Monday, October 17, 2011

FedEx package of drugs prompts arrest of Kingsport commercial pilot

A Kingsport pilot employed by US Airways has been arrested after allegedly receiving drugs illegally in a FedEx package.

Though an affidavit in Sullivan County court lists the suspect as working for the company, US Airways media relations personnel have declined to confirm or deny his employment. Meanwhile, a Federal Aviation Administration database lists a man by the same name as a certified airline transport and commercial pilot, while the suspect's Facebook page says he's an Airbus 330 captain.

The Sullivan County Sheriff's Office reports Christopher Alan Rumley, 60, of 5701 Cochise Trail, Kingsport, was arrested Wednesday afternoon and arraigned on Thursday. He has been charged with possession of schedule III drugs for resale and bonded out of the Sullivan County jail on Saturday.

An affidavit filed in Sullivan County court states an employee of FedEx, 2165 Highway 75, Blountville, called the Sheriff's Office on Wednesday. The employee advised he had obtained information that Rumley, "was receiving illegally diverted prescription medication through Fed-ex packages."

A search of the package, according to the affidavit, found it contained a jacket and a ziplock baggie, filled with 36 yellow pills. It was reportedly shipped from a freight and cargo company in Greensboro, N.C., with the affidavit naming an individual alleged to have sent it. The pills were later identified as hydrocodone.

The parcel was resealed when Rumley called to report he was coming to pick it up, while a Sullivan County officer responded to wait in the parking lot. When Rumley obtained his package and drove away a deputy conducted a traffic stop.

Police say the officer asked if the package contained pills. Rumley allegedly claimed it contained a jacket, which he had left a friend's house and they had shipped back to him. Consent to search the package was granted, according to police, with the jacket, pills and a note found inside.

The affidavit says the note reads, "you owe $120, I gave you 20 or 25 last time for $40. Don't worry about the fed ex bill just send some 'Tussipax.'"

Vice officers at both Sullivan County and Kingsport police report being unfamiliar with the drug. A web search indicates it's a tablet containing codeine, available over-the-counter in some European countries.

In an April column from Times-News columnist Trease Carpenter, Rumley claimed to fly the route from Charlotte, N.C., to Madrid, Spain. His Facebook page says he's originally from Greensboro, N.C., and captains flights to Western Europe.

Along with the drug charge Rumley was charged with a seatbelt violation in the traffic stop. He has a court date set for Nov. 29.

http://www.timesnews.net

Editorial: Jets - Point Mugu Naval Station, California.

Re: Leon Helfret’s Oct. 14 letter, “Military flights”:

Please do not consider closing our base. Yes, Camarillo has had flights over Santa Rosa Valley recently, but I must point out that this is the price of freedom! Point Mugu Naval Air Station existed long before any of the homes in the Mission Oaks area.

I used to go to Point Mugu with my mother to visit my brother in the hospital there when he returned from Vietnam in the 1960s. I have lived here in Camarillo since 1978 and at no time have I ever wished to close the base. The base protects us. Does Mr. Helfet want Al Qaeda attacking us? We need this base.

I do not think Mr. Helfet realizes that the pilots need to practice maneuvers to stay current. Yes, those jets are loud, but it is better than being dead. I will take the protection of those men and women who work at that base any day of the week rather than complain that some jet is loud. Bring on the jets!

- Denise Gartner Gamboa,

Editorial: Silencing jets - Point Mugu Naval Station, California.

Re: Leon Helfret’s Oct. 14 letter, “Military flights”:

I have been a resident on the Point Mugu Naval Station for four years. There have been many days and nights where the sounds of the planes have woken my babies from their naps, caused my dogs to bark uncontrollably or disrupted my concentration during an important study session.

Each time this happens, it is easy to look at it as a negative, but I see it differently. The sounds of these planes serves as a reminder that we are lucky enough to live in the United States of America and have a strong military that allows us the freedoms that we have each day.

Whats next? Will the sounds of an ambulance or police sirens be the next nuisance to the community that should be silenced as well? Next time you hear these planes fly overhead, please consider that these pilots are in training to keep you and the rest of this country safe.

- Amy Hammer,
Point Mugu

Scrapped aircraft parts theft: Air India staffers held, released on bail

NEW DELHI: Two Air India staffers, including an assistant manager were arrested for the theft of three tons of scrapped aircraft parts, on Saturday. The accused have been identified as Gyan Chand Garg and Kishan Kumar. However, the duo were released on interim bail on the same day.

"Garg is an assistant manager in the material management department while Kishan is a supervisor. They were granted interim bail on humanitarian grounds because of Karva Chauth on Saturday. However, on Monday, they were bailed out on a bond of Rs four lakh with instructions to assist the police in the probe. We are investigating the matter," said a senior police officer from IGI district.

Around 3000 kg of aircraft parts were found missing in June. An internal inquiry was initiated but when no headway could be made, airline officials contacted the police in September end. The stolen parts were worth one crore, said sources.

Cops have demanded relevant documents of last six months from the duo and have asked for their full co-operation during investigations. Earlier, police suspected the role of insiders in the theft.

"We are investigating how the goods - including more than 1600 engine parts - were stolen from AI's engine overhaul complex, a high security area. The multi-level checking should have stopped the items from being taken outside the complex. We are probing if a bigger racket was involved in the case," added the source.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Fake pilot stunt court case delayed

The six men charged after a made-for-TV airport stunt went wrong have had their case put off