Monday, July 25, 2016

Envoy Embraer ERJ-140, N830AE: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 at Tyler Pounds Regional Airport (KTYR), Tyler, Smith County, Texas

TYLER - An investigation is underway into why the pilot of a Tyler-bound flight was unable to contact ground crews as the plane approached Tyler Pounds Regional Airport on Sunday night, forcing the flight to return to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

A spokesperson for Envoy Air, which operates American Eagle flights, said Tyler's airport terminal may have suffered a lightning strike that impacted the ground crew’s radios and ability to transmit back to the aircraft.

"[The flight crew] had been calling since they left Dallas," said passenger Wendy Bratteli. "And no one would answer the phone so they turned us around and flew us back to Dallas."

Once the plane got back to Dallas, passengers said they had to wait for a new pilot to arrive and fly the plane back to East Texas. The flight resumed once the crew arrived and communication was restored with American Eagle crews at Tyler Pounds,

The flight arrived just after midnight Monday -- three hours later than initially scheduled.

One passenger who spoke with CBS19 commended the flight crew for their professionalism throughout the incident. While she said the flight was frustrating, she hopes American Eagle works to prevent a similar incident from occurring in the future.

"I just hope they get a recovery plan, that they take it and learn from it, and next time they have a backup plan for whatever caused the problems," said Cynthia Campbell.

An Envoy Air spokeswoman said the airline is working to do just that.

"We sincerely regret the inconvenience to our passengers and are working to prevent a future occurrence," Nancy Kalin, director of communication for Envoy Air wrote in an email.

Officials with Tyler Pounds Regional Airport received reports the flight crew was unable to contact the air traffic control tower as they approached TYR. According to airport administrator Davis Dickson, it is "very likely" the pilot did not contact the tower due to its closing  at 9:30 p.m. as posted in the FAA facility directory.

Dickson said in a statement the airport will work closely with Envoy to learn what caused this incident.

“We have interviewed some of our customers and gathered a number of documents validating the timelines of this event.  It’s valuable for us to work from the facts to take action as needed.” 
The airport has reviewed the airfield inspection reports and found that the airfield systems were in compliance.

Thus far the airport continues research to learn if the facility experienced a lightning strike and will assist Envoy in the investigation.”- Davis Dickson

CBS19 received reports that people trying to exit the airport's long-term parking had to wait for an attendant to arrive in order to leave the lot.

Dickson said he reviewed records and video footage which showed the plane arrived on the tarmac at 12:10 a.m. and the first credit card transaction exiting the parking lot was recorded at 12:16 a.m.

Story and video:   http://www.cbs19.tv

Yakovlev Yak-11, Yak Flight LP, N5940: Fatal accident occurred July 25, 2016 at Allegheny County Airport (KAGC), West Mifflin, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

YAK FLIGHT LP: http://registry.faa.gov/N5940

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Allegheny PFSDO-03

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA269
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 25, 2016 in West Mifflin, PA
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK11, registration: N5940
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 25, 2016 about 0945 eastern daylight time, a Yakovlev Yak-11; N5940, was substantially damaged by fire after landing, at Allegheny County Airport (AGC) West Mifflin, Pennsylvania, The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, which originated at Chester County Airport (MQS), Coatesville, Pennsylvania about 0830.

The accident occurred during the first leg of a multiple leg cross country flight to the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) fly-in and convention (EAA Airventure Oshkosh), which was being held at Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

According to preliminary air traffic control information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and security camera video, the pilot first made contact with the airport control tower at AGC when he was approximately 20 miles to the east of the airport for landing. The pilot was then directed to "proceed straight in" for runway 28. The pilot was then cleared to land on Runway 28 at AGC.

