Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Aiken Municipal Airport (KAIK) a popular choice for Masters visitors

“X” marks the spot of a closed-off runway Saturday afternoon at AIken Municipal Airport, where the Masters Tournament had brought enough guests to have one of the facility’s two runways shut down to allow for more aircraft parking. 


Aiken Municipal Airport drew an extra-large crowd of aviators and spectators Sunday afternoon, with the end of the Masters Tournament and the annual aerial exodus of visitors.

“This airport is busier than what people think,” one participant noted, describing the facility as “a great resource” at both the city and county levels.

Flight instructor Baptiste Charlot, with Aiken Flyers, pointed out that the airport was so crowded that one of its two runways was closed down, to allow more room for aircraft to park.

Some airplanes (including Charlot’s) that normally are stored in hangars were outdoors for the week – a period of mostly mild temperatures, with strong winds requiring adjustments for golfers and pilots alike.

Another airport representative noted that the April 3 to 10 period included about 600 “instrument operations,” with each representing an aircraft arriving or departing. Those data reportedly represent a slight increase from 2015.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.aikenstandard.com

LC-41-550FG, Farr Aviation LLC, N410TW: Incident occurred April 09, 2016 in Bartow, Polk County, Florida

FARR AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N410TW

Date: 09-APR-16
Time: 14:31:00Z
Regis#: N410TW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA 
Aircraft Model: LC41
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Aircraft Missing:
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15
City: BARTOW
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, WING STRUCK A PARKED AIRCRAFT, BARTOW, FL

PenAir's New Planes, Seven Years And Counting

For seven years, PenAir officials have been working on getting new planes for the Anchorage to Dutch Harbor route. The wait is almost over -- but not quite yet.

This morning, PenAir president Scott Bloomquist said the company is in the final stretch of necessary certification for the Saab 2000. Before any passengers can board, the Federal Aviation Administration has to sign off on the plane after what's called proving runs, which can last anywhere from 35 to 100 hours.

"They want to sit on board with our crews and fly out to the destinations where the airplane is going to go and just make sure that all of our procedures this airplane are being followed and followed to the letter."

In order to do that, an FAA official has to be available to do the runs. Manpower shortage at the federal agency is the holdup.

"We're finally in the last little stage that has to happen. And for the proving runs to take place a gentleman from the FAA, located in Texas, has to come up here and ride in -- they're telling us, the first two flights. We've been sitting here for two weeks waiting for him to arrive."

Bloomquist says May 1 is the company's new target date for the Saab 2000 to start carrying passengers.

PenAir has had three of the new planes since early November, and two more are on the way. They will primarily fly between Anchorage and Unalaska, but will be used for other flights in the system.

Bloomquist says getting new planes on the route started with finding the right aircraft for the job.

"Finding an airplane that does 700 nautical miles and goes 140 miles to it’s nearest alternate and land on a 3900 foot strip is pretty hard to find."

The Saab 2000 quickly stood out, but only a few were built.

The plane is a twin-engine turboprop similar to the planes flown now. But the big difference is size and speed. The Saab 2000 carries 45 passengers. Plus, there’s more room for luggage and fuel. The flight to Anchorage will be about 45 minutes shorter.

Original article can be found here:  http://kucb.org

Piper PA-34-200, A S Flight Academy LLC, N43034: Incident occurred April 09, 2016 in Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida

A S FLIGHT ACADEMY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N43034

Date: 09-APR-16
Time: 15:01:00Z
Regis#: N43034
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15
City: FORT PIERCE
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF, COWLING SEPARATED FROM FUSELAGE, FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA

Dick Sipp achieves Federal Aviation Administration rank of Master Pilot

Dick Sipp of Midland talks about a flying drill he participated in during college at a Midland Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 1093 meeting. Sipp was awarded the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award during the meeting. "I feel so thankful to have found something that I enjoy doing," Sipp said. "I knew too many friends that dreaded Mondays; I never did."



It was both an honor and a surprise when Dick Sipp was recognized as a Master Pilot by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Midland resident Sipp received the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award April 7, as a result of 50 years of accident and violation-free flying and demonstrating professionalism, skill and aviation expertise by maintaining safe operations. He applied for the recognition, awarded by the FAA, about a year ago.

“It’s obviously an honor to survive this long and I tell people it’s a matter of being smart enough and being lucky enough,” Sipp said.

