Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Peninsula airport disputes budget-cut warning

Leaders of Newport News' airport reject the assertion that the facility could be shut down for lack of air traffic controllers if federal budget cuts begin next year, an airport spokeswoman said Wednesday.

"That's ridiculous," said Jessica Wharton, marketing and public affairs director for Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport. "There has to be solution on the budget, but shutting 106 airports is not the solution and we are not going anywhere."

U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott, who warned of the possible shutdown earlier this week, said Wednesday that the threat is real but can be avoided.

The Newport News Democrat said during a Norfolk forum on Monday that if Congress doesn't head off $1 trillion in automatic budget cuts set to begin in January, reductions in funding of the Federal Aviation Administration would mean the loss of air traffic controllers.

 He cited a study released earlier this month by the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank, that stated that Newport News airport, Roanoke Regional Airport and 104 other airfields could lose their controllers and be forced to close.

Wharton said Newport News airport operators don't accept the think tank's findings.

"This airport is not going to shut down," she said, noting that it contributes $350 million to the regional economy. "We are in Hampton Roads to stay."

Scott said in a statement Wednesday that the center's analysis "is an accurate assessment of the possible outcome" of the budget cuts. He said the American Association of Airport Executives has acknowledged the findings are a possibility.

The $1 trillion in automatic cuts over 10 years - known as sequestration - were set in motion last year when Congress failed to reach a compromise to reduce deficit spending.

Scott argues that the reductions in government services are so severe that Congress needs to allow all or most of the George W. Bush administration's tax cuts to expire to reduce the deficit without cutting federal programs.

In his statement, Scott said he thinks Congress will find a way around the sequester but noted that "elected officials have a responsibility to be open and honest" about the repercussions of the budget cuts on government services.

Read more here:   http://hamptonroads.com

Spirit Airlines to add daily service between Denver, Mesa

Low-cost carrier Spirit Airlines says it plans to add daily non-stop service between Denver International Airport and Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, starting Oct. 4.

Flights will leave Denver at 9:20 a.m. daily, arriving in Mesa at 10:13 a.m. Flights will leave Mesa at 11:05 a.m., arriving in Denver at 1:49 p.m.

Spirit began service from Mesa earlier this year, with routes to Las Vegas and Dallas that launched this spring. After an absence, the Miramar, Fla.-based airline returned to the Denver airport in May.

Spirit's fall/winter schedule from Phoenix-Mesa includes daily non-stop service to Denver and Dallas/Fort Worth, and seasonal service to Chicago O'Hare, as well as one-stop service to Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

In the West, Spirit also serves the Bay Area, Los Angeles, San Diego and Las Vegas.

Source:  http://www.azcentral.com

China Southern to fly Airbus SAS A380s to Paris

China Southern Airlines Co will fly Airbus SAS A380s on a Beijing-Paris route beginning in October, ending a yearlong wait to use superjumbos on international services from the Chinese capital.
 

The Paris route, which will require two A380s, will be operated with Air China Ltd, China Southern Chief Financial Officer Xu Jiebo said on Wednesday. The terms of the agreement with Air China are still being discussed, he said.

Air China, Beijing's biggest carrier, will stop flying its own planes to Paris, according to Citigroup Inc.

Using A380s on international routes may help China Southern narrow losses from the planes' operation, Citigroup analyst Vivian Tao wrote in a note to clients on Tuesday. China Southern has so far only used the aircraft domestically because of delays in getting regulatory approval for overseas routes.

China Daily-Agencies

Piper PA-23-150 Apache, N1486P: Fatal accident occurred August 29, 2012 in Canton, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N1486P 

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA586
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 29, 2012 in Canton, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/07/2014
Aircraft: PIPER PA-23-150, registration: N1486P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness, who was a private pilot, stated that he observed a twin-engine airplane flying overhead on a northerly heading. He reported that the airplane was about 2,000 feet above ground level in level flight and that the left propeller blades were not rotating. The accident site, located in an open field with obstacles, including rolling hills, woods, and roads, was about 6.5 miles from the private pilot’s location. Evidence indicated that the airplane struck a tree in a near wings-level attitude. Larger fields and flatter terrain with fewer obstacles were located northwest of the apparent route of flight (the airplane’s actual flight route was unknown), and, if the pilot had landed in one of these areas, he would have had a greater opportunity for a successful forced landing. However, the airplane was near or exceeded its maximum takeoff weight upon departure. According to the accident airplane’s climb chart, the airplane was unable to maintain altitude when the left engine lost power due to its excessive weight and single-engine performance, the existing high-density altitude (2,963 feet), and, possibly, the pilot's execution of single-engine flight procedures, which left the pilot fewer options to reach a more suitable landing location.

Evidence indicates that the left engine experienced a total loss of power. The spark plugs in the Nos. 1, 2, and 4 cylinders, which had fuel primer lines attached, exhibited carbon-fouling, indicating that a rich-fuel mixture existed at the time of the accident and that the pilot most likely unsuccessfully attempted to regain the left engine’s power by using the fuel primer to prime the cylinders. 

The left wing gascolator bowl was removed and a blue silicon jell-type sealant was found covering about two-thirds of the area of the bowl's circumference and the area where a gasket is typically placed; however, no gasket was found in the gascolator. The blue silicon jell was consistent with Permatex Blue Silicon Gasket Maker, which has the following note in its directions: "NOTE: Not recommended for use on head gaskets or parts in contact with gasoline." If the gascolator seal is breached, air can enter the fuel system and possibly unport the carburetor, which would cause an uncommanded engine shutdown due to fuel starvation. The pilot was also an airframe and powerplant mechanic with inspection authorization. He performed the last annual maintenance inspection of the airplane and subsequent aircraft maintenance. He likely improperly used the blue silicon sealant during maintenance operations. 

Although the autopsy and toxicological examinations revealed that the pilot possibly had significant health issues, no evidence was found indicating that the pilot was incapacitated during the flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper decision to attempt to execute a forced landing to an open field with obstacles. Contributing to the accident was the left engine’s total loss of power due to fuel starvation as a result of the introduction of air into the fuel system through a gascolator seal breach and the pilot’s use of an improper substance on the left wing gascolator bowl during maintenance operations, which led to the gascolator seal breach.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 29, 2012, about 1800 central daylight time, a Piper PA-23-150, N1486P, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a partial loss of power when it impacted trees and terrain about 3 miles southwest of Canton, Missouri. The pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight, which was not on a flight plan, departed from Pinckneyville-DuQuoin Airport (PJY), Pinckneyville, Illinois, about 1600, and was en route to the Antique Airfield, a private airstrip near Blakesburg, Iowa. 

