Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Zenair STOL CH 701, N3846T: Incident occurred April 11, 2017 in Red Lion, Windsor Township, York County, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N3846T 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft force landed in a field.  

Date: 11-APR-17
Time: 16:16:00Z
Regis#: N3846T
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL ZENITH
Aircraft Model: ZENAIR STOL CH701
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RED LION
State: PENNSYLVANIA



A small plane experienced a rough landing in York County on Tuesday, according to a release from the Federal Aviation Administration.

A Zenair STOL CH 701 force landed in a Windsor Township field about 12:15 p.m., the FAA said. The condition of the pilot was not immediately available Tuesday afternoon.

The plane could be seen damaged in a field in the area of the 300 block of White Oak Road  on Tuesday.

The FAA is investigating.

This is the second time in less than a month that a small aircraft has made an emergency landing in a York County field .

Last month, a Cessna C162 aircraft landed  about 6:30 p.m. March 23 in a  field  in the area of Sticks Road and Mummert Road in Codorus Township.

It had taken off from Lancaster Airport and was headed to the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster, Maryland, when it experienced an engine-related problem.

Original article can be found here: 
http://www.yorkdispatch.com



YORK COUNTY, Pa. —

The pilot of a Zenair STOL CH 701 force landed in a Windsor Township, York County field earlier today.

It happened at White Oak Road and Frysville Road.

Police say John Stone force landed his plane upon take-off in a field near his home.

Authorities say the pilot, John Stone, suffered minor injuries and was taken to a nearby hospital. He was released from the hospital and is doing OK.

Story and video:  http://www.wgal.com

Do what you can to make flights with a bush pilot easier



By Christine Cunningham

The woman behind the counter told me she could try to get me over on wheels when the first pilot got back. I was eager to join the rest of my hunting party already in the field, but I hadn't called ahead to confirm my flight and spent the next several hours watching a little wiry white-haired pup named Piper come in and out the door with business.

We watched as a crew unloaded a moose from a floatplane while pilots checked in with the office in the carefree manner of men who spend most of their days in the sky. Finally, and without introduction, a man in a red-and-black flannel shirt asked if I was ready to go. I didn't know whether I was getting kicked out or picked up. I followed him out the door 20 feet to a Super Cub parked next to my truck.

"I've never flown in a plane that small before," I admitted.

"It's only my second time," he said.

Visiting wild places

Once inside the Cub, we sped across the parking lot and scooted up the driveway like we were on a four-wheeler with wings, turned a corner and were airborne. Below, the perfectly mowed lawn and office on the lake turned into an image from Google Earth.

Oil platforms stationed in Cook Inlet appeared below. Mount Redoubt steamed in the distance above the Drift River Valley. The tidal sloughs glowed amber, and the flats were gold with the day's last light. Flying just above sea level, I watched through the passenger window as the Cub carried me to a hunting camp I knew was on the horizon.

I may be guilty of a few romantic thoughts about flying in Bush planes. After all, it's difficult not to associate Bush planes with the wild places they fly — places where solitude dissolves rudimentary notions of time and space. The rules are based on changing weather, terrain and game plans. You want your pilot to be as close to the pulse of that world as possible and able to react to changing circumstances without any time lost to surprise.

No matter how glamorous the job looks, bush pilots aren't getting rich. Most fly because they love it and can't imagine doing anything else. Flying in numerous Bush planes over the years on hunting and fishing trips has provided lessons in how to be considerate of myriad contingencies concealed behind bush pilots' outwardly cool appearance.

If the air-taxi service says don't bring more than a certain amount of gear, I don't. This request isn't like a commercial airline asking me to fit my carry-on into a prescribed square or asking me what fictional weight is on my driver's license. Over-the-limit payloads in small aircraft are dangerous and illegal.

The smaller the plane, the smaller the area to hold gear. If you haven't flown in a Bush plane before, it's worthwhile to look at the aircraft you're flying to get a frame of reference when you pack. If you have extra-long or extra-heavy gear, ask if it will fit ahead of time.

