Saturday, August 5, 2017

Historic airport farm site can't be razed until artifact search: Hagerstown Regional Airport (KHGR)



More digging for possible artifacts needs to be done before Washington County can have historical farmstead structures on Hagerstown Regional Airport property razed.

Airport Director Phil Ridenour said the goal is to take care of the remaining steps to record the farm's historical nature and demolish structures on the farm before a memorandum of agreement, or MOA, with the Federal Aviation Administration and Maryland Historical Trust expires in May 2018.

Ridenour said he would like to have the land regraded by then to make it available for use as farmland. A farmer is leasing the barn and property around it for pasture and cropland, he said.

The structures are on an 85-acre tract of farmland southeast of the airfield that the county bought in 1999 as part of a runway expansion project.

The site is known as the Brumbaugh-Kendle-Grove Farmstead.

It is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, according to the Washington County Historical Trust's website.

The farmstead — first settled in the mid-18th century — is eligible for its "connection with the early settlement of Washington County and the history of agriculture in the county" in the late 19th and 20th centuries, the website said.

Under the MOA, county officials sought an aviation-related reuse for the property, with demolition as a last resort.

With no results for a reuse or relocation of the buildings on or off airport property, the county decided last summer to pursue demolition.




The buildings are a security risk for the airport, and the house has already been broken into, Ridenour said.

Ditches need to be dug to search for more artifacts before the deteriorated structures can be razed. There is a farmhouse, smokehouse, barn, silo and loafing shed for cattle.

The estimated cost of the archeological and architectural recordings, the demolition and the regrading of the land is $600,000, Ridenour said.

The county expects to be reimbursed 95 percent of the cost. The FAA would pay for 90 percent, and the state would cover 5 percent.

Ridenour said it is still possible the silo might be disassembled and reassembled for use elsewhere. He is also hoping several materials, including barn wood, can be recycled or reused.

Some pictures of the buildings were already taken as part of the runway project, and some digging has occurred. Small items like old utensils and glassware were found, Ridenour said.

The Washington County Board of Commissioners approved a budget amendment last week for the airport's capital-improvement plan.

Funds budgeted for two other projects, an environmental assessment and terminal expansion, are being used for the project and an updated airport layout plan.

Ridenour said the FAA did not have funding lined up for the terminal expansion in the near future.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N739ZE, registered to Libra Air Inc and operated by Encore Flight Academy: Fatal accident occurred May 28, 2016 in Avalon, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16FAMS1
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 28, 2016 in Avalon, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N739ZE
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and student pilot departed for an instructional flight from an airport on an island en route back to their home airport on the mainland. A review of radar data indicated that the airplane took off with its transponder in the “off” position; therefore, no altitude information was available. The data indicated that, after taking off, the airplane flew north. The track ended 3 minutes later over open water about 5 miles north of the departure airport. After the airplane was reported missing, a search ensued. Although an oil slick consistent with drift models was present in this area, neither the airplane nor the occupants were found. 

Four minutes before the airplane took off, the reported weather at the departure airport included 9 statute miles visibility and a broken cloud ceiling at 800 ft above ground level (agl); however, the remarks section reported that the ceiling varied between 600 and 1,000 ft agl. In addition, satellite imagery indicated that there was a thick marine layer just north of the airport. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Undetermined because the airplane was not located.






The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered to Libra Air Inc 
Operated by Encore Flight Academy

http://registry.faa.gov/N739ZE


Jason Glazier, Flight Instructor

Edmond Haronian, Student Pilot



NTSB Identification: WPR16FAMS1
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 28, 2016 in Avalon, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N739ZE
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 28, 2016, about 1257 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N739ZE, is presumed to have crashed in the Pacific Ocean about 5 miles north of Avalon, California. The airplane was registered to Libra Air Inc. and operated by Encore Flight Academy as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. The certified flight instructor and student pilot have not been located and the airplane is missing; presumed to be destroyed. Both pilots are presumed to be fatally injured. Both instrument and visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and no flight plan had been filed. The airplane departed Catalina Airport (AVX), Avalon, California about 1254 and was destined for Van Nuys Airport (VNY), Van Nuys, California.

On May 29, 2016, a concerned family member of the student pilot contacted the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department (LASD) to report their family member missing. They reported that the student pilot went flying with an instructor the day prior, and they have not heard from him since. The LASD contacted Encore Flight Academy, who reported that the accident airplane was not at their facility, nor do they have record of it returning the day prior.