A witness reported that the route of flight that the pilot commonly traveled from PJY to Blakesburg was direct from PJY to the airport at Litchfield, Illinois, and then west to the Mississippi River, while staying clear of the St. Louis Class B airspace, and then north following the Mississippi River to Blakesburg. Using that route of flight, the distance from PJY to the accident site was about 187 nautical miles. At an average airspeed of 120 knots, the time en route was calculated to be about one hour and thirty-five minutes. The airplane was flying under visual flight rules and the transponder code was 1200. There was no radar track data available that identified the airplane or its actual route of flight. There were no witnesses to the airplane's impact with terrain.

A witness, who was a 75-hour private pilot, stated that he was in the parking lot at the Wakonda State Park around 1800 to 1830 when he observed a twin-engine airplane flying overhead on a northerly heading. He reported that the airplane was about 2,000 feet in level flight, and that the left propeller blades were not rotating. The accident site was about 6.5 miles north of the parking lot. 

A witness, who lived about a quarter mile from the accident site, reported that about 1745 he observed a low flying airplane and heard a "crunching" sound, but there was no smoke or other evidence to indicate the airplane crashed. He later observed the airplane wreckage in a field when he was driving by and he notified local authorities of the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 74-year-old commercial pilot held single-engine land, single-engine sea, and multi-engine land ratings. He held a third-class medical certificate that was issued September 10, 2010. The pilot's logbook was destroyed in a hangar fire in August 2011. Remaining pilot records indicated that the pilot had about 6,459 total flight hours and 809 multi-engine hours. It is unknown how many hours he had flown in the make and model of the accident airplane. The pilot also held an airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic's rating and had inspection authorization (IA). The airplane was purchased by the pilot on October 15, 2011. He performed the last annual maintenance inspection of the airplane and subsequent aircraft maintenance. 



AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a twin-engine Piper PA-23-150, serial number 23-255, manufactured in 1956, powered by 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320 engines. It was manufactured with a "Super Custom" configuration which included two 18-gallon auxiliary fuel tanks and a fifth passenger seat, and it had a maximum gross weight of 3,500 pounds. The airplane's original logbooks were lost or destroyed in 1995, and the first entry in the current logbooks was dated October 1, 1995. The available airplane records indicated that the airplane total time was 5,724 hours; and the left engine total time was 3,609 hours, with 1,773 hours since major overhaul (SMOH); and the right engine total time was 3,624 hours, with 1,567 hours SMOH. The last annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2011, but no total airplane time or engine time was shown on the logbook entry. The logbook entry was made by the accident pilot/IA. The airplane had flown about 21 hours since March 10, 2010. 

The last available weight and balance found for the airplane dated back to 1962, and the empty weight listed was 2,348 pounds. A witness reported that the airplane was topped off before the flight. A fuel receipt showed that 62.23 gallons of fuel were purchased by the pilot about 1508 on the day of the accident at the Sparta Community Airport (SAR), Sparta, Illinois, located about 19 nautical miles northwest of PJY. The airplane's main fuel tanks held 72 gallons of fuel which weighed 432 pounds. It is not known if the auxiliary fuel tanks contained any fuel. The total weight of the pilot and passenger was about 410 pounds. The baggage found at the accident site was weighed and it totaled about 320 pounds. The 4 gallons of oil weighed 30 pounds. The estimated takeoff weight of the airplane was about 3,540 pounds, not including any fuel that might have been in the outboard auxiliary fuel tanks. If the auxiliary fuel tanks were topped off, the takeoff weight of the airplane was about 3,756 pounds. 

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS 

At 1754, the surface weather observation at the Quincy Regional Airport-Baldwin Field (UIN), Quincy, Illinois, located about 20 miles southeast of the accident, was: wind calm; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 33 degrees Celsius; dew point 15 degrees Celsius; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted trees and terrain in an area of rolling hills, woods, and open fields. A tree about 60-70 feet in height was initially impacted. An 8-foot outboard section of the left wing was found about 30 feet from the tree in the debris field that was on a 100 degree magnetic heading. The leading edge of the wing section exhibited a semi-circular indentation, which was consistent with a wings level impact with the tree. The left propeller was found along the tree line stuck in the ground in a near vertical position. The initial ground scar from the airplane impacting the ground was found about 93 feet from the initial tree strike. The main wreckage came to rest about 40 feet from the initial ground scar with the wreckage facing in the opposite direction of the debris field. There was no post impact fire, although there was evidence of fuel blight in the vegetation and trees. A tree branch about 6 inches in diameter was found with a diagonal slash through it that was consistent with a propeller slash with paint transfer. 

The fuselage was found on its right side on top of the right wing in the field. The nose section was compressed back to the instrument panel, and the cockpit sustained significant structural deformation. The avionics and instruments were impact damaged. The right engine's oil temperature, oil pressure, and fuel pressure gauge needles were all found in the operating range; the left engine's oil temperature, oil pressure, and fuel pressure gauge needles were all found at low or zero readings. The engine power lever quadrant was separated from the instrument panel mounting. The controls were impact damaged, but there was very little movement of the levers when they were manipulated. The right engine's throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were found positioned forward; and the left engine's throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were found pulled back relative to the right engine's control levers. The fuel control panel, which was mounted between the front seats, exhibited light impact damage. Both left and right engine fuel primers were found in the locked position. The fuel tank selector levers were found in the main tank position for both wings with the levers mechanical detent locking guards in place. The cross feed lever was in the off position. The landing gear control lever and the flap control lever were found in the up position. The pilot seats remained attached to their seat tracks, but the seat tracks were partially separated from the cabin floor. About 320 pounds of cargo, consisting mostly of camping equipment, food, clothing, and tools, were found in the aft cabin. Flight control continuity from the airplane's controls to their respective control surfaces was not established due to the extensive impact damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage; however, all separations were consistent with overload failures. 

The empennage remained loosely connected to the fuselage, but was found lying at an approximately 90 degree angle to the fuselage. The horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer remained attached together, and the elevator and rudder remained attached at their hinge points.

