Saturday, February 21, 2015

Pipistrel Virus SW, C-FCDZ: Incident occurred February 21, 2015 at former City Centre Airport, Edmonton



EDMONTON - An Edmonton pilot escaped without injury Saturday after using his plane’s parachute to make an emergency landing at the former City Centre Airport.

Darryl Zubot took off from the Cooking Lake Airport for what was supposed to be a two-hour flight in his Pipistrel Virus, a single-engine two-seater kit plane he’s been flying for one year.

But the commercial pilot had mechanical trouble about 45 minutes into the flight.

Zubot was south of the former airport, closed in November 2013 for the Blatchford redevelopment, when the plane started vibrating.

There wasn’t much time to decide what to do, Zubot said.

“I just wanted to be in an open area. The only place I could see was the airport.”

The Virus is equipped with a parachute that can bring it down safely in an emergency.

Zubot was about 350 metres in the air when he cut the engine and pulled hard on a lever, releasing a pink-and-white parachute.

“It shot out with rockets, with quite a bit of force. That slowed the plane down.”

He landed in a snow-covered field on the former airport lands around 12:45 p.m.

Zubot walked away unharmed, although wind later flipped the plane on its back.

A nearby construction worker who called for help came over and asked if he was all right.

“I’m still quite shaken,” Zubot said a few hours laer.

“The fact I’m OK is quite amazing.”

His brother Neil captured the incident on video.

He’s visting Edmonton from Cameroon and had planned to watch Zubot fly over a third brother’s home near the Blatchford site.

They worried until they heard from Darryl that he hadn’t been injured.

“We were relieved to know he was OK, that everything was fine, relieved the parachute opened up,” Neil Zubot said.

Investigators with the Transportation Safety Board of Canada were on their way to the scene Saturday afternoon, a spokeswoman said.

Zubot said the parachute is an optional feature for the plane.

He decided to include it, “just in case something like this ever happened.”

Story, comments and photos:  http://www.edmontonjournal.com








EDMONTON - A pilot has made a successful emergency landing at a closed Edmonton airport.

Edmonton Fire Rescue spokeswoman Jill McKenzie says the pilot experienced engine trouble with the small, two-seater plane while flying over the city Saturday afternoon.

McKenzie says the plane was equipped with a parachute, which the pilot deployed, and the aircraft landed on the grounds at City Centre Airport.

The airport, located northwest of the city's downtown, was closed at the end of 2013 to make way for a housing development.

McKenzie says the pilot was the only person on board and wasn't injured.

But she says the plane was heavily damaged after the landing when the wind caught the parachute and dragged it along the ground.

The Transportation Safety Board says it's sending an investigator to look at the incident.

McKenzie says she doesn't know where the plane took off from or was headed.

Original article can be found at: https://ca.news.yahoo.com




A small plane was forced to make an emergency landing on a closed runway in the centre of the city Saturday, police confirm. 

The plane made a "hard landing" at the Edmonton City Centre Airport after experiencing mechanical trouble Saturday afternoon. After hitting the ground, the glider flipped over. 

A spokesperson for Edmonton Fire Rescue told the Canadian Press that the two seater plane was equipped with a parachute, which deployed during the landing. 

The plane was heavily damaged after the landing, as the wind caught the open parachute and dragged the craft along the ground. 

Police say the pilot was the only person on board, and wasn't injured.

The airport was closed in 2013 to make way for residential development. 

The Transportation Safety Board is now investigating. 

Story and comments:  http://www.cbc.ca



EDMONTON — Transportation Safety Board investigators are en route to Edmonton’s former City Centre Airport after a small plane made an emergency landing Saturday afternoon.

Edmonton Fire Rescue says the plane was forced to make an emergency landing after it lost engine power. It happened around 12:45 p.m.

Michael Gaddie was driving down 101 Street just before 118 Avenue when he saw the plane come down.

“I saw a big pink parachute and it was floating down to the ground just over NAIT,” he told Global News. “We saw it coming down this direction, we followed it over here and it landed upright at the airport here and the wind pulled it over with the parachute.”

Fire crews were deployed to the scene but called back because there was no fire.

Police were also called to the scene, but officers wouldn’t comment on the crash as the investigation has been turned over to the TSB. Officers said no injuries were reported.

Story and photos:  http://globalnews.ca



Pipistrel Virus SW, C-FCDZ

North Dakota: Airline boarding see continued increase

Since hustling through several years of exponential growth, North Dakota airports may get to take a breather.

The North Dakota Aeronautics Commission predicts airline boardings will continue to grow in 2015 but at a slightly less rapid pace than that of previous years.

In 2014, the state marked seven consecutive years of growth. That trend is continuing into 2015 so far, with 4 percent more boardings this January compared to the year before. Boarding numbers totaled 100,674 passengers compared to 96,803 passengers in January 2014.

That 4 percent is less than the 9 and 10 percent year-over-year growth rates experienced last year and several years prior, Kyle Wanner, director of the Aeronautics Commission, said.

“We know that with so many years of large growth, at some point, it needs to level off,” he said, and this could be that year.

There is still growth, and Wanner said there are no indications that a decline would take place – even with oil prices down in the western half of the state, where oil exploration drove a lot of travel.

“I’m sure there’s potentially a concern in those communities, but I think they all understand they were behind on infrastructure in the first place,” he said. “Even if there is a minor decline, we’re still catching up to where we need to be.”

“We forsee not as much growth as last year, sort of a leveling off,” said Anthony Dudas, the assistant manager at Williston’s Sloulin Field International Airport.

In fact, Delta and United are adding flights to Denver and Minneapolis in March, according to Dudas, adding that more seats typically leads to more traffic.

There has been no slowing of private aviation traffic. Wednesdays are still very busy days for company charters bringing in workers to Williston, Dudas said. Several scheduled charters are being moved back to Williston from Minot, and Williston is getting more use than some of the smaller, more outlying airports, he said.

Boardings at Williston's airport were up from 8,479 in January 2014 to 10,621 last month. At 2,142 more passengers, the airport had the largest year-over-year numeric growth of all of North Dakota's commercial airports. Bismarck had the second largest passenger growth, going from 19,445 in January 2014 to 21,239 passengers last month, a difference of 1,794 passengers year-over-year.

“We’ll continue to see the numbers, in my opinion, in western North Dakota,” Wanner said.

Wanner’s confidence comes from the increased number of flights, airlines and destination that weren’t there a year ago, such as flights from Williston to Houston that started in the fall.

Load factors are high across the state, too, according to Wanner, who said Fargo’s airport averages 86 percent load factor on its flights, which means the planes are full, he said.

“That’s incredible,” Wanner said, adding that an airline typically needs between 70 and 80 percent load factors to be profitable.

Wanner said some airport managers are encouraging airlines to increase their number of flights in an effort to attract more passengers by making it more convenient to fly.

“We’ll see what the year brings, but, so far, it’s looking good,” Wanner said.

In the meantime, airports need to continue to plan for the demand the state already has, according to Wanner, adding that, if oil prices do go back up, the infrastructure needs to be in place, he said.

The North Dakota State Aviation System Plan technical report, which is meant to provide guidance for infrastructure development, will be coming out in the summer. Preliminary results from a study outlining aviation’s economic impact in the state are also expected in the summer or fall. 

Original article can be found at: http://bismarcktribune.com

Construction begins at Taos Regional Airport (KSKX), New Mexico

TAOS — Less than 10 days after a judge declined to halt the project, construction began this week at Taos Regional Airport on the first stage of a long-awaited expansion.

The airport is closed to fixed-­wing aircraft for two weeks as crews shorten the existing runway and build a road for construction equipment. The airport remains open to helicopter traffic.

Supporters say the expansion, which has been debated and studied for three decades, will improve safety at the airport and foster economic development in Taos.

The project has encountered opposition, however, from local residents concerned that an expansion of the airport will worsen the economic gap between the wealthy and poor, increase pollution, affect property values in the surrounding area, and lead to an increased military presence in Taos.

A group of local residents challenged the project in a lawsuit filed last September against the town and county governments. The plaintiffs argued the construction of a second runway at the airport was moving forward before the area was properly zoned by county officials.

Attorneys representing the group, which included local author John Nichols, asked 8th Judicial District Judge Jeff McElroy to issue an injunction halting work until the zoning process was completed.

McElroy rejected calls to halt the project in a letter filed Feb. 9.

The project includes the construction of an 8,600­-foot by 100­-foot crosswind runway, the shortening of an existing runway by 420 feet, the construction of a new airport access road approximately 3,200 feet long and the extension of another airport access road by approximately 2,800 feet.

Most of the $24 million project is being funded with a federal grant. The town government, which owns and operates the airport, provided a match of approximately $1.4 million to secure the federal funding.

Original article can be found at:    http://www.santafenewmexican.com

Avid FLYER, N88WJ: Incident occurred February 21, 2015 at St. George Municipal Airport (KSGU), Utah

http://registry.faa.gov/N88WJ

ST. GEORGE — Just after 1 p.m. Saturday a single engine experimental plane got caught in a crosswind while landing at St. George Municipal Airport, crashing and ejecting the pilot about 3-4 feet from the plane. The pilot, who had been flying solo, walked away from the crash with no injuries except for scratches to his head and hand.

The pilot, local to the St. George area whose name has not been released by airport officials, was flying an Avid Flyer Model B, single engine, two-place (or seater), plane, tail number N88WJ, Airport Operations Supervisor Brad Kitchen said.

“The pilot was landing on Runway 19 and got caught up in a crosswind while he was landing and it took him off the runway,” Kitchen said, “He came through the infield and went over the top of a drainage ditch and ended up on Taxiway Alpha, or Taxiway A, with a collapsed left landing gear.”

When Kitchen arrived on scene shortly after the plane crash, winds were blowing from the west at about 7-10 knots, he said.

The pilot was thrown out about 3 or 4 feet from the airplane when the aircraft stopped. “He hit sideways, it stopped him abruptly and popped him out the pilot door,” Kitchen said. “The door opened – it probably opened from hitting an embankment or right near the edge of the taxiway – it doesn’t take much to jar these doors on any of these small aircraft.”

In addition to the collapsed landing gear, the aircraft suffered substantial structural damage.