There was something he didn’t expect when Sipp and his family showed up at the meeting for Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 1093 in Midland. Along with a plaque and certificate, he received a half-inch thick stack of papers: his flying record straight from the FAA, which included his licenses over the years and any communications he had with the organization.

“It was interesting to look at that stuff. I was surprised they kept so much of it,” Sipp said.

He has been a pilot for about 51 years, ever since his father suggested he join a fraternity and Sipp heard about the Air Force and the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps.

“I qualified for pilot training and the rest is history,” Sipp said.

Sipp achieved the rank of colonel and retired from the Air Force Reserve after 33 years of military service, during which he served in Vietnam and Desert Storm. He also worked as a commercial pilot and sometimes piloted executives of the Ford Motor Co.

He described it as a “fairly good accomplishment” to make it 50 years without any violations or minor accidents like blowing a tire, especially considering his previous work as a commercial pilot flying two or three times a week.

When asked to share some memorable moments in his flying career, Sipp said there are almost too many to count.

While he regularly takes leisurely trips to take in the fall colors or do some sightseeing, Sipp said he truly enjoys joining other pilots in what is called formation flying.

“It requires a lot of discipline but it’s a lot of fun to do,” Sipp said.

On one occasion, Sipp and other pilots had the chance to fly with a group known as the Tuskegee Airmen who were the first black military pilots during World War II. It was during an air show, and Sipp can still recall being up in the air surrounded by 14 or 15 different airplanes and watching the airmen react to the appearance of a rare WW II airplane that they flew while in the military.

“It was quite an emotional time for them,” Sipp said.

Sipp himself had the opportunity to fly a B-25 plane that was used in WW II after volunteering with the Yankee Air Museum in Ypsilanti.

Nowadays he helps introduce area youths to the fun that can be had up in the air through the Young Eagle program, where experienced pilots take children ages 8 to 17 for a quick spin above the Jack Barstow Municipal Airport. It’s a treat for him to see their faces as some take to the sky for the first time.

“A few of them really have quite a reaction, which is fun,” Sipp said.

Sipp flies a small experimental aircraft, designated as RV12, that he built himself. He plans to take it out of winter storage next week to fly up north in Michigan and have a friend do some maintenance on it.

“I try to fly as often as I can, at least two or three times a month,” Sipp said. “It’s strictly for fun.”

While he is the only pilot in the family, Sipp was surrounded by members of his family when he accepted the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award and said he was especially glad his three granddaughters were there with him.

“I could not have done it without their support,” Sipp said about his family, especially when he was serving in the military. “They are really the reason you can spend so many years on this, and make it work.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ourmidland.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, TransPac Aviation Academy, N415PA and Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, TransPac Aviation Academy, N318PA: Incident occurred April 11, 2016 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

BIRD ACQUISITION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N415PA

Date: 11-APR-16
Time: 16:25:00Z
Regis#: N415PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: CHANDLER
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT N318PA PIPER PA44 AND AIRCRAFT N415PA PIPER PA 28 WHILE IN RUNUP AREA, STRUCK WINGTIPS, CHANDLER, AZ

BIRD ACQUISITION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N318PA

Date: 11-APR-16
Time: 16:25:00Z
Regis#: N318PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: CHANDLER
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT N318PA PIPER PA44 AND AIRCRAFT N415PA PIPER PA 28 WHILE IN RUNUP AREA, STRUCK WINGTIPS, CHANDLER, AZ

Cessna 310D, N6930T: Incident occurred April 11, 2016 at Glendale Municipal Airport (KGEU), Maricopa County, Arizona















AIRCRAFT: 1960 Cessna 310D, N6930T, Serial No. 39230

ENGINE(S) – 
Left:  Continental IO-470-D, Serial No. CS104607-6-0
Right:   Continental IO-470-D, Serial No. 88287-4-D-R

PROPELLER(S) – Destroyed

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE(S):   
Left: 545.5 TSMOH TT: 2187. Last Overhaul was on 03/14/1987
Right:  30 SMOH Last Overhaul was on 08/21/2015 by Aircraft Engine Specialists.

PROPELLER(S):    Damaged

AIRFRAME:        4327              

OTHER EQUIPMENT:      MX385, KMA24, KT76A.

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  The nose gear collapsed on landing. 

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    The damages are to both propellers and nose of the aircraft. 

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:           Glendale Aero Services at Glendale Airport, AZ. 

REMARKS:           Airframe Logbooks go back only to 1995. Left Engine logs go back to 1987 Right Engine go back to 1994. Inspection of aircraft is highly recommended. 

