Saturday, August 18, 2012

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, Haps Aerial Enterprises Inc., N9677H: Fuel exhaustion, aircraft force landed on a highway, near Sellersburg, Indiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N9677H

http://www.flickr.com/photos

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 9677H        Make/Model: C172      Description: Skyhawk
  Date: 08/18/2012     Time: 1347

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: SELLERSBURG   State: IN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR SELLERSBURG, IN

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: INDIANAPOLIS, IN  (GL11)              Entry date: 08/21/2012  















Police said the plane ran out of fuel.


SELLERSBURG, Ind. - No one was hurt when a small plane made an emergency landing Saturday morning on a highway in Indiana.  

Two people were on board the aircraft when it landed on Highway 60 near Interstate 65 at about 10 a.m.

Cheryl Koetter, who works at Cricket's Cafe, spoke with the passenger. She said he told her they lost power a ways back and were debating whether to crash land into a tree or a pond. He told her when they got to the road, they decided to land instead of crashing.

The passenger was shaken. He said it was his first time in a plane, and he'd never go up again.

It is believed that a fuel issue was the reason the pilot had to put the plane down. After refueling, police escorted the plane about a mile and a half to the Clark County Regional Airport.

Read more: http://www.wlky.com

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) - - Think about if you're driving down the road and all of the sudden a plane decides it's going to use your lane as a runway. 

 That was the story Saturday near Sellersburg.

Motorist David Via said “I was headed this way (points) and outta nowhere I just looked up and there’s a plane coming at me. So I tried to veer over to the right as much as I could. He landed, kinda bounced around a little bit, and then the next thing I know the wing clips my truck and goes right over top of my car. It was the wildest thing I've ever seen. I can't believe it.”

A single engine Cessna had to make an emergency landing on SR 60 at about 10 a.m. because the plane ran out of gas.

Eyewitnesses say several cars had to move off the road to avoid being hit by the plane.

One driver that couldn't move in time was David Via.

His red truck now has marks on the roof to show where the plane scrapped across it.

Cpl. Nick Mobley with the Clark County Sheriff's Office said “There were no injuries. We were very lucky that we sustained no injuries, especially at the time due to the traffic volume at the time on SR 60.”

The plane landed about a mile and a half from the Clark County Airport.

The pilot and authorities went to get gas and after it was refueled police officers from Sellersburg and Indiana State Police were able to escort the plane down the highway and back into the airport safely.


Source:  http://www.whas11.com 

SELLERSBURG, Ind. -- A single-engine plane made an emergency landing on a rural road in southern Indiana early Saturday, officials said.

About 10 a.m., investigators said several cars had to move off State Road 60 in Sellersburg to avoid being hit by the plane.

Police said the plane ran out of gas.

One driver could not clear the roadway fast enough and the plane scraped across the roof of his truck.

“I tried to veer over to the right as much as I could. The pilot landed and kind of bounced around a little bit. The next thing I know, the wing clips and goes right over the top of my car. It was the wildest thing I’ve ever seen,” driver David Via said.

State police escorted the plane down the highway and into a regional airport.

No injuries were reported.


 http://www.theindychannel.com

'14 pilots, 31 cabin crew members failed pre-flight alcohol test'

NEW DELHI: Fourteen pilots and 31 cabin crew members failed alcohol test during the pre-flight medical examination between January and March this year, civil aviation minister Ajit Singh said on Friday. 

 "This year 14 pilots and 31 cabin crew members failed the breathalyzer test, compared to four and 21 last year," Singh said in a written reply to Lok Sabha.

Of the 14 pilots, four are of Jet Airways, three of Air India, two each of Kingfisher Airlines, SpiceJet and IndiGo while one was of Jetlite, he said, adding that last year only pilots were found under the influence of alcohol, of which two were of Kingfisher and one each of Jet Airways and Jetlite.

Compared to 21 last year, this year 31 cabin crew members were caught drunk on duty. Of these 10 were of Jet Airways, nine of IndiGo, three each of Jetlite, Air India and SpiceJet while one each were of Kingfisher, Go Airways and Air India Express.

Singh informed the House that as per the Civil Aviation Regulation (CAR), licenses of first time offender were suspended for three months while those caught for the second time had their licenses cancelled for five years.

The license of a Jetlite pilot was cancelled for five years as he tested positive for second time while the services of a cabin crew member of the same airline were terminated as per company procedure as she was on probation, Singh said.

Last year, between January and March, no pilot and cabin crew member of Air India and Air India Express were found reporting under the influence of alcohol.


http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Macleod FW-190 1/2 Scale, N149AM: Accident occurred August 18, 2012 in Columbus, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N149AM

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA513  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 18, 2012 in Columbus, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/13/2013
Aircraft: MCLEOD ALAN FW-190 1/2 SCALE, registration: N149AM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was performing pattern work at the airport. After conducting a touch-and-go landing on runway 24, with more than 1,638 feet of runway ahead, the pilot turned the airplane right and advised the controller that he had a partial loss of engine power and intended to land on runway 13. Near the approach end of runway 13, the pilot banked left, stalled, pitched nose down, and impacted the ground within 157 feet of the runway threshold. A witness reported that the engine was running rough but not sputtering. Another witness stated that the engine was not developing full power, and an airframe and powerplant mechanic reported that the engine sounded as if it were operating between 1,200 and 1,300 rpm.

Examination of the flight controls revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical failure or malfunction of the power train, air induction, or fuel metering systems; however, postaccident testing of the spark plugs revealed that five exhibited weak spark, which would have been detected during an engine run-up before takeoff.

About the time of the accident, the temperature and dew point were favorable for serious icing at glide power. The engine sounds described by the witnesses are consistent with carburetor icing, as is the pilot’s report of a partial loss of power after operating at a reduced power setting in the traffic pattern and then advancing the power after the touch-and-go landing. It could not be determined why the pilot did not elect to land the airplane on the remaining runway ahead.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airspeed while maneuvering following a partial loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s decision not to land on the remaining runway ahead, and the partial loss of engine power due to carburetor ice.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 18, 2012, about 1023 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur built FW-190 ½ scale replica, N149AM, registered to a private individual, crashed near the approach end of runway 13 at Columbus Metropolitan Airport (CSG), Columbus, Georgia. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal, local flight from CSG. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the commercial pilot, was fatally injured. The flight originated from CSG about 1018.

An individual who spoke with the accident pilot before takeoff stated they never discussed how much fuel was on-board, nor did the pilot mention to him any malfunction of the aileron flight controls. Rather, the individual commented to the accident pilot about the short wing span and that the aileron flight controls must be “kind of touchy” to which the accident pilot said “yes a little touchy.”

The pilot was cleared to taxi to runway 24, and according to a transcription of communications, at 1018, the local controller cleared the pilot for takeoff left traffic runway 24, and advised him that the wind was from 290 degrees at 5 knots. The pilot acknowledged the takeoff clearance and left traffic instruction from the controller. The pilot remained in the traffic pattern for runway 24, and about 1020:42, the pilot advised the controller that he was turning left base for runway 24, to which the controller cleared the pilot for the option runway 24 and advised the wind was from 310 degrees at 5 knots. The pilot acknowledged the instructions from the controller at 1020:53, and about 1 minute 13 seconds later or at 1022:06, the pilot advised the controller he intended to land on runway 13, and, “…I’ve a little power loss.” The controller who was communicating with the pilot later reported during an interview with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge that immediately after executing a touch-and-go landing for runway 24 or at a point located before the intersection of runways 6/24 and 13/31, the pilot turned right for downwind for runway 13.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane when it was north of runway 06/24 and east of runway 13/31, turn onto the downwind leg for runway 13.

The transcription of communication further indicates that at 1022:22, the pilot advised the controller that he intended to land on runway 13, and again advised of a loss of engine power. The controller cleared the pilot to land on runway 13, and later reported observing the pilot turn onto a short left base.

One witness reported first seeing the airplane when it was near taxiway D4, and noted the airplane was about 200 to 300 feet above ground level, and banked to the left then flew over hangars flying towards the approach end of runway 13. The witness reported that to him the engine sounded as if it were operating on 3 cylinders instead of 4, and also described, “…engine was running rough not sputtering…” and that the engine did not seem to be developing full power. The witness did not notice any smoke trailing the airplane. Another witness heard the pilot announce of the CTAF “power failure” and ran outside.