The NTSB attempted to contact the operator numerous times, but to no avail; nor did the operator submit a Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report, NTSB Form 6120.1. 

Review of radar data for the area revealed that the airplane took off from VNY and landed safely at AVX at 1209. At 1254, the airplane took off from AVX with its transponder in the off position and flew north. At 1257 the track ends over the water 5 miles north of AVX. An oil slick consistent with drift models was present in this area. 

A weather study revealed that at the time of takeoff from VNY, the weather at AVX reported 4 miles visibility, mist, and an overcast ceiling of 300 feet agl. When the airplane arrived at AVX weather indicated 8 miles of visibility and an overcast ceiling of 500 feet agl. Four minutes prior to the airplane departing AVX, weather reported 9 miles of visibility and a broken ceiling at 800 feet agl, however, in the remarks section it reported the ceiling varied between 600 feet agl and 1000 feet agl. In addition, satellite imagery indicated a thick marine layer was just north of AVX, and in the vicinity of the presumed accident location. 

The U.S. Coast Guard, Civil Air Patrol, and private entities conducted a search for the missing airplane along the apparent route of flight; however, no wreckage was found. The pilots and airplane remain missing. 

Low-flying military planes could startle some Charlotteans on Saturday



CHARLOTTE, NC (Joe Marusak/The Charlotte Observer) -  No need to dive into a ditch or call 911 when low-flying military planes suddenly come into view over Charlotte on Saturday.

“The military is not taking over,” joked Capt. Monica Ebert of the North Carolina Air National Guard.

All eight C-130 Hercules planes in the Guard’s 145th Airlift Wing will fly in formation to train and to celebrate the 46-year mission of the C-130 unit.

The planes are scheduled to fly from the Guard base at Charlotte Douglas International Airport at 12:30 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. for a Guard base in Stanly County, where they will conduct a simulated cargo drop, probably pallets of sandbags, Ebert said.

The planes are scheduled to return to Charlotte’s airport at 2:15 p.m.

Because the planes will fly at an altitude of only 1,000 feet, “you’re not going to miss them,” Ebert told the Observer. “You will get lots of calls.”

On a Monday morning last August, a low-altitude flight by four military jets over Bank of America Stadium startled residents and office workers.

The pilots of those planes were “careless and reckless” in flying lower and faster than authorized, according to a preliminary report obtained by the Observer under the Freedom of Information Act.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbtv.com

Aeronca 7BCM/CONV, N1639E: Accident occurred July 20, 2016 at Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport (KVVS), Dunbar Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Connellsville, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/22/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N1639E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he hand-propped the engine, boarded the airplane, and began to taxi and that, shortly thereafter, the engine "sputtered and stalled." He then realized that he had left the fuel selector in the “off” position. He set the parking brake, turned the fuel on, exited the airplane, and hand-propped the engine again. The engine started and ran at a high rpm. The airplane moved forward and began to spin in circles. The pilot attempted to get back in the cockpit; however, the door had swung closed, and the airplane struck him, knocking him to the ground. The airplane spun a few more times before striking a hangar, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing, and coming to a stop. Afterward, the pilot recalled that he had forgotten to retard the throttle before attempting the second engine start. The airplane was not equipped with an electric starter.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to properly set the throttle and secure the airplane before hand-propping the engine for startup.



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1639E








NTSB Identification: ERA16CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Connellsville, PA
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N1639E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he hand-propped the engine, boarded the airplane and began to taxi. Shortly thereafter, the engine "sputtered and stalled." He then realized that he had left the fuel selector in the off position. He set the parking brake, turned the fuel on, exited the airplane and hand-propped the engine again. The engine started and ran at a high rpm. The airplane moved forward and began to spin in circles. The pilot attempted to get back in the cockpit; however, the door had swung closed and the airplane struck him, knocking him to the ground. The airplane spun a few more times before striking a hangar, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing, and coming to a stop. Afterward, the pilot recalled that he had forgotten to retard the throttle before attempting the second engine start. The airplane was not equipped with an electric starter.

Several cars stolen at gunpoint from Avis at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania



SOUTH PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- A guard was assaulted and multiple vehicles were stolen during an early-morning heist at the Avis car rental location at the Philadelphia International Airport.

Police say four men hit the location around 4 a.m. Friday.

It began when one of the suspects punched a guard in the face.