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N6930T.htm

http://registry.faa.gov/N6930T

Date: 11-APR-16
Time: 19:28:00Z
Regis#: N6930T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: GLENDALE
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, GLENDALE, AZ



GLENDALE, AZ - A pilot and passenger appear to be okay after an emergency landing in Glendale, Arizona.

Video from Air15 showed the plane with obvious signs of nose gear failure.

The plane landed just before 12:30 pm. at Glendale Municipal Airport.

Both people in the plane appeared to get out of the plane without any injuries. 

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com




GLENDALE, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -  The pilot of a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing when the plane's front landing gear failed, according to the Glendale Fire Department.

It happened Monday afternoon at the Glendale Municipal Airport.

Amateur video of the incident showed the plane touching down on the wheels below each wing before the front landing gear collapsed. The plane's nose and propellers then hit the run*way and the aircraft quickly skidded to a stop.

The pilot was alerted to a problem with the landing gear before he landed. He could not get it to lock fully in the down position, and he could not get it to rise back up into the plane, according to Mike Young with the Glendale Fire Department.

The plane had 40 miles of fuel on board and was 40 miles from the airport.

Emergency crews were standing by as the plane landed.

There was no sign of fire and both men on board were able to quickly and safely get out of the aircraft.

They were not injured but were checked out by emergency medical personnel as a precaution.

Story and video: http://www.wsmv.com

Piper PA-22-108, N5069Z: Accident occurred April 09, 2016 in Pantego, Beaufort County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N5069Z

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA183

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 09, 2016 in Pantego, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA22, registration: N5069Z
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff roll on a grass airstrip, a "strong burst of wind" blew his airplane out of control. The airplane departed the grass airstrip to the right, nosed over, and came to rest in a canal. He reported that he had not reached rotation when the loss of control occurred. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, the vertical stabilizer, and the rudder. 

The pilot verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that he took off from the grass airstrip with a heading of 020 degrees about 1530 and the wind gust just before rotation came from the west. He reported that the wind velocity at the accident site was 15 knots gusting to 20 knots, and the wind direction was 320 degrees. The closest weather reporting facility to the accident location reported that from 1510 to 1530, the wind velocity varied from 15 to 17 knots with occasional gusts from 25 knots to 33 knots, and the wind direction was 290 degrees. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses operations in crosswind conditions and states in part:

Takeoffs and landings in certain crosswind conditions are inadvisable or even dangerous. If the crosswind is great enough to warrant an extreme drift correction, a hazardous landing condition may result. Therefore, the takeoff and landing capabilities with respect to the reported surface wind conditions and the available landing directions must be considered.

The headwind component and the crosswind component for a given situation can be determined by reference to a crosswind component chart. It is imperative that pilots determine the maximum crosswind component of each airplane they fly, and avoid operations in wind conditions that exceed the capability of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of directional control during the takeoff roll in gusting wind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion, a nose over, and an impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to takeoff in gusting crosswind conditions.

State funds allow for expansion of plans for Covington Municipal Airport (KCVC) new terminal

Covington Municipal Airport manager Vincent Passariello points to the area where a new terminal will be built as part of plans to convert the airport to a major regional hub and attract industry. 


COVINGTON — By Christmas air travelers and visitors to the Covington Municipal Airport may see a brand new terminal anchoring the southeastern corner of the airport near a site that’s now ready for future corporate jet hangers.

But it is like Christmas in April for the Airport Authority and city officials because unexpected state funding will give the terminal a larger footprint.

In 2014 the Covington City Council approved a five-year Capital Improvement Plan to convert the Covington Municipal Airport into a major regional hub such as the Augusta airport. The pieces for that conversion are beginning to fall into place, and recent action by airport officials, the Georgia Department of Transportation and the council paved the way to make the project even better at no extra cost to Covington taxpayers.

When funds became available from another state transportation project that isn’t ready for construction, GDOT officials contacted CMA manager Vincent Passariello.




As the transportation department needs to spend that unused money before the end of the state fiscal year on June 30, Passariello was able to negotiate a deal for GDOT to fund 75 percent of facilities at the terminal that are of service to air travelers. That allows the size of the terminal to increase with an additional paved parking lot and space for future expansion for a revenue-generating business such as a restaurant.

The city’s original budget for the terminal was $1.5 million for 7,200 square feet, which included no parking lot and no future expansion for a restaurant or other service business that can generate revenue for the airport.