The pilot acknowledged the landing clearance and advised that he would be going to "Corporate Air" and would need "progressive" taxi instructions. During the landing, the airplane appeared to touchdown approximately 2,000 feet down the runway. The pilot was then advised by the tower controller to "make any left turn" and to contact ground control. The airplane then rolled past taxiway "C." The pilot then asked if he could turn around on the runway. He was given permission to do so, and to contact ground control. The pilot then advised he was switching frequencies to ground control. The airplane was then observed in a left turn. Moments later, as the airplane continued to turn to the left, the airplane's right side became visible to the personnel in the control tower, and the ground controller advised the pilot that "you have a fire under your wing." At this point, the airplane continued in the left turn until it traveled off the right side of the paved surface of the runway and rolled through the airport infield until it came to rest near taxiway "G." Smoke and flames were then observed to increase in size from the right side of the airplane.

After the airplane came to rest, the pilot egressed and was observed standing near the airport windsock by airport personnel. He was then transported by golf cart to a nearby hangar where a helicopter emergency service operator was based. Paramedics began treatment of the pilot who had visible thermal injuries, had not been wearing his fire retardant flight suit, and was clad only in shorts and a T-shirt. He was then transported to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries approximately 6 days later.

Examination of the runway and accident site revealed that after the airplane traveled past taxiway "C," and entered the left turn, it continued to turn left for approximately 294 degrees until it traveled off the right side of the runway pavement, on a magnetic heading of approximately 346 degrees. The airplane then traveled across a storm drain, and across the airport infield for approximately 612 feet, before coming to rest.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the majority of the metal and fabric covering of the fuselage had been consumed by fire, and the right wing, and empennage displayed evidence of thermal damage. Vertical soot trails were evident throughout the wreckage along with numerous areas of vertically oriented solidified rivulets of metal alloy. Further examination also indicated extensive fire damage in the area of the aft inboard trailing edge of the right wing, near a section of "L" shaped alloy channel mounted along the wing root fuselage juncture, near the right side of the fuel system engine feeder tank.

Compression damage was also discovered in the area of the forward section of the right wing, inboard of the right main landing gear, with portions of the airplane's tubular frame displaying displacement to the right side of the airplane's centerline, along with bending of some sections of the tubing which made up the airplane's tubular frame.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the flight control surfaces, to the burned out section of the cockpit. The mixture control was full rich. The fuel shutoff lever was approximately 3 inches forward of the aft (shutoff) stop, the throttle was full aft (idle), and the propeller was in the full forward (full rpm) position.

All three blades of the propeller displayed minimal damage and no evidence of a propeller strike. Both magnetos were intact on the front of the engine, and the rear of the engine displayed minimal thermal exposure near several openings in the firewall.

Examination of the landing gear system revealed that the main landing gear were in the down and locked position. The brake disks showed no indications of overheating, pitting, or grooving. The brake calipers were intact, and there was no sign of hydraulic leakage. The tailwheel was functional, and undamaged.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, and held a letter of authorization from the FAA to operate the Yak-3, Yak-9, and Yak-11, as pilot-in-command under visual flight rules. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on April 5, 2016. He reported on that date, that he had accrued approximately 3,100 total flight hours.

According to FAA and sales records, the airplane was manufactured in 1952 and was operated by the Egyptian Air Force from 1952 through the 1980s. During a rebuild in 1990, the 700 horsepower, Shvetsov Ash-21, 7-cylinder radial engine, and VIS-111-V20 two-blade constant speed propeller, were replaced with a 1,350 horsepower, Pratt & Whitney R1830-75, 14-cylinder, radial engine and a Hamilton Standard 3-bladed constant speed propeller. On December 5, 1990, the airplane was classified by the FAA as experimental, and a special airworthiness certificate was issued for the airplane in the racing, crew training, and exhibition category.

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Ira Saligman, 53, aviator, philanthropist, investor

Ira Saligman’s passion for flying was realized when he became a naval aviator. After the Persian Gulf War, he pursued philanthropic causes. 


Ira M. Saligman, 53, of Wayne, an aviator, philanthropist, and real estate investor, died Sunday, July 31, of injuries he had sustained six days earlier when his vintage aircraft caught fire as it landed in West Mifflin, Pa.

Mr. Saligman got out of the airplane at Allegheny County Airport, but died in the Mercy burn unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

The cause of the fire in the World War II-era plane, as it pulled to a stop on the tarmac, was unknown. Mr. Saligman was en route to an air show in Oshkosh, Wis., where he intended to meet his pilot friends.