That suspect also displayed a handgun in his waistband, police said, and took the guard's iPhone.

Police say at least four cars were stolen.

The suspect with the gun was described by police as a male with light brown skin standing 5'8" tall and wearing a blue hoodie. The other suspects were described as black males between 19 and 21 years old.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Philadelphia police.

Story and video ➤ http://6abc.com

Cessna 140, N89738: Accident occurred August 05, 2017 in Mount Sterling, Montgomery County, Kentucky

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N89738

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA268
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 05, 2017 in Mount Sterling, KY
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N89738
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2017, about 1000 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 140, N89738, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of power near Mount Sterling, Kentucky. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Stanton Airport (I50), Stanton, Kentucky.

The pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that while flying at an altitude of 2,200 ft, and the engine operating at 2,400 rpm with the mixture leaned, when the engine experienced a total loss of power. He made a forced landing to a flat, 15-acre field, and after touchdown the airplane went over a fence and down a hill before impacting a creek.

Initial examination of the airplane by the FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage.

The two-seat, high wing, tailwheel-equipped airplane, was powered by a Lycoming O-235, 116-horsepower engine.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported 1,200 hours of total flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA third-class medical certificate, which was issued on August 3, 2016.

The 1255 weather at Mount Sterling Montgomery County Airport (I50), about 9 miles northwest of the accident site included wind from 100° at 6 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 22° C; dew point 11° C; and altimeter setting 30.18 inches of mercury.


The airplane was recovered and retained for further examination.




MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Ky. (WKYT) - A pilot has been taken to the hospital after investigators say his aircraft force landed in a Montgomery County field Saturday.

The Montgomery County sheriff says it happened near the intersection of Spencer Road and Tapp Lane, east of Mount Sterling.

The sheriff says the pilot of a Cessna 140 took off from Clay City around 9 a.m. Saturday. Once in the air, the plane lost power, and the pilot had to make a force landing in the field.

"It took him a while, I'm assuming, to get out of the plane and crawl to where he did," Sheriff Fred Shortridge said. "The comment he made to my deputy was he left Powell County around 9 o'clock this morning. Where he went from that point we don't know yet but he had engine problems and had to make an emergency landing."

Investigators aren't sure exactly when the plane went down, because they say the pilot never communicated any trouble to a nearby airport.

The sheriff says the pilot has been airlifted to UK Hospital with multiple injuries. His condition is not known at this time.

The pilot was the only person on board the plane.

The FAA confirms it is investigating, but it's not clear when someone will be on scene.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wkyt.com




MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Ky. (LEX 18) - A man was sent to the hospital after his plane force landed in a field Saturday.

The Montgomery County Sheriff says the plane went down in a field near the intersection of Spencer Road and Tapp Lane, east of Mount Sterling.

Reportedly the plane lost power after taking off from Clay City around 9:00a.m. 

The sheriff says the pilot was forced to make a force landing in the field.

The sheriff tells LEX 18 the pilot never communicated any problems to nearby airports so they aren't sure exactly when the plane went down.

We're told the pilot was airlifted to UK Hospital to be treated for his injuries. So far there is no update on his condition.

Story and video ➤ http://www.lex18.com

Van's RV-6, N676DT: Fatal accident occurred September 02, 2016 in Viborg, Turner County, South Dakota

Allen L. Bucholz


Destiny Karpinen 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N676DT



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA344 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 02, 2016 in Viborg, SD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/02/2017
Aircraft: AVES DOUGLAS JAMES RV 6, registration: N676DT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot and the passenger, his 14-year-old granddaughter who wanted to become a pilot, were making a local flight in the airplane. No radar or GPS track information was found for the flight. A witness heard the airplane's engine "sputtering" before the airplane impacted the ground in a cornfield. A postimpact fire consumed the engine cowling, cockpit, fuselage, and the forward portion of the empennage. Damage to the airplane, the crop, and marks on the ground indicated that the airplane impacted in a slightly nose-low and left-wing-low attitude with no forward airspeed, consistent with a relatively flat spin. The propeller remained attached to the engine and was embedded in the soil and positioned horizontally. The propeller blades were slightly bent aft and did not exhibit any leading-edge damage, consistent with minimal, if any, power being produced by the engine during impact. No mechanical malfunctions or anomalies were found with the engine or airframe that would have precluded normal operation. However, the examination was limited by the extensive postcrash fire damage. The circumstances of the accident are consistent with the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack, resulting in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent flat spin into terrain. Given the witness report of a "sputtering" engine and the propeller signatures consistent with the engine not producing power at impact, it is likely that the engine lost power before impact. However, it could not be determined whether the engine lost power before the loss of control or whether the pilot intentionally reduced power during the descent.