Now, with the state funding, the total area has been expanded to 9,019 square feet. The cost to the city will be approximately $1.032 million, which includes $669,713 for areas not eligible for state support such as landscaping.

“So, we went from a $1.5 million budget with no parking and no future expansion to $1 million with parking and future expansion,” Passariello said.

“I think it’s a good deal for everybody,” said airport supervisor Rusty Auglin. “It’s taxpayers’ money no matter how you cut it, but this saved Covington taxpayers money.”

“The airport is a driving economic development force,” Passariello said. “Every large corporation looking to come to Newton County — the first thing they ask is how do we get here? Most of them have or lease private jets to do their business. It’s very, very important. Covington is lucky to have an airport.”

The new terminal is located 1 mile from Interstate 20, which, Passariello pointed out, makes it an ideal location for easy access to and from the destinations of air travelers. Airplanes and automobiles will be able to park adjacent to the terminal.

The terminal will include offices for the staff, large and small conference rooms, pilots’ lounge, waiting area, rental car space and a kitchen area that can be converted to serve a future restaurant.

Sunbelt Builders Inc., a Covington company, will perform the construction, which, according to Passariello, should be completed by the end of this year.

He said a groundbreaking ceremony for the terminal will be held in June.




Infrastructure work by Covington firm Legacy Water Group LLC and Pittman Construction Company in Conyers was completed last week at the site for new corporate hangars near the terminal at the airport’s southeastern parking apron. A retaining wall to divert wastewater was built by Global Stability, an Alpharetta firm.

A future project will be widening of the runway to allow larger aircraft to land at the airport.

In August 2014 Passariello and a planning team headed by David Bernd, vice president for economic development at the Covington-Newton County Chamber of Commerce, presented a “Proposed Airport Master Plan,” to the Covington City Council that could provide air service to and from roughly 80 percent of the U.S. business market and 59 percent of the Canada’s. The plan included an industrial park for aviation industries. The city of Covington owns 450 acres adjacent to the airport that could be used for the industrial park.

A successful industrial park could create from 2,000 to 5,000 new jobs, the planners said. According to that report, the Covington airport is accessible to approximately 6.5 million people within a 90-minute drive, an attractive factor for prospective industries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.newtoncitizen.com

Van's RV-8, C-GKSZ: Incident occurred April 09, 2016 in Lynchburg, Virginia

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT,C-GKSZ CANADIAN REGISTRY VANS RV-8, ON LANDING, SUSTAINED UNKNOWN DAMAGE, LYNCHBURG, VA

Date:  09-APR-16
Time:  20:30:00Z
Regis#:  CGKSZ
Aircraft Make:  VANS
Aircraft Model:  RV8
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Unknown
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City: LYNCHBURG
State: Virginia

de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter 100, Skydive San Marcos, N122PM: Accident occurred April 09, 2016 at Fentress Airpark (XS90), Caldwell County, Texas

DILKARA LEASING LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N122PM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA184
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 09, 2016 in Fentress, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2016
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 6 TWIN OTTER, registration: N122PM
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was landing in gusty crosswind conditions following a parachute jump flight, and that the gusty conditions had persisted for the previous 10 skydiving flights that day. The pilot further reported that during the landing roll, when the nose wheel touched down, the airplane became "unstable" and veered to the left. He reported that he applied right rudder and added power to abort the landing, but the airplane departed the runway to the left and the left wing impacted a tree. The airplane spun 180 degrees to the left and came to rest after the impact with the tree.

The left wing was substantially damaged. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the aborted landing in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion and a collision with a tree.

Italian aircraft developed in cooperation with Cape Air makes debut

Cape Air board member Stan Bernstein, second from left, and senior vice president Jim Goddard, right, pose with Tecnam personnel in front of the newly developed Tecnam P2012 Traveller. 

A schematic drawing shows the dimensions and seating configuration aboard the P2012 Traveller. 


HYANNIS — The likely future of Cape Air has moved from the drawing board to the tarmac.

The Italian aircraft manufacturer, Tecnam, rolled out the first Tecnam P2012 Traveller from its experimental assembly line on March 31.

The company said that's the day test pilot Lorenzo De Stefano engaged the plane’s two Lycoming prop engines and taxied onto a ramp adjacent to the company's facility in Capua, Italy.