The right wing was partially attached to the fuselage. The leading edge exhibited accordion type aft crushing. The flap and aileron remained attached to the wing. The landing gear was found in the retracted position. Both the inboard and outboard fuel tanks were breached. Their fuel caps were loose in the fuel tank filler neck and could be removed without loosening the caps adjuster lever. The outboard tank cap had a vent hole drilled through it. The right wing gascolator bowl was missing from impact damage. The engine nacelle was impact damaged. The engine was loosely attached to the wing, but the propeller was separated from the engine. 

The left wing was separated from the fuselage. The 8-foot outboard section contained the outboard fuel tank, the aileron with the balance weight attached, and the outboard flap section. The fuel cap was located in the outboard fuel tank filler neck. It could be removed without lifting the expansion lever, and it had a vent hole drilled through it. The outboard and inboard section of the wing exhibited accordion type aft crushing. The landing gear was attached to the inboard section of the wing. The left engine was separated from the left wing, and the propeller was separated from the engine. 

The left wing gascolator bowl was removed and found to contain a blue silicon jell type of sealant that covered about two-thirds of the area of the bowl's circumference, and the area where a gasket is typically placed. No propagation of the blue jell substance was found in the adjacent fuel pump screens or fuel lines. No gasket was found in the gascolator. The blue silicon jell found in the gascolator was observed to deteriorate gradually after it was removed from the airplane wreckage. The amount of jell was substantially less than what was first observed after a two day period. Fuel was found in the bowl and Kolor Kut was used to check for water with only a trace amount found. 

The engines were inspected at the Canton R-V Fire Protection District fire house. The right engine was rotated by hand using a tool inserted at the vacuum pump drive pad. The crankshaft and camshaft rotated, all accessory gears rotated, and the valves and rocker arms were observed rotating. Thumb suction and compression was observed on all cylinders. Both magnetos were rotated and spark was observed on all outlet points. The carburetor was broken by impact and separated at the throttle plate. The composite floats were destroyed by impact, and the fuel inlet screen was not recovered. The engine driven fuel pump was actuated and it displaced fuel. The captured fuel was tested for water and none was observed. The spark plugs exhibited a color consistent with normal combustion when compared to the Champion Spark Plug Wear Guide. 

The left engine was rotated by hand using a tool inserted at the vacuum pump drive pad. The crankshaft and camshaft rotated, all accessory gears rotated, and the valves and rocker arms were observed rotating. Thumb suction and compression was observed on all cylinders. Both magnetos were rotated and spark was observed on all outlet points. The carburetor was broken by impact and separated at the throttle plate, and the composite floats were destroyed by impact. The fuel inlet screen was examined and it displayed no contaminants. The engine driven fuel pump was actuated and it displaced fuel. The captured fuel was tested for water and none was observed. All of the spark plugs were observed carbon fouled except for the No. 3 cylinder spark plugs, which exhibited a color consistent with normal combustion when compared to the Champion Spark Plug Wear Guide. The Nos. 1, 2, and 4 cylinders had fuel primer lines attached to the cylinders; the No. 3 cylinder did not have a fuel primer line attached. 

The right propeller marked "A" exhibited gouges along its leading and aft edges. The blade exhibited chordwise scratching and tip curl. The blade marked "B" had about the outboard 8 inches of the blade tip missing. The inboard section of the blade was bent forward at the fracture and red paint transfer was present on the fracture surface. 

The left propeller blades exhibited much less impact damage than the right propeller blades. The blade marked "A" did not exhibited leading edge gouges, but it did have two gouges on the trailing edge. The blade marked "B" exhibited no chordwise scratching, or leading or trailing edge nicks or gouges. Both blades exhibited some blade twist or bending to the low pitch setting. The blade hub fractures did not exhibit fractures consistent with torsional signatures, and both blades were loose in the propeller hub. 

The NTSB retained the fuel primers and spark plugs from both engines for further testing. An iFly GPS unit was found in the airplane and it was retained for examination. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was conducted on August 31, 2012, at the Boone/Callaway County Missouri Medical Examiner's office. The "Cause of Death" was noted as "blunt trauma to the head, trunk, and extremities secondary to an airplane crash." A Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report was prepared by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. The results were negative for carbon monoxide and cyanide. 15 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol was detected in the urine, but none in the blood. N-propanol was detected in the urine. 0.018 (ug/mL, ug/g) of cetirizine was detected in the blood and it was detected in the urine. Glucose was not detected in vitreous. 171 (mg/dl) glucose was detected in urine. 8.6(%) hemoglobin A1C was detected in blood. 

Cetirizine is an over-the-counter sedating antihistamine used to control allergies. The therapeutic low level is 0.1900 ug/mL, and the high therapeutic level is 1.4500 ug/mL. 

Postmortem urine levels of glucose above 100 mg/dL are considered abnormal. Hemoglobin A1C blood levels above 6% are considered abnormal. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The iFly GPS unit was sent to the NTSB Vehicle Records Laboratory for examination. The unit still operated; however, the Scan disk flash card that stored the non-volatile memory was not in the GPS unit's flash card slot, and it was not found at the accident site.

The fuel primers for both engines were examined for leaks by testing them on a fuel bench and applying vacuum pressure to the primers. No leaks or other anomalies were observed. 

The eight spark plugs from the left engine were examined. Both spark plugs from the Nos. 1, 2, and 4 cylinders exhibited carbon fouling. All eight spark plugs from the left engine were installed in a Piper Cherokee with a 160-horsepower Lycoming O-320 engine. The engine started immediately and operated normally at all power settings. 

On June 18, 2013, an exemplary Piper gascolator was filled with Permatex Blue RTV Silicone Gasket Maker in the area where a normal gasket sits. The gascolater bowl was secured to the base of the gascolator and was filled with 100 low lead aviation fuel for a 24-hour period. The gascolator was opened and the blue RTV silicone was observed to have expanded inside the gascolator bowl, which was similar to the blue silicone jell observed in the accident airplane's left wing's gascolator. The directions for using Permatex Blue RTV Silicon Gasket Maker states: "NOTE: Not recommended for use on head gaskets or parts in contact with gasoline." 

Aircraft Performance

Total Empty Weight 2,348 2,348

Oil 30 30

Fuel (Main – 72 gal) 432 432

Aux Fuel (36 gal) 216

Pilot and Pax 410 410

Equipment 120 120

Baggage 200 200

Total T/O Weight 3,540 3,756

Fuel Burn (17 gph @ 1.58 hour) 161 161 

Approx. Weight at Accident Site 3,379 3,595 

The elevation at the accident site was about 657 feet, and the density altitude at the time of the accident was about 2,963 feet. 

