DHC 2 MK III Turbo-Beaver, N30CC -and- Cessna 210-5, Flying High, LLC, N1839Z: Accident occurred August 05, 2016 at Wasilla Airport (PAWS), Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1839Z

http://registry.faa.gov/N30CC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC16LA052B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 2, registration: N30CC
Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA052A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 210-5, registration: N1839Z
Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2016, about 1340 Alaska daylight time (AKD), a Cessna 210-5 airplane, N1839Z, and a turbine-powered, wheel/ski-equipped, de Havilland DHC-2T (Beaver) airplane, N30CC, collided midair while landing at the Wasilla Airport, Wasilla, Alaska. The Cessna 210-5 was registered to Flying High, LLC, Eagle River, Alaska, and operated as visual flight rules (VFR) instructional flight. The de Havilland DHC-2T was registered to a private individual in Fairbanks, Alaska, and operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight. Both airplanes were operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, when the accident occurred. The certificated flight instructor (CFI) in the right seat, and the student pilot in the left seat of the Cessna 210-5, sustained minor injuries. The commercial pilot in the left seat, and the sole passenger in the right seat of the de Havilland DHC-2T, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. The Cessna 210-5 departed Merrill Field Airport, Anchorage, Alaska, about 1230 destined for the Wasilla Airport, with no flight plan on file. The de Havilland DHC-2T departed Leisurewood Airstrip, Wasilla, about 1335 destined for the Wasilla Airport, with no flight plan on file.

During an on-scene interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on August 5, the CFI of the Cessna stated that he and the student pilot departed from the Merrill Field Airport to conduct basic instrument flight training before proceeding to the Wasilla Airport to practice landings. He said that after arriving at the Wasilla Airport the student pilot completed three successful stop-and-go landings on runway 4, while using the published right traffic pattern. He added that they were using the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) of 122.80 to announce their position and intentions throughout the series of stop-and-go landings. The CFI stated that during the accident landing, just as the student pilot began her landing flare, there was a sudden loud noise, and the airplane abruptly nosed down. The airplane's nose subsequently impacted the runway.

The Cessna sustained substantial damage to the empennage and the fuselage.

During an on-scene interview with the NTSB IIC on August 5, the pilot of the de Havilland DHC-2T stated that he and his passenger were en route to the Wasilla Airport to get fuel before continuing on to Healy, Alaska. He stated that after departing from the Leisurewood Airstrip, he conducted a long straight in final approach for a landing on runway 4. He further stated that while on final approach, about 20 feet above the runway, the Cessna overtook the de Havilland from directly above, impacting the propeller. Following the impact with the Cessna, he continued the approach and landed on runway 4. The airplane subsequently departed the left side of the runway and came to rest in about 5-foot-high vegetation on sloping terrain. The pilot stated that he utilized the CTAF of 122.80 prior to and entering the straight in final for runway 4 at the Wasilla Airport.

The de Havilland sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilots of both airplanes stated that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframes or engines that would have precluded normal operation.

CTAF recordings from the Wasilla Airport were requested. Radar data for the two airplanes was requested from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The closest official weather observation station is located at the Wasilla Airport. At 1336, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, in part: wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, overcast clouds at 6,000 feet; temperature 61 degrees F; dew point 55 degrees F; altimeter 30.02 inHg.





WASILLA — Two single-engine planes collided while landing on the same runway at Wasilla Airport Friday afternoon but no one was seriously injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration closed the airport after the accident was reported about 1:30 p.m. The airport was still closed early Friday evening.

There were two people in each of the planes, which sustained substantial damage.

One, a Cessna 210, was operated by a student pilot with a certified flight instructor on board, according to Mike Hodges, an aviation accident investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.  It wasn't immediately clear where the Cessna had originated from, Hodges said.

The other aircraft was a converted turboprop de Havilland Beaver registered to former Alaska Attorney General Charlie Cole of Fairbanks. A friend of the family said Cole was not flying the plane and not involved in its operation.

The Beaver's door was marked with the logo of Fly Denali, a Denali Park-based flightseeing and climbing support carrier. People near the plane declined to comment Friday as did a staff member at the air carrier's office.

A friend of the Beaver pilot said he took off from his private Wasilla airstrip and was bound for Healy. The plane stopped at the airport for fuel, Hodges said.