Reared in Gladwyne, Mr. Saligman attended the Haverford School, but graduated from Harriton High School. He earned a bachelor's degree from George Washington University and a master's degree in business administration from Emory University in Atlanta.

Mr. Saligman's passion was flying airplanes. After college, he enlisted in the Navy, which sent him to its officer training school. His dream came true when he was accepted at flight training school, and after three years, received his wings as a naval aviator.

"The passion of flying permeated his entire life," said friend Jay Leberman. "It was a metaphor for his life - to reach out and look at the sky, to soar above and not be limited by constraints."

When the Persian Gulf War broke out in 1990, he was assigned to the Viking S3 anti-submarine aircraft and flew off the aircraft carrier USS America for the duration of the conflict.

"He was a patriot and served very, very proudly," Leberman said.

After completing his tour of duty, he followed family tradition by entering the real estate business and mimicking his father's devotion to philanthropy in Philadelphia and on behalf of the State of Israel.

He worked for Cynwyd Investments, the family business, before joining the finance and acquisition groups at Preferred Real Estate, where he oversaw the underwriting, leasing, and financing of "difficult to finance" commercial projects.

After the sale of the family business, he began working informally with other family members to invest the proceeds. That effort led to the creation of Saligman Capital in Wayne.

"He was always looking for a new way of doing things. He was very motivated," said sister Laury Saligman.

In the nonprofit world, he served as the chief financial officer for the Robert Saligman Charitable Foundation. The Bala Cynwyd foundation supports Jewish agencies, temples, and education, and provides funding for the arts, health, and human services.

He served as a board member and chairman of the Investment Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.

Mr. Saligman also served on the board of Federation Housing, a 1,200-unit independent living facility for low-income seniors in Philadelphia.

As word of Mr. Saligman's death spread, the National Museum of American Jewish History purchased an ad in the Inquirer describing him as a longtime trustee and "among the museum's earliest and most steadfast supporters."

"He championed a new initiative to collect and preserve family stories for generations to come," said the ad, signed by Philip Darivoff, board chair, and Ivy Barsky, the museum's CEO.

He was a founding member of the Jewish Federation of Real Estate Professionals. He also was active in Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy in Bryn Mawr, and Atidim, an enrichment program for gifted students in Israel.

"With his quick wit, sense of humor, and extraordinary generosity, Ira touched many lives in Philadelphia and beyond. He will be dearly missed," his family said.

Besides his sister, Mr. Saligman is survived by his wife, Arden Williams Saligman; his mother, Alice; sons Van and Gill; daughter Lila; another sister, Carolyn; and a brother, Peter.

Funeral services were Friday, Aug. 5.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the National Museum of American Jewish History, 101 S. Independence Mall E., Philadelphia 19106.

Source: http://www.philly.com



A pilot who suffered burns to his body and face following a crash last month at the Allegheny County Airport has succumbed to his injuries.

Ira Saligman, 53, of Wayne died at 11:53 p.m. Sunday in the UPMC Mercy burn unit, according to the Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Office supervisor.

The Yak-11 propeller airplane Saligman was flying caught fire after landing on Runway 28 at the airport at 9:45 a.m. July 25, the FAA said in a written statement. Allegheny County Airport Authority officials confirmed the plane did not take off from the airport and did not file a flight plan with the airport.

The pilot contacted the airport's tower when he was about 20 miles east of the airport, said Jeff Martinelli, Allegheny County Airport Authority's vice president for customer relations.

“At that point, he indicated that he was just going to land here,” Martinelli said. “There was no indication of any emergency situation whatsoever.”

FAA crews in the airport's control tower first noticed the plane was on fire shortly after it landed and notified the pilot, he said.

The pilot got out of the aircraft before emergency personnel arrived on scene.

West Mifflin No. 3 Volunteer Fire Company firefighters extinguished the fire, and the airport reopened by 11:15 a.m., Martinelli said.