“He’s very lucky,” Kitchen said of the pilot. “He crashed his airplane, the prop is no longer with us, it’s pretty much gone, and there’s substantial structural damage to the aircraft.”

Ultimately, the only injuries the pilot showed were a scratch on top of his head and a scratch on his hand. He declined medical transport, Marc Mortensen, assistant to the city manager of St. George, said.

Neither the airport nor its runways, except of a portion of one taxiway, were closed in response to the incident at any time with no impacts on its commercial or private use.

“We did a thorough runway inspection and we kept the runway open,” Kitchen said, “and the airport remained open. We just closed Taxiway Alpha from Alpha 2 to Alpha 1 for a short time.”

St. George Municipal Airport’s AR21 fire unit responded, as did St. George Fire Department’s Engine 28, St. George Police Department and Gold Cross Ambulance.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted by airport staff to provide notification of the incident.

Neither Mortensen nor Kitchen knew what the FAA may require in this instance.

“We don’t know,” Mortensen said, “but we’ll have a report. We file a report with the Police Department as well.”

Story, video and photos:   http://www.stgeorgeutah.com













What is aerotoxic syndrome? As a Coroner writes to British Airways and the Civil Aviation Authority calling for 'urgent action' about aircraft air contamination, we ask whether we should be worried

What is aerotoxic syndrome?

It is an illness caused by exposure to contaminated air in aircraft – known as a “fume event”.

Commercial passenger jets have a system that compresses air from its engines and uses it to pressurize the cabin. However, this can malfunction, causing excess oil particles to enter the supply.

The term “aerotoxic syndrome” was coined in 2001 by Dr Harry Hoffman, a former US Navy flight surgeon, Prof Chris Winder, a toxicologist at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, and Jean Christophe Balouet, a French environmental forensics expert.

Whom does it affect?

Aircrew, who spend considerable periods of time on aircraft, are the most vulnerable, according to experts. Some frequent travellers who are genetically susceptible to the toxins could fall ill.

Just how worried should we be?

Most airlines say we have no cause for concern. They cite independent studies commissioned by the Department for Transport which found “no evidence that pollutants occur in the cabin air at levels exceeding available health and safety standards”.

A KLM study into air quality in aircraft cockpits in December 2013, prompted by a court ruling in a case between a pilot and the airline, found that TCP – a neurotoxin – was present only “in minimal concentrations in aircraft cockpits”.

But campaigners insist we should be concerned about the problem and that airlines need to act urgently. The International Transport Workers’ Federation says there is growing evidence of the toxicity of the oil fumes, warning that contaminated air poses a “flight safety and worker health hazard”.

How can you tell if cabin air is contaminated?

A slight leakage of oil into the cabin can sometimes be detected by an odour that has been described as similar to sweaty socks, wet dog or vomit, according to the Aerotoxic Association, a campaign group. If a “fume event” occurs, bluish haze or smoke in the cabin may be visible. There are no chemical sensors in modern jet aircraft.

What action is being taken?

British Airways (BA) and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) have been given until April 13 to respond to a coroner’s “prevention of future deaths report”.

Stanhope Payne, the senior coroner for Dorset, who was investigating the death of BA pilot Richard Westgate in December 2012, said he was concerned about “the presence in his body of organophosphate toxins that are present in aircraft cabin air”.

He has told BA and the CAA that people in aircraft cabins are exposed to these toxins with consequential damage to their health, and noted that there are currently no systems in place for monitoring cabin air. Separately, the International Transport Federation’s (ITF) air quality working group is due to meet this week to discuss the problem of contaminated air on commercial aircraft and at airports.

Story and photos:   http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Tangier Island: Guard delivers provisions to ice-bound Chesapeake Bay island

VIRGINIA GUARD PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE
A Virginia Army National Guard aviation crew from the 2nd Battalion, 224th Aviation Regiment, in Sandton delivers food, mail and drugs Thursday to iced-in Tangier Island.



TANGIER ISLAND—The Virginia National Guard flew in food, medicine and mail to ice-bound Tangier Island, and the mayor said a Coast Guard cutter was on its way Friday to open a passage to this tiny fishing and tourism outpost in the middle of Chesapeake Bay.

Like many longtime islanders, Mayor James “Ooker” Eskridge played down Tangier’s plight but said medicines were essential for those who could not get off the island. Tangier has no drugstore.

“But you know, we’re not starving out here,” he said in an interview. “This happens when you live in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay.”

The guard’s 224th Aviation Regiment used a UH–60 Black Hawk helicopter Thursday to deliver milk, eggs, bread and prescription medicines to the 1.2-square-mile island of 460 people.

While the island has a grocery, many islanders hop on a ferry to Crisfield, Md.—14 miles away—for larger purchases. Ice has made that route impassable. The only way off the island now is by air; the island has a small airport.

Like most of the Mid-Atlantic, Tangier has shivered through an unseasonable cold stretch, dipping to 9 degrees Friday. It received about 8 inches of snow this week.

Islanders who are accustomed to the isolation said many newcomers hadn’t planned ahead for the long winter months.

“We plan for it. We stock up our cabinets,” said Judith Eskridge, the mayor’s wife. “Some of the new people who come, they don’t know.

“It’s inconvenient, but it’s not life-threatening.”

Another longtime islander, the mayor’s nephew Tommy Eskridge, agreed. “We’re used to it. Like, it’s not our first rodeo.”

The island’s frozen place in the bay has brought hardship. Some are unable to pay bills or visit relatives who are hospitalized on the mainland. Many on the island pilot or crew tugboats, often in two-week shifts. They’ve been stranded on the mainland.

Because of its isolation, many Tangier residents still retain the linguistic echoes of the island’s settlers, primarily from Cornwall along England’s southwest coast. John Smith, the intrepid Jamestown settler, is believed to be the first European to step foot on the island four centuries ago.

Many islanders fish or haul in the bay’s beloved blue crabs. The island is a popular destination for tourists, who explore it by foot. Most islanders get around on golf carts.

Mayor Eskridge said the ice is “the worst it’s been in a long time” and has kept oystermen from Tangier Sound and a bountiful season. The season ends in two weeks.

“It puts the guys out of work,” he said. “We just can’t get the boats out to them. You look out there and it looks like the Arctic.”

Story and photo:  http://www.fredericksburg.com

Tulsa man gets probation for pointing laser at police helicopter

A federal judge sentenced a Tulsa man to three years of probation Friday after he admitted to pointing a laser at a police helicopter last February.

U.S. District Judge Claire Eagan imposed the sentence on Carl Don Floyd following a short hearing in Tulsa federal court, saying she considered both the nature of the offense as well as his criminal history.

In November, Floyd entered a guilty plea on the eve of his second jury trial in the case. As part of an agreement, prosecutors agreed to support a probationary sentence.

Floyd’s initial trial resulted in a deadlocked federal jury in July.

Eagan granted a defense request for probation after Floyd’s attorney argued in court filings that he was the sole caregiver for his 14-year-old daughter. A prison term would “impose an extraordinary hardship upon Mr. Floyd’s family and in particular his daughter,” papers filed on his behalf state.

“Though Mr. Floyd may not be able to provide much financial support, the emotional support and bond between a father and his teenage daughter should be considered by the court,” the request says.

Federal sentencing guidelines call for a prison term of 37 to 46 months, although Floyd faced a possible prison term of up to five years and a $250,000 fine in connection with the single count of aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft.

State Department of Corrections records indicate that Floyd received a six-year prison term in 1999 in connection with drug and forgery charges. Also, Floyd was sentenced to drug court in connection with a 2007 drug-related case, DOC records reflect.

In granting probation, Eagan ordered Floyd to serve the first six months of the term in home detention, with allowances to leave for work. Eagan waived a fine in the case after finding that Floyd did not have the ability to pay.

Police arrested Floyd at his home in the 2100 block of West Archer Place after a police helicopter crew reported that a green laser struck their aircraft multiple times while on patrol. One of the crew members said he was struck in both eyes by the laser.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the number of reported laser strikes on aircraft appears to have leveled off in 2014 after increasing more than 1,000 percent since 2005.

The number of reported laser incidents involving aircraft nationwide declined from 3,960 in 2013 to 3,894 in 2014, FAA data indicates.

In the Tulsa area, the number of laser incidents declined from 29 in 2013 to 14 in 2014.

A federal law became effective in February 2012 that made it a federal crime to aim a laser pointer at an aircraft.

Story, comments and photos:  http://www.tulsaworld.com

Thirty years later, survivors of plane crash reflect on fateful night: Piper PA-31T Cheyenne, Norment Industries, N100RN, accident occurred February 22, 1985 in Utica, Michigan

Oakland Township architect Dominic Abbate points to the site of the Feb. 22, 1985 plane crash near the former Berz Macomb Airport that killed two men. Abbate and Donald Amboyer survived the collision and continue to remember the victims on the anniversary of the incident. 




With a frigid February wind blowing against his face, Dominic Abbate squints as he looks across a field near 23 Mile Road in Macomb Township.

The 73-year-old Oakland Township architect grows silent as his thoughts swirl around the events of a night 30 years ago while the winter wind gently peppers him with snowflakes. It was that evening he and another man walked away from a plane crash that claimed two lives.

“I’m just lucky to be alive,” he says softly. “I’m very grateful to still be alive.”

Abbate was one of four people aboard a twin-engine Piper Cheyenne that crashed amid dense fog in the field about 500 feet short of the former Berz-Macomb Airport runway on the night of Feb. 22, 1985.

Donald Amboyer, a Macomb County Jail administrator, was the other man who survived the crash. Killed were the pilot and another Macomb County official.

Both survivors were hospitalized for their injuries but soon went back to their daily routines in the days after the incident. Over the years, they have re-connected on the anniversary to either talk by phone or get together for dinner, mark the occasion and mourn the two lives lost.

Both have wrestled with “survivor’s guilt” and question why their lives were spared.

It’s an ongoing process, both men say.

Routine trip

It was supposed to be a routine, one-day business trip.

Abbate was the head of Warren-based Wakely Associates architectural firm, which had been hired to work on an expansion plan for the Macomb County Jail in Mount Clemens. He also was a member of the Oakland Township Board of Trustees.