Ray Block, owner of Ray's Aircraft Service shop near the runway, said he heard the planes collide with "sort of a scraping sound" loud enough to grab his attention.

"I looked up there and saw two planes on the runway and thought, 'That is not good,' " Block said.

The planes came together, the Cessna atop the Beaver, at the far end of the runway and then slid 600 or 700 feet before the Cessna separated and veered to the right, he said. Other pilots told Block one aircraft was flying the standard right traffic pattern for the runway, the other a left traffic pattern.

The accident marks a third midair collision in the busy airspace over Mat-Su over the past two years, though no deaths have resulted. One collision in June 2015 involved another low-altitude incident just before touchdown at Talkeetna. The other, high over the Knik-Goose Bay Road area in January 2015, severely injured both pilots.

FAA rules say pilots near airports are supposed to use the same radio frequency and pilots also have a responsibility to "see and avoid" other aircraft.

Hodges said Friday he was still trying to confirm "who was saying what and what frequencies were being used at the time" of the Wasilla Airport collision.

Authorities early Friday afternoon issued a warning to pilots about the airport closure but numerous planes could be seen circling low before flying away. At least two planes landed despite the warning and the obvious emergency scene below, that included a Wasilla police SUV with lights flashing, a plane in the middle of the runway and another off to the side.

One came in low over the wreckage, continued to descend around it, and landed on the far end of the same runway before quickly taking off again.

The NTSB will produce a preliminary report on the accident within a week or so. The final investigation may take up to a year.

Source:  http://www.adn.com



























WASILLA — Four people escaped injury Friday afternoon after two planes collided at the Wasilla Airport. Witnesses said the two planes, a turbine de Havilland Beaver and a Cessna 210, were landing at the time of the collision. Both the Cessna and Beaver had two aboard, witnesses said.

An NTSB investigator was on the scene shortly after the collision, which happened around 2 p.m.

The airport was officially closed, as the investigation and removal of the aircraft progressed.

The Cessna, which came to rest in the middle of the runway, suffered the most damage; its front landing gear had collapsed and much of its tail was torn away. The Beaver sat off the runway with visible damage to its propeller.

Source:  http://www.frontiersman.com 




WASILLA, Alaska (KTUU) No one was seriously injured after a mid-air collision Friday afternoon at the Wasilla Airport. According to Aviation Accident Investigator Mike Hodges with the National Transportation Safety Board, a Cessna 210 airplane and a DeHavilland DHC2 collided mid-air at 1:40 pm on Friday.

The investigation is still in its preliminary stages but Hodges did say both planes suffered "substantial damage." The NTSB will continue to gather information about the collision including radio transmissions and air traffic control data.

Hodges says the collision happened on Runway 4.

A witness tells KTUU that the collision appears to have happened as the Cessna was landing and the DeHavilland DHC2 was taking off. 

Source:  http://www.ktuu.com

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, N323DC: Incident occurred August 05, 2016 at Waco Regional Airport (KACT), McLennan County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N323DC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19

Date: 05-AUG-16
Time: 22:53:00Z
Regis#: N323DC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WACO
State: Texas


AIRCRAFT LANDED AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, WACO, TEXAS.


A single-engine propeller airplane with four people aboard landed at Waco Regional Airport at about 6 p.m. with its landing gear still up and caused a runway to be closed for about six hours Friday evening, the Federal Aviation Administration reported.

No one was reported injured. FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford of Fort Worth identified the craft as a Cessna 210. He did not identify the pilot, but the FAA website said the owner is John M. Meraviglia II of Austin.

Lunsford said the plane was en route from the Dallas-Fort Worth area to Austin when it had to be diverted because of an electrical problem.

“The plane came to rest on its belly on the runway,” Lunsford said. “The runway was closed until investigators could get there and the plane could be removed.”

Two Envoy Air flights had to be canceled.

Source:  http://www.wacotrib.com

WACO, Texas (KWTX) The runway of Waco Regional Airport is closed after a small plane made a gears-up landing Friday evening.

A single-engine Cessna 210 propeller plane made the landing just before 6:00 p.m. after some kind of electrical problem on board.

The small plane ended up on its belly, blocking the runway.

No one on board was injured in the hard landing, but the plane was left damaged on the runway.

The runway is closed until the plane can be moved, FAA spokesperson Lynn Lunsford said.

Two Envoy flights were canceled in the meantime.