Even if time allows and you can afford an additional trip for gear transport, weather can close in fast, particularly in mountain passes. No one wants to get stuck in the Alaska Bush lacking items that had to be left behind because you didn't plan well or ignored the air-taxi guidelines.

Passengers wanting to know more about their chosen air taxi before takeoff can search the National Transportation Safety Board aviation database (ntsb.gov) and come up with the company's accident history.

Read more here:  https://www.adn.com

Pittsfield Municipal Airport (KPSF) taking off: There's a waiting list for hangar space and a solar installation on the way

PITTSFIELD — With growth ahead of national trends, the city's municipal airport is "booming" and could operate in the black in the foreseeable future.

That would follow at least seven years of operating in the red.

An uptick in the economy is the likely cause for the change, resulting in 18 percent growth over the past year.

"It's booming," Gloria Bouillon, airport manager, said of the number of airplanes that remain at the airport for more than 60 days. She said nationally airports are seeing a 4 to 5 percent increase.

She attributed the increase to a rebounding economy and because of that, an increase in the number of jets utilizing the airport.

She said the airport could see more growth if it had additional infrastructure to support it.

The airport has a waiting list or 14 people interested in hangar spaces for them to park airplanes.

The statistics were gathered by Bouillon as she continues to identify ways the airport can be self-sufficient for the long run, which she said may be achievable within the next two years.

On the job about six weeks, among the tasks Bouillon was charged with when she was hired earlier this year was making the airport financially stable.

Formed more than a year ago, a nine-member Airport Study Commission was tasked with determining if it made financial sense for the city to continue to operate the Pittsfield Municipal Airport. It determined it should, citing a lack of commercial traffic as its reason.

"With a city management model, such items as real estate and property taxes, aeronautical-related businesses, and a solar facility can offset losses," the report reads.

The study group's findings were presented to the City Council Tuesday night.

A 38-page report from the study group outlined nine recommendations — which it forwarded to the mayor, the council and the Airport Commission — ranging from an annual review of fees by the Airport Commission to requiring the commission make an annual report to the council.

Airport Study Commission chairman Thomas Sakshaug said the growth trends have him feeling equally optimistic about the airport's financial future.

"When the solar field goes in, I think we are there," he said of self-sufficiency.

The Airport Commission is considering placing a five to eight-and-a-half megawatt solar installation on airport land.

The commission could select a solar company at a meeting later this month. And airport officials believe the panels could be up and running by 2019.

Whether the airport is operating in the red or the black is a more difficult question to answer.

As the study group reviewed the airport's finances it found if FAA funding and taxes for the Westwood Business Park are included as revenue the airport would show about a $25,000 surplus, Sakshaug said.

But Bouillon said when reviewing its budget the FAA looks at income and expenses that can be linked directly to airport operations. From that perspective, the airport will likely finish with a deficit this year, as it has each year since 2010.

During that time losses have been between $66,006 and $98,303 a year.

Projected losses for 2017 are expected to be $44,338, a decrease of $47,701 from the current year.

"I think that is quite an improvement," Sakshaug said. "You can thank the Airport Commission negotiating with Lyon Aviation for a lot of that."

Lyon Aviation agreed to several changes to the fees it pays the city including those for landing and jet fuel.

Lyon Aviation, the airport's fixed based operator since 1982, provides a variety of services to those using the airport. Those services include fee collection, on the city's behalf, for fuel, parking and landing, refueling, flight school, and maintenance.

Mayor Linda M. Tyer appointed the study group at the request of City Councilors Donna Todd Rivers, Melissa Mazzeo, Christopher J. Connell and former councilor Jonathan Lothrop in February 2016

During the council meeting Connell congratulated the group on the work it accomplished.

"There were a lot of layers of the onion to peel back," he said. "I think that one of the main goals was to see if we could really stop the bleeding."