Two witnesses who were outside on the ramp near the approach end of runway 13 reported that the airplane flew over their position between 250 and 300 feet above ground level, and one of the witnesses who is an airframe and powerplant mechanic described hearing a reduced power setting which to him sounded like the engine was operating between 1,200 and 1,300 rpm. The witness reported seeing the airplane bank to the left at what was described as nearly 90 degrees of bank, followed by the nose pitching down. The other witness reported that as the airplane neared the approach end of runway 13, the airplane was in a “pretty good turn to the left.” The witness noted that the left wing dipped down, followed by stall, the nose pitching down, and subsequent impact. No sputtering sounds or smoke was observed trailing the airplane by any witnesses.

A fixed base operator located on the airport near the approach end of runway 13 with a security camera positioned to their ramp recorded a portion of the uncontrolled nose low descent during the final seconds of flight. No components were noted separating from the aircraft during the nose-low descent.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 71, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a certified flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single engine, airplane multi-engine and instrument airplane. He held a third class medical certificate with limitations issued on April 14, 2011.

The pilot’s wife reported finding a pilot logbook which indicated her husband had accrued 13,000 hours flight time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single seat wood structured airplane was built by a private individual in 1996, as a ½ scale Focke-Wulf (Fw) 190, and was designated serial number M2649. It was powered by a 100 horsepower Continental O-200-A engine and equipped with a three-bladed composite propeller. It was equipped with a manually retractable main landing gear and fixed tail wheel. The flight control system for pitch and roll was controlled by push/pull rods, while the flight control system for yaw was controlled by cables. The fuel supply system consisted of a 13 to 14 gallon gravity fed fuel tank that connects via hoses and lines to the carburetor through components consisting of a fuel shutoff valve, fuel strainer, and electric fuel pump.

No airworthiness files for the accident airplane existed at the FAA Aircraft Registry located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Aircraft Registry did however have a registration file with the first document historically being an Affidavit of Ownership for Amateur-Built Aircraft from the builder which was dated April 29, 1996. The affidavit reflected the make, model, and serial number of the engine, which was the same engine installed at the time of the accident. Additional documents contained in the registration file consisted of a bill of sale to the accident pilot dated April 27, 2012, and an aircraft registration application in the accident pilot’s name dated June 12, 2012.

The builder/previous owner reported to NTSB that when the airplane was sold to the accident pilot, it was not equipped with a fuel quantity gauge. He initially reported that he did not give a fuel dipstick he made to the accident pilot when it was sold; however, he later stated that he did give the accident pilot the fuel dipstick. The builder/previous owner also reported that when he built it, a fuel sending unit was installed in the fuel tank; however, the sending unit never worked so he disabled it. When asked how he disabled it he reported he could not recall. The builder/previous owner was asked about stall speeds and reported the power-off stall speed with the landing gear down was 72 to 73 miles-per-hour (mph), and the typical approach speeds in the traffic pattern on the base leg was 100 mph, and over the runway threshold was 85 to 90 mph. He was also asked if he had ever performed spins in the accident airplane and he reported he had performed two. He indicated that during coordinated flight, the airplane stalled straight forward with, “good size buffet before the wing stalled”, and spins became, “very tight very quick.” Since building the airplane, he replaced the hour meter when the airplane total time was less than 100 hours. At the time of the sale, he estimated the airplane total time was between 140 and 150 hours. The maintenance records were reportedly given to the new owner/accident pilot at the time of the sale.

The maintenance records were not located during the postaccident investigation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at the accident airport at 1051, or approximately 28 minutes after the accident indicates the wind was from 300 degrees at 8 knots, the visibility was 10 miles, clear skies existed. The temperature and dew point were 28 and 21 degrees Celsius, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 29.97 inches of Mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS

The pilot was in contact with the Columbus Metropolitan Airport air traffic control tower at the time of the accident. There were no reported communication difficulties.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Columbus Metropolitan Airport is a tower controlled facility and has 2 runways designated 6/24 and 13/31. Runway 24, which was the runway the pilot initially departed from is 6,997 feet long and 150 feet wide, while runway 13, which was the pilot’s intended runway is 3,997 feet long and 150 feet wide.

With respect to runway 24, approximately 1,638 feet of runway remain at the intersection of that runway and runway 13/31.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane crashed on airport property in close proximity to the approach end of runway 13. Further examination of the accident site revealed an impact scar associated with the right wing and engine oriented on a magnetic heading of 258 degrees; the impact scar was located approximately 157 feet and 327 degrees from the approach end centerline of runway 13. The wreckage came to rest on a magnetic heading of 302 degrees magnetic.

Examination of the airplane revealed all components necessary to sustain flight remained attached or were in close proximity to the main wreckage. Structural damage was noted to the wings, front fuselage, cockpit, and empennage. Both ailerons remained attached, and the elevator remained connected to the horizontal stabilizer which was separated. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer which was also separated. Flight control continuity was confirmed for roll, pitch, and yaw from the cockpit controls to the bellcrank near each control surface attach point. The fixed portion of the windscreen was broken but did not exhibit any evidence of bird strike. Both main landing gears were symmetrically bent aft approximately 50 degrees consistent with being down and locked at the time of impact.

The fuel tank was separated and fully breached but there was no pre or postcrash fire noted on any components. Further inspection of the fuel tank revealed the remains of a fuel sending unit; however, the wire portion that would connect to a float was found to be cut near the sending unit housing. No obstruction of the fuel supply system was noted; the fuel shutoff valve was in the on position. A small amount of debris was noted adhering to the fuel outlet finger screen inside the separated fuel tank.

Examination of the cockpit revealed throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat control continuity from the cockpit to their respective attach points of the control shaft in the engine compartment. The carburetor heat control was extended ½ inch. The magneto switch which was in the both position tested satisfactory during postaccident testing, and the oil pressure indicator was reading 0. The recording tachometer needle was off scale low and read 112.5 hours.

Examination of the engine following recovery of the airplane revealed crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity. Differential cold cylinder compression testing using 80 psi revealed the Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 cylinders registered 52, 62, 28 and 32 psi, respectively. Leakage in the exhaust was noted during testing of the No. 3 cylinder while leakage in the crankcase was noted during testing of the No. 4 cylinder. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft but 2 blades were sheared. The carburetor was impact separated, and the fuel inlet fitting was broken at the carburetor. The fuel inlet screen was clean. Disassembly inspection of the carburetor revealed about 3 drops of fuel and a small amount of debris inside the carburetor bowl. No water was detected in the drops of fuel when checked using water finding paste. Further inspection of the carburetor revealed the accelerator pump rod was fractured, the float moved freely, and the needle valve and seat tested satisfactory with up and down movement of the float. The position of the throttle plate at impact was consistent with being in nearly the full open position. The exhaust system components were crushed in several areas but inspection of the non-crushed areas revealed no obstructions.

The air induction system was free of obstructions. Inspection of the components of the lubrication system revealed ferrous and non-ferrous particles in the oil suction screen. The oil suction screen housing also contained ferrous and non-ferrous particles. The oil pump gears were satisfactory but the interior surface of the oil pump housing exhibited scratches consistent with hard particle passage. The oil tank which was crushed and breached was drained and found to contain approximately 8 ounces of oil admixed with water. RTV type sealant was noted in the gear-train area of the engine, and also on the threads of the oil tank drain plug.

The left magneto remained tightly secured to the accessory case and was timed to specification on the data plate (24 degrees before top dead center), while the right magneto remained connected by one stud/nut while the opposite side mounting flange was broken. During hand rotation of the crankshaft, spark was noted at all spark plugs connected to the left magneto with the exception of the No. 4 bottom lead which exhibited impact damaged. The right magneto was rotated by hand and produced spark at all towers. Inspection of the spark plugs revealed the No. 1 top plug exhibited excessively eroded center and ground electrodes, while the remainder of the plugs exhibited normal wear when compared with the Champion Aviation Check-A-Plug chart. Operational testing of the spark plugs as received was performed on a spark plug test machine. The testing was performed using 80 psi, which revealed all spark plugs exhibited a weak spark with the exception of the No. 3 top and bottom, and No. 1 bottom plugs which exhibited a normal spark during testing.