In addition to Tecnam Managing Director Paolo Pascale and Stefano, Cape Air board member Stan Bernstein and Jim Goddard, Cape Air’s senior vice president for fleet planning, were on board for the rollout.

“This is their first prototype,” Goddard said Friday. “Once it gets its (European) flight permit in about two months we’ll get to know more about its flight characteristics.”

The P2012 Traveller is an 11-seat, twin-engine prop plane that Cape Air is eyeing as a long-term replacement for its current fleet of Cessna 402s. Cape Air has been working closely with Tecnam for five years to develop the new aircraft, which is expected to take its first test flight in June, Goddard said.

Designed to carry nine passengers with one seat for the captain and another for an optional co-pilot, the new plane has more cabin room, allowing for more comfortable seating and more under-seat storage, Goddard said.

And, just like the 402, it can be configured to carry freight.

In addition to Tecnam and Cape Air, Lycoming Engines in Pennsylvania and Garmin Avionics in Kansas are partnering in the development of the P2012 Traveller.

The goal is to satisfy the growing demand of short-haul transportation operators worldwide, Pascale said in a statement following the prototype's unveiling.

Cape Air is one of the largest regional airlines in the United States, operating scheduled flights throughout New England, New York, the Caribbean, the Midwest Florida, the Bahamas and Micronesia and carrying more than 686,000 passengers a year.

The company’s fleet of 84 Cessna 402s has been completely rebuilt over the years, but no new planes have been manufactured since the mid-1980s.

“We’ve basically replaced them with new components and are confident in the structural integrity of the 402s,” Goddard said. “But we know we have to integrate new fleets for the future.”

Goddard said he met with Tecnam and Lycoming teams for two years starting in 2010, working out plans for a new twin-engine, short-haul craft.

The prototype’s high wing gives passengers a clear look at the ground below and its engines are electronically controlled, allowing for optimized fuel flow based on the phase of flight — taxi, take off, cruise and landing — and enhanced passenger comfort and safety. The RPMs adjust automatically to reduce noise and vibration, and the engines themselves store downloadable information that can help maintenance crews with troubleshooting, Goddard said.

Operating and maintaining the P2012 Traveller will require Cape Air, with input from Tecnam and Lycoming, to develop a whole new training program for pilots, maintenance crews and even baggage handlers, Goddard said.

While Cape Air has no formal purchase agreement in place with Tecnam, Goddard said, “We hope there will be one in the future.”

If the company follows through with the purchase of the new aircraft, it likely would do so incrementally, possibly over 10 years, once all final regulatory approvals were secured, he said.

“The schedule plan Tecnam has in place is for full regulatory certification in November 2018,” Goddard said in a follow-up email. “If a purchase agreement is reached between Cape Air and Tecnam, deliveries could be planned to begin approximately 30 days after the regulatory approval.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.capecodtimes.com

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, Dirty Side Down Aviation LLC, N716MW: Accident occurred April 09, 2016 in Killeen, Bell County, Texas

DIRTY SIDE DOWN AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N716MW

Date: 09-APR-16
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N716MW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17
City: KILLEEN
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT WHILE IN PATTERN, STRUCK A BIRD AND SUSTAINED SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE, KILLEEN, TX

Monocoupe 110 Special, N501W: Accident occurred April 12, 2016 at Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), Maricopa County, Arizona

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  - Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N501W

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA190
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 12, 2016 in Chandler, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: MONOCOUPE 110, registration: N501W
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane, after performing an initial test flight, during the landing roll the airplane rapidly veered right and the left wing struck the ground. The pilot reported that he overcorrected by applying full left rudder and the airplane exited the left side of the runway and nosed over. The pilot affirmed that prior to the flight he performed maintenance on the airplane to include the tail wheel single bungee steering system. The pilot reported that he installed the bungee incorrectly. The airplane sustained substantial both wings, the windshield and the fuselage.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's incorrect installation of the tailwheel steering bungee, which resulted in a runway excursion and airplane nose over.



CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) — Authorities say a pilot escaped injury when a small plane flipped upside-down while landing at the Chandler Municipal Airport.

The pilot was the only person aboard the single-engine plane when the accident occurred Tuesday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fox10phoenix.com





CHANDLER, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - A pilot was uninjured after a small plane flipped over at Chandler Municipal Airport Tuesday morning.

Officials said the plane flipped over after landing on a runway at about 9:50 a.m. The plane is still upside down at the airport near Queen Creek and McQueen roads.