Source:  http://triblive.com





WEST MIFFLIN (KDKA) – A pilot suffered some burns Monday morning when his vintage plane burst into flames while landing at the Allegheny County Airport.

According to airport officials, the plane landed around 10 a.m. A cloud of smoke and flames could be seen in the distance from an airplane burning near the airport’s runway.

“Flames and a lot of smoke, and I inquired to others what had happened,” said Cheryl Freedman, a witness.

The fire started in an airplane described as a vintage single-engine, Russian-built World War II YAK plane.

The pilot, who is believed to be from Delaware, was on his way to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, for the World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration.

The pilot radioed the tower saying he was planning to land at the airport and wasn’t having any problems; but when his plane touched down on the runway, the tower noticed smoke was coming from the cockpit.

Freedman says airport rescuers got to the pilot, who was flying alone, after he jumped out of the airplane with severe burns.

“They brought him over pretty quickly to get treatment and my prayers are with the pilot,” she said.

“He was treated on site by EMS for burns to his face and body and then transported to UPMC Mercy,” said Jeff Marinelli, of the Allegheny County Airport Authority.

Eventually, West Mifflin firefighters put the fire out, but the airplane was badly damaged especially in the cockpit area. It was towed to a nearby hangar as part of the investigation by the FAA.

Story and video:  http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com



Emergency crews were called to the Allegheny County Airport after a plane caught fire with a pilot inside this morning.

The fire began at 9:50 a.m, just after the World War II-era plane, a single-propeller Yak, landed at the airport. 

The pilot notified the airport that he was going to land when his plane was about 20 minutes away, according to airport spokesperson Jeff Martinelli.

"At that time there was no indication of any type of stress or emergency," Mr. Martinelli said.

"When the plane stopped the tower noticed flames. Our staff responded and shut down the airport for almost an hour."

The pilot escaped the burning aircraft with burns on his face and body. He was then taken to UPMC Mercy.

Fatal accident occurred July 24, 2016 in Cushing , Payne County, Oklahoma

 Sheralynn Neff 



CUSHING, Okla. (KSNW) – Crews in Oklahoma have found the body of a missing skydiver.  The body was found just after 8 a.m. near Cushing in Lincoln County.

The skydiver, identified as 26-year-old Sheralynn Neff from Newton, jumped around 3:45 p.m. Sunday near Cushing. Her parachute was found in a wooded area, but she wasn’t with it.

Authorities say she was found about five miles away from where her parachute was located.

Investigators say they believe she fell completely out of her harness.

Multiple law enforcement agencies and the Red Cross assisted in the search.

Many people in Newton are grieving after getting wind of Neff’s death.

David Williams says Neff was in his public speaking class in sophomore year.

He remembers he as being shy and quiet, but very well rounded and someone whose work ethic rubbed off on others.

Williams pointed out in the 2008 NHS yearbook, the year Neff graduated, that she was heavily involved in many activities.

Neff was a member of the National Honors Society and Spanish National Honors Society.

Neff was also valedictorian of her senior class.

Outside the classroom, she was part of the swim team and played the flute.

Williams says it wasn’t uncommon to see Neff carrying her flute around school, saying she was very interested in music.

Being so well rounded, Williams said it was hard to forget Neff, even eight years after she graduated.

“Her goal was perfection in virtually everything she did and she achieved it, I don’t know of anything she wasn’t successful at, if there was stuff going on, she was involved in it and it just hurts a lot to think about her not being around,” said Williams.

Greg Bergman, the Director of Bands for USD 373 also spoke out about Neff’s death in an email this afternoon saying:

“Sheralynn was an outstanding flutist and leader in our band program at Newton High School, in addition to her numerous academic successes. Sheralynn served as Drum Major for the NHS Railer Marching Band and was Principal Flute in the Wind Ensemble and Orchestra. She earned Division 1 “Outstanding” ratings at several music festivals, and was a member of the Kansas Music Educators Association South Central District Honor Band. I’ll always remember that Sheralynn pursued so many academic and artistic interests at NHS that she didn’t have time to take 9th Grade P.E. until her Senior year. Sheralynn was a kind, talented, and highly motivated young woman with a variety of interests. My thoughts are with her family.”