Source:  http://www.kwtx.com

Cessna 180E, N2601Y: Accident occurred August 06, 2016 near My Place Airport (3OH7), Cardington Township, Morrow County, Ohio

The  National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

ELWAIN C. DREYER: http://registry.faa.gov/N2601Y

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Columbus FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA311 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 06, 2016 in Cardington, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N2601Y

Injuries: 1 Minor.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial-rated pilot was conducting a local, personal flight and planned to land on a small private grass runway. He reported that he initially planned to land to the east, but he noticed some people on the ground and then chose to maneuver to land to the west. During the landing, the airplane floated and then drifted right, so he decided to go around. He reported that he advanced the throttle full forward and that the airplane felt “anemic” but that the engine gauges appeared normal. At the end of the runway, he rotated for takeoff, and the airplane started to slowly climb; however, the airplane impacted a building just past the end of the runway. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of the airplane. 

A visual examination of the engine did not reveal any obvious discrepancies; however, fire/thermal damage to the engine prevented a detailed examination. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the accumulation of serious carburetor icing at glide power settings. The pilot would have reduced engine power while maneuvering to land, and it is likely that the carburetor accumulated ice at glide power settings, which prevented the production of full engine power during the attempted go-around.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The partial loss of engine power due to carburetor icing during an attempted go-around.

On August 6, 2016, about 1515 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 180E airplane, N2601Y, impacted a building near Cardington, Ohio. The commercial rated pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was destroyed during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported he planned to land on a small (1,950 ft by 40 ft) private grass runway. Initially, he planned to land to the east; however, he noticed some people on the ground and elected to maneuver to land on runway 24. The airplane touched down with the flaps fully extended; the airplane floated and then drifted right, so he decided to go-around. He advanced the throttle to full forward and added that the airplane felt "anemic" but the engine gauges appeared normal. At the end of the runway he rotated for takeoff, and the airplane started to slowly climb. The next thing he remembered was seeing the building in his windscreen.

The airplane impacted a small pole-barn; just past the end of the runway. The pilot managed to exit the airplane, before a post-crash fire engulfed the airplane.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector noted that the airplane was destroyed by the impact and post-crash fire, and that the airplane had recent engine work done. The pilot, who was also an aircraft mechanic, reported that the engine had accumulated about 2 hours since a top overhaul. A visual inspection of the engine did not note any obvious discrepancies; however, fire/thermal damage to the engine prevented a detailed examination.


The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice formation at glide power settings.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA311
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 06, 2016 in Cardington, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N2601Y
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2016, about 1645 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 180E airplane, N2601Y, impacted terrain near Cardington, Ohio. The commercial rated pilot received serious injuries and the airplane was destroyed during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the pilot was landing on a small private airstrip. The airplane continued past the end of the runway, and impacted a small building. The pilot managed to exit the airplane, before a post-crash fire engulfed the airplane. The inspector added that the airplane was destroyed by the impact and fire, and that the airplane had recent engine work done. 

The airplane was retained for further examination.






One person was injured when a single engine aircraft crashed into a field near 3226 Twp. Rd. 152, in Cardington.

At approximately 4:30 pm today, emergency crews responded to a call of a single engine plane crash that was engulfed in flames.

The pilot of the Cessna, Joe Dreyer, was able to exit the aircraft and walk to an ambulance under his own power. According to the pilot’s sister Lois Rogers, Dreyer suffered burns on his arm and other minor injuries. He was transported by Delaware EMS to The Ohio State University Wexner Burn Center.

Dreyer is a known local small aircraft pilot and has been flying for over 35 years. This is his first accident, according to his sister. He has a small airstrip and hangar on his property.

One witness at the scene described hearing unusual engine noises before hearing the crash.

Rogers said that Dreyer may have been experiencing engine trouble as she heard him gunning the engine before flying beyond the end of the runway where he clipped a small metal barn which flipped the aircraft and caused it to crash.

There were no other passengers on board. The crash is under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Responding to the scene were multiple units from the Morrow County Sheriff’s Office, Delaware EMS, Elm Valley Fire District, Cardington Fire Department and the Cardington Police Department.

Source:  http://morrowcountysentinel.com

Rockwell International 112A, RL Pender & Associates LLC, N1362J: Incident occurred August 06, 2016 at Orlando Executive Airport (KORL), Orange County, Florida

RL PENDER & ASSOCIATES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1362J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

Date: 06-AUG-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N1362J
Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL
Aircraft Model: 112
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ORLANDO
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH PARTIAL GEAR RETRACTED, ORLANDO, FLORIDA.