Officials said the pilot was the only person on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Original article can be found here: http://www.azfamily.com





CHANDLER, AZ - A recently restored airplane landed and flipped over at Chandler Municipal Airport on Tuesday.

Stephanie Romero, spokesperson for the City of Chandler, said identified the plane as a Monocoupe 110 Special. She said this was the plane's first flight since the owner restored it.

The pilot was the only person aboard the aircraft and was not injured.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration, said the plane flipped over after landing on runway 4L around 9:50 a.m.

The runway was closed but has since reopened.

Cirrus SR22, Destinations Efc LLC, N8139V: Incident occurred April 09, 2016 in Tulsa, Oklahoma

DESTINATIONS EFC LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8139V

Date: 09-APR-16
Time: 19:33:00Z
Regis#: N8139V
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15
City: TULSA
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, TULSA, OK

Cirrus SR20, N8PY, Second Chance Wings LLC: Accident occurred April 10, 2016 at Caldwell Municipal Airport (KRWV), Burleson County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Second Chance Wings LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8PY

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Caldwell, TX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N8PY
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 10, 2016, at 1534 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR20 airplane, N8PY, exited the end of the runway after a precautionary landing at Caldwell Municipal Airport (RWV), Caldwell, Texas. The private rated pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Second Chance Wings LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated with visual flight rules flight following.

According to the pilot, while en route he started to feel an unusual vibration and noise that seemed to originate from the engine. The engine rpm became erratic and the airplane became harder to control due to the vibrations. He contacted air traffic control and reported the difficulty he was experiencing with the airplane. The pilot did not want to declare an emergency and air traffic control informed the pilot that the closest airfield (RWV) was 6 miles behind his current direction. As the pilot proceeded to the airport, he reported that the engine "seemed to be starting and stopping" or sputtering. The pilot did not see the airport quick enough for a straight in approach, so he circled the airport to land on runway 15. During the circle, the engine sputtering got worse. Prior to touching down on the 3,252-ft long runway, the pilot reported that the engine sputtered to a stop and the pilot then slipped the airplane to the runway. He flared the airplane and touched down with about 60% runway remaining (about 1,950 ft) and at a higher than normal approach speed. The airplane bounced and touched down again near mid-field. Using full braking action, the pilot was unable to keep the airplane on the runway and it overran the runway and collided with a tree and a fence.

An examination of the engine found that the exhaust pipe had fractured from the No. 5 cylinder. No additional preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane was equipped with an Avidyne Primary Flight Display and Multifunction Flight Display. Data recorded by these devices was downloaded and reviewed. On the accident flight, the No. 5 cylinder exhaust gas temperature (EGT) was consistently lower than the other cylinders, while the cylinder head temperatures were all similar. At 1525:48, No. 5 EGT was 1290° Fahrenheit (F) and at 1525:54, the EGT decreased to 93° F and continued to rapidly decrease. Between 1525:54 and 1532:30, engine rpm fluctuated between 2,080 and 2,400 rpm, fuel flow varied between 9 and 14 gallons per hour (GPH), and manifold pressure varied between 24 and 26 inches of mercury (inHg). Between 1532:36 and 1533:00, rpm stabilized about 1890, fuel flow varied between 6 and 8 GPH, and manifold pressure was between 21 and 23 inHg. Between 1533:24 and 1533:54, engine rpm decreased from 1,880 to 1,300, fuel flow remained constant at 2 GPH, and manifold pressure varied from 7 to 12 inHg. Altitude data put the airplane's touch down between 1533:42 and 1533:54. At 1534:00, engine rpm was 40, fuel flow was 0, and manifold pressure was 30 inHg

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Caldwell, TX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N8PY
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 10, 2016, a Cirrus SR20 airplane, N8PY, was substantially damaged during landing when it exited the end of runway 33 at Caldwell Municipal Airport (KRWV), Caldwell, Texas. The private pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Second Chance Wings LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated with visual flight rules flight following.

According to a statement provided by the pilot, while en route the pilot heard loud noises of an unknown origin. The pilot requested a vector to the nearest airport and the noises began to sound like they originated from the engine. The noises began getting louder and the pilot began having difficulty controlling the airplane. Engine power was erratic as the pilot approached the airport. The airplane was at a higher than normal approach speed when it landed halfway down the 3,252 foot long runway. Despite maximum braking, the airplane exited the end of the runway striking a tree and a fence.

The airplane was retained for further examination.