The FAA will investigate the incident.

Story and video:  http://ksn.com

United Airlines, Boeing 757-200, N595UA: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 16:55:00Z
Regis#: UAL1919
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 757
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: UAL-United Airlines
Flight Number: UAL1919
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: Utah

UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT UAL1919 BOEING 757 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, DIVERTED WITH MINOR DAMAGE TO FUSELAGE WHEN PANEL DOOR SEPARATED, NO INJURIES, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT AT SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.

Mooney M20R Ovation, Wazney Aviation LLC, N999JW: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

WAZNEY AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N999JW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 16:58:00Z
Regis#: N999JW
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSHKOSH
State: Wisconsin

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN.

Piper AEROSTAR 601P, N-54 INC, N54AJ: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 in Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas

N-54 INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N54AJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 13:48:00Z
Regis#: N54AJ
Aircraft Make: AEROSTAR
Aircraft Model: AEROSTAR601
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: OLATHE
State: Kansas

AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF ROLL STRUCK A RUNWAY LIGHT, OLATHE, KANSAS.

Beech 65-A90, N80896 LLC, N256TA: Accident occurred July 23, 2016 in Byron, Contra Costa County, California

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N80896 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N256TA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Byron, CA
Aircraft: BEECH 65 A90, registration: N256TA
Injuries: 15 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On July 23, 2016, about 1900 Pacific daylight time, a Beech 65- A90, N256TA, sustained substantial damage following a reported loss of control while climbing out near the Byron Airport (C83) Byron, California. The airplane was registered to N80896 LLC, and operated by Bay Area Skydiving under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and the 14 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed C83 at about 1845.


According to the pilot, as the airplane neared the planned jump area and altitude between 10,000 to 11,000 feet, mean sea level (msl) the airplane stalled and began to rotate nose-down. He recovered the airplane and the sky divers successfully jumped out. Subsequent to the jumper's departure, he noticed that the airplane handled abnormally
. During the landing sequence back at C83, a witness observed that the airplane's right stabilizer and elevator were missing. The separated airplane parts were located in a field about 1 mile south of the airport.

The pilot reported no abnormalities during preflight and during the previous flights that day in the airplane. He stated that the weather was clear and that there was light chop.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Quad City Challenger II. C-IJQP: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 in Lake of the Isles, Wellesley Island, Jefferson County, New York

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Rochester FSDO-23

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: CIJQP
Aircraft Make: QUAD CITY
Aircraft Model: CHALLENGER
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LAKE OF THE ISLES
State: New York

AIRCRAFT, CANADIAN REGISTERED C-IJQP CHALLENGER II QUAD CITY ULTRALIGHT, CRASHED OFF WELLESLEY ISLAND, LAKE OF THE ISLES, NEW YORK.




A man is okay after a plane crash just off of Wellesley Island Sunday morning.

The crash happened in American waters on the Lake of the Isles around 9:30 a.m.

A spokesperson for the U.S. Coast Guard said the pilot was trying to land the amphibious ultralight on the water with the wind at his back.

State police say the pilot was 66 year old Michael Laprade of Arroyo Grande, California.

Officials say the winds picked up and he landed more quickly than expected. One pontoon hit the water first, causing the pilot to lose control of the plane and crash.

The pilot was wearing a life jacket in the water when crews arrived. A Coast Guard official also said the pilot was not hurt and didn't seek medical treatment.

The plane was salvaged. It was registered to Honey Bee Island, just across the international border.

Story and video:  http://www.wwnytv.com

Diamond DA40 DiamondStar, Carrillo Sky LLC, N321CK: Incident occurred June 24, 2016 at Fullerton Municipal Airport (KFUL), Orange County, California

CARRILLO SKY LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N321CK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Long Beach FSDO-05

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 00:24:00Z
Regis#: N321CK
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA40
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: FULLERTON
State: California

AIRCRAFT CANOPY SEPARATED FROM FUSELAGE, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA.