ORLANDO, Fla. —   A pilot safely landed a single-engine plane at Orlando Executive Airport Saturday afternoon despite being unable to lower the aircraft's landing gear, the Orlando Fire Department said.

Firefighters said the pilot noticed a landing-gear indicator light was on while he initially attempted to land.

The pilot, who reported having 30 minutes’ worth of fuel left, circled the airport.

The plane landed at about 2:45 p.m., firefighters said.

Firefighters staged at the airport as a precaution.

Only one person was aboard the plane, officials said.

No injuries were reported.

Source:   http://www.wftv.com




ORLANDO, Fla. —A pilot escaped injury when the plane's landing gear failed while landing Saturday.

The  Rockwell International 112A plane was going to land at Orlando Executive Airport about 1:30 p.m. when the landing gear would not deploy.

Officials said two of the plane’s three wheels locked into place and the plane went off the runway.

The pilot climbed out without injuries.

One runway light sustained damaged and has been repaired already.

The Federal Aviation Administration inspected the plane and released it to its owner.

The main runway closed during the investigation; however, a second runway remained open and operations continued as normal.

Source:   http://www.wesh.com

Fatal accident occurred August 06, 2016 in Acampo, San Joaquin County, California

The identity has been confirmed of the skydiving instructor killed over the weekend during a jump that also claimed the life of an 18-year-old Los Banos man.

South Korean native Yong Kwon, 25, was the instructor who died Saturday along with recent Pacheco High School graduate Tyler Turner, according to the San Joaquin County Coroner’s Office.

Sgt. Mike Reynolds said Tuesday the deaths were under investigation.

The accident at the Parachute Center in Acampo, near Lodi, is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration, according to agency spokesman Ian Gregor.

Turner’s mother, Francine Salazar, said she was present when an instructor told Turner and others they didn’t need to finish watching a safety video shown beforehand.

Bill Dause, owner of the Parachute Center, told the Sun-Star that he was “pretty sure” the group watched the whole video because it plays on a continuous loop, but he couldn’t be sure.

However, Dause said whether they finished the video wouldn’t have changed the tragedy’s outcome.

An FAA inspector arrived in Acampo on Monday to examine a parachute and also attempted to review video that may have recorded Turner’s jump, Gregor said in an email to the Los Banos Enterprise.

Salazar said she paid for video of Turner’s jump, but the video was taken into evidence.

That inspector continued the investigation and obtained the video Tuesday, Gregor said.

According to data from the U.S. Parachuting Association, skydiving deaths have on average decreased since 2000. The rate of fatalities was 7.5 per 1 million jumps, in 2014.

Ed Scott, executive director of USPA, said the USPA doesn’t track fatalities by location because “it would simply show what is intuitive; the busiest skydiving locations also have the most accidents.”

Scott also said nearly all accidents are the result of acts or errors made by the individual skydivers.

The FAA has investigated a number of past accidents at the Parachute Center, Gregor said.

“The FAA’s role in these investigations is typically to determine whether the parachutes were properly packed by the appropriate person” in accordance with federal regulations, Gregor said.

The FAA has never taken enforcement action related to past skydiving accidents against the Parachute Center, Gregor said. However, the FAA has proposed two fines totaling $933,000 for failing to follow airworthiness directives for aircraft.

“We were unable to reach a settlement with the company and referred the cases to the U.S. Attorney’s Office,” Gregor said.

Federal prosecutors couldn’t confirm the status of the cases.

When asked about the status of the cases on Tuesday, Dause said the center has never been fined and he knows nothing about the case.

More than 150 people supported Turner’s family during a vigil held Sunday evening.

Salazar thanked the crowd and asked for individuals to tell their personal stories of Turner, who graduated in June with honors from Pacheco High.

Turner planned to study biomedical engineering at UC Merced in the fall, earning enough Advanced Placement credit to start as a sophomore, Salazar said.

Tyler Turner, 18, of Los Banos, Calif., was killed Saturday while skydiving in Lodi, Calif., according to his mother, Francine Salazar. Turner, pictured here in June at commencement ceremonies for Pacheco High School in Los Banos, where he graduated with honors. He planned to attend UC Merced in the fall.