The Piper PA-23 Rate of Climb chart for single-engine operation indicated that an airplane weighing 3,379 pounds with a density altitude of 2,963 feet, the rate of climb would be about 170 feet per minute. An airplane weighing 3,595 pounds with a density altitude of 2,963 feet, the rate of climb would be about 110 feet per minute. The rate of climb chart was based on the performance of a new engine, and proper pilot inputs for single-engine operation. 

The Piper PA-23 Pilot Operating Handbook states that the procedures for single-engine failure during cruise flight is to correct the yaw with rudder or the rudder trim tab; pull the throttle to idle; feather the propeller by pulling back on the propeller lever; pull mixture lever to idle cut-off; turn the ignition off; and raise the dead engine wing up about 3 degrees higher than level to counteract the tendency to turn in that direction.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The debris path was on a 100 degree magnetic heading, and there was an open field located on the east side of the road from where the airplane wreckage was found. The terrain between the accident site and where the airplane was observed by the witness consisted of rolling hills, woods, open fields, and roads near the Mississippi River. However, larger fields and flatter terrain with fewer obstacles were located to the northwest of the apparent route of flight, and on the east side of the river.

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA586 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 29, 2012 in Canton, MO
Aircraft: PIPER PA-23-150, registration: N1486P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 29, 2012, about 1800 central daylight time, a Piper PA-23-150, N1486P, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing when it impacted trees and terrain about 5 miles southwest of Canton, Iowa, after a partial loss of power. The pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight, which was not on a flight plan, departed from Pinckneyville, Illinois, about 1600, and was en route to the Antique Airfield, a private airstrip near Blakesburg, Iowa.

At 1754, the surface weather observation at the Quincy Regional Airport-Baldwin Field (UIN), Quincy, Illinois, located about 20 miles southeast of the accident, was: wind calm; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 33 degrees Celsius; dew point 15 degrees Celsius; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury. 


Plane Crash: http://addins.whig.com/betweenthelens/plane-crash
  Piper PA-23-150, N1486P

Luke Barton, a deputy with the Lewis County Sheriff's Department, looks over the plane wreckage. 


Deputies' shadows cast across a field pointing toward the plane wreckage. 

Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish speaks about a plane crash that occurred Wednesday night in rural Lewis County.





CANTON, Mo. — Two southern Illinois men were killed in a small-plane crash Wednesday in a rural pasture about 3 1/2 miles southwest of Canton.

The plane crashed in an open field nearby a wooded area relatively close to 314th Ave.

John R. Johnson, 74 of Carbondale, and Carl S. Maiden, 47, of DuQuoin, died in the crash, believed to have occurred around 6 p.m. Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish said Thursday morning it was not clear yet which man was piloting the plane.

The identities were confirmed Thursday morning in a joint statement by Parrish and Lewis County Coroner Larry Arnold. Arnold had pronounced the two individuals dead at 9:20 p.m. Wednesday.
"The crash is believed to have been an accident," Parrish said. "The two men were believed to be on their way to Iowa for an antique air show, but that has not yet been confirmed."

Parrish said it is believed the plane took off from an airport in Pinckneyville, Ill. The crash site is about 10 miles from Lewis County Regional Airport, but it is not known if the plane was attempting the land at the facility.

Parrish said the time of the crash was determined by a report the Lewis County Sheriff's Department received from an individual who lives within a mile of the crash site.

"We also talked with someone who said he heard a plane at about 5:45 p.m. and a (possible) crash sound (shortly afterward)," Parrish said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were expected to have representatives on the ground at some point Thursday. The FAA was in contact with the Lewis County Sheriff's Department and the Missouri State Highway Patrol throughout Wednesday evening.
Two local residents from near the site of the crash said Wednesday night the area where the plane went down is considered "haunted." Jacob Taff, 18, and Logan Cibert, 20, arrived around 10 p.m. after they had heard about the crash.

"This is referred to as Magic School Bus Road and has always been considered haunted," Taff said.
Cibert said there have been numerous accidents on the road in past years.


Parrish said this is the third plane crash he has had to deal with in Lewis County in his 12-year tenure as sheriff.

Stevens Lee Walker, 71, of Newark, Mo., was the pilot and sole occupant of a single-engine plane that crashed and burned Nov. 1, 2007, shortly after taking off from the Sharpe Farms Airport. The plane crashed nose-first about 2.5 miles southeast of the private airstrip in a yet to be harvested field of milo. The site was seven-tenths of a mile east of State Highway D, on Lewis County 245th Street. Walker, a retiree from the Missouri Department of Transportation, was piloting a Zodiac 601XL.

Sam E. Sparks, 40, of Casselberry, Fla., and his 11-year-old son, Justin Sparks, of Winter Springs, Fla., were killed in a plane crash two miles from the Taylor airport on May 26, 2000.  The plane went down in a soybean field in severe weather conditions. The single-engine Bellanca 17-30A landed about a mile east of County Road Z, 1 1/2 miles north of County Road V. The father and son were visiting family in the area.

Parrish said there was not yet any information on the make, model or other details involving the plane. According to information supplied by an individual who arrived at the scene before dark, the plane appeared to have been a relatively small craft and was "broken into pieces."

"At this point, we have no idea what may have caused the crash," Parrish said.

Also assisting at the scene were members of the Canton police and fire departments, and the Lewis County Ambulance District.

http://www.whig.com

CANTON, Mo. — Authorities are investigating the crash of a small plane in northeast Missouri that killed both men on board.

 Lewis County, Mo., authorities identified the victims Thursday as 74-year-old John R. Johnson, of Carbondale, Ill., and 47-year-old Carl S. Maiden, of DuQuoin, Ill.

The crash happened around 6 p.m. Wednesday a few miles from Canton. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro said the agency is trying to determine the cause of the crash. It wasn’t clear who was flying the plane. There was no rain or adverse weather at the time of the accident.

Molinaro said the 1956 Piper Apache plane did not have a flight plan. Relatives of the victims told the Missouri State Highway Patrol that the plane took off from an airport in Pinckneyville, Ill., and was en route to an antique air show in Blakesburg, Iowa.