He was tapped to fly to Montgomery, Ala. to visit Southeastern Specialty Co., a division of Norment Industries, which made locks, security devices and control panels for correctional facilities. The company had been contracted to provide security equipment for the new jail.

Also on the trip was Amboyer, head of the county jail, an integral part of the team working on the jail expansion project, and Robert Olafson, 47, of Washington Township, a county facilities and operations maintenance manager.

Both Ambyoer and Olafson, a personal friend of then-Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel, were respected officials.

In fact, Hackel and then-sheriff’s Inspector Ron Tuscany were scheduled to make the fateful trip.

“We were supposed to go along but had to back out about two hours before they left,” Hackel told The Macomb Daily in the days after the incident.

The plan was to fly down to Montgomery, check out the locks offered by Southeastern Speciality, have lunch at the factory, and return home that evening.

In a Feb. 5, 1985 letter faxed to Abbate, Southeastern Speciality project manager James Moseley confirmed the times, and indicated pilot Charlie Burnett would arrive the night before the trip, stay overnight in Michigan and be ready to fly out at 7 a.m. the following day. The plane ride would take about 3 hours.

“We would like to show you and your guests our facilities and discuss and demonstrate some of the locks that will be installed at the Macomb County Jail,” Moseley said in the letter. “After lunch we will continue any further discussion, or our pilot will be available for your return trip to Michigan.”

Foggy conditions

The day trip went well and the group boarded the six-seat turboprop plane for the ride back home.

Back in the Detroit area, February temperatures were on the rise, creating foggy conditions in the night sky. Flight conditions quickly deteriorated, forcing some air facilities such as Detroit Metropolitan Airport to divert airplanes elsewhere.

Once in Detroit airspace, the Macomb group was unable to see anything outside their windows.

“It was a nice flight back, but I was worried about the weather conditions,” Abbate said. “When we got over Detroit, it was like we had never come out of the clouds because the fog was that thick -- you couldn’t see a thing.”

Fog had cut ground visibility to 300 feet in the area, according to investigators.

Burnett, the 52-year-old pilot from Montgomery, had trouble locating the runway at Berz Macomb Airport, a reliever airport for Detroit Metropolitan Airport and home to about 70 private and corporate aircraft located in the area of 22 Mile and Hayes roads.

According to a National Transportation Safety Board report on the crash, the pilot advised air traffic controllers he missed his first attempt to land because he could not see the runway. If he could not see it on the next attempt, the pilot indicated he would head to either Detroit Metro or Oakland Pontiac Airport.

Instrument-rated flyers are able to use cockpit equipment to find the airport, but still have to be able to see the runway to land, especially in foggy conditions.

On his second approach, he made what’s called a beacon approach and was trying to make a visual observation with the runway lights.

That’s when the pilot hit a power line on the north side of 23 Mile Road, then tried to pull up and struck a series of treetops, shearing the right wing. The aircraft flipped over, landing on its nose and fuselage. It slid for a distance before coming to rest in a field.

Investigators would later say the humidity and damp, mushy grounds were factors in the plane not exploding, even as fuel leaked from the wreckage.

After the commotion and crunch of the crash, there was silence in the plane.

All four men hung upside down, still strapped into their seats by seatbelts.

“There was a big bang, and then we slid for a long time, it seemed like at least 10 seconds,” Abbate recalled. “After we stopped, I said ‘Don..Don,’ but there was no answer.”

After a few minutes, Amboyer came to and the men unbuckled their seatbelts, falling to the ceiling of the cabin. After checking on the pilot and Olafson, they realized both were deceased.

“Then we were like -- how do we get out of here,” Abbate said.

The two survivors could see a blue-green light through the fog, but inside the plane it was dark. The light actually was the beacon at Berz Macomb Airport.

They used a briefcase to try to break out the windows, but were unable to. The emergency exit window was jammed shut and a hydraulically operated back door couldn’t be opened.

While Amboyer and Abbate tried to stay calm even as they smelled leaking fuel and feared an explosion, help was on the way.

A few blocks from the crash site, Macomb Township resident Paul Kaiser heard the crash as he drove to his father’s house, Ralph Kaiser, chief of the township fire department. They jumped into a pickup truck and headed to the scene.

After finding the wreckage, the Kaisers called for additional manpower. Macomb Township firefighters soon arrived and freed the survivors.

“We were so happy to see them shining their flashlights at us,” Abbate said. “We crawled out of the plane and went righto a waiting ambulance.”

The NTSB would later say the pilot failed to use the appropriate procedures to land the plane including failing to maintain minimum descent altitude not following instrument flight measures.

The agency listed poor judgement by the pilot as a contributing factor to the crash.

The aftermath

Amboyer suffered numerous contusions and Abbate had a punctured lung. Both were hospitalized for several days, but discharged themselves to attend Olafson’s funeral.

Berz Macomb Airport shut down in 2003. It was demolished and the property is now a residential subdivision being developed by Pulte Homes.

Abbate’s firm went on to design the jail expansion and Amboyer continued to supervise the facility.

After the crash both men added sons to their families. Dan Amboyer is an actor appearing in the TV series “The Younger,” and Dominic Abbate, the son, is art director for marketing at George Washington University.

Don Amboyer, a U.S. Air Force veteran who started his law enforcement career as a probation officer, went on to earn a master’s degree in criminal justice and a doctorate in higher education administration.

He left the criminal justice system to work in education at Macomb Community College, serving as a dean of continuing and professional education and a vice provost for learning outreach.

Now semi-retired, Amboyer and his wife, Claudia, reside in Shelby Township but spent this past week vacationing with their family week at Disney World in Florida and will not have his annual visit with Abbate.

He says he feels “absolutely blessed and thankful” to have survived the crash, have the chance to spend the last 30 years as a husband and father, and to “give back” by trying to do good work while employed at MCC and performing volunteer work.

Still, the memory of the crash lingers.

“There has not been a day since Feb. 22, 1985 that I have not questioned why God spared me, felt guilty for surviving the crash, or thought about Robert (Bob) Olaafson, his wife, Leann, and their children,” Amboyer wrote in an email. “I did not know the pilot who perished in the crash, but my thoughts and prayers have also been for him and his family as well.”

The Olafson family did not respond to an invitation to comment.

Abbate, now a consultant for Wakely Associates, is back working on the largest bond program in Macomb County history to revamp government buildings in downtown Mount Clemens.

Like Amboyer, Abbate has had to contend with “survivor’s guilt.” From time to time he feels he’s “over” the crash, but then thoughts of that night sometime return.

Asked how he rationalizes how he and Amboyer survived, Abbate thinks for a moment.

“We didn’t have a vote in the matter,” he said. 

Story and photos: http://www.macombdaily.com

NTSB Identification: CHI85FA120
The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 27987.
Accident occurred Friday, February 22, 1985 in UTICA, MI
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31T, registration: N100RN
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

THE PILOT ATTEMPTED A VOR APPROACH AND MISSED. HE ADVISED ATC HE WAS GOING TO ATTEMPT THE NDB & IF HE COULD NOT SEE THE RWY HE WOULD GO TO METRO AT DETROIT OR PONTIAC. ON THE NDB APPROACH THE AIRCRAFT STRUCK TREES 960 FT BELOW THE MOA. THE AIRCRAFT FLIPPED OVER LANDING ON THE NOSE & TOP OF THE FUSELAGE.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

MINIMUM DESCENT ALTITUDE..NOT USED..PILOT IN COMMAND 
DECISION HEIGHT..NOT MAINTAINED..PILOT IN COMMAND 

Contributing Factors:
IN-FLIGHT PLANNING/DECISION..NOT CORRECTED..PILOT IN COMMAND 
IFR PROCEDURE..NOT FOLLOWED..PILOT IN COMMAND 
JUDGMENT..POOR..PILOT IN COMMAND 


An evidence photo shows the wreckage the day after the crash. 
Photo COURTESY Macomb County Sheriff’s Office

Port Authority Officer Attacked at Newark Liberty International Airport (KEWR), New Jersey; 2 Arrested

NEWARK, N.J. (WABC) -- A mother and daughter were arrested Thursday at Newark airport, accused of attacking a Port Authority police officer.

Katrina Dansby, 41, and Nephatira Dansby, 24, both of East Orange, N.J., were arrested and charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, obstruction of administrative law, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

Around 5 p.m. Thursday, a uniformed officer ordered a vehicle blocking two lanes of traffic outside Terminal A at Newark airport to move, according to a statement from Port Authority police.

When the officer approached the vehicle and signaled the driver to move to the curb, the driver began to shout and curse at the officer, and refused to move, the statement said. 

When the officer went to the driver's side window and requested the driver's license and registration, the suspect opened the driver's side door, striking the officer. According to police, the officer told the driver to remain in her car, but the driver pushed her way out and grabbed the officer's arms and face.

The driver's mother arrived at that point, the statement said, and grabbed the officer while the driver punched the officer with her fists.

Additional Port Authority police officers arrived and placed the suspects under arrest. 

The officer was taken to Trinitas Hospital and treated for trauma to her face and her knee.

Story, photo and comments:  http://7online.com


Katrina Dansby (left) and Nephatira Dansby

Incident occurred February 20, 2015 at Long Beach Airport (KLGB), California

LONG BEACH — A single-engine plane rolled to a stop on its belly Friday after its front landing gear collapsed upon touchdown at Long Beach Airport, a fire department spokesman said.

The plane landed about 4 p.m. Friday on runway 25L, said Jake Heflin, public information officer with the Long Beach Fire Department.

A man and woman aboard the plane escaped unharmed and there was no major impact on airport operations, Heflin said.

Original article can be found at: http://www.presstelegram.com

Southwest Airlines wants to add more international flights at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (KBWI), Maryland

Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly said Friday, Feb. 20, 2015 that BWI is a focal point as the carrier expands its international service.



Southwest Airlines Co. wants to schedule more international flights out of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, but don't expect to see the carrier adding tickets to Europe or Asia anytime soon.

BWI is the top international gateway for Dallas-based Southwest, airline CEO Gary Kelly said Friday at a BWI Business Partnership breakfast. The Baltimore-area airport will continue to be a focus as Southwest seeks to further spread its international wings. The airline only started flights to locations outside of the United States last year.