One of two skydivers killed Saturday was an 18-year-old Los Banos, Calif., man who graduated from high school just two months ago and was jumping for the first time, his mother said Sunday in an interview with the Merced Sun-Star.

According to Francine Salazar, the young man who died while skydiving in Lodi, Calif., was her son, Tyler Turner.

She said the other man killed during the tandem jump was an instructor. Salazar was there watching for her son as jumpers came out of the plane. He was there with several friends celebrating a birthday, she said.

“Before he got on the plane, he knelt down and prayed, made his peace with God, and then turned around and gave me a great big, huge hug,” Salazar said. “He said, ‘I love you, Mom,’ and then he got on the plane.”

She never saw him come down.

“I was watching everybody coming down; they look like little dots and you can’t tell who is who. We didn’t know what color his ’chute was,” she said. “I asked everyone where he was and nobody panicked or anything, we just started looking for him. He went really far off course.”

Salazar said she was troubled before the jump because, she said, an instructor told the boys they did not need to finish watching the safety video shown beforehand. She said she was there and witnessed the instructor tell the group: “Oh, you don’t need to watch that,’” she said.

“I don’t know why they have it if they don’t need to watch it,” Salazar told the Sun-Star.

Bill Dause, owner of the Lodi Parachute Center, told the Sun-Star he was “pretty sure” the group watched the whole film before jumping, but acknowledged he couldn’t be sure.

“It (the video) plays on a continuous loop, it plays continuously, so I’m pretty sure they saw it,” he said in a telephone interview. “But, it wouldn’t have made any difference (if they didn’t). It was an unfortunate accident.”

Dause said he sympathized with Salazar, but insisted whether her son had seen the video or not, it would not have prevented Saturday’s tragedy.

“I know she’s grasping for reasons,” he said, “and we’re just as upset about it as everybody is.”

Salazar said she paid to have her son’s jump videotaped, but said the Federal Aviation Administration took the tape as part of its investigation.

An exact cause will be determined by the FAA.

Turner graduated in June with honors from Pacheco High School in Los Banos. He planned to attend UC Merced in the fall to study biomedical engineering, his mother said. Her son took advanced placement courses in high school, performed exceptionally well and, she said, was going to begin his college career as a sophomore.

“He’d earned the credits to do that. He was born with cerebral palsy and he wanted to do something to help others with the condition,” she said. “He was going to find something that would help people. He was going to change the world.”

Salazar said Turner was the youngest of four children – an older sister, Tiffany, and two older brothers, Todd and Troy. He also is survived by his young niece, Charlie Ray.

She said the friends that were with her son on Saturday were going to be his college roommates in a campus apartment.

“He was an incredibly strong boy, had integrity like nobody else,” she said. “Live your life like he would’ve. He was an incredible boy.”

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com

Bill Dause, owner of the Lodi Parachute Center, speaks to media after two men died in a tandem parachuting accident Saturday morning, Aug. 6, 2016.




Two men died in a tandem skydiving accident around 10 a.m. near the Parachute Center in Acampo on Saturday.

“We had reports of a parachuting incident and we don’t know exact cause, said San Joaquin Sheriff’s Lt. Randy Johnson.The accident took place near Highway 99 and East Peltier Road.

Both men were the in their early 20s, Lt. Johnson said. He said the FAA is handling the investigation.

Bill Dause, owner of the Lodi Parachute Center, spoke about the incident at the end of the day:

“We had an unfortunate incident this morning, around ten o’clock. With the respect to the families, I am not going to give out any names. There were two fatalities, it was a tandem. It was an experienced jumper, he had over 700 jumps. He had been doing tandems for quite some time. And the passenger’s family was out here, which was a really unfortunate situation. There was a couple of brothers, a mother, and family. So it was a real sad situation for everybody."

Dause had no details of what went wrong during the jump.

"Unfortunately, I don’t have any information other than what the camera person said. It looked like he did things out of sequence. The FAA won’t let us get close to the equipment or the personnel, they treat it like a crime scene. So other than that I really don’t have any information.”

Dause said the jumper was not a staff member, but one of the jumpers at the center. He describes him as a freelancer.  

He said the passenger was 18 or 19 years old, a first-time jumper, and the tandem jumper was described as a man under 30. Dause said the pair had a back-up chute.

”From what I understand, he didn’t pull the right handles at the right time. That’s speculation on my part, which I really don’t want to do. It looked like it was an out-of-sequence deployment.”