Cessna 182A Skylane, N3984D: Incident occurred July 23, 2016 in Santa Fe, New Mexico

RAVEN AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3984D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 14:27:00Z
Regis#: N3984D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SANTA FE
State: New Mexico

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, STRUCK A TAXIWAY LIGHT, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, Ameriflyers of Texas, Inc., N48AF: Incident occurred July 23, 2016 in Mesquite, Dallas, Texas

AMERIFLYERS OF TEXAS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N48AF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05

AIRCRAFT ON DOWNWIND, SUSTAINED MINOR DAMAGE FROM A BIRDSTRIKE, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, MESQUITE, TEXAS.

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 16:24:00Z
Regis#: N48AF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172RG
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MESQUITE
State: Texas

Cessna 310L, N3261X: Incident occurred July 23, 2016 at Linden Airport (KLDJ), Union County, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N3261X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Teterboro FSDO-25

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 17:25:00Z
Regis#: N3261X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Damage: Unknown
City: LINDEN
State: New Jersey

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT, GEAR COLLAPSED, LINDEN, NEW JERSEY.

Velocity XL RG, N84KJ: Accident occurred December 04, 2016 at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Sonoma County, California -and- Incident occurred July 23, 2016 in Grant, Perkins County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N84KJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA032

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 04, 2016 in Petaluma, CA
Aircraft: HOSKINS LONNIE F VELOCITY XL RG, registration: N84KJ
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2016, about 1525 Pacific standard time, an experimental Velocity XL/RG, N84KJ, landed gear-up at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Petaluma, California. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from O69 at 1455.

The pilot reported that during the landing sequence, he extended the landing gear; however, the airplane impacted the runway surface with the landing gear in the gear-up position. Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the landing gear handle was in the "up" position.


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Lincoln FSDO-65

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL VELOCITY XL RG, LANDED GEAR UP, GRANT, NEBRASKA.

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N84KJ
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GRANT
State: Nebraska

Beech 35 Bonanza, N4550V: Incident occurred July 23, 2016 in Liberal, Seward County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N4550V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 22:05:00Z
Regis#: N4550V
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LIBERAL
State: Kansas

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH NOSE GEAR RETRACTED, LIBERAL, KANSAS.

Cessna 210-5A(205A), N4834U: Incident occurred July 23, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

http://registry.faa.gov/N4834U

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

Date: 23-JUL-16
Time: 14:35:00Z
Regis#: N4834U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSHKOSH
State: Wisconsin

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED AND STRUCK THE PROPELLER ON THE RUNWAY, OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN.

Titan T-51 Mustang, N5103: Accident occurred July 23, 2016 and incident occurred April 18, 2016 in Lancaster, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N5103

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA149
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Lancaster, CA
Aircraft: SWARTZ GENE TITAN T 51 MUSTANG, registration: N5103
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 23, 2016, about 1313 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur built Swartz Titan T-51 Mustang, N5103, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a reported loss of engine power while on downwind at the General William J Fox Airfield (WJF) Lancaster, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The local flight departed WJF about 1228

According to the pilot, the airplane was about 1000 feet, above ground level, when the engine failed. He quickly attempted an engine restart but was unsuccessful and decided to land on a nearby road. During the landing roll, the airplane's right gear collapsed, causing the airplane to veer and strike a highway traffic sign, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing.

The airplane was recovered to a secure storage facility for further examination.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01

Date: 19-APR-16
Time: 00:22:00Z
Regis#: N5103
Aircraft Make: TITAN
Aircraft Model: T51
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LANCASTER
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT, NOSED OVER, LANCASTER, CALIFORNIA.

Bell OH-58A, N288NS: Accident occurred July 22, 2016 in Lake Mills, Winnebago County, Iowa

NORTH STAR HOLDINGS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N288NS

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Des Moines FSDO-61


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA289
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, July 22, 2016 in Lake Mills, IA
Aircraft: BELL OH 58A, registration: N288NS
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 22, 2016, about 1600 central daylight time, a Bell OH-58A helicopter, N288NS, sustained substantial damage when it struck a wire and the ground during an aerial application pass near Lake Mills, Iowa. The pilot received minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to North Star Holdings, Inc., and operated by North Star Helicopters, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from a farm near Northwood, Iowa about 1430. 