Southwest is not looking at adding flights to far-away destinations such as Europe or Asia in the near future, however. Those could come down the road, but the carrier has its sights set on scheduling flights to new North American locations for the time being.

"One of these days I'm sure we'll think about that," he said. "We've got all kinds of opportunities right here in an area we know."

The airline has 50 new destinations in mind, Kelly said. It's particularly interested in flights to Latin America, which has it building out international terminals in southern airports like Houston and Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

BWI has a role in the airline's Latin American expansion, too. Southwest tabbed the airport for flights to San Jose, Costa Rica, which are slated to start in March. They'll be the first international service to a new destination that the airline launches since closing on its acquisition of AirTran in 2011.

When Southwest started its international flights in 2014, it began flying to cities AirTran had served. Southwest ended AirTran flights in December, completing its integration of the carrier.
Southwest is a critical airline for BWI. It has about 70 percent market share at the airport.

Looking into the future, Kelly wouldn't rule out Southwest flying to new locations including Canada or even Cuba.

"Canada is definitely in our idea stage," he said. "It's definitely within our capabilities, and certainly from BWI it would be, I think, a very logical opportunity for us to think carefully about."

International flights represent only about 1 percent of Southwest's capacity, Kelly said. Adding more is attractive to the airline because international flights are more lucrative than domestic flights.

The domestic short-haul market is flat over the last 15 years as rising fares have hurt traffic, Kelly said. International markets — longer flights — haven't seen the same erosion.

As a result, Southwest has changed its strategy since first coming to BWI in 1993.

"The long-haul markets have grown," Kelly said. "So we have pivoted from our early days in the 1990s here from being just a short-haul carrier to being much better prepared to serve long-haul routes."

Story and photos:  http://www.bizjournals.com

Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly says BWI is a focal point as the carrier expands its international service.

Two Indicted for Laser Strikes on Law Enforcement Aircraft

Fresno, California - A federal grand jury returned two indictments today against Jose Javier Rosas, 62, resident of Bakersfield, California, and Jeremy Scott Danielson, 34, of Clovis, California, charging them with crimes relating to laser strikes of law enforcement aircraft, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

Reports of laser attacks have increased dramatically in recent years as powerful laser devices have become more affordable and widely available to the public. Lasers can completely incapacitate pilots who are trying to fly safely to their destination, endangering their crew members, passengers and people on the ground.

Lasing of Kern County Sheriff Helicopter

Rosas was charged with aiming a laser pointer at Air-1, a Kern County Sheriff’s Office helicopter. According to court records, Air-1 was struck last month during the evening hours by a powerful green laser. As a result, the pilot experienced glare, flash blindness, significant loss of night vision, watering eyes, and eye pain and was forced to disengage from a robbery investigation.

Rosas was charged with the laser offense following an investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Homeland Security Investigations of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Kern County Sheriff’s Office.

Lasing of CHP Aircraft

Danielson was charged with interfering with the safe operation of a California Highway Patrol (CHP) aircraft, Air 43, and aiming a laser pointer at it. According to court records, Air 43 was struck in August and September of last year by a powerful green laser pointer seized from Danielson. The second incident involved up to 23 laser strikes and occurred while Air 43 was taking off from the Fresno Yosemite International Airport during a critical phase of flight. As a result, the pilot and tactical flight officer suffered flash blindness and watering eyes.

The case was investigated by the FBI, CHP, Clovis and Fresno Police Departments.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Karen A. Escobar is prosecuting both cases.

Danielson is scheduled for arraignment on the indictment on February 23, 2015. Rosas is scheduled for arraignment on the indictment on February 27, 2015. They both face a maximum prison term of five years and a fine of up to $250,000, if convicted of aiming the beam of a laser pointer at an aircraft. Danielson faces an additional prison term of twenty years and a fine of up to $250,000, if convicted of interfering with the safe operation of an aircraft.

An indictment contains allegations that a defendant has committed a crime. Every defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

Original article can be found at: http://www.imperialvalleynews.com

Marijuana To Placencia By Plane

On last night's newscast, we told you how accurate police intelligence led Placencia Police to intercept a cargo of marijuana which was mailed from Corozal to the peninsula, via Tropic Air's cargo service. Well, Placencia police have kept the pressure up, and this morning, they seized almost 1.5 kilos of marijuana during an anti-drug operation.

Between 5:30 and 9:00 this morning, a team of officers from Special Branch, the K-9 Unit and uniformed police went out on an operation in both Seine Bight and Placencia Villages. 3 houses were searched in Placencia, which resulted in 1 person being arrested for possession of controlled drugs.

The discovery of the large stash of marijuana happened shortly after when 2 empty lots were searched in Placencia Village. In one of the lots, the officers found 1 white t-shirt, and wrapped inside it were 5 plastic bags each containing cannabis. The bags had a total of 1.156 kilograms - or 2 and a half pounds.

Another abandoned lot was searched near the football field, and the officers found a black handbag which contained 2 black plastic bags, each containing hi-grade weed known on the street as "hydro". It was weighed, and the officers discovered that the two parcels amounted to 231 grams - or just over half a pound.

The drugs were deposited as found property. Recently Placencia police have become very active in their anti-drug operations, and to date, the officers have seized different types of drugs including, cocaine, methamphetamines - better known as crystal meth - and marijuana. The intelligence suggests that because of the abundance of tourists visiting the peninsula, it has attracted drug traffickers and peddlers, whose numbers - police say - continue to grow.

Original Site:  http://www.7newsbelize.com

Cirrus SR22, Orthopedic Aviation Services LLC, N811CD: Fatal accident occurred November 06, 2014 in Grover Hill, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N811CD

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA040 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 06, 2014 in Grover Hill, OH
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N811CD
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

"The following is an INTERIM FACTUAL SUMMARY of this accident investigation. 

A final report that includes all pertinent facts, conditions, and circumstances of the accident will be issued upon completion, along with the Safety Board's analysis and probable cause of the accident:"

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 6, 2014, about 1800 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 airplane, N811CD, impacted a farm field near Grover Hill, Ohio, and a post impact fire occurred. The pilot, a pilot-rated passenger, and another passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed by the impact and subsequent fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Orthopedic Aviation Services LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed in the area of the accident. The flight operated on an activated IFR flight plan. The flight originated about 1545 from the Washington Municipal Airport (AWG), near Washington, Iowa, and was destined for the Findlay Airport (FDY), near Findlay, Ohio.

A fueling receipt from AWG showed that N811CD was serviced with 26.67 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline at 1519. The AWG airport manager indicated that he was at the airport at 1530 and he talked to three people who flew in N811CD. There were two men and a woman of the same age. He reported that they said they were flying east and would be back on Sunday as part of their return flight. Witnesses reported to the airport manager that they thought the woman was seated in the front right seat. The manager indicated that from 300 feet away, the airplane looked very clean. He was outside when they took off and the engine start-up sounded normal as did the engine run-up. The manager said that the takeoff appeared to be under full power and they climbed at a normal rate of climb.

According to records from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the accident airplane communicated with the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) located near Ft. Wayne, Indiana. About 1729, the pilot requested a climb to 10 or 11 thousand feet above mean seal level (MSL) because he was "picking up a little ice". The air traffic controller cleared the flight to 10,000 feet MSL, and asked for more details. The pilot reported that the windshield was picking up a little ice, and the outside air temperature was minus six degrees. About 1746, the pilot reported that the cloud tops were ragged between 9,500 and 10,300 feet MSL. About 1749, the pilot requested a lower altitude and the controller cleared the flight to 5,000 feet MSL. About 1751, the controller handed the flight off to Toledo TRACON.

About 1752, the pilot checked on with Toledo TRACON and indicated that he was on descent to 5,000 feet. The controller asked if the pilot had the current FDY weather. About 1754, the pilot reported that he had the current FDY weather and requested the RNAV [Area Navigation] Runway 25 approach to FDY. The controller advised the pilot to expect that RNAV approach. The last radio transmission from the airplane restated that the RNAV Runway 25 approach was requested and that transmission was received about 1754. The last transponder reply was about 1757, which indicated the airplane was at 3,600 feet MSL. That transponder reply showed the airplane was located to the south and east of the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137, near Grover Hill, Ohio.

A witness was driving in her car eastbound on Route 60 and was approaching Town Road 117. This intersection was about three miles west of the accident site. She indicated that she was driving about 45 to 50 mph. It was dark at the time and "spit" rain was coming down. She said that she could see through the car's windshield. She stated that above woods just south of Route 60, she saw a light coming down slowly. She described it as looking similar to a comet. The descent angle she physically gestured while being interviewed was about 35 to 45 degrees downward in the direction of the accident site. She said she saw the descending light for about two seconds. She subsequently saw an explosion, which was orange in color.

Another witness was in a house about a third of a mile northwest of the accident site. She indicated that a heavy wind or tornado sound is what got her attention. She also heard a sound she vocally described as "NEEEEER." She saw a reflection of light in a mirror. An explosion occurred when the NEEEEER sound stopped. She said that the conditions at that time were windy, dark, and rainy.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 59-year-old pilot held a FAA private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. He had been issued a FAA third-class medical certificate on October 15, 2014, with a limitation that he must have available glasses for near vision. The pilot reported on the application for that medical certificate that he had accumulated 987 hours of total flight time and 150 hours of flight time in the six months before that application.

The last entry in the pilot's logbook was dated November 5, 2014. The pilot recorded that he had accumulated 1,000.3 hours of total flight time, 151.5 hours of flight time during night conditions, 127.8 hours of flight time in SR22 airplanes, and 19.3 hours of flight time in actual instrument conditions. A certified flight instructor's endorsement in the pilot's logbook showed that the pilot received a flight review on August 16, 2014.