When asked why they didn’t close down the center, he explained: “Well, it’s an unfortunate situation, but if you see a car wreck, they don’t close down the freeway. It’s something in this sport ...  in scuba diving, in skiing, there are fatalities, people pushing the envelope in some cases, in some cases pure accidents. But they don’t stop scuba diving, they don’t stop skiing. We didn’t stop because we didn’t like the guy, we didn’t stop because we weren’t interested in the guy, we didn’t stop, because life goes on.”

Jonathan Flores, of Salida, visited the center earlier in the day. He said he was a member of the parachute group Four Battalion USA, and the group had previously done jumps at the facility.

"Unfortunately this happens. (In February) another guy hit the wall. It's not the first time."

He said he has three children, and the recent incidents have affected him: "It affects me, I wonder if I want to do it again. It's a great sport, but you never know if it's going to be safe enough for you."

"I am very sorry to hear this happened. Another brother from the air passed away."

At the end of the tragic day, a large group of jumpers at the center lined up for one last jump, in honor of their friend and the passenger, who lost their lives that day. They stuck white roses into their harnesses, which they were going to release on their way down. As they completed the jump, one by one they landed on the large grassy field at the center.

Daniele Vitorino, from Brazil, was one of the jumpers. She was emotional as she talked about her friend:

“He was our friend. We just did a jump for him.”

She spoke of the incident earlier in the day: “It can happen, skydiving is a pretty safe sport, but it can happen. He loved what he was doing. It was a big passion… It is a big passion for all of us. He loved what he did.” She said about the jump in his honor: “It was really sad, because we just jumped two weeks ago.”

The identities of the victims have not yet been released.

In May, A Cessna 208 plane carrying skydiving passengers made an emergency landing in a vineyard near the 4800 block of Jahant Road north of Lodi, just east of Highway 99.

Seventeen skydiving passengers were on board, but only minor injuries were reported.

On February 13, 2016, a solo skydiver died after a parachute malfunction at the same center.  Dause said he hadn’t heard anything yet about any of the incidents, saying it takes about six months for the FFA to release their findings.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.lodinews.com



Two men died in a skydiving accident Saturday morning near Lodi.

The San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office received a call around 10 a.m. about the accident near the Acampo-based Parachute Center, said Sgt. Brandon Riley.

The two men were attempting a tandem jump, Riley said. Investigators are still trying to determine the cause of the accident. The victims’ identities have not yet been released.

Parachute Center owner Bill Dause declined to comment Saturday afternoon at his facility.

Chris Conkright, 55, of Acampo, said he did three tandem skydives Saturday, all after hearing about the deaths.

“I’m not happy about it, but it’s part of the deal, I guess,” said Conkright, who has jumped at the center for 21 years.

“I know too many people who have died parachuting,” he added. “You’re jumping out of a plane. It’s part of the territory.”

Federal authorities investigated a plane crash at the center in May in which no one was injured. The Federal Aviation Administration has twice challenged and proposed fines for not maintaining a plane and otherwise failing to follow regulations. The center’s owner denied the allegations.

Professional skier Timy Dutton died while skydiving out of the Acampo center in 2014. His parachute didn’t open, according to media reports.

Conkright vouched for the center.

“They’re great,” he said. “It’s a good operation – good equipment, good staff. I don’t know what happened exactly (Saturday).”

Story and video: http://www.sacbee.com

Cessna 195A, N4026A: Accident occurred August 06, 2016 at Stark's Twin Oaks Airpark (7S3), Hillsboro, Washington County, Oregon

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4026A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary   -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA422
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 06, 2016 in Hillsborough, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 195, registration: N4026A
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing flare she could not see forward beyond the engine cowl, and due to the side-by-side seat configuration of the airplane she lost sight of right side of runway. She recalled that the airplane touched down slightly left of the center line and continued to roll further left. She reported that she applied full right rudder and applied the brakes in order prevent a runway excursion to the left, but the airplane nosed over and partially exited the left side of the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing, the vertical and horizontal stabilizer, and the rudder. 

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to attain a proper touchdown point and loss of directional control and her subsequent excessive brake application, which resulted in a nose-over.



While all eyes are on the Hillsboro Airport this weekend for the Oregon International Air Show, crews with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue were at Stark's Twin Oaks Airpark near Scholls after a small plane flipped onto its top while landing at the air field on Saturday morning.