The 14-year-old passenger was seated in the left seat, and the pilot was seated in the right seat. Although the family reported that the flight was not instructional, it is possible that the pilot allowed the passenger to manipulate the flight controls. Regardless of which occupant was manipulating the flight controls, the pilot was the only certificated pilot on board and was responsible for the safety of the flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack, an aerodynamic stall, and subsequent flat spin into terrain.


 Destiny Karpinen 

Allen L. Bucholz


HISTORY OF FLIGHT 

On September 2, 2016, about 1000 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built RV-6 airplane, N676DT, impacted a cornfield following a loss of control near Viborg, South Dakota. The commercial pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed from Marv Skie-Lincoln County Airport (Y14), Tea, South Dakota, about 0900. 

Family members reported that the passenger was the pilot's 14-year-old granddaughter, who aspired to become a pilot, and that it was very common for them to take local flights on the weekends. They added that the purpose of the flight was personal and not instructional. 

A witness reported hearing an engine "sputtering," followed by a loud "thud," and then he observed a fireball. The witness did not see the airplane in flight. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was built from a kit by a previous owner, and it was configured for two occupants with side-by-side seating. The airplane received a special airworthiness certificate with an experimental designation on September 11, 1996. 

The investigation was unable to determine when the airplane had been fueled last. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

There were no active AIRMETs or SIGMETs near the accident location. Also, there were no PIREPS applicable to the accident area. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a mature cornfield about 10 nautical miles west of Viborg and 27 nautical miles southwest of Y14. The airplane came to rest on top of the corn stalks, some of which remained unbroken near the empennage. The wreckage exhibited no lateral or forward displacement. Outside of the wreckage area there was no airplane debris and no noticeable damage to the crop. According to first responders, the passenger was seated in the left seat and her 4-point seatbelt remained fastened. The pilot was seated in the right seat and his 4-point seatbelt remained fastened. 

The engine cowling, cockpit, fuselage, and forward portion of the empennage were consumed by a postimpact fire (figure 1).

The wing roots and bottom side of the fuselage were thermally damaged. The wing tank fuel caps were found in place and secure. 

The left wing tip fairing separated from the wing and was found near the forward left side of the wreckage. The left wing exhibited rearward and upward impact crushing signatures (figure 2). Impact marks were found under the left wing tip. The left flap was partially underneath the left wing and remained attached at the connection points. The left aileron remained partially attached to the wing; the inboard connection remained attached while the outboard connection was impact separated. The left fuel tank was breached.

The right wing sustained leading edge damage and rearward crushing near the inboard section. The right flap was retracted and mostly undamaged. The right aileron was found in a neutral position, remained attached, and was mostly undamaged. 

The aileron control tubes remained attached to the aileron surfaces and were continuous inboard to the fuselage where they were both consumed by fire. 

The elevator control tube remained attached to the elevator surface and extended about 4 ft into the rear fuselage where it was thermally damaged and partially consumed by fire. The forward portion of the elevator control tube remained attached to its connection at the control stick. The elevator trim tab was slightly down from the neutral position. The rudder control cables remained attached to each side of the rudder. The rudder control cables were continuous to the forward ball swage in the cockpit area, and the right ball swage was covered with melted aluminum. The rudder pedals were found in the forward cockpit near the firewall and sustained thermal damage and impact damage. 

The throttle and mixture control knobs were near the full forward position. The cockpit instrumentation was mostly consumed by fire. The ignition was positioned to "BOTH." The fuel selector was set to the right fuel tank position.

The two-bladed metal propeller remained attached to crankshaft flange. The propeller was embedded in the soil and positioned horizontally (figure 3). The propeller blades were slightly bent aft and did not exhibit any leading edge damage.