The 65-year-old pilot rated passenger held a FAA commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a FAA flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine and instrument airplane ratings. He had been issued a FAA second-class medical certificate on April 21, 2014. This medical certificate was issued to the pilot rated passenger as a Time-limited Special Issuance Second Class Medical Certificate with the following limitation(s): "Not Valid for Any Class After 04/30/2015" and "Must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision." He reported on the application for that special issuance medical certificate that he had accumulated 5,016 hours of total flight time and 160 hours of flight time in the six months prior to that application.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N811CD, a 2001 model Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, serial number 0120, was a four-place single engine low-wing airplane powered by a six-cylinder, 310-horsepower, Continental Motors model IO-550-N7B engine, with serial number 686224, that drove a three-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller. According to airplane logbook entries, an annual inspection was completed on October 8, 2014. The airplane accumulated 1806.2 hours of total flight time at the time of that inspection.

The aircraft was fitted with a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) designed to recover the aircraft and its occupants to the ground in the event of an in-flight emergency. The CAPS contains a parachute (within a deployment bag) located within a fiberglass CAPS enclosure compartment, a solid-propellant rocket contained within a launch tube to deploy the parachute, a pick-up collar assembly and attached Teflon-coated steel cable lanyard and incremental bridle, a rocket activation system that consisted of an activation T-handle, an activation cable, and a rocket igniter, and a harness assembly which attached the parachute to the fuselage.

The accident airplane was not certified for flight in icing conditions.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) senior meteorologist collected factual weather data in reference to the accident flight and produced a group chairman's factual weather report. The report showed that the accident pilot was provided weather information from Lockheed-Martin Flight Service through the ForeFlight.com website. He also filed an IFR flight plan for a direct flight from AWG to FDY. The pilot also requested a standard text weather briefing format. Standard weather information for the accident flight, to include the airmen's meteorological information (AIRMETs), area forecast (FA), meteorological terminal air reports (METARs), terminal aerodrome forecasts (TAFs), and pilot reports (PIREPs), was contained in the text weather briefing package. Meteorological Impact Statements (MIS) were not contained in the weather briefing information package. There is no record of any additional weather briefing information the accident pilot received.

A review of the 1900 surface analysis chart showed that it depicted a surface trough stretching from central New York westward across northern Pennsylvania, northern Ohio, and central Indiana. Constant pressure charts depicted a low-level trough over or just to the northwest of the accident site around the accident time with temperatures below freezing.

At 1753, the recorded weather about 38 miles and 93 degrees from the accident site at FDY was: Wind 260 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 3 statute miles; present weather mist; sky condition overcast clouds at 600 feet; temperature 7 degrees C; dew point 6 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

At 1753, the recorded weather about 18 miles and 10 degrees from the accident site at the Defiance Memorial Airport, near Defiance, Ohio, (DFI) was: Wind 280 degrees at 8 knots: visibility 6 statute miles; present weather light rain, mist; sky condition overcast ceiling at 1,000 feet; temperature 8 degrees C; dew point 6 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

At 1853, the recorded weather at DFI was: Wind 320 degrees at 15 knots with gusts to 20 knots; visibility 9 statute miles; present weather light rain; sky condition overcast ceiling at 1,100 feet; temperature 8 degrees C; dew point 6 degrees C; altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury.

The 1900 Wilmington, Ohio, (KILN) upper air sounding was plotted. The plotted sounding depicted the lifted condensation level at 1,502 feet, a convective condensation level of 2,554 feet, and a level of free convection at 1,675 feet. The freezing level was located at 3,829 feet. The precipitable water value was 0.54 inches.

The sounding indicated a relatively moist vertical environment from the surface through 12,000 feet MSL with several layers of conditional instability. This environment would have been conducive of cloud formation from the surface to 12,000 feet and icing (clear, rime, and mixed) between 4,000 and 12,000 feet MSL. Additionally, the sounding was close to saturation between 0 degrees C and -11 degrees C (between 4,000 and 12,000 feet MSL) which, according to articles in professional meteorology journals, is considered a temperature range supportive of the growth of supercooled liquid water droplets (SLD).

Visible and infrared data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 13 (GOES-13) was obtained and plotted. GOES-13 imagery at a wavelength of 0.65 microns (µm) and 10.7 µm depicted brightness temperatures for the scene and imagery surrounding the time of the accident, from 1400 through 2000 at approximately 15-minute intervals, were reviewed. The review revealed a general northwest to southeast movement of the clouds over the accident site about the accident time. Based on the brightness temperatures above the accident site and the vertical temperature profile provided by the 1900 KILN sounding, the approximate cloud-top heights over the accident site were 13,000 feet at 1800.

Fort Wayne, Indiana, (KIWX) Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D), was located about 57 miles west-northwest of the accident site. Archive radar data was plotted with the airplane's radar track. Plotted base reflectivity values are located over and along the route of flight with the precipitation targets moving from north to south between 1755 and 1757. These reflectivity values correspond to very light precipitation targets. There were no lightning strikes near the accident site at the accident time.

KIWX WSR-88D dual-polarization (dual-pol) archived radar data was obtained and plotted. About 1750, radar data showed the accident flight began a descent from 10,000 feet and dual-pol depicted conditions near the aircraft location at the precipitation targets indicated small hydrometeor sizes, and/or a small amount of hydrometeors in the beam, hydrometeors that were much more horizontally shaped as they fell than spherical, and all the hydrometeors in the scan had very similar characteristics. These shape characteristics are similar to the freezing drizzle and supercooled liquid water characteristics described in articles in professional meteorology journals.

PIREPs, two hours before and after the accident and within 300 miles of the accident site, were reviewed. A portion of the PIREPS reported light or moderate icing conditions to include one report of severe clear icing at 4,000 feet MSL at 1900 about 180 degrees and 175 miles south of the accident site.

There was no issued significant meteorological information valid for the area of the accident site at the accident time.

There was no issued Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) advisory valid for the area of the accident site at the accident time.

There was a MIS issued at 1344 by the CWSU near Cleveland, Ohio, valid for the accident site at the accident time. The MIS discussed patchy light to moderate icing conditions with bases at 4,500 feet in the northern half of Cleveland's airspace, with the icing base at 7,500 feet across the southern half of Cleveland's airspace. The top of the icing was forecast to be at 16,000 feet with patchy instrument conditions in the precipitation.

AIRMET Zulu was issued at 1545 and was valid at the accident time. It was the only AIRMET valid for the accident site, at the accident time, and the accident flight level. AIRMET Zulu forecasted moderate icing conditions between the freezing level and flight level (FL)180 with the forecasted freezing level between 2,000 and 7,000 feet within the AIRMET airspace.

A corrected FA issued at 1540, valid at the accident time, forecasted an overcast ceiling from 1,500 to 2,500 feet MSL with tops to FL240, visibility between 3 and 5 miles, scattered light rain showers, and mist.

The Ft Wayne, Indiana, TAF, valid at the time of the accident, was issued at 1235 and was valid for a 24-hour period beginning at 1300. The TAF forecast for the time period surrounding the accident was for wind from 300 degrees at 16 knots with gusts to 26 knots, 6 miles visibility, light rain shower, and an overcast ceiling at 2,000 feet.

The current icing potential (CIP) supplements other icing advisories. The CIP icing probabilities, icing severity, and SLD potential, valid at 1700 and 1800 EST at 10,000, 9,000, 8,000, 7,000, and 6,000 feet MSL were reviewed. The CIP icing probabilities depicted 50 to above 85 percent probability of icing at every flight level between 10,000 and 6,000 feet around the accident site around the time of the accident. The highest probabilities for icing were located between 8,000 and 6,000 feet with the tongue of greater than 85 percent probability of icing stretching westward from the accident time into northern Indiana. In addition to the CIP indicating greater than 85 percent probability of icing, the CIP indicated that the icing severity around the accident site was between light and moderate. Below 8,000 feet, the icing severity around the accident site was depicted as mostly moderate icing at both 1700 and 1800. SLD potential was also calculated by CIP. Around the accident site at the accident time, where the SLD potential was calculated as "unknown", the SLD potential was between 40 and 70 percent with the highest probability of SLD between 9,000 and 6,000 feet.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main sections of the airplane fuselage and empennage were found impacted and buried in soft terrain about 199 degrees and 907 feet from the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137. The airplane's resting heading was about 77 degrees. The airplane's airframe was found fragmented with its heavier components north of the main wreckage and its lighter components east of the main wreckage. The observed debris field of components extended about 124 feet north and about 187 feet east of the main wreckage.

Flight control cable and engine cable continuity was not established due to fragmentation and thermal damage. Airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. Both navigation light covers were found and green glass fragments were found under the navigation light cover on the south side of the main wreckage. The engine cowling was fragmented and it exhibited a crush line consistent with a right wing low impact. Both left and right ailerons and flaps were found resting on the ground in the debris field to the north of the main wreckage. The empennage, to include the lower section of the rudder, was found discolored and deformed consistent with thermal damage. The empennage was found under charred sections of the fuselage at the southwest side of the main wreckage. The upper section of the rudder was found resting on the ground in the debris to the north of the main wreckage. Separation surfaces on the upper and lower sections exhibited consistent sized and shaped tears and separations. The upper rudder section did not exhibit the same dark discoloration as the lower section did. The rudder sections were shipped to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for examination.

The rocket motor and parachute were found within subsurface empennage and fuselage fragments in the main wreckage area. The rocket motor was found with its propellant expended and it exhibited discoloration consistent with thermal damage. The parachute was found in a packed state and it exhibited deformation and discoloration consistent with thermal damage.

Disassembly of the attitude indicator revealed rotational scoring on its rotor and cage.

The propeller and propeller flange separated from its engine crankshaft and was found buried about four feet below the field. The propeller blades exhibited S-shaped bending and leading edge gouges. The engine was found deformed and buried about eight feet below the field. The no. five and no. six cylinders separated from their crankcase. Disassembly of the fuel pump showed its shear shaft separated in overload and it shaft was bent. The pump's vanes were intact and the pump rotated by hand freely about a quarter turn. The pump's mixture arm also rotated when moved by hand. Both magnetos sustained impact damage. One magneto produced spark when its impulse coupling was rotated by hand. Removed sparkplugs exhibited normal combustion discoloring and a "worn out, normal condition" when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Accessible cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope and no preimpact anomalies were detected during the borescope inspection. Disassembly of the oil pump revealed no debris or preimpact anomalies. Disassembly of the fuel manifold revealed that its seal surface facing its screen and valve exhibited deterioration and its seal surface facing its spring did not exhibit deterioration.