Canton, a small Mississippi River town, is about 30 miles south of the Iowa border. The crash site is about 10 miles from Lewis County Regional Airport, but authorities weren’t sure if the plane was attempting to get there to land.

Though the FAA is investigating, Molinaro said information will be turned over to the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the cause of the crash.


LA GRANGE, Mo. (WGEM) - Two men died Wednesday evening in a plane crash north of La Grange, Missouri. Lewis County Coroner Larry Arnold says authorities the two victims are not from the tri-state region. Arnold said the two men were pronounced dead at 9:20 p.m. 

Specific information regarding the victims and the plane is not being released at this time, pending notification of next of kin.

An autopsy will be performed on the pilot, Arnold said, per Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations. 

Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish says crews are unsure at this time as to why the plane may have went down. Weather conditions were clear in the area Wednesday evening. Parrish said authorities responded to the scene after reports of a plane crash around 8:20 p.m. Wednesday. The plane was located at 314th Avenue, roughly 4.5 miles southwest of Canton.

However, initial investigations indicate that the plane could have crashed hours earlier.

"A farmer in the area that heard a plane at about 5:45 p.m. and recalled hearing the plane and hearing the sound of a soda can crunch," Parrish said. "He looked to the direction he thought it came from, but did not see smoke and did not think anything more about it."

"The people who actually found the plane were looking for deer, so it's kind of an unusual response," he added.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified of the crash and will be on the scene Thursday morning to begin an investigation.

Canton Police, Canton Fire Department, Missouri State Highway Patrol and Lewis County Ambulance Service all responded to the call.

CANTON, Mo. — Lewis County law enforcement officials confirmed late Thursday night the crash of a small plane in a rural pasture claimed the lives of two people believed to be from outside the Northeast Missouri and West-Central Illinois region.

The crash took place near 314th Ave., about 3 1/2 miles southwest of Canton sometime between 6 p.m. and dusk. 

 "The investigation is very preliminary at this point, but we can confirm two fatalities," Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish said.   "Their identities are not being released until family members can be contacted. Both individuals are believed to be from out of state. I can confirm they are not Lewis County residents."

Lewis County coroner Larry Arnold pronounced both individuals dead at 9:20 p.m., Parrish said.
 

Two local residents from near the site of the crash said the area where the plane went down is considered haunted. Jacob Taff, 18, and Logan Cibert, 20, arrived around 10 p.m. after they had heard about the crash.

"This is referred to as Magic School Bus Road and has always been considered haunted," Taff said.
 

Cibert said there have been numerous accidents on the road in past years.

Parrish said this is the third plane crash he has had to deal with in Lewis County in his 12-year tenure as sheriff.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were expected to have representatives on the ground at some point Thursday morning. The FAA was in contact with the Lewis County Sheriff's Department and the Missouri State Highway Patrol throughout Wednesday evening.

"The Canton 911 received a report at 8:20 p.m. of a possible plane crash," Parrish said. "We also talked with someone who said he heard a plane at about 5:45 p.m. and a (possible) crash sound (shortly afterward)."

Parrish said there was no information on the make, model or any other details involving the plane. According to information supplied by an individual who arrived at the scene before dark, the plane appeared to have been a relatively small craft and was "broken into pieces."

"At this point, we have no idea what may have caused the crash," Parrish said.

Also assisting at the scene were members of the Canton police and fire departments and the Lewis County Ambulance District.
 


Source:  http://www.whig.com

 
Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish has confirmed that two people lost their lives in a plane crash Wednesday night near LaGrange, Missouri. The first call came in at 8:20PM to the Lewis County 911 office. The names of the victims are not being released pending notification of family.  

Two people have died in a plane crash that happened in rural Lewis County Wednesday night. 

 Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish said names are not being released at this time pending notification of the victims' families.

Parrish did confirm that the victims were out-of-state.

The crash happened near Sunflower Road and 314 Avenue about 4 1/2 miles southwest of Canton.

The call was reported to the Lewis County 911 dispatch center at around 8:20 p.m.
  
Parrish wouldn't release any details about the type of plane.

"We're still worried about getting ahold of next of kin," Parrish said. "We're not sure why they're in this area. We don't want them to find out about it on the news. Once we get the formal notifications done, then we'll release more of that information."

The FAA is expected to arrive at the crash site  sometime Thursday morning.

Parrish said this is his third plane crash he has seen during his years in office at the Lewis County Sheriff's office.



 








Story, photos and video:  http://www.wgem.com


Story and comments:    http://www.connecttristates.com

Plane downed between LaGrange and Canton

From KHQA News: The Lewis County Sheriffs Department has confirmed to KHQA that Law Enforcement and Emergency First Responders are responding to plane crash in a rural section of Lewis County. 


UPDATE: KHQA has learned that the FAA has been called in by authorities to investigate a plane crash off of old US 61 near Lagrange.  The site of the accident is off of Sunflower Road between LaGrange and Canton in rural Lewis County.


Source:  http://quincyjournal.com

LEWIS COUNTY, Mo. (WGEM) -- Right now, authorities are on the scene of a plane crash in Lewis County, Missouri. 

 A WGEM News crew on the scene can see a pieces of a crashed plane. The plane went down north of La Grange, near Old Highway 61 by Sunflower Street.

Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish said authorities responded to the scene after reports of a plane crash around 8:15 p.m. Wednesday.

It is not yet known what type of plane it was, nor information on any possible passengers at this time.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash.
 

The Lewis County Sheriffs Department has confirmed to KHQA that Law Enforcement and Emergency First Responders are responding to a report of a possible plane crash in a rural section of Lewis County. 






Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, Hayward Aviation, N7774P: Fatal accident occurred August 24, 2012 in Milner, Colorado

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA571 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 24, 2012 in Milner, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/04/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24-250, registration: N7774P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot departed on a cross-country flight and was not in contact with air traffic controllers; no flight plan had been filed. Log data recovered from the handheld global positioning system (GPS) unit depicted a flight track consistent with the accident flight and logged a maximum speed of 135 knots and a maximum GPS altitude of 18,379 feet. The airplane’s wreckage was located in a remote valley the following afternoon. An examination of the engine and airframe revealed no anomalies. Damage to the airplane and ground scars were consistent with the airplane being in a stall and flat spin at the time of impact. During the examination of the wreckage, marijuana and an opened six-pack of beer were found; the beer bottles were located in the front of the airplane, within the pilot’s reach. Toxicological testing found both alcohol and marijuana in the pilot’s system. The amount of alcohol in the pilot’s system would have significantly impaired the pilot’s performance. In addition, the amount of marijuana and its metabolite found in the pilot’s system indicated he was actively smoking in the hour before the accident; this would also have significantly impaired his ability to control the airplane. Both of these intoxicants may have impaired his judgment and contributed to the pilot’s decision to fly above 18,000 feet in an aircraft not equipped with oxygen. The resulting hypoxia also impaired his ability to control the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot’s impairment from alcohol, marijuana, and hypoxia, which adversely affected his ability to maintain control of the airplane.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 24, 2012, about 1445, a Piper PA-24-250, N7774P, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain northwest of Milner, Colorado. The student pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport (KGWS), Glenwood Springs, Colorado at 1359.