The engine remained attached to the engine mounts and sustained thermal damage primarily near the rear, which encompassed the engine accessories. The top spark plug electrodes, which were all automotive style plugs, were free of damage and exhibited coloration consistent with normal operation. The empennage and exhaust manifold did not contain any visible oil residue. Engine mechanical continuity was established from the vacuum pump drive to the propeller flange. When the crankshaft was rotated via the accessory drive gear, thumb compression and suction were obtained at each cylinder. The valve rockers were undamaged and exhibited movement consistent with normal operation. The magneto drive gear in the accessory section and fuel pump plunger actuated when the accessory drive gear was rotated. The engine driven fuel pump was thermally damaged. The carburetor remained secure on its mounting pad with the mixture and throttle controls secure at their respective connections. The carburetor throttle control was near the full open position, and the mixture was near the full rich position. The carburetor fuel inlet screen was free of contaminants. The carburetor air inlet was free of obstruction. The carburetor was removed and opened for examination, which revealed that the float bowl remained free of contamination and the plastic floats were thermally damaged. The left and right electronic ignition components were thermally damaged. The ignition harness was mostly consumed by fire; however, it appeared to have been connected at each spark plug. The vacuum pump remained secure to its mounting pad, and the plastic coupler was thermally damaged. The engine oil suction screen was free of contaminants. 

The postaccident examination of the engine and airframe did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The postimpact fire prevented a complete examination of the airplane. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The Sanford Health Pathology Clinic, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, completed an autopsy on the pilot, and the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory conducted toxicology testing, which revealed verapamil and norverapamil in the blood and liver. 

Verapamil is a prescription drug used in the treatment of hypertension, angina, and arrhythmias. Norverapamil is a metabolite of verapamil. 

The Sanford Health Pathology Clinic also completed an autopsy on the passenger, and the cause of death was blunt force injury. The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory conducted toxicology testing, which was negative for carbon monoxide in the blood. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A review of FAA radar data for the accident area did not reveal any radar returns that correlated to the flight. Also, there were no air traffic control communications found from the airplane. 

An undamaged Appareo Stratus PRX V2 was found near the wreckage. The unit was downloaded by the NTSB Recorders Laboratory and did not reveal any data from the accident flight. 

The pilot's iPad was found by the family, and the ForeFlight application revealed 37 previous flight track logs. The track logs were from November 29, 2014 to July 26, 2016.
















NTSB Identification: CEN16FA344
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 02, 2016 in Viborg, SD
Aircraft: AVES DOUGLAS JAMES RV 6, registration: N676DT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 2, 2016, about 1000 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built AVES DOUGLAS JAMES RV-6 airplane, N676DT, impacted a corn field near Viborg, South Dakota. The commercial rated pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed from Marv Skie-Lincoln County Airport (Y14), Tea, South Dakota about 0900. 

The airplane was located in a mature corn field about 10 miles west of Viborg. Outside of the main wreckage area there was no noticeable damage to the corn stalks. The cockpit, engine cowling, and a majority of the fuselage were consumed by fire. The wings and empennage were mostly intact and sustained some thermal damage where they connected with the fuselage. 

Witnesses near the accident reported hearing the engine "sputtering" and then heard and "thud" and saw a fireball. They did not observe the airplane in the air. 

The occupants' family reported that the purpose of the flight was personal and not instructional. The pilot and passenger frequently flew together because the passenger wanted to be a pilot. It was very common for them to take local flights on the weekends. 

At 0955, the automated weather observation station at the Chan Gurney Municipal Airport (YKN), Yankton, South Dakota, located 18 miles southeast of the accident site, recorded wind from 150 degrees at 12 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 66 degrees F, dew point 55 degrees F, altimeter setting 30.17 inches of mercury.

Airbus A330-323, American Airlines, flight AA-759, N276AY: Incident occurred August 05, 2017 at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N276AY


AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT AAL759 AIRBUS A333 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, WHILE ENROUTE FROM ATHENS GREECE TO PHILADELPHIA, PA, ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE, 18 PERSONS ON BOARD SUSTAINED UNKNOWN INJURIES, 1 PERSON ON BOARD SUSTAINED A SERIOUS INJURY, PHILADELPHIA, PA

Date: 05-AUG-17
Time: 15:25:00Z
Regis#: AAL759
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A333
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL759
City: PHILADELPHIA
State: ATLANTIC OCEAN

Flight AAL759, aircraft encountered turbulence ten (10) miles off the coast of Long Island enroute to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Ten (10) persons on board sustained minor injuries. Landed without incident.

Date: 05-AUG-17
Time: 18:35:00Z
Regis#: N276AY
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A330
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL759
City: PHILADELPHIA
State: ATLANTIC OCEAN




PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (WPVI) -- New video and images show what it was like inside a Philadelphia-bound jetliner that encountered severe turbulence Saturday.