All cylinders were removed and no erosion of the pistons was noted. Also, although the gaps of 2 of the 3 upper rings of some cylinders were nearly aligned, none of the cylinders exhibited all gaps of the upper 3 rings in alignment. Following removal of the cylinders, no discoloration was noted to any of the connecting rods.

Examination of the propeller revealed two blades were sheared near the hub while the remaining blade remained connected in the hub.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed by the Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation. The cause of death was listed as “massive blunt traumatic injuries”.

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens of the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated the results were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and tested drugs of abuse.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

As previously reported, the pilot purchased the airplane on April 27, 2012, and by the previous owner’s account, he flew it back to his home base (CSG Airport). A document located in the wreckage associated with the accident airplane indicating date, tachometer time, pilot name, and flight duration, documented 4 separate entries all with the accident pilot’s initials beginning with the first entry dated April 27, 2012, to the last entry dated May 18, 2012. The first entry flight duration was 2.3 hours and was consistent with the pilot’s purchase and subsequent flight to the CSG Airport. Fuel records from a fixed base operator at the accident airport associated with the pilot’s name indicate 6.60 gallons of 100 low lead fuel purchased on April 28, 2012; the request was for a top off of the fuel tank. No determination was made as to whether the airplane was fueled before or after the next logged airplane operation on the same day lasting 0.5 hour tachometer time. The next documented airplane operation occurred on April 30, 2012, and was recorded to last 0.3 hour tachometer time. The last documented airplane operation occurred on May 18, 2012, and was recorded to last 0.2 hour tachometer time. The ending tachometer time was recorded to be 112.3 hours, and as previously reported, the tachometer time postaccident was recorded to be 112.5 hours.

FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) CE-09-35, titled Carburetor Icing Prevention contains a chart that depicts temperature, dew point, and the icing probability. Based on the temperature and dew point about the time of the accident (82 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively), the conditions were favorable for serious icing at glide power. The SAIB indicates that the sign of carburetor icing in an airplane equipped with a fixed pitch propeller is a drop in engine rpm, which will be accompanied by engine roughness.


NTSB Identification: ERA12FA513
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 18, 2012 in Columbus, GA
Aircraft: MCLEOD ALAN FW-190 1/2 SCALE, registration: N149AM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 18, 2012, about 1023 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur built FW-190 ½ scale replica, N149AM, registered to and operated by a private individual, crashed near the approach end of runway 13 at Columbus Metropolitan Airport (CSG), Columbus, Georgia. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal, local flight from CSG. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the commercial pilot, was fatally injured. The flight originated from CSG about 1018.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) information, the pilot was cleared for takeoff for left traffic to runway 24 at 1018, and advised that the wind was from 290 degrees at 5 knots. The pilot acknowledged the takeoff clearance and left traffic instruction from the controller. The pilot remained in the traffic pattern for runway 24, and at 1020:46, the pilot advised the controller that he was on left base for runway 24.The controller cleared the pilot for the option on runway 24 and advised the wind was from 310 degrees at 5 knots. The pilot acknowledged the instructions from the controller and at 1022:07, the pilot advised the controller he intended to land on runway 13, and reported a partial loss of engine power. Witnesses reported seeing the airplane when it was west of runway 06/24 and south of runway 13/31, turn onto the downwind leg for runway 13. One witness described hearing a reduced power setting, while another witness estimated the airplane was at 200 feet.

Preliminary ATC information further indicates that at 1022:22, the pilot advised the controller that he intended to land on runway 13, and again advised of a loss of engine power. The controller cleared the pilot to land on runway 13. When the flight was near the approach end of runway 13, the airplane was observed in a left bank, with one witness describing the left bank as a, “pretty good turn to the left.” The same witness reported the left wing dropped, the nose pitched down, and the airplane stalled.

Preliminary examination of the accident site revealed an impact scar associated with the right wing and engine oriented on a magnetic heading of 258 degrees; the impact scar was located approximately 157 feet and 327 degrees from the approach end centerline of runway 13. The wreckage came to rest on a magnetic heading of 302 degrees. All components necessary for flight remained attached or were found in close proximity to the main wreckage. There was no evidence of in-flight or postcrash fire on any observed components.




The pilot of an experimental plane died early Saturday after his single-engine aircraft plunged into a grassy field at the Columbus Metropolitan Airport, an official said.

George Wade, 71, of Columbus died in the crash, Muscogee County Coroner Bill Thrower said.

The plane had taken off from the airport when it immediately experienced engine problems. The pilot of the small craft tried to return to the airport when the aircraft crashed on its nose.

Thrower pronounced Wade dead at 11:20 a.m.

Steven Hewlett said Wade was a pilot and instructor at the airport. Hewlett, also a pilot, said he last saw Wade two days ago.

In a statement from the Federal Aviation Administration, spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the single-engine aircraft, an FW-190, was practicing approaches about 10:40 a.m.

"After completing one touch and go, the pilot announced he lost engine power and would be landing on Runway 13," the statement said. "The aircraft crashed short of the runway and was destroyed."

Debris was scattered east of Armour Road and south of Airport Thruway just off a taxiway to the hangars at the west end of the fenced airport. The crash site was sealed off with bright yellow tape.

The crash remains under investigation by the FAA. Thrower said an investigator was headed to Columbus Saturday, and he would be at the scene this morning.

Thrower said Wade's body would be sent Monday to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab in Atlanta for an autopsy.

Bergen said the cause of the crash would be determined by the National Transportation Safety Board, which could take up to a year.

The aircraft was registered to a Columbus man, but the owner wasn't identified.

http://www.ledger-enquirer.com





Airport officials, the Columbus Police Department and the Muscogee County Coroner work at the scene of an experimental aircraft crash on the west taxiway of the Columbus Airport. The pilot, George Wade of Columbus, was killed as he tried to land the aircraft Saturday morning.





COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) - Emergency responders were called to the Columbus Airport Saturday morning after a plane went down near the runway. 

Coroner Bill Thrower said he pronounced 71-year-old George Wade dead around 11: 20 a.m. on the scene.

Wade's small experimental plane crashed near the runaway while he was making an emergency landing, according Sherry Goodrum, chairperson for the airport commission.

The crash site is located off Airport Thruway. It is unclear what caused the plane to crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are en route to Columbus to investigate.

Wade was an independent instructor at the Columbus Airport.  


  http://www.wsfa.com

Cessna A150L, N6006J: Accident occurred August 17, 2012 in Tribune, Kansas

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA552 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 17, 2012 in Tribune, KS
Aircraft: CESSNA A150L, registration: N6006J
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On August 17, 2012, about 1300 central daylight time, a Cessna A150L, N6006J, impacted a corn field 13 miles, north of Tribune, Kansas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Tribune Municipal Airport (K5K2) about 1200.

The pilot reportedly told rescuers that he lost control while in a bank, recovered, and impacted terrain.


 http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=N6006J

 A western Kansas man is injured after crashing his fixed-wing airplane into a Greeley County cornfield. 

The Garden City Telegram reports 52-year-old A.B. Smith of Sharon Springs was flying the single-engine Cessna at 10:38 a.m. Friday when he lost control of the plane when banking to turn.

The Kansas Highway Patrol says Smith was able to straighten out the plane and crash landed in a field near Tribune. It came to rest on its landing gear in an upright position.

Smith was taken to Greeley County Hospital, which declined to release information about his condition late Friday. A woman at the hospital told The Associated Press on Saturday he was transferred to a different hospital soon after he arrived, but she didn't have information on where he was taken.

Source:  http://www.kfdi.com


Published 8/18/2012 
By The Telegram

The pilot of a fixed-wing aircraft was hospitalized following a crash landing in Greeley County around 10:38 a.m. on Friday.

A. B. Smith, 52, Sharon Springs, was taken to Greeley County Hospital following the crash landing about 13.1 miles north of the Kansas Highway 27 and Kansas Highway 96 junction in Tribune, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol.

A KHP report said Smith was flying the single-engine 1971 Cessna plane and lost control of the plane when banking to turn.

Smith was able to straighten out, and landed in a cornfield with the plane, coming to rest on its landing gear in an upright position, according to the KHP.

Hospital at Greeley County Hospital did not release information about Smith's condition late Friday.

Smith was wearing a safety restraint, the KHP also said.