According to the Routt County Sheriff’s Office, a sheepherder found the wreckage around 1000 on August 25, 2012. The airplane was not in contact with air traffic control. According to a family member, the airplane departed Glenwood Springs, Colorado, and was en route to Minnesota. The airplane was not reported missing by friends or family, and an Alert Notification for a missing airplane had not been filed.

Radar data, provided by Denver Center in en route radar intelligence tool (ERIT) format, depicted a flight path consistent with that of the accident airplane. The transponder in the airplane was off so the radar data did not depict the altitude of the flight.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 36, held a student pilot certificate issued on March 21, 2011. He was issued a third class airman medical certificate without limitations on March 21, 2011. At the time of application, the pilot reported that he had logged zero hours of flight time.

A personal logbook reflecting the flight experience of the pilot or instructor endorsements was not located.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, a Piper PA-24-250 (serial number 24-2990), was manufactured in 1962. It was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on a standard airworthiness certificate for normal operations. A Lycoming O-540-A1-D5 engine rated at 250 horsepower at 2,575 rpm powered the airplane. The engine was equipped with a metal, 3-blade, McCauley propeller.

The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, and was maintained under an annual inspection program. A review of the maintenance records indicated that an annual inspection had been completed on March 1, 2012, at an airframe total time of 7,303 hours. The airplane had flown 67 hours between the last inspection and the accident, and had a total airframe time of 7,370 hours. The airplane was not equipped with a supplemental oxygen system or a portable bottle.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather observation station was Steamboat Springs Airport/Bob Adams Field (KSBS), Steamboat Springs, Colorado, located 8 nautical miles (nm) east of the accident site. The elevation of the weather observation station was 6,882 feet above mean seal level (msl). The routine aviation weather report (METAR) for KSBS, issued at 1453, reported, wind 040 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky condition, scattered clouds at 2,100 feet, broken clouds at 12,000 feet, temperature 18 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 4 degrees C, altimeter 30.08 inches.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

A Garmin GPSMAP 696 portable multi-function display and global positioning system receiver was found in the wreckage. The unit was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorders Lab in Washington, D.C., for data recovery. The unit was capable of recording flight track history when configured to do so. The unit was repaired and recorded waypoint, route, and tracklog data was successfully downloaded. The unit had been configured not to record tracklog data; however, flight history from May 24, 2012, through August 24, 2012, was recovered. The last flight log recovered was consistent with the accident flight and logged a maximum ground speed of 135 knots and a maximum GPS altitude of 18,379 feet, though the groundspeed and altitude values could not be validated.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage came to rest upright on a heading of 010 degrees in the bowl of a valley, surrounded by deciduous and coniferous trees and bushes, at a measured elevation of 7,070 feet msl. The main wreckage included the engine and propeller assembly, the fuselage, empennage, and the right and left wings. Paint chips, plexiglass, and small components surrounded the main wreckage. One ground scar, approximately 8 inches in depth, was located just forward of the engine. There were no other ground scars or points of impact noted.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage. The upper two engine mounts were bent, broken, and pushed aft, and the engine cowling was bent and crushed up and aft around the engine. The propeller remained attached to the engine at the propeller flange. The propeller blades were labeled “A”, “B”, and “C” for identification purposes in the report. Blade “A” was unremarkable. Blade “B” exhibited leading edge polishing, and was otherwise unremarkable. Blade “C” was bent aft 45 to 55 degrees under the engine. Blade “C” exhibited leading edge polishing but was otherwise unremarkable. The spinner on the engine was crushed aft.

The left wing included the left aileron and left flap and remained attached to the fuselage. The entire leading edge of the left wing was crushed up and aft in an accordion manner. Paint along the entire leading edge separated from the airplane. The main and auxiliary left wing fuel tanks were crushed down and the fuel bladders torn open. No fuel was present in either tank. The left aileron remained attached to the left wing and was impact damaged. Bending and wrinkling of the wreckage prevented full manipulation of the left aileron; however, both the primary and balance cables were continuous. The left flap remained attached, was impact damaged, and appeared to be extended several degrees.

The fuselage on the left side of the airplane, between the left wing and the empennage was buckled in several locations. The fuselage between the empennage and the right wing was unremarkable.

The empennage included the stabilator, rudder, and vertical stabilizer, and remained attached to the empennage. The left side of the stabilator was wrinkled along the entire control surface. The right side of the stabilator was wrinkled along the outboard trailing edge of the control surface. The vertical stabilizer was unremarkable. The upper portion of the rudder control was bent to the left. Bending and wrinkling of the wreckage prevented full manipulation of the rudder and stabilator; however, both the stabilator and rudder control cables were continuous.

The right wing included the right aileron and the right flap, and remained attached to the fuselage. The entire leading edge of the right wing was crushed up and aft in an accordion manner, with the extent of crushing decreasing in intensity toward the tip of the wing. Paint along the entire leading edge separated from the airplane. The main and auxiliary right wing fuel tanks were crushed down and the fuel bladders torn open. No fuel was present in either tank. The right aileron remained attached to the right wing and was impact damaged. Bending and wrinkling of the wreckage prevented full manipulation of the right aileron; however, both the primary and balance cables were continuous. The right flap remained attached, was impact damaged, and appeared to be extended by several degrees.