The pilot reported that the while spraying a field, he hit a wire that he did not see. The wire went into the upper wire cutter, bringing the helicopter to a stop, and then the wire broke. He flew the helicopter to the ground, hitting hard and the helicopter flipped onto its side. He reported no mechanical failures or malfunctions of the helicopter.

Cessna 182D, Shar Air LLC, N9072X: Accident occurred July 22, 2016 in Hogansville, Troup County, Georgia

SHAR AIR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9072X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA387
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 22, 2016 in Hogansville, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N9072X
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that prior to the flight the fuel tanks were "topped off with fuel" and after being distracted, a second walk around the airplane was not properly conducted. The pilot further reported that after about an hour of flight the engine lost power and he was forced to maneuver for an emergency landing. During the emergency landing, the pilot reported that his initial approach was to an interstate, but due to thick traffic he made a turn towards a landfill and impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that after the impact the passenger received a telephone call from the departure airport fuel service attendant stating that the airplane's left fuel cap was on the airport ramp. During a postaccident examination by the pilot, it was revealed that the left fuel cap was missing.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to replace the left fuel cap following the preflight inspection, which resulted in fuel exhaustion, a loss of engine power, an emergency landing, and impact with terrain.

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, Aircraft Sales Inc., N9111P: Accident occurred July 22, 2016 in Claremore, Rogers County, Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT SALES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9111P

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA390 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 22, 2016 in Claremore, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA46, registration: N9111P
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was performing the takeoff on a taxiway, due to a notice to airmen (NOTAM) in effect which closed the sole runway at the airport and allowed takeoff's and landing's from the parallel taxiway. During the takeoff roll, the pilot reported that the airplane hit a "dip" in the pavement and became airborne unintentionally. The pilot further reported that he heard the stall warning horn and pitched forward, but the airplane drifted off to the left into a ditch and the nose and main landing gear collapsed.

The left and right wings were substantially damaged. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The airport manager provided video surveillance of the takeoff. The video showed that about 2,050 feet into the takeoff roll, the airplane pitched up, the nose and left main landing gear became airborne, but the airplane did not climb. Subsequently, the airplane touched back down and attempted to become airborne a second time about 300 feet further into the takeoff roll. The airplane's nose and main landing gear monetarily became airborne, but the airplane quickly touched back down and moved out of camera view. 

The pilot reported that the takeoff weight was about 1 pound under the maximum allowable takeoff weight and he was attempting to perform a short field takeoff technique.

The density altitude about the time of departure was 3,168 feet, the pressure altitude was 579 feet, and the temperature was 93 Fahrenheit (34 Celsius). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provides guidance on how density altitude affects aircraft performance. According to the FAA Koch Chart, the airplane would have likely experienced a 35% increase to the normal takeoff distance and a 25% decrease in a normal climb rate. 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook in part states: "Due to the reduced drag in ground effect, the airplane may seem to be able to take off below the recommended airspeed. However, as the airplane rises out of ground effect with an insufficient airspeed, initial climb performance may prove to be marginal because of the increased drag. Under conditions of high-density altitude, high temperature, and/or maximum gross weight, the airplane may be able to become airborne at an insufficient airspeed, but unable to climb out of ground effect. Consequently, the airplane may not be able to clear obstructions, or may settle back on the runway."

It is likely that the pilot exceeded the critical angle of attack during the two initial climbs and the airplane did not exit ground effect due to insufficient airspeed at rotation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff after multiple climb attempts at insufficient airspeed, which resulted in a runway excursion, a landing gear collapse, and a collision with a ditch.

Cessna 172, N960MS: Incident occurred July 22, 2016 at Brackett Field Airport (KPOC), La Verne, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N960MS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23

Date: 22-JUL-16
Time: 21:33:00Z
Regis#: N960MS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LAVERNE
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, LAVERNE-BRACKETT, CALIFORNIA.