Source:  http://www.gctelegram.com

Two Virgin jets 'sent emergency calls' over Stansted Airport on the same day

Two Virgin Atlantic passenger jets issued emergency alerts on the same day this year because they were running out of fuel.

Air traffic controllers dealt with a total of four low-fuel emergencies at Stansted Airport, Essex, that day – including a ‘mayday’ call.

Two were Virgin 747s, which can carry 451 passengers each. They needed priority landing after flying from America, according to an investigation by the Exaro website.

Virgin Atlantic denied that the planes – named Jersey Girl and Hot Lips – issued maydays. They had been diverted from Gatwick because of severe winds. A passenger on Jersey Girl said: ‘To see so many fire engines on landing made me realize it could have been bad.’

On the same day, an Embraer 190, which can carry 114 passengers, was diverted to Southampton and put out a mayday over fuel.

The revelation comes as Spanish authorities investigate Ryanair for three low-fuel maydays in Valencia.

There have been at least 28 cases of UK passenger airlines declaring low-fuel emergencies in the last two years while flying to airports in Britain, the Civil Aviation Authority has revealed.

Three were mayday calls made in the first five months of this year. Destinations included Heathrow, Birmingham, Edinburgh, Liverpool, Manchester and Nottingham.

Commercial passenger aircraft are legally required to have enough fuel to reach their destination and perform a ‘go-around’ – when the landing is aborted and the plane flies around the airport for another attempt – and divert to another airport plus stay in a holding pattern for 30 minutes.

Virgin Atlantic said: ‘Due to severe and abnormal weather conditions, two flights in January 2012 were diverted to Stansted.

Our fuel management procedures are approved by  the CAA and comply with all industry regulations.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II, Aviatour Fly'In, RP-C4431: Accident occurred August 18, 2012 off Masbate - Philippines

 
(AP Photo/Philippine Red Cross Masbate) 

 
This Aug. 19, 2012 photo released by the Philippine Red Cross Masbate shows part of a plane carrying Philippine Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo as it lies on a boat after being recovered near the crash site off Masbate city, about 380 kilometers (235 miles) southwest of Manila, Philippines Sunday Aug. 19, 2012. The small plane carrying 4 persons crashed into the sea Saturday while attempting an emergency landing. One person was rescued but Robredo and the two pilots are still missing, officials said.
 (AP Photo/Philippine Red Cross Masbate) NO SALES 

 
 MANILA, Philippines — The wreckage of the ill-fated twin engine Piper Seneca, which carried Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo and with Registry No. RPC 4431, has not been found, as of Sunday evening.

“No sightings, so far,” said Transportation and Communication Secretary Mar Roxas, the Palace-designated spokesperson for the search and rescue operations for the missing Robredo and the two pilots of the ill-fated plane that crashed off the coast of Masbate City before dusk Saturday.

Only the right wing of the twin-engine plane has been recovered, but divers have not yet located the aircraft believed to be 130-131 feet underwater.

At about 3 p.m. Sunday, a team from the Masbate Bantay-Dagat relayed an initial report to Masbate City Mayor Socrates Tuason and Police Superintendent Rodolfo Abella, the city chief of police, that a large object had been detected lying on the seabed.

But when the Philippine Daily Inquirer sought a confirmation from Roxas by phone, he replied:

“Nothing yet. Some underwater, seabed disturbances of indeterminate origin indicated by sonar.”

Roxas said that the divers were still scouring an area of 40-80 meters.

The crash site is about 200 meters from the tip of the runway of the Masbate airport, the only airstrip servicing all 21 towns of the island-province of Masbate.

Roxas said that divers from the Philippine Coast Guard, Navy Special Operations Group and Philippine National Police have been using Trimix or Nitrox blend (a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen), which extended the dive/bottom time of divers, compared to using the usual compressed air.

It was Abella who became the ground commander at the initial phase of search and rescue operations ordered by Mayor Tuason, before the provincial command took over Saturday.

The President himself became the ground commander when he arrived early Sunday to personally oversee the Robredo search.

Roxas described the search and rescue efforts as “air, surface and underwater” operations.

The President was accompanied by Roxas, defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin, Philippine National Police Chief Nicanor Bartolome, Budget Secretary Florencio Abad and Representative Jun Abaya, the president of the ruling Liberal Party (LP).

“Throughout the night, search and rescue operations for Secretary Jesse Robredo and party continued. More assets are being deployed this morning to intensify the search,” said presidential spokesperson Edwin Lacierda, adding:

“In the meantime, the President, along with Secretaries Roxas, Abad, Gazmin and Representative Abaya flew to Masbate at 5:45 a.m. to personally observe the search and rescue effort. We will be issuing more updates as they become available.”

In an interview with Radyo ng Bayan, deputy presidential spokesperson Abigail Valte said:

“The President himself is there at the command center for the search and rescue,” said Valte.

 The circumstances of plane crash were also unclear, with details

Valte said that Robredo’s aide, Chief Insp. Jun Abrazado, who survived the crash, had tried to help in the rescue operations in the first few hours following the crash, which authorities said occurred from 4:20 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday.

Abrazado tried but failed to extricate Robredo from the plane after impact.

“I think both Secretary Robredo and Jun Abrazado were able to send (text) messages (before the crash). I think Mr. Abrazado sent it to one of his colleagues that they were having engine trouble and then Secretary Jess sent a message to his wife also on the same subject.

“But … he was not able to … he was trying, I think, to pull out Secretary Jess from the plane but, perhaps, we’ll leave it to Secretary Roxas for the finer details of the story of Jun Abrazado,” said Valte.

The President had visited Abrazado at a Masbate hospital before he was brought to Bicol mainland at noon Sunday.

“Abrazado is in the hospital right now after, I think, he lost consciousness. Because, when he was rescued, they found out that he had a fractured arm. But Jun Abrazado had insisted on going back to the site to help in the search and rescue for Secretary Jess and the other two pilots. So now he is under observation, and the President is back at the center of the site to oversee the search and rescue that is ongoing,” said Valte.

Search and rescue operations of the Masbate City Bantay Dagat under Mayor Tuason and Police Supt. Gonzalo Villamor, the provincial deputy director for operations, were underway when the Inquirer contacted Tuason and Governor Rizalina Seachon-Lanete—at 6 p.m. Saturday.

According to Tuason, witnesses saw the plane trying to land on the tarmac of the Masbate airport at about 4:20 p.m. However, the plane suddenly plunged into the waters about 200 meters from the shore.

The crash was witnessed by Masbateños who were having their leisurely weekend walk at the Masbate Circumferential Road, which separates the airstrip’s northern tip from the seashore.


Aviatour Air, the Cebu-based airplane charter operator of ill-fated aircraft that carried Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) Secretary Jesse Robredo has been under investigation by the Aircraft Accident and Investigation Board of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) for its March 2012 crash landing incident in Camiguin province that killed two passengers and injuring three others. 

Aviatour Air, a general aviation service provider, air taxi operator and charterer in the Visayas region operating at the Cebu-Mactan International Airport owned the six-seater PA-34 Piper Senica twin engine aircraft that carried Robredo that crash landed at sea on Saturday afternoon near Masbate Airport.

Since March this year, the company has been investigated after one of its chartered plane, a Cessna 172 crash landed in Mambajao, Camiguin on March 4, 2012, killing Norwegian tourist Racquel Strande and Filipino pilot Christian Cesar Cebrecus.

Racquel’s husband Lars, their three-year-old child and student pilot Nurmala Dewi survived and were injured in the crash.

The president and CEO Captain Jessup Bahinting of Aviatour Air, the pilot of the aircraft that carried Robredo, is still reportedly missing together with Nepalese co-pilot Kitis Chand.

The fourth passenger, Robredo’s aide-de-camp Police Senior Inspector Jun Abrazado survived the crash and was rescued by fishermen.

Secretary Robredo was assisted by NAIA terminal 3 public affairs division protocol officers at the VIP room while waiting for his flight to Cebu via Cebu Pacific flight 5J 553 that was scheduled to take-off for Cebu at 10:00 am.

Protocol officers who assisted Robredo told Manila Standard that the Secretary came at NAIA terminal 3 an hour ahead of his flight schedule with two aides. Robredo had coffee at the terminal VIP room and even chatted with 2 nuns who were his co-passengers for the flight.