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot and pilot-rated passenger by the Paulding County Coroner's Office. Both their causes of death were listed as blunt force trauma. Toxicological samples were not able to be taken on neither the pilot nor the pilot-rated passenger.


FIRE

The main wreckage exhibited charring, deformation, and discoloration consistent with a ground fire. Separated airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. A witness reported the sound of an explosion consistent with a ground impact explosion.


TESTS AND RESEARCH

An NTSB senior air traffic specialist obtained radar data from the FAA. He produced a table of the data and graphical images of the airplane's radar returns. The data was given to the weather group chairman and vehicle performance group chairman for use in their reports. The radar data and graphics are appended to the docket material associated with this case.

An NTSB senior aerospace engineer, who was the vehicle performance group chairman, used the radar data to produce a three dimensional graphic. The graphic does not depict the airplane's airspeed or descent rates. However, the graphic visually shows the slope of the accident airplane's descent near the accident site. The vehicle performance graphic is appended to the docket material associated with this case.

An NTSB chemist indicated that the submitted rudder from this accident was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory to determine if rocket fuel residue from the parachute system was present on the exterior surface of the rudder skin. The entire surface was swabbed and the individual swabs were analyzed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a diamond attenuated total reflectance accessory in accordance to ASTM E1252-98 (American Society for Testing Materials E1252-98: Standard Practice for General Techniques for Obtaining Infrared Spectra for Qualitative Analysis). The spectra from all the samples were compared to a known spectra for the rocket fuel components. No spectral signatures matching the rocket fuel components were found in any of the swab samples.


ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

Both the pilot and pilot-rated passenger were heard communicating on the air traffic control frequency during the flight. Additionally, the investigation could not determine which pilot-rated occupant was flying the airplane or where each pilot-rated occupant was seated due to the fragmentation of the airplane.

According to NTSB accident report CEN13FA096 , on December 10, 2012, about 2016 central standard time, a Messerschmitt Bolkow-Blohm model BK 117-A3 helicopter, N911BK, impacted the ground near Compton, Illinois. The pilot, flight nurse, and flight paramedic were fatally injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage from impact forces. The emergency medical services (EMS) equipped helicopter was registered to Rockford Memorial Hospital, and operated by Air Methods Corporation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand air-taxi flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company visual flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Rockford Memorial Hospital Heliport (LL83), Rockford, Illinois, about 1958 and was en route to the Mendota Community Hospital Heliport (14IL), Mendota, Illinois, where it was to pick up a patient for transport back to the Rockford Memorial Hospital.

Within the report, weather data and reports from first responders indicated that the flight likely encountered areas of snow, freezing drizzle, and supercooled liquid water.

The National Transportation Safety Board determined the probable cause in reference CEN13FA096 as follows: The inadvertent encounter with inclement weather, including snow, freezing rain, and reduced visibility conditions, which led to the pilot's spatial disorientation and loss of aircraft control.

According to preliminary information supplied to the NTSB, on October 18, 2013, about 1017 central daylight time, N610ED, a Cessna 500, Citation, multi-engine turbofan airplane, was destroyed during impact with terrain near Derby, Kansas. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Dufresne, Inc.; Murrieta, California. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. The airplane departed Wichita Mid-Continent Airport (ICT), Wichita, Kansas, about 1007 and was destined for New Braunfels Regional Airport (BAZ), New Braunfels, Texas.

Preliminary data from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control showed normal operations during climb before the pilot contacted the FAA Kansas City Air Route Traffic Control Center at 1014 and reported leveling at 15,000 feet. The controller cleared the pilot to proceed direct to Millsap, Texas and climb to 23,000 feet. Over the next minute, the aircraft made an abrupt right turn followed by an abrupt left turn. Radar data showed the airplane descended to 14,600 feet before resuming climb and reaching 15,200 feet at 1016:20. The aircraft then made an abrupt descending left turn and radar and radio contact was lost.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane below the clouds in a nose down vertical dive. One witness reported that after impact he saw a fireball about 500 feet high followed by a column of smoke. Evidence at the accident scene showed evidence of a postimpact fire with most of the wreckage located in or near a single impact crater. The outboard portion of the left wing and the left aileron was located about 3,000 feet west of the main wreckage.

At 1038, the closest official surface weather observation site at McConnell Air Force Base (IAB), Wichita, Kansas, reported a northeast wind at 12 knots, light rain, and a broken ceiling at 1,700 feet above ground level. Satellite imagery indicated abundant cloud cover with the cloud cover top near 21,000 feet mean sea level (msl). Pilot reports in the area indicated light to moderate icing conditions above 6,000 feet msl at the accident time. This accident investigation's report number is CEN14FA009

According to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) Aviation Occurrence Investigation AO-2007-018, on February 5, 2007, a Cirrus SR22 aircraft, registered VH-HYY, with a pilot and one passenger on board, was being operated on a private flight from Canberra, ACT to Bankstown, NSW. As the aircraft approached the Cecil Park area, NSW, the pilot reported to air traffic control that the engine had lost power and he was attempting a forced landing. Soon after, the aircraft impacted terrain close to the M7 motorway and both occupants sustained serious injuries.

The ATSB report, in part, indicated that before impact, the pilot activated the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS), but the system malfunctioned and the parachute did not deploy correctly. According to the report, subsequent testing by the aircraft and CAPS manufacturers found that the pick-up collar could move prematurely from the top of the rocket launch tube during activation. Such movement was considered to have the potential to adversely affect the rocket's trajectory. However, the trajectory of the rocket that was evident in this accident, was not able to be replicated.

Subsequent to this ATSB report, the FAA issued airworthiness directive (AD) 2007-14-03 for Cirrus Design Corporation Models SR20 and SR22 Airplanes. The AD, in part, stated:

SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain
Cirrus Design Corporation (CDC) Models SR20 and SR22 airplanes. This AD
requires you to replace the pick-up collar support and nylon screws, of the
Cirrus Airplane Parachute System (CAPS), with a new design pick-up collar
support and custom tension screws. This AD results from a CDC report of an
in-flight CAPS activation where the parachute failed to successfully deploy.
We are issuing this AD to correct pick-up collar support fasteners of the CAPS,
which could result in the premature separation of the collar. This condition,
if not corrected, could result in the parachute failing to successfully deploy
(CAPS failure).

Logbook entries revealed that AD 2007-14-03 had been complied with on N811CD before the accident.

According to NTSB incident report CEN13IA285, on May 16, 2013, about 1120 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp (CDC) SR22, N715CD, airplane ballistic parachute was activated by the pilot during flight near Dallas, Texas, following a loss of control in cruise flight. The parachute pack remained in its compartment, its rocket was deployed, and the rocket propellant was expended. The airplane received no damage. The private pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to Jeramiah 2911 Inc and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Marginal visual flight rules conditions prevailed and the flight was operating on instrument flight rules (IFR) plan for the flight that originated from Addison Airport (ADS), Dallas, Texas, about 1055 and was destined for Independence Municipal Airport (IDP), Independence, Kansas. The flight returned to ADS and landed without further incident.

The report, in part, stated that the postincident examination of the parachute system did not reveal any system component failure. Postincident testing showed that off-axis deployment of the parachute could exceed the forces required for a successful deployment of the parachute. If the airplane has a large pitch or bank angle or angular rates (or a combination of these) as the parachute rocket leaves the airplane, the airplane will rotate and cause the rocket tether to pull at an angle other than that intended, and the parachute will fail to deploy. Radar data showed that the airplane was in a very dynamic flight pattern with extreme pitch and bank angles when the parachute system was activated. Thus, the parachute likely failed to deploy when activated due to the dynamic maneuvering of the airplane at the time of the activation, which exceeded the parachute system's certification requirements.

The National Transportation Safety Board determined the probable cause in reference to CEN13IA285 as follows: The failure of the airplane's parachute to deploy when activated during a loss of control in cruise flight due to the dynamic maneuvering of the airplane at the time of the activation, which exceeded the parachute system's certification requirements.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA040
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 06, 2014 in Grover Hill, OH
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N811CD
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 6, 2014, about 1800 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 airplane, N811CD, impacted a farm field near Grover Hill, Ohio, and a post impact fire occurred. The pilot, a pilot-rated passenger, and another passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed by the impact and subsequent fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Orthopedic Aviation Services LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed in the area of the accident. The flight operated on an activated IFR flight plan. The flight originated about 1545 from the Washington Municipal Airport (AWG), near Washington, Iowa, and was destined for the Findlay Airport (FDY), near Findlay, Ohio.

Preliminary flight service station information showed that the pilot requested a weather briefing and filed an IFR flight plan for a direct flight from AWG to FDY.

A fueling receipt from AWG showed that N811CD was serviced with 26.67 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline at 1519. The AWG airport manager indicated that he was at the airport at 1530 and he talked to three people who flew in N811CD. There were two men about 60 and a woman of the same age. He reported that they said they were flying east and would be back on Sunday as part of their return flight. Witnesses reported to the airport manager that they thought the woman was seated in the front right seat. The manager indicated that from 300 feet away, the airplane looked very clean. He was outside when they took off and the engine start-up sounded normal as did the engine run-up. The manager said that the takeoff was under full power and they climbed at a normal rate of climb.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the accident airplane communicated with the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) near Ft. Wayne, Indiana. About 1729, the pilot requested a climb to 10 or 11 thousand feet above mean seal level (MSL) because he was "picking up a little ice". The air traffic controller cleared him 10,000 feet MSL, and asked for more details. The pilot reported that windshield was picking up a little ice, and temperature was minus six degrees. About 1746, the pilot reported that the cloud tops were ragged between 9,500 and 10,300 feet MSL. About 1749, the pilot requested a lower altitude and the controller cleared him to 5,000 feet MSL. About 1751 pm the controller handed him off to Toledo TRACON.

About 1751, the pilot checks on with Toledo TRACON and indicated that he was on descent. The controller asked the pilot if he had current FDY weather. About 1725, the pilot reported that he has the current FDY weather and requested the RNAV [Area Navigation] Runway 25 approach to FDY. The controller advised the pilot to expect that RNAV approach. The last radio transmission from the airplane was received about 1754. The last transponder reply was at 1757, which indicated the airplane was at 5,100 feet MSL. That transponder reply showed the airplane was located to the south and east of the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137.