According to Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, two people flew a 1952 Cessna 195 into the private airport at about 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 6.

The plane had flown from the San Francisco Bay area but flipped on its top after landing. No one was injured in the crash and Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue said that the pilot and occupant in the plane were able to crawl out of the plane.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue crews arrive on the scene and stood by with fire extinguishers while staff from Twin Oaks flipped the plane back onto its wheels.

Stark's Twin Oaks Airpark is located at 12405 S.W. River Road, in Hillsboro.

Source:   http://pamplinmedia.com



Just before 8:30 a.m. this morning, crews from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Midway station responded to a 1952 Cessna 195 that flipped on its top after landing at Twin Oaks Airpark off River Road in Hillsboro.

The two occupants on board that had flown in from the Bay Area were not injured and able to crawl out of the plane.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue crew stood by with extinguishers while staff from the Airpark flipped the plane back over onto its wheels.

Ohio airport's fuel tanks closed after 2 small planes crash

GEORGETOWN, Ohio — The fuel tanks at a southwest Ohio county airport have been shut off pending investigation after two small aircraft that refueled there separately experienced engine trouble and crashed.

Authorities say the two single-engine planes went down Thursday evening in Brown County after leaving Brown County Airport. No serious injuries were reported.

One plane carrying two people made an unexpected landing in Russellville. The other plane carrying only the pilot crashed in a field near Mount Orab.

Investigators say both pilots indicated they had fueled the planes at the airport before takeoff, but it's unclear whether fuel was a factor in the crashes.

The cause of the crashes remains under investigation. The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to take over the case. 

Source: http://www.whio.com

Aero Commander S2R, Lakeview Aviation Inc., N5599X: Accident occurred August 05, 2016 in Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota

LAKEVIEW AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5599X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fargo FSDO-21

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA314
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Valley City, ND
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER S2R, registration: N5599X
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2016, about 1500 central daylight time, an Aero Commander S2R airplane, N5599X, made a forced landing to a wet field following a total loss of engine power. The pilot sustained minor injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to an operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. 

The pilot reported that he was completing an aerial application run and was returning to his home base when he noticed the fuel quantity indicators showing 1/4 on one side and 1/8 on the other side. About 450 ft above ground level (agl) the engine "sputtered" and then experienced a total loss of power. He made a forced landing into a field and the airplane nosed over when it entered a swampy area. The airplane came to rest inverted and the pilot pushed out the windscreen in order to exit. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the engine and found no presence of fuel in the fuel lines to the engine. The propeller blades did not sustain any leading edge damage or chordwise scratches. The fuel filler caps were removed and no fuel was noted.




VALLEY CITY, N.D. (Valley News Live) - The pilot of a crop duster was reported to be alert and walking after crashing the plane near Valley City Friday afternoon.

Brian Welken, 45, of Valley City was flying in the Sanborn area when he experienced difficulties with the aircraft and attempted to set the plane down in an open field. While doing so, the plane clipped a corn field, flipped over onto its top and crashed in a slough in about 3-4 feet of water.

Lance Peterson says he was one of the first people on scene. He took pictures of the plane and shared them with Valley News Live.

Barnes County Sheriff’s Deputy Don Fiebiger, told News Dakota that Welken used an air pocket trapped in the craft to breathe before escaping from the plane. He was taken by ambulance to the hospital for non-life threatening injuries.

The crash is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.valleynewslive.com 






On Friday, August 5th, 2016, at approximately 2:48 pm, ND Highway Patrol and Barnes County Sheriff’s Office officers responded to a report of a plane crash one mile south of I-94 exit 283, approximately 8 miles east of Valley City.

A 1974 Thrush cropduster was flying in the Sanborn area when the pilot experienced difficulties with the aircraft and attempted to set the plane down in an open field. While doing so, the plane clipped a corn field and came to rest in a slough, upside down, one mile south of I-94 Exit 283.

The pilot, Brian Welken, 45 YOA, Valley City, was able to extricate himself from the aircraft and was transported to Mercy Hospital in Valley City for non-life threatening injuries.

In addition to the HP and SO, the Sanborn FD & 1st Responders, Valley City FD & 1st Responders and the Barnes County Ambulance Service responded to the crash scene.

The crash is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration. The NDHP will not be releasing any other details about the crash.