Robredo flew in to Cebu for the Convenors of the Community Investigative Support (CIS) National Summit and the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) at the Cebu International Convention Center in Mandaue City.

He was supposed to board his 5 p.m. Cebu Pacific flight to Manila but decided instead to proceed to Naga City to attend to some commitments.

On their way to Camarines Sur, the plane develop engine trouble.

Bahinting asked for an emergency landing at the Masbate Airport but crash landed at sea about 500 meters from the runway.

Initial reports said Robredo’s police aide de camp Senior Inspector Jun Abrazado had been rescued from the crash area, but there were no immediate reports on the other three passengers including Robredo.

Records from the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) appears that Aviatour Air is operating with a fleet of more than 35 aircrafts and a workforce of more than 70 employees, providing aerial tours and chartered flights to Tagbilaran, Bantayan and Camotes Islands, Surigao, Siargao and Masbate.

http://manilastandardtoday.com


 
File photo of the Piper Seneca RP-C4431 plane that DILG Sec. Jesse Robredo boarded, which crashed Saturday afternoon in Masbate. A portion of the right wing was recovered Saturday night, with the numbers 431 visible. Courtesy of Aviatour Air

 
Photo courtesy of Philippine National Red Cross


MASBATE CITY, Philippines – The light plane wobbled for several minutes before it dropped into the sea. It then stayed in the water’s surface for about 10 minutes before it completely sank. 

This was the account of Joel Espinilla, 37, a coastal resident of Masbate City who witnessed the last few minutes before the Piper Seneca, with Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo and three others on board, crashed into the waters off the city’s airport on Saturday.

Espinilla said he was playing chess on the shore with some friends at around 4:30 p.m. when they saw the small plane wobbling. The plane then went belly up before it dropped. He said they thought it would drop on the houses nearby but it went down into the water, on its side.

 “It happened very fast. The tail was bobbing up for about 10 minutes before it sank,” Espinilla said.

 He said it was low tide at that time so there were few fishermen in the area that could have helped.

So far, only one of the passengers was plucked out from the sea by passing fisherman, Chief Inspector Jun Abrazado, Robredo’s security aide. Abrazado suffered a fractured arm and had bruises all over his body.  After getting first aid, he joined the search and rescue team to help them pinpoint the crash site.

 Robredo and pilots Capt. Jessup Bahinting and Nepalese Kshitiz Chand remained missing 16 hours into the search.

 Espinilla said those on the shore who saw the plane drop wanted to help but were scared that the aircraft would explode.

 He said they only learned that it was Robredo who was on board the plane when top local officials themselves came to lead the search and rescue at around 5 p.m.


A report from the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) Undersecretary Benito Ramos confirmed in a report that a fuel tank was found, and that it is now with the Masbate Police.

Robredo and two others, pilot Jessup Bahinting and Nepalese flight student Kshitiz Chand are still missing, while Robredo's aide-de-camp, Police Senior Inspector Jhun Abrasado survived the crash with a fractured arm.

According to the NDRRMC, Abrasado was rescued by passing fishermen after the crash.

Abrasado joined the rescuers in the search for Robredo, Bahinting, and Chand, Communications Strategy Secretary Ricky Carandang said in an earlier report.

President Benigno Aquino III and members of his cabinet arrived at the crash site in Masbate before 7 a.m. Sunday. PNoy wil lead search-and-rescue efforts, Transportation secretary Manuel Roxas II said in an earlier report.

The President was accompanied by cabinet secretaries Voltaire Gazmin (defense) and  Florencio Abad (budget), Philippine National Police chief Director General Nicanor Bartolome, and Armed Forces chief of staff Gen. Jessie Dellosa. — Carmela Lapeña /LBG, GMA news


Aviatour Air has two Piper Seneca planes in its fleet of 35+ planes. Robredo’s plane was piloted by Jessup Bahinting, the CEO of Mactan-based Aviatour Air and a flight insructor, and his student Kshitiz Chand, a Nepali. Aviatour Air




 
P-Noy arrives in Masbate City via a C130 flight from Villamor Airbase to check on the search and rescue efforts for DILG Sec. Jessie Robredo and company. 
Photo courtesy of https://twitter.com/noynoyaquino

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippines on Saturday evening, August 18, accepted help from the United States government in search and rescue operations for Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo and his companions after their plane crashed off Masbate.

 The plane carrying Robredo and three others, including the pilots, crashed on its way to the Masbate airport at 4:30 p.m.

In a 9 p.m. update on Twitter, Transportation Secretary Mar Roxas said the US offered to help through US Naval Attache Captain Jack Sutherland. The US government has a fleet survey team in Cavite that is going to the crash site, Roxas said.

He said the crash site is 200 meters from the shoreline. Surface search and rescue operations are now ongoing, he added. Roxas said the diving search has resumed using compressors as rescuers have obtained compressors from the area.

A Philippine navy vessel is already at the crash site aiding the effort, according to Masbate Mayor Socrates Tuason, who is part of the local rescue team.

Search 'won't stop'

The Philippine Coast Guard confirmed that search and rescue operations will continue tonight after being temporarily suspended earlier.

Philippine Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Algier Ricafrente told ANC that nearly a dozen boats would scour the area all night. He added that divers from Legazpi were already en route to Masbate to support the search tomorrow.

"We are not stopping our search and rescue operations even tonight," said Ricafrente.

Many arms of society are aiding the efforts, from the Philippine National Police to local fisherman. "We're in the middle of the ocean, surveying the waters. Many of us are here - the Coast Guard, the PNP, Bantay-Dagat, the fisherman. More than 50 people are here," said Tuason.

So far only parts of the private plane have been found. "Fisherman recovered one of the wings of the airplane earlier," he added.

"In front of the airport it looked like it was going to land but it didn't," said Tuason.

Robredo was on his way to Naga to celebrate the long weekend there with his family.

http://www.rappler.com 


Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II, RP-C4431: Search for DILG Secretary, flight school owner and co-pilot covers sea off Masbate 

 Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo and two others remain missing at sea after the six-seater Piper Seneca they were flying crashed in waters off Masbate City past 5 p.m yesterday

The private plane took off from Mactan for Naga City, the hometown of Robredo, who earlier visited Cebu to attend a launching of a police safety school and a police summit.

Search and rescue operations continue today for Robredo, the pilot Capt. Jessup Bahinting, who is owner of the Cebu-based Aviator Flying School and a Nepalese flight student Kshitiz Chand.

An aide of Robredo on the flight, Senior Insp Jun Abrazado, was plucked from the sea by fishermen who witnessed the crash. Abrazado, who suffered a fracture in the arm still joined the search efforts after receiving emergency treatment at a hospital in Masbate.

The aide was thrown out of the aircraft as it plowed into the water but he did not see Robredo get out of the plane, said Lt. Col Julian Pacatan, commander of the Army 9th Infantry Battalion in Masbate.

LIFE SAVER

Cebu City officials expressed grief over the possible fatal loss of Bajinting, who three days earlier helped saved the life of a zoo keeper by sending his plane to pick up anti-snake venom from Camiguin province to treat the patient who was bitten by a King Cobra.

Bajinting was due to receive a special award for his mercy flight in the next Charter Day celebration in February 2013, said Sylvan “Jack” Jakosalem, chief of the Cebu City Traffic Operations Management (Citom).

He said Mayor Michael Rama had agreed to give the special recognition, only to be devastated by news of the crash.

Robredo was supposed to take a Cebu Pacific flight back to Manila but made last-minute changes to board the private plane heading straight to Naga.

The pilot sent a distress call to the Masbate Airport about 5 p.m. requesting for an emergency landing, said lawyer Dominina Rances, executive assistant of Robredo.

The plane crashed about three kilometers from the airport in Masbate Bay and about one kilometer from the shoreline.

CEBU VISIT


Robredo arrived in Cebu about 11 a.m. and attended the ground-breaking for the Philippine Police Safety College in Consolacion town.

Consolacion Mayor Nene Alegado said that during her lunch with Robredo, the secretary commented about the humid weather in Cebu.

“Mainit dito sa Cebu. Sa Manila palagi umuulan (It is very warm here in Cebu unlike in Manila where it is always raining),” Alegado quoted Robredo as saying.