A witness was driving in her car eastbound on Route 60 and was approaching Town Road 117. This intersection was about three miles west of the accident site. She indicated that she was driving about 45 to 50 mph. It was dark at the time and "spit" rain was coming down. She said that she could see through the car's windshield. She stated that above woods just south of Route 60, she saw a light coming down slowly. She described it as a comet. The descent angle she physically gestured was about 35 to 45 degrees downward in the direction of the accident site. She said she saw the descending light for about two seconds. She subsequently saw an explosion, which was orange in color.

Another witness was in a house about a third of a mile northwest of the accident site. She indicated that a heavy wind or tornado sound is what got her attention. She also heard a sound she vocally described as "NEEEEER." She saw a reflection of light in a mirror. An explosion occurred when the NEEEEER sound stopped. She said that the conditions at that time were windy, dark, and rainy.

The 59-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. He had been issued a FAA third-class medical certificate on October 15, 2014, with a limitation that he must have available glasses for near vision. The pilot reported on the application for that medical certificate that he had accumulated 987 hours of total flight time and 150 hours of flight time in the six months prior to that application.

The last entry in the pilot's logbook was dated November 5, 2014. The pilot recorded that he had accumulated 1,000.3 hours of total flight time, 151.5 hours of flight time during night conditions, 127.8 hours of flight time in SR22 airplanes, and 19.3 hours of flight time in actual instrument conditions. A certified flight instructor's endorsement in the pilot's logbook showed that the pilot received a flight review on August 16, 2014.

N811CD, a 2001 model Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, serial number 0120, was a four-place single engine low-wing airplane powered by a six-cylinder, 310-horsepower, Teledyne Continental Motors model IO-550-N7B engine, with serial number 686224, that drove a three-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller.

At 1753, the recorded weather about 38 miles and 93 degrees from the accident site at FDY was: Wind 260 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 3 statute miles; present weather mist; sky condition overcast clouds at 600 feet; temperature 7 degrees C; dew point 6 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

The main sections of the airplane fuselage and empennage were found impacted and buried in soft terrain about 199 degrees and 907 feet from the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137. The airplane's resting heading was about 77 degrees. The airplane's airframe was found fragmented with its heavier components north of the main wreckage and its lighter components east of the main wreckage. The observed debris field of components extended about 124 feet north and about 187 feet east of the main wreckage. The propeller and propeller flange separated from its engine crankshaft and was found buried about four feet below the field. The propeller blades exhibited S-shaped bending and leading edge gouges. The engine was found deformed and buried about eight feet below the field. The no. five and no. six cylinders separated from their crankcase. Disassembly of the fuel pump showed its shear shaft separated in overload and it shaft was bent. The pump's vanes were intact and the pump rotated by hand freely about a quarter turn. The pump's mixture arm also rotated when moved by hand. Both magnetos sustained impact damage. One magneto produced spark when its impulse coupling was rotated by hand. Removed sparkplugs exhibited normal combustion discoloring and a "worn out, normal condition" when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Accessible cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope and no preimpact anomalies were detected during the borescope inspection. Disassembly of the oil pump revealed no debris or preimpact anomalies. Disassembly of the fuel manifold revealed that its seal surface facing its screen and valve exhibited deterioration and its seal surface facing its spring did not exhibit deterioration. Disassembly of the attitude indicator revealed rotational scoring on its rotor and cage. The rocket motor and parachute were found within subsurface empennage and fuselage fragments in the main wreckage area. The rocket motor was found with its propellant expended and it exhibited discoloration consistent with thermal damage. The parachute was found in a packed state and it exhibited deformation and discoloration consistent with thermal damage. Flight control cable and engine cable continuity was not established due to fragmentation and thermal damage. Airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. Both navigation light covers were found and green glass fragments were found under the navigation light cover on the south side of the main wreckage. The engine cowling was fragmented and it exhibited a crush line consistent with a right wing low impact. Both left and right ailerons and flaps were found resting on the ground in the debris field to the north of the main wreckage. The empennage to include the lower section of the rudder was found discolored and deformed consistent with thermal damage. The empennage was found under charred sections of the fuselage at the southwest side of the main wreckage. The upper section of the rudder was found resting on the ground in the debris to the north of the main wreckage. Separation surfaces on the upper and lower sections exhibited consistent sized and shaped tears and separations. The upper rudder section did not exhibit the same dark discoloration as the lower section did.

The Paulding County Coroner was asked to perform an autopsy on the pilots and take toxicological samples for testing at the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute.

The main wreckage exhibited charring, deformation, and discoloration consistent with a ground fire. Separated airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. A witness reported the sound of an explosion consistent with a ground impact explosion.

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Columbus FSDO-07



OBITUARY: Michael L McCarty, MD 

Michael L. McCarty, 59, of Grand Island, NE died Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, as the result of a fatal plane crash in Paulding County, Ohio.

Memorial services will be held Saturday, November 15, 2014 at 11:00 AM at St Mary’s Cathedral, Grand Island, NE with Reverend Richard Piontkowski officiating. Reception and dinner to follow at St. Mary’s Parish Center. There will be no visitation. Inurnment will be at a later date. Apfel Funeral Home is assisting the family. Dr. McCarty was born to John McCarty and Frieda Faye Neth on January 18, 1955 in Hastings, NE. Starting at age 7 Dr. McCarty started working to help contribute to his family which lead to the work ethic and success in life. 


Read more: http://www.apfelfuneralhome.com
GRAND ISLAND, Neb. -- The investigation continues after Thursday's small plane crash in Ohio killed three Grand Island residents.  

The plane took off from the Central Nebraska Regional Airport in Grand Island.

Friends and family are remembering those lives that were lost.

Dr Michael McCarty as a very giving man, recalls his sister, "He was somebody that can't be replaced and he's had a huge impact on some many people's lives, my children, his children, other peoples children and just people in general," says Kim Gangwish.

Dr. McCarty was the pilot of the small single-engine plane that crashed last Thursday in Paulding county, Ohio. Wayne Weiss was the co-pilot that day. His wife Rosalee Weiss was also on board. All three were killed.

Airport officials aren't sure what happened and say it will take several months until they are able to determine what exactly caused the crash. But family members say both Dr. McCarty and Wayne had a lot of experience.

"He had the confidence to fly that day because he was with the most experienced pilot he knew between the two of them if there was a way that they could have saved that plane they would have," says Kim Gangwish, Dr. Michael McCarty's sister

Coworkers are struggling with the sudden loss.

"For me personally, I lost a friend. We're all in a state of shock and miss him greatly," says Tim Klemme the Central Nebraska Orthopedics Clinic administrator.

"Everybody in the office is just trying to adjust to not having him here with us," says Candi Price, Dr McCarty's nurse.

Dr. McCarty left an impact on many. Kim says that Grand Island lost some great people that day.

"We all learned from him, we all grew from him, we all have strength from him today, and he changed all of our lives in so many ways and we'll miss him a lot."

Officials say the cause of the crash could take months to determine. 


http://www.nbcneb.com


GROVER HILL, Ohio (WANE) The names of three victims in a Paulding County plane crash that happened Thursday night have been released by the county’s coroner.

According to a press release from the Paulding County Sheriff’s Department, the pilot of the aircraft is identified as Dr. Michael McCarty, 59, of Grand Island, Nebraska. The passengers on the plane are identified as Wayne Weiss, 65, and Rosalee Weiss, 62, both of Grand Island, Nebraska.

“The news is unfathomable at this time and we are deeply saddened and struck with this terrible loss,” Bryan Bydalek, a son-in-law of the Weiss couple, said in a statement issued to KGIN in Lincoln, Nebraska.  “Words cannot express the hurt we feel, but we do find some solace in knowing they passed together and that as a lifelong pilot, Wayne was doing something that he loved.  We would also like to send our condolences to the McCarty family as they deal with their loss as well.  We would also like to thank all our family and friends who have expressed their thoughts and prayers and support and we will continue to need support in the hard days to come.”

According to FAA records, they were on a section of the trip that would stop in Findlay, Ohio.

The three were traveling to New Jersey, family members told Paulding County Sheriff, Jason Landers. The plane crashed around 6 p.m. at the intersection on County Road 137 and County Road 60 in Latty Township.

McCarty was visiting a daughter and the Weisses were vacationing. Landers was told that both Michael and Wayne were longtime friends and experienced pilots. When the three failed to arrive in New Jersey at the scheduled time, the families began to search for them.

The aircraft was registered to Orthopedists Aviation Services. Investigators are continuing to clean up the scene on Saturday. They are hoping to wrap things up at the crash site so they can start the process of determining what actually happened.

- Source:  http://wane.com



Three people are dead after a plane that departed from Grand Island crashed in a western Ohio field. 

Family members say the pilot was Dr. Michael McCarty, 59, and on board were his friend and old flight instructor Wayne Weiss, 65, and Weiss' wife Rosalee, 62, all of Grand Island.
 

The three took off from the Central Nebraska Regional Airport around noon Thursday.  They refueled in Iowa, and planned to spend the night in Ohio before continuing on to visit family in New Jersey.  But around 6 pm, the Paulding County, Ohio sheriff says the four-seat single-engine plane went down there, with witnesses reporting it was on fire before impact.
 

McCarty was a well known orthopedic surgeon. His family tells NTV he was an experienced pilot and say the plane had just passed an annual inspection.

The Weiss family says Wayne was an experienced flight instructor, and had been flying since his military days. He had taught McCarty to fly some time ago.

"The news is unfathomable at this time and we are deeply saddened and struck with this terrible loss," the Weiss family said in a statement to NTV.  "Words cannot express the hurt we feel, but we do find some solace in knowing they passed together and that as a lifelong pilot, Wayne was doing something that he loved.  We would also like to send our condolences to the McCarty family as they deal with their loss as well.  We would also like to thank all our family and friends who have expressed their thoughts and prayers and support and we will continue to need support in the hard days to come."

The Paulding County sheriff said FAA and NTSB investigators were still on the scene as of Saturday morning.