The fuselage included the forward and aft cabin, and the instrument panel. The front two seats remained in the seat track and were crushed down. The rear seat was crushed down and the floor of the airplane was crushed up. The forward portion of the fuselage, including the floor and the instrument panel was crushed up and aft. The upper portion of the fuselage was bent and wrinkled and the plexiglass windscreen separated and was fragmented. The roof of the cabin had been bent aft for the purpose of extracting the pilot. An auger, a chain saw, a backpack full of personal effects, a basket of clothing, food, six beer bottles, marijuana, and various other personal effects were located throughout the cabin. The beers bottles were in a cardboard container with a six pack configuration located in the front seat of the airplane and were broken.

The fuel selector valve was in the right auxiliary position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by a Forensic Pathology Consultant as authorized by the Routte County Coroner’s office on August 27, 2012. A toxicology screen conducted by the Horizon Lab, LLC, detected amphetamine and cannabinoid in the blood, in addition to 0.110 g/dl of ethanol. The autopsy noted the cause of death as multiple blunt force injuries and listed the specific injuries. It stated that “acute ethanol intoxication may have been a contributing factor in the events which lead up to the accident. Based on comparison of the ethanol levels in the blood with those in the vitreous fluid, it is likely that [the pilot] was consuming ethanol within 1 – 2 hours of the accident. Based on this behavior, suicide cannot be excluded as the manner of death.” The manner of death was listed as undetermined.

The FAA’s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological tests on specimens that were collected during the autopsy (CAMI Reference Number 201200176001). A sample of peripheral blood detected 104 mg/dL of ethanol, 0.072 ug/ml Tetrahydrocannabinol (Marihuana), and 0.0174 ug/ml Tetrahydrocannabinol Caroxylic Acid (Marihuana). Amphetamines were not detected in these samples.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The wreckage was recovered and relocated to a hangar in Greeley, Colorado, for further examination.

There were no shoulder harnesses installed in the accident airplane. Neither of the forward lap belts were latched. The webbing of the buckle end of the left seatbelt was chaffed and the flat end webbing was unremarkable.

Approximately 5 ounces of fuel was recovered from the fuel bowl at the fuel selector valve. The fuel was clean, bright, and blue in color. Small particles were found in the fuel bowl and the fuel bowl screen was free of contamination. Approximately ¼ cup of fuel was recovered from one electric fuel boost pump and a trace amount of fuel was recovered from the other electric fuel boost pump. The filters were free of debris.

The position of the flap transmission assembly was consistent with retracted flaps. The jack screw exposed 8 threads which is also consistent with retracted flaps. Flight control continuity for the rudder and ailerons was confirmed from the center portion of the fuselage forward to the flight control yokes in the cabin.

The engine was removed from the airframe to aid in the examination. Both magnetos exhibited impact damaged and were removed for further examination. When actuated by hand, spark was observed at each lead. The vacuum pump was impact damaged and the shaft of the pump was intact and unremarkable. The engine driven fuel pump was dry and when actuated by hand, air movement/suction was produced.

The top bank of sparkplugs was removed and the leads on the sparkplugs were light in color consistent with a lean fuel mixture. The engine was rotated at the propeller flange. Air and valve movement was noted on all six cylinders. All six cylinders were examined with a boroscope and no anomalies were noted.

The oil pick-up screen, the propeller governor screen, and the carburetor fuel inlet screen were all clear of contaminations. No fuel was noted in the carburetor. The mounting flange was impact damaged and the carburetor was otherwise unremarkable. The throttle cable remained attached to the carburetor. The mixture cable separated from the mixture control arm, consistent with impact damage.



 
Peter N. Landherr of Glenwood Springs, Colorado and Walnut Grove, Minnesota


Peter N. Landherr, 36 

 Peter N. Landherr recently of Glenwood Springs, CO and Walnut Grove, MN area died Saturday, August 25, 2012 near Steamboat Springs. CO from injuries sustained from a single engine plane crash.

Mass of Christian Burial is scheduled for on Saturday, September 1, at 11:00 am at Sacred Heart Church, 810 Cedar Avenue South, Owatonna, MN. Friends may greet the family on Friday, August 31, from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Brick - Meger Funeral Home, 1603 Austin Road, Owatonna, MN. The visitation will continue l be a one hour before the funeral liturgy on Saturday

Peter Nicholas Landherr was born to Nick and Teresa Landherr in Blue Earth MN on the Fourth of July 1976. He continued to be a fire cracker his entire life! He was baptized into the Catholic Church in Blue Earth using the blessed water from the flowing spring on the family acreage.

Pete moved with his parents to Lake City MN where his sister, Katie joined the family. From here they moved to Austin MN and, finally, to Owatonna when Pete was 13 years old. He was confirmed at Sacred Heart Catholic Church and graduated from Owatonna Senior High School in 1995. He still holds several track and field records for his pole vaulting activities. At the age of 16, he participated in the Junior Olympics in Los Angeles CA, coming in 17th in the nation in his age group. He also pole vaulted for Minnesota State University, Mankato from which he graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.

While attending school in Mankato, he met and later married Rachel Fritz of Tracy MN. They were married on October 24, 1998 in Currie MN at St. Mary's Church and were just recently divorced.

Their first child, Fritz Matthew was born in 2000. After college the family moved to the Walnut Grove MN area where Pete proudly restored and returned to life Rachel's ancestral homestead near the banks of Plum Creek. Here, Elsa Marie Autumn, Quinn Peter and Tellef Gregory joined the family.

Peter enveloped himself in his adopted acreage and community. He was a member of the Lucan Lions Club. He started a prairie wild flower seed business to preserve the native habitat and he built the largest an agama style kiln in Minnesota. Minnesota Pubic Radio featured Peter and the kiln in one of their "What's Happening in Minnesota?" series. Peter was quoted by MPR as saying " …melding his visions into clay is the best part of a day, apart from pushing his kids on the rope swing." He worked on the wind turbine sites on the SW Minnesota Buffalo Ridge. He was a proponent of using renewable resources to leave the smallest "footprint" possible. He and Rachel raised pasture-fed finished cattle. Peter used the family baby grand piano to teach himself to play by ear. With the kids on percussion, an impromptu family concert was always a joy. The family moved to Grand Lake CO in 2010 where Pete continued to pursue his passions which included becoming a pilot.

Peter is survived by his four children and their mother, all of Walnut Grove MN; parents, both of Owatonna MN; sister and brother-in-law, Katie and Brandon Weir of Owatonna MN; grandmothers Joan Rickerl of Austin MN and Barbara Landherr of Rose Creek MN. Also by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, large extended family, the loving Fritz family, and many, many friends.