In video taken by Los Angeles-area ophthalmologist Ervin Fang, the captain be heard saying:

"Ladies and gentlemen, this is your captain. We really apologize for that unexpected bump. We were expecting some light turbulence...it was just totally unexpected. We've asked our cabin to make an assessment, make sure everybody is OK. Again, we sincerely apologize. We don't anticipate any more of that. We want to make sure, as always, to keep your seat belt fastened."

Fang shot the footage, taken inside American Flight 759, just after the plane shook and dropped in extreme turbulence.

Flight attendants had just started serving drinks and people, beverages, and anything loose in the cabin went flying.

Three passengers and seven crew members were injured.

Dr. Fang said he reset a dislocated shoulder after the incident.

FAA officials say the flight crew reported severe turbulence while flying over the North Atlantic Ocean. The flight had taken off from Athens, Greece.

American Airlines released the following statement:

"American Airlines flight 759 from Athens, Greece to Philadelphia International Airport briefly encountered severe turbulence shortly before landing safely in Philadelphia. The seat belt sign was on at the time. Three passengers and seven crew members were transported to a local hospital for evaluation. We are taking care of our passengers and our crew members at this time and want to thank our team members for keeping our passengers safe."

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://6abc.com




Ten people were injured after an American Airlines flight from Athens, Greece, experienced "severe turbulence" prior to landing at Philadelphia International Airport Saturday.

Three passengers and seven crew members were taken to the hospital upon landing, American Airlines said in a statement. The fasten seatbelt sign was on at the time of the turbulence, according to the airline.

American Airlines flight 759 from Athens to Philadelphia landed safely at 3:10 p.m. after the FAA said the crew reported the turbulence while flying over the North Atlantic Ocean.

"We are taking care of our passengers and our crew members at this time and want to thank our team members for keeping our passengers safe," the statement read.

There was no word on the severity of injuries suffered, but American Airlines reported those going to the hospital were transported "for evaluation."

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Vans RV-10, N100UK: Accident occurred October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/22/2017
Aircraft: ALGIMANTAS JONUSAS RV-10, registration: N100UK
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The noninstrument-rated private pilot obtained weather information from an on-line flight planning website. Before departure, he also telephoned his destination airport and "determined the weather was all OK." He then took off and climbed to 5,500 ft mean sea level for the cruise portion of his flight. He advised that he also checked and monitored weather while en route but that the "fog and clouds came down really thick," so he decided to divert to the nearest airport. While flying toward his diversion airport, the visibility deteriorated and a "TERRAIN ALERT" warning illuminated on his GPS display. He attempted to pull up twice but impacted trees and terrain on the side of a mountain. The pilot and passenger were seriously injured during the impact, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. Review of weather observations indicated that an extensive area of low clouds and a large area of marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions existed over the pilot's planned route. Low instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed at the diversion airport and near the accident site with visibility less than 1/4 mile in heavy rain and overcast ceilings at 100 ft. The MVFR-to-IFR weather conditions had been forecast, and AIRMETs warning of IFR and mountain obscuration conditions had been issued.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The noninstrument-rated pilot's inadequate preflight and in-flight weather planning and continued flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in impact with trees and terrain.

 



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N100UK 






NTSB Identification: ERA17CA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, VA
Aircraft: ALGIMANTAS JONUSAS RV-10, registration: N100UK
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The non-instrument rated private pilot obtained weather information from an online flight planning website. Prior to departure he also telephoned his destination airport and "determined the weather was all OK." He then took off and climbed to 5,500 feet above mean sea level for the cruise portion of his flight. He advised that he also checked and monitored weather while enroute, but the "fog and clouds came down really thick," so he decided to divert to the nearest airport. While flying towards his diversion airport, the visibility deteriorated and a "TERRAIN ALERT" warning illuminated on his GPS display. He attempted to pull up twice, but impacted trees and terrain on the side of a mountain. The pilot and passenger were seriously injured during the impact and the airplane was substantially damaged. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Review of weather observations indicated an extensive area of low clouds, and a large area of marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions existed over the pilot's planned route. Low instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed at the diversion airport and in the vicinity of the accident site, with visibility less than 1/4-mile in heavy rain and overcast ceilings at 100 ft. The MVFR to IFR weather conditions had been forecast, and AIRMETs warning of IFR and mountain obscuration conditions had been issued.