According to WPTA-TV of Fort Wayne, Ind., witnesses told police they heard an explosion and saw the plane on fire before it crashed, . The flight began at Central Nebraska Regional Airport and left at 12:19 p.m. on Thursday. It flew for about two hours to Washington, Iowa, then took off about 40 minutes later for Findlay, Ohio. After making a short stop in Fort Wayne, Ind., it dropped off the radar in Paulding County, Ohio, at an altitude of about five thousand feet.

The aircraft is registered to Orthopedic Aviation Services out of Delaware.


- Source:  http://www.nebraska.tv

PAULDING COUNTY, Ohio (WANE) – A Thursday night plane crash that left three dead has brought federal investigators to an area in rural Paulding County.

 The crash happened near County Road 60 and County Road 137 around 6 p.m. on Thursday, and on Friday evening crews had arrived with heavy construction equipment to help them clear the scene of debris and remove the remains of those who perished in the crash.

The site is about two miles north of Grover Hill and several miles east of Wayne Trace High School.

Witnesses told police the small plane was on fire before it crashed into the field, which lies about two miles north of Grover Hill and several miles east of Wayne Trace High School. Paulding County Sheriff Jason Landers said a passing motorist and a hunter who was nearby would be interviewed Friday about what they saw and heard around the time of the crash.

“They heard an explosion and they actually saw the aircraft on fire in the air prior to the collision on the ground. One of them quite a distance away felt the concussion from the impact. It was a devastating incident that happened,” Landers said.

Debris is scattered in an area about 100 yards by 100 yards, according to Landers. The plane crashed in a field directly across the road from a house.

“The largest amount of material, if you will, is in the ground. We believe the way the aircraft descended into the ground and the speed at the time of the collision caused it to go into the ground, so we have to take our steps to go backwards and properly bring that back out,” Landers said.

According to flight tracking information, it appears the plane was traveling from a Washington, Iowa airport to Findlay, Ohio. Air traffic controllers in Toledo lost radar contact with the plane before it crashed due to still unknown circumstances.

According to information from the Federal Aviation Administration’s accident and incident notifications, there were three people on the plane when it crashed: the pilot and two passengers. All three died. The plane was registered to Orthopedic Aviation Services LLC out of Middletown, Delaware.

It’s unclear if the pilot made radio contact or a distress call before the crash. Landers said they hope media reports about the crash will help them identity details they have not been able to put together at the crash site. This is the first plane crash Landers has encountered as sheriff.

“I’m weighing heavily on people who know what they’re doing through federal agencies and the sheriff’s association. They have people who are trained to know how to investigate this. I’m not afraid to reach out for help,” he said.

The FAA arrived around 11 p.m. from Columbus. A representative from the National Transportation Safety Board out of Chicago was traveling to the scene Friday morning. The Paulding County Sheriff’s Department and firefighters secured the site and assisted with the investigation.

The Grover Hill Fire Department, Paulding County Coroner’s Office, and an Aviation Crash Investigation team with the Buckeye State Sheriff’s Association are all involved with the investigation.


Story, comments, video and photo:  http://wane.com

Wayne and Rosalee Weiss, Dr. Michael McCarty











NTSB Identification: CEN15FA040
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 06, 2014 in Grover Hill, OH
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N811CD
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 6, 2014, about 1800 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 airplane, N811CD, impacted a farm field near Grover Hill, Ohio, and a post impact fire occurred. The pilot, a pilot-rated passenger, and another passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed by the impact and subsequent fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Orthopedic Aviation Services LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed in the area of the accident. The flight operated on an activated IFR flight plan. The flight originated about 1545 from the Washington Municipal Airport (AWG), near Washington, Iowa, and was destined for the Findlay Airport (FDY), near Findlay, Ohio.

Preliminary flight service station information showed that the pilot requested a weather briefing and filed an IFR flight plan for a direct flight from AWG to FDY.

A fueling receipt from AWG showed that N811CD was serviced with 26.67 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline at 1519. The AWG airport manager indicated that he was at the airport at 1530 and he talked to three people who flew in N811CD. There were two men about 60 and a woman of the same age. He reported that they said they were flying east and would be back on Sunday as part of their return flight. Witnesses reported to the airport manager that they thought the woman was seated in the front right seat. The manager indicated that from 300 feet away, the airplane looked very clean. He was outside when they took off and the engine start-up sounded normal as did the engine run-up. The manager said that the takeoff was under full power and they climbed at a normal rate of climb.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the accident airplane communicated with the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) near Ft. Wayne, Indiana. About 1729, the pilot requested a climb to 10 or 11 thousand feet above mean seal level (MSL) because he was "picking up a little ice". The air traffic controller cleared him 10,000 feet MSL, and asked for more details. The pilot reported that windshield was picking up a little ice, and temperature was minus six degrees. About 1746, the pilot reported that the cloud tops were ragged between 9,500 and 10,300 feet MSL. About 1749, the pilot requested a lower altitude and the controller cleared him to 5,000 feet MSL. About 1751 pm the controller handed him off to Toledo TRACON.

About 1751, the pilot checks on with Toledo TRACON and indicated that he was on descent. The controller asked the pilot if he had current FDY weather. About 1725, the pilot reported that he has the current FDY weather and requested the RNAV [Area Navigation] Runway 25 approach to FDY. The controller advised the pilot to expect that RNAV approach. The last radio transmission from the airplane was received about 1754. The last transponder reply was at 1757, which indicated the airplane was at 5,100 feet MSL. That transponder reply showed the airplane was located to the south and east of the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137.

A witness was driving in her car eastbound on Route 60 and was approaching Town Road 117. This intersection was about three miles west of the accident site. She indicated that she was driving about 45 to 50 mph. It was dark at the time and "spit" rain was coming down. She said that she could see through the car's windshield. She stated that above woods just south of Route 60, she saw a light coming down slowly. She described it as a comet. The descent angle she physically gestured was about 35 to 45 degrees downward in the direction of the accident site. She said she saw the descending light for about two seconds. She subsequently saw an explosion, which was orange in color.

Another witness was in a house about a third of a mile northwest of the accident site. She indicated that a heavy wind or tornado sound is what got her attention. She also heard a sound she vocally described as "NEEEEER." She saw a reflection of light in a mirror. An explosion occurred when the NEEEEER sound stopped. She said that the conditions at that time were windy, dark, and rainy.

The 59-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. He had been issued a FAA third-class medical certificate on October 15, 2014, with a limitation that he must have available glasses for near vision. The pilot reported on the application for that medical certificate that he had accumulated 987 hours of total flight time and 150 hours of flight time in the six months prior to that application.

The last entry in the pilot's logbook was dated November 5, 2014. The pilot recorded that he had accumulated 1,000.3 hours of total flight time, 151.5 hours of flight time during night conditions, 127.8 hours of flight time in SR22 airplanes, and 19.3 hours of flight time in actual instrument conditions. A certified flight instructor's endorsement in the pilot's logbook showed that the pilot received a flight review on August 16, 2014.

N811CD, a 2001 model Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, serial number 0120, was a four-place single engine low-wing airplane powered by a six-cylinder, 310-horsepower, Teledyne Continental Motors model IO-550-N7B engine, with serial number 686224, that drove a three-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller.

At 1753, the recorded weather about 38 miles and 93 degrees from the accident site at FDY was: Wind 260 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 3 statute miles; present weather mist; sky condition overcast clouds at 600 feet; temperature 7 degrees C; dew point 6 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

The main sections of the airplane fuselage and empennage were found impacted and buried in soft terrain about 199 degrees and 907 feet from the intersection of Route 60 and Town Road 137. The airplane's resting heading was about 77 degrees. The airplane's airframe was found fragmented with its heavier components north of the main wreckage and its lighter components east of the main wreckage. The observed debris field of components extended about 124 feet north and about 187 feet east of the main wreckage. The propeller and propeller flange separated from its engine crankshaft and was found buried about four feet below the field. The propeller blades exhibited S-shaped bending and leading edge gouges. The engine was found deformed and buried about eight feet below the field. The no. five and no. six cylinders separated from their crankcase. Disassembly of the fuel pump showed its shear shaft separated in overload and it shaft was bent. The pump's vanes were intact and the pump rotated by hand freely about a quarter turn. The pump's mixture arm also rotated when moved by hand. Both magnetos sustained impact damage. One magneto produced spark when its impulse coupling was rotated by hand. Removed sparkplugs exhibited normal combustion discoloring and a "worn out, normal condition" when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Accessible cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope and no preimpact anomalies were detected during the borescope inspection. Disassembly of the oil pump revealed no debris or preimpact anomalies. Disassembly of the fuel manifold revealed that its seal surface facing its screen and valve exhibited deterioration and its seal surface facing its spring did not exhibit deterioration. Disassembly of the attitude indicator revealed rotational scoring on its rotor and cage. The rocket motor and parachute were found within subsurface empennage and fuselage fragments in the main wreckage area. The rocket motor was found with its propellant expended and it exhibited discoloration consistent with thermal damage. The parachute was found in a packed state and it exhibited deformation and discoloration consistent with thermal damage. Flight control cable and engine cable continuity was not established due to fragmentation and thermal damage. Airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. Both navigation light covers were found and green glass fragments were found under the navigation light cover on the south side of the main wreckage. The engine cowling was fragmented and it exhibited a crush line consistent with a right wing low impact. Both left and right ailerons and flaps were found resting on the ground in the debris field to the north of the main wreckage. The empennage to include the lower section of the rudder was found discolored and deformed consistent with thermal damage. The empennage was found under charred sections of the fuselage at the southwest side of the main wreckage. The upper section of the rudder was found resting on the ground in the debris to the north of the main wreckage. Separation surfaces on the upper and lower sections exhibited consistent sized and shaped tears and separations. The upper rudder section did not exhibit the same dark discoloration as the lower section did.

The Paulding County Coroner was asked to perform an autopsy on the pilots and take toxicological samples for testing at the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute.

The main wreckage exhibited charring, deformation, and discoloration consistent with a ground fire. Separated airframe components in the debris field exhibited localized discoloration and charring consistent with a post-impact ground fire. A witness reported the sound of an explosion consistent with a ground impact explosion.