Alegado said she asked Robredo if she could again meet him in the evening to discuss some concerns, but Robredo said “Maybe some other time” since he was leaving in the afternoon.

From Consolacion, Robredo went to o the Cebu International Convention Center in Mandaue City to deliver a keynote speech before the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group-Community Investigative Support national summit.

Robredo’s wife, Leni said he called her at about 4:30 p.m. to say that the airplane he was on was having an engine problem. The call was immediately cut off and she had no contact with her husband after that.

At the Robredo residence, at Bulusan Street, Dayangdan, Naga City, his family, friends, and political allies were gathered and keeping vigil, awaiting word on his fate.

Up to 7 p.m., Coast Guard divers were still scouring the spot in the Masbate Pass where the plane plummeted.

MALACANANG

Malacañang appealed for calm.

Trade Secretary Mar Roxas asked for prayers for the missing Robredo, whom he described as one of the most sensible people in the government.

“Isa po siya sa mga pinakamatino na tao, kaya ipagdasal natin siya.”

Robredo is one of the Cabinet members closest to President Benigno Aquino III and helped his election campaign in 2010.

Communication Secretary Ricky Carandang who said search and rescue operations were ongoing added that “speculation is not useful at this point.”

By late evening, the Coast Guard had to call off the search since they could not continue without special night vision equipment.

PCG Bicol District commander Commodore Joel Garcia said the plane was reported to have crashed at 5:15 p.m. some three miles away from the shoreline.

“The plane reportedly had to make an emergency landing, but it did not make it to the airport of Masbate. It crashed near the beach resort of Masbate,” said Garcia.

He asaid two PCG search-and-rescue teams were sent to the site, along with Special Operations Group divers from Masbate.

NEW PLANE

The Piper Seneca, an American twin-engine light aircraft is typically used for personal and business flying.

In Cebu, Jakosalem said the six-seater plane was one of the newest acquisitions and top of the line planes of Aviator.

The Citom board chairman said that he immediately called Aviator about 5 p.m. when he heard about the plane crash.

He said he was told the Piper Seneca experienced right engine failure and crash landed in Masbate. Last contact with the plane was made at 4:20 p.m./INQUIRER, AP and a report from Chief of Reporters Doris Boncac

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net

United Boeing 757-200, N17126: Tire blew after take off, both engines red at Newark Liberty International Airport (KEWR), New Jersey

Witnesses described a frightening scene. 

Fire and smoke could be seen spewing from the left wing of United Airlines Flight 96 shortly after the twin-engine, Berlin-bound jet took off from Newark Liberty International Airport just before 6 p.m.


On board were 173 passengers and crew.

But two hours later, after the Boeing 757 burned off excess fuel over northern New Jersey, the narrow-body jet returned to Newark to make a safe landing while emergency crews watched from the side of the runway.

FAA spokesperson Kathleen Bergen said the crew of United Flight 96 landed safely at 8:05 p.m.

The cause of the jet’s engine problems remained unclear tonight.
Initial reports indicated that a blown tire was to blame. Barbara Woodruff, a special agent with the F.B.I., said pieces of the tire were sucked into one of the plane’s engines shortly after takeoff. The Federal Aviation Administration said it could not confirm that.

The incident, as initially described, was unusual. While passenger jets often experience blown tires, it is not common for such a problem to lead to an engine fire. In July 2000, an Air France Concorde crashed outside of Paris, killing 113 people, after runway debris led to a tire failure, puncturing a fuel tank on takeoff.


A United airlines spokesman said only that the Boeing 757 experienced a “mechanical issue“ with an engine.

“The crew followed standard procedures in returning to Newark, where the airplane landed safely,“ said the spokesman, Joe Micucci. “Meanwhile, we are working to re-accommodate the customers to their final destinations.“

Witnesses watching the plane said they saw flames from under a wing.

Keisha Thomas of central Jersey was driving south on the New Jersey Turnpike with her family when her brother noticed a plane looked strange as it took off.

“We looked a little closer and there were fireballs coming out from under one of the wings. We heard a popping sound coming from the engine,“ Thomas said. “It was a pretty scary sight, I’ve never seen anything like that in my life.“

According to Bergen, the plane crew initially reported “an issue“ with the plane’s left engine but the aircraft then began operating normally. She said the aircraft returned to Newark as a precaution.

Boeing 757 aircraft are designed to fly safely on one engine.

Just last week, another United Airlines 757 set to fly from Seattle to the Washington, D.C., area caught fire before takeoff, but no one was hurt as all passengers were safely evacuated.

Officials said the fire had originated in an auxiliary power unit, which was extinguished by firefighters.

The jet involved in tonight’s incident was 14 years old. A number of service difficulty reports in connection with the aircraft have been filed over the years, but none involving the engines. In 2001, its landing gear would not retract after takeoff from Newark, but an override was used and a maintenance crew later found a leaking pressure line.


 
The United Airlines flight was operated by a Boeing 757. (Source: CNN)


http://flightaware.com/live/flight/UAL96/history/20120818/2150Z/KEWR/EDDT

NEWARK (WABC) -- A United flight flying from Newark International Airport to Berlin, Germany was sent back to Newark after a tire blew during take off causing problems in one of the planes engines. The plane landed safely back in Newark, just after 8:00 PM, Saturday.

Flight 96, a Boeing 757, carrying 173 passengers and crew reported a problem in an engine after it left New Jersey just before 6:00 PM.

As a precaution the flight returned to Newark. After an estimated landing time of 7:40pm Saturday, it's landing was rescheduled for 8:30pm by the FAA, as the flight needed to burn off more fuel.

It is still unclear if passengers will have to find another flight.

United just released a statement:
"United flight 96, operating between Newark and Berlin, returned to Newark this afternoon after the Boeing 757 experienced a mechanical issue with an engine. The crew followed standard procedures in returning to Newark, where the airplane landed safely. Meanwhile, we are working to re-accommodate the customers to their final destinations."

http://abclocal.go.com

New York (CNN) -- A Berlin-bound United Airlines flight returned Saturday night to Newark Liberty International Airport after an engine problem developed during or right after takeoff, officials said.

Eyewitnesses reported seeing flames spewing from the left engine.

A tire blew during takeoff and flew into an engine, FBI spokeswoman Barbara Woodruff said. The Federal Aviation Administration said it could not confirm that.

Flight 96 circled the airport and burned fuel for more than an hour before landing at 8:05 p.m., according to the FAA. United described it as a "mechanical issue."

The crew of the Boeing 757 reported a problem after it left New Jersey for Berlin, said FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen. The engine was operating properly before it landed, she told CNN.

Eyewitness Keisha Thomas, who was traveling on the New Jersey Turnpike, said she witnessed fireballs near a wing shortly after the plane took off.

Thomas heard a loud sound, describing it as "pow, pow, pow." The plane was circling the airport, she said.

Djenaba Johnson-Jones, who lives across the river from the airport, said she heard an unusual noise and saw fire, but not smoke, coming from the aircraft's left engine.

Eyewitness Dennis Ostolaza said he heard a "propeller sound" akin to a military helicopter as the plane gained altitude after takeoff, with "black smoke and fire spitting out of the engine."

http://www.cnn.com

Benin residents, passengers panic, as plane fails to land

Written by Uchechukwu Olisah, Benin City 
Sunday, 19 August 2012

Residents of Benin City, the Edo State capital, were panic-stricken on Saturday when an Arik Airline aircraft carrying over 50 passengers and which hovered for about 15 minutes in the airspace failed to land at its Benin Airport destination.

The incident, which occurred at about 7.30 a.m., sent shivers down the spines of residents as some people living around the airport hurriedly left their homes for fear that the aircraft might crash-land.

The aircraft, however, flew back to Lagos after it failed to land in Benin.

A passengers aboard the aircraft who pleaded anonymity said some “passengers fainted due to fear. We thought it was going to be another serious crash. We were hovering round Benin, but we could not land. People were shouting the name of Jesus until we were taken back to Lagos.”

A source at the airport said there was a possibility that the pilot failed to get landing clearance from the Control Tower.

The Airport Manager. Mr. Segun Ayodele, told journalists that he was not aware of the incident. 