Pete was taken too soon at the age of 36, as a result of a single engine plane crash. Peter lived each day to the fullest and touched many people through his passion for life. He was a bright star that burned out much too soon. He had such a love of life and his family.

We await the day we can join Pete and all rejoice in the presence of God.
 

Memorials preferred to the "Landherr Family Memorial" at Profinium Financial, 1080 West Frontage Road in Owatonna, MN 55060 (507-444-0111).

Read more here:   http://www.tributes.com/show/Peter-N-Landherr-94350250

Source:  http://www.brick-megerfuneralhome.com/peter-n-landherr

 Visitation
Friday, August 31
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM   

Brick Meger Funeral Home
1603 Austin Road
Owatonna, MN 55060-4021
(507) 451-1457
Get Directions 

Visitation 
Saturday, September 01
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM   

Sacred Heart Catholic Church
810 Cedar Avenue South
Owatonna, MN 55060
(507) 451-1588
Get Directions

Funeral Service
Saturday, September 01
11:00 AM   

Sacred Heart Catholic Church
810 Cedar Avenue South
Owatonna, MN 55060
(507) 451-1588
Get Directions

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA571
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation  
 Accident occurred Saturday, August 25, 2012 in Milner, CO
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24-250, registration: N7774P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.
On August 24, 2012, at an unknown time, a Piper PA-24 -250, N7774P, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Milner, Colorado. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport (KGWS), Glenwood Springs, Colorado at an undetermined time.

According to the Routt County Sheriff’s Office, a sheepherder found the wreckage around 1000 on August 25, 2012. The airplane was not in contact with air traffic control and no flight plan had been filed. According to a family member, the airplane departed Glenwood Springs, Colorado, and was en route to Minnesota. The airplane had not been reported missing by friends or family and an Alert Notification for a missing airplane had not been filed.

The wreckage came to rest upright on an heading of 010 degrees in the bowl of a valley, surrounded by trees and bushes. The main wreckage included the engine and propeller assembly, the fuselage, empennage, and the right and left wings. Paint chips, Plexiglas, and small components surrounded the main wreckage. One ground scar, approximately 8 inches in depth, was located just forward of the engine. There were no other ground scars or points of impacted noted.

The airplane was recovered and relocated to a hangar for further examination.


http://registry.faa.gov/N7774P
 
IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 7774P        Make/Model: PA24      Description: PA-24 Comanche
  Date: 08/25/2012     Time: 1900

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS   State: CO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DENVER, CO  (NM03)                    Entry date: 08/27/2012 

Transportation Safety Board Warns Heat Poses Challenge to Safe Flying - Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, C-GLGJ; Accident occurred August 13, 2012 near Peachland - Canada

B-29 pilot recounts 35 missions: He may have been the luckiest pilot in World War II

In his 35 missions as a B-29 pilot, Col. Charles Chauncey said he never once took a hit in his B-29 “Goin’ Jessie.”

Chauncey, who won the Distinguished Cross, was guest speaker at the B-29 Museum open house at Pratt Regional Airport on Saturday, Aug. 25.

Chauncey spoke in the Pratt Army Air Field parachute building that is currently undergoing renovation to become a B-29 Museum on the airport.

The open house featured a variety of displays including period flight suits, a bomber tire, numerous pictures of PAAF as well as other B-29 and WWII events. Airplane models, a variety of historical books and other items were also on display.

While the display items got a lot of attention, visitors to the event were drawn to Chauncey who provided a living link to the B-29 bombing runs over Japan.

Chauncey flew 32 of his 35 missions in the B-29 “Goin’ Jessie” a name that means going very fast in WWII slang. Of all his missions, he flew 22 at nighttime. In all of his missions he never took a single lick.

In daytime missions, many planes could fly in formation and attack a target with multiple strikes from many planes.

Nighttime missions were different. Because the planes couldn’t fly with lights, it was impossible to have formation attacks so B-29s had to fly solo missions at night, Chauncey said.

The missions were 98 percent over water and the average mission lasted 14.8 hours, without refueling, with the longest mission at 17 hours and 20 minutes. Fully loaded the plane weighed 141,000.

Some missions covered 1,500 miles. They had very little fuel reserves to play with on these flights.

Their first large group mission included four targets: Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka and Kobe.

When the mission was announced, there was a big commotion in the room because the mission was scheduled at 5,000 feet and many crews figured it was a suicide mission.

During the Tokyo portion of the mission, the planes set fire to 16 square miles of the city with napalm bombs. It is estimated that 230,000 people died in Tokyo in that one raid.

That night a total of 32 square miles in the four cites were burned. By wars end, they had burned 70 cities in Japan.

While over Nagoya, he was flying at 6,500 feet on just three engines. He could actually see handgun fire aimed at the plane. But getting hit was not his biggest concern.

Read more here:   http://www.pratttribune.com

City chips in $100k to airline expansion

ST. GEORGE — Aiming to boost services and provide a lift for the local economy, the St. George City Council voted Wednesday to toss in $100,000 of city funds to support a new flight destination out of the new city airport.

The city was awarded a $550,000 grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Small Community Air Service Development Program in order to help get a new flight going to Denver, and possibly other western regional hubs, such as Phoenix or San Francisco.

Currently there are commercial flights to Salt Lake City and Los Angeles at the 19-month-old airport.

To get the grant, the city agreed to put $100,000 in cash toward the effort. There is also an agreement in place to get $100,000 of in-kind funding in the form of fee waivers and an advertising campaign through the St. George Convention and Tourism Bureau and State of Utah Tourism office. A program sponsored by the St. George Area Chamber of Commerce could be worth another $100,000 in pre-purchased tickets.

That gives city leaders $850,000 worth of incentives to lure airlines into bringing a new flight route to the airport.­ They can use the money to supplement any losses incurred by the airline as it tries to establish the new route, City Manager Gary Esplin said.

“The traveling public is using it more,” he said. “Is it enough to keep it going? We hope.”

Marc Mortensen, assistant to the city manager, said city leaders have initiated talks with several airlines on the topic, including SkyWest Airlines, the company that offers the airport’s current commercial flights.

SkyWest submitted a letter to the U.S. Department of Transportation voicing support of the grant, and Marissa Snow, company spokesperson, said SkyWest is committed to meeting the market demand, whatever that includes.

“Those are conversations that are being had based on what the market entails and what makes the most sense for the current market size,” she said.

Source:   http://www.thespectrum.com