Original article can be found here:  http://www.berkshireeagle.com

Cessna 140, N2414N: Accident occurred April 11, 2017 in Bowdoin, Sagadahoc County, Maine

http://registry.faa.gov/N2414N

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft force landed on a highway.

Date: 11-APR-17
Time: 14:20:00Z
Regis#: N2414N
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C140
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BOWDOIN
State: MAINE







BOWDOINHAM (WGME) -- A plane force landed on I-295 Tuesday morning. The pilot and his passenger walked away without serious injuries.

It happened near Exit 37 in Bowdoinham.

The FAA says the pilot of the 1947 Cessna used the highway as an emergency landing strip after he experienced an engine related problem during his flight, but luckily he and his passenger escaped with minor injuries

Maine State Police say the pilot, John Gayley of Bowdoin, suffered facial injuries and was taken to Maine Medical Center.

His passenger, Rodney Voisene of Bowdoin, has a minor injury to an arm and was taken to a local hospital to be checked.

Maine State Police say the plane made the emergency landing around 10:15 a.m.

Gayley had taken off from Twitchell airport and the engine stalled when he attempted to switch fuel tanks, according to officials.

Police say Gayley landed the plane in the southbound lane, against traffic, and the plane then veered into the guardrail, along the breakdown lane.

One vehicle had to swerve to avoid the plane as it landed. 

The crash also caused the plane to start leaking fuel, which crews are working to clean up.

A wrecker will remove the plane from the road Tuesday afternoon. Southbound traffic will be disrupted during that time.

The FAA says they are investigating the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here:  http://wgme.com

Cub Crafters CC11-100, N74WS: Incident occurred April 10, 2017 in Taylorsville, Alexander County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N74WS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;Charlotte, North Carolina

Aircraft landed in a field and struck the propeller.

Date: 10-APR-17
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N74WS
Aircraft Make: LIGHT SPORT CUB CRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: CC11
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TAYLORSVILLE
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Cessna 172G, N5813R LLC, N5813R: Accident occurred April 10, 2017 at Somerset Airport (KSMQ), Bedminster, New Jersey

N5813R LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5813R

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey 

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into a ditch.  

Date: 10-APR-17
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N5813R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BEDMINSTER
State: NEW JERSEY

Weatherly 620B, Skyline Aviation LLC, N9004M: Incident occurred April 10, 2017 in Lewistown, Fergus County, Montana

SKYLINE AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9004M

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aircraft during aerial application, gear and wings struck the ground.  

Date: 10-APR-17
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N9004M
Aircraft Make: WEATHERLY
Aircraft Model: 620B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: LEWISTOWN
State: MONTANA

Grumman American AA-1B, N9613L: Accident occurred March 28, 2017 at Dalton Airport (3DA), Flushing, Genesee County, Michigan

http://registry.faa.gov/N9613L

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Detroit, Michigan 

Aircraft on landing, went off the end of the runway and struck a tree.

Date: 28-MAR-17
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N9613L
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: AA1B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FLUSHING
State: MICHIGAN

Cessna 525B, Flagship Private Air LLC, N315CJ: Incident occurred April 10, 2017 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Flagship Private Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N315CJ

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;Tampa, Florida

Aircraft on takeoff, struck  a fox.  Returned and landed without incident.

Date: 10-APR-17
Time: 23:59:00Z
Regis#: N315CJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C525B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

Beech A36TC Bonanza, Level '5', N755R: Incident occurred April 10, 2017 in Livermore, Alameda County, California

LEVEL '5':   http://registry.faa.gov/N755R

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California 

Aircraft landed gear up. 

Date: 10-APR-17
Time: 17:25:00Z
Regis#: N755R
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36TC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LIVERMORE
State: CALIFORNIA

Tecnam P-2004 Bravo, N54EB: Accident occurred April 09, 2017 in Avalon, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N54EB

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California 

Aircraft on landing, struck the wing on the runway.  

Date: 09-APR-17
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N54EB
Aircraft Make: COSTRUZIONI TECNA
Aircraft Model: P2004 BRAVO
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: AVALON
State: CALIFORNIA