Source:  http://tribune.com.ng

Engine restart in Diamond DA42 over Orcas

Attorney's disciplinary hearing delayed: Foothills Regional Airport (KMRN), Morganton, North Carolina

By: Julie N. Chang | Morganton News Herald 
 Published: August 18, 2012

Morganton --   A disciplinary hearing in front of the North Carolina State Bar has been delayed for a Burke County attorney who is already under a stayed five-year suspension.

Clyde Gary Triggs was scheduled to appear before the Disciplinary Hearing Commission on Thursday, but his hearing was continued and rescheduled for 1 p.m. Sept. 20.

In addition to his upcoming disciplinary hearing, Triggs may play a role when the FBI completes its investigation at Foothills Regional Airport.

Triggs is a registered agent for Burkemont Service Center of Morganton, which was one of several businesses listed in an attachment to the FBI’s search and seizure warrant served June 5. Agents seized documents related to Burkemont Service Center, which is owned by Foothills Regional Authority board member Randy Hullette.

RANMAC and Hullette Aviation, other businesses owned by Hullette, are also named in the warrant.

Hullette has retained Triggs in the past, acquiring his services to file a lien against Foothills Flying Club, resulting in a default judgment awarding Hullette $9,918.25.

Triggs is also professionally linked to former airport manager Alex Nelson, who, with former airport employee Brad Adkins, is explicitly named in the FBI warrant. The warrant called for records involving Nelson and Adkins.

Triggs is a registered agent for South ATC Enterprises, which was incorporated Aug. 25, 2011 by Alex and Tammy Nelson of Lenoir.

The N.C. State Bar’s amended complaint against Triggs, filed on July 6, 2011, includes nine claims for relief concerning clients and their cases spanning from 2004 to 2011. Triggs is accused of violating several Rules of Professional Conduct.

The bar claims Triggs has failed to act with reasonable diligence in several cases, failed to keep his clients informed about the status of their cases, violated several rules by filing a client’s pleading with false verification, failed to surrender a client’s file materials, failed to promptly respond to reasonable requests for information and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, deceit and misrepresentation by concealing information.

Triggs filed a response in May 2011 and an amended response Aug. 11 to address the ninth claim. He denies that he violated any Rules of Professional Conduct and makes a motion to dismiss the claims.

Triggs’s filing admits to many of the paragraphs in the bar’s complaint, such as factual information regarding the existence of an attorney-client relationship and information established by dated documents.

The Hildebran attorney also denies many of the claims, such as his failure to respond to clients, his alleged responses to clients or his failure to respond to clients’ requests.

The disciplinary committee in 2008 stayed his five-year suspension upon several conditions including that he not violate any provision of the revised Rules of Professional Conduct.

At the time, the committee found that Triggs had experienced, beginning or before 1996, “chronic cash flow problems,” according to the findings of fact the bar filed. “Triggs frequently borrowed money from clients, employees and others to cover payroll checks to his employees and to pay other office expenses.”

The committee chose to suspend Trigg’s law license but stayed the suspension after it concluded that Triggs had failed to promptly pay the IRS funds withheld from paychecks of his law firm’s employees, failed to maintain a sufficient balance in his trust account at all times to cover the amount required to pay a client’s subcontractors, used his client’s money for purposes other than disbursing to subcontractors, entered a business transaction with a client and failed to communicate the terms of the loan agreements in writing, filed to advise a client to seek the advice of independent legal counsel on transactions and failed to obtain a client’s informed consent in writing to the essential terms of the transactions.

The committee included several terms and conditions for Triggs to adhere to in order for the suspension to remain stayed. Those included, but weren’t limited to, paying fees, paying the IRS, retaining an accountant and submitting to random audits.

Triggs also has been censured twice by the Grievance Committee of the N.C. State Bar.

According to the bar, “a censure is a written form of discipline more serious than a reprimand, issued in cases in which an attorney has violated one or more provisions of the Rules of Professional Conduct and has caused significant harm or potential significant harm to a client, the administration of justice, the profession or a member of the public, but the misconduct does not require suspension of the attorney’s license.”

The grievance committee first censured Triggs in 1996 for borrowing money from his clients and entering loan transactions that were not fair to his clients.

The committee censured him again in 2009 for several violations including charging a client for time spent drafting and filing a motion to withdraw from a case, refusal to respond to repeated requests from a client for his own files, arranging a “clearly excessive fee” and failure to adequately explain his fees.


Source:   http://www2.morganton.com

Piper PA-28-140, N1845J: Accident occurred August 18, 2012 in Leesburg,

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA569
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 18, 2012 in Leesburg, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N1845J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was taking off on a 2,100 foot grass runway with a quartering tailwind. The pilot stated that the airplane lifted off and climbed normally until it passed the end of the runway, at which time the engine "coughed" and lost power. A witness stated that the airplane's speed during the takeoff and climb was slow and that the airplane reached an altitude of about 40-50 feet above the runway end. A review of the airplane's takeoff performance data from a hard surface runway showed that the airplane’s takeoff distance over a 50-foot obstacle was nearly equal to the runway length for the density altitude at the time of the accident. However, the soft grass runway surface, runway slope, and quartering tailwind present during the accident takeoff would have further lengthened the airplane’s takeoff distance. Because of these considerations, the pilot should not have attempted to takeoff on that runway in those conditions.

The airplane’s most recent annual maintenance inspection was completed about 5 months (about 7.8 flight hours) before the accident. However, the engine had not been overhauled within the manufacturer's recommended overhaul time of 12 years. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed a leak from the fuel selector and evidence that one of the magnetos had a preexisting grounding anomaly; both conditions should have been discovered during the annual maintenance inspection. Additionally, the grounded magneto should have been evident to the pilot during the engine run-up. However, these anomalous conditions would not have had a significant effect on the airplane’s performance. Examination did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper preflight planning and decision to attempt a takeoff from a runway that was too short for conditions, which resulted in the airplane settling into terrain.

On August 18, 2012, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N1845J, impacted trees and terrain during initial climb from Donner Field Airport (OH28), Leesburg, Ohio. The private pilot and a passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed for the local flight that was originating at the time of the accident.

A witness, who also had given the pilot a recent biennial flight review in the accident airplane, stated that the airplane's performance was 'anemic'. The witness questioned the pilot prior to the accident takeoff whether he should attempt to depart from the airport given the density altitude, grass runway, and airplane weight.

Another witness stated that the airplane seemed "too slow," and its climb was "slow". The airplane attained an altitude of 40-50 feet above the ground, and from his view, it was level with the trees on the side of the runway and slightly above the trees at the end of the runway.

The pilot stated that prior to departing, he performed a preflight inspection and engine runup, all of which were "normal." He set 20 degrees of flaps and used a short/soft field takeoff technique with a best angle of climb from runway 09 (2,100 feet by 120 feet, turf). He said that the airplane was climbing "normally" when it 'coughed' over the end of the runway. The airplane "quickly" lost engine speed, and the propeller was turning. He leveled the airplane in time to hit the trees at the departure end of the runway.

According to the pilot's logbook, he accumulated a total flight time of 523.5 hours as of the last flight entry, which was dated August 12, 2012. The last flight was in the accident airplane and was 1.0 hours in duration from "REED-OH28-REED". The preceding flight was dated June 7, 2012, which was the pilot's recent biennial flight review. The flight review was conducted in the accident airplane for a flight that was 1.1 hours in duration from "MGY-I74-MGY." The entry for the flight review includes "...short/soft t/os + landings... ."

The 1968 Piper PA-28-140, serial number 28-24280, airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-320-D2A engine. The airplane was registered to the pilot on March 14, 2012.

A logbook entry dated June 19, 1998, stated that the engine was overhauled and installed on the airplane on November 15, 1998, at a tachometer time of 2,333.3 hours. Lycoming Service Instruction No. 1009AS states, "...all engines that do not accumulate the hourly period of time between overhauls specified in this publication are recommended to be overhauled in the twelfth year.

Logbook entries for the last annual inspections of the airplane and engine were dated March 7, 2012, at a total time of 3,230.6 hours. The entry for annual inspection for this dates stated that time since major overhaul was 897 hours and the total time since new was 1,962.3 hours.

The tachometer at the accident site indicated 3,238.37 hours.

The Piper Cherokee 140 Owner's Handbook provided a Take-off Distance vs. Density Altitude chart for hard surfaced runways for airplane gross weights of 1,950 lbs and 2,150 lbs. At a density altitude of about 2,524 feet and gross weight of 1,950 lbs, the takeoff ground run was about 1,000 feet, and the distance over a 50-foot obstacle was 2,050 feet. At a density altitude of 2,524 feet and gross weight of 2,150 feet, the ground run was about 1,100 feet, and the distance over a 50-foot obstacle was 2,300 feet.

According to the airplane weight and balance form, the airplane had an empty weight of 1,301 lbs. The pilot reported that there was 30 gallons of fuel on board at the time at takeoff. The pilot's airman medical certificate indicated his weight was 220 lbs. The weight of the passenger was estimated by a witness as 180 lbs. Another witness estimated the passenger weight as 190-200 lbs.

The Wilmington Air Park (ILN), Wilmington, Ohio, automated weather observing system located about 10 miles northwest of OH28 recorded at 1654: wind - 150 degree at 5 knots; temperature - 25 degrees Celsius; dew point - 9 degree Celsius; altimeter - 29.92 inches of mercury.

Based upon the field elevation of OH28, which was 990 feet, and the ILN temperature and altimeter, the density altitude was about 2,524 feet.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the airplane came to rest at the northwest corner of a field located about 700 feet from the departure end of runway 09. The airplane's left wing initially contacted a tree yawing the airplane left into another tree, which impacted the right side of the fuselage just behind the aft seats. Photos show that the cockpit flap control and the flaps were in the 0 degree flap position.

The fuel selector was in the off position, the magneto switch was in the off position, and the keys for magneto key switch had been removed and were hanging on the altimeter's post light. The cockpit engine throttle control was in the full forward position, the carburetor heat control was in off position, the master switch in the off position, the electric driven fuel pump switch was in the off position, and the mixture control was in the full aft position.

Both wing fuel tank caps were secure, and when they were opened, 100 low lead fuel poured out. The engine firewall fuel sump bowl was unseated from its mount due to impact damage and contained fuel. Fuel was present in the carburetor bowl.

The propeller displayed S-shaped bending on one of the two propeller blades. The other propeller blade did not exhibit impact damage. A severed tree limb consistent with a propeller strike was near the airplane. The tree limb was estimated to be several inches in diameter.

Examination of the engine confirmed throttle and mixture control continuity. The engine sump contained about 5 quarts of oil. The top spark plugs were removed and none of the spark plugs exhibited fouling. The engine was rotated and compression from all cylinders was confirmed. Engine continuity was also confirmed. The air induction system was unobstructed.

The carburetor, both magnetos, and the cockpit fuel selector were tested and examined under the supervision of the National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-In-Charge.

The left magneto was a Bendix magneto with a “Teledyne Continental Motors – Orig Mfr” data tag showing model “S4LN-21,” part number “10-51360-37,” serial number “A192644,” and overhaul date “4/98. ”Examination and testing of the left magneto revealed that the magneto flange gasket was red in color and had annotations of “PMA” and “L62224.” The gasket had two holes at one edge and one hole at the opposite edge. The P-lead and its internal spring, part number 10-20-90, had evidence of arching consistent with a preexisting partial/intermittent grounded/ungrounded condition.

The left magneto was placed on a magneto test stand and operated at about 4,500 rpm. A spark of at least 0.25 inch test gap was noted from each lead from the distributor. The impulse coupling also was tested and functioned without any anomalies. The magneto was not able to be grounded using the P-lead during the test.

The right magneto was a Bendix magneto with a Teledyne Continental Motors – Orig Mfr” data tag showing model “S4LN-20,” part number “10-51360-29, serial number “A194869,” and overhaul date “4/98.” The P-lead and its internal spring, part number 10-20-90, had no evidence of arching.

The right magneto was placed on a magneto test stand and operated at about 4,500 rpm. A spark of at least 0.25 inch test gap was noted from each lead from the distributor. The impulse coupling also was tested and functioned without any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The magneto was able to be grounded using the P-lead during the test.

The carburetor was a Facet Aerospace Products model “4SPA,” part number “10-5135,” serial number “CK 4 8686,” and original manufacture “MF V A1 92.” Examination of the carburetor revealed that the heat box to carburetor gasket had a smaller inside diameter than that of the carburetor inlet and the incorrect gasket. The gasket was similar in size to the carburetor manifold gasket. The correct heat box to carburetor gasket had a part number of 649974. Both carburetor screens did not contain debris and were unobstructed. The carburetor bowl did not contain debris or corrosion. The carburetor float was intact, moved freely, and had the correct drop. All of the carburetor linkages were intact and secure.

The electric driven fuel pump was a Facet with no model, part, or serial number. The pump was connected to a 12 volt source of electrical power and was noted to operate with no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The pump could not be bench tested due to impact damage to the inlet tube base.

The engine driven pump, AC, part number “154729210,” serial number “AA7477,” was operated using hand pressure. No anomalies were revealed that would have precluded normal operation.

The fuel selector was examined and tested using a test bench. The fuel selector cover had blue staining, and the fuel selector had black colored residue near the fuel selector stem consistent with a preexisting fuel leak. The fuel selector was operated from right, to off, to left supplies using test fluid. A small intermittent leak was noted at the selector valve stem. The fuel selector operation did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The Airplane Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-3A states, in part:

Takeoffs and climbs from soft fields require the use of operational techniques for getting the airplane airborne as quickly as possible to eliminate the drag caused by tall grass, soft sand, mud, and snow, and may or may not require climbing over an obstacle. The technique
makes judicious use of ground effect and requires a feel for the airplane and fine control touch...

After becoming airborne, the nose should be lowered very gently with the wheels clear of the surface to allow the airplane to accelerate to VY, or VX if obstacles must be cleared. Extreme care must be exercised immediately after the airplane becomes airborne and while it accelerates, to avoid settling back onto the surface. An attempt to climb prematurely or too steeply may cause the airplane to settle back to the surface as a result of losing the benefit of ground effect. An attempt to climb out of ground effect before sufficient climb airspeed is attained may result in the airplane being unable to climb further as the ground effect area is transited, even with full power. Therefore, it is essential that the airplane remain in ground effect until at least VX is reached. This requires feel for the airplane, and a very fine control touch, in order to avoid over-controlling the elevator as required control pressures change with airplane acceleration.



http://registry.faa.gov/N1845J

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA569 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 18, 2012 in Leesburg, OH
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N1845J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 18, 2012, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N1845J, impacted trees and terrain during initial climb from Donner Field Airport (OH28), Leesburg, Ohio. The certificated private pilot and a passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed for the local flight that was originating at the time of the accident.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 1845J        Make/Model: PA28      Description: PA-28 CHEROKEE, ARROW, WARRIOR, ACHER, D
  Date: 08/18/2012     Time: 2100

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: LEESBURG   State: OH   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON TAKEOFF, LEESBURG, OH

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER

  FAA FSDO: CINCINNATI, OH  (GL05)                Entry date: 08/20/2012

Gary Abernathy/Ohio Community Media 
Two people walked away from this plane crash near Leesburg on Saturday afternoon.

Gary Abernathy/Ohio Community Media
 North Joint Fire District chief Kenny Stevens, right, and other North Joint fire and rescue personnel examine the plane crash off Jamison Road near Leesburg on Saturday.

A pilot and a passenger miraculously walked away from a plane crash near Leesburg late Saturday afternoon.

Officials on the scene said a man and a woman escaped unharmed and refused treatment. They walked away from the incident through an adjacent field where the crash happened in the backyard of a residence on Jamison Road outside Leesburg, apparently making their way to a nearby destination where they were attempting to land. A grass air strip is near the site of the crash, officials said.

"This wasn't their day to go," said Highland County North Joint Fire and Ambulance District chief Kenny Stevens, who was on the scene, referring to the plane's occupants' ability to survive such a crash.

A neighbor said he heard the plane coming in low, followed by the sound of the crash. Officials surmised that the plane might have clipped branches during its descent, causing the plane to spin around and land as though it had backed into the tree where it came to rest.

The plane's cabin was relatively unharmed, saving the lives of its passengers.

Responders from the North Joint Fire District and the Highland County Sheriff's Office were on the scene, but officials said the Ohio State Highway Patrol was on its way and would handle the investigation of the incident.

The crash happened sometime around 5 or 5:30 p.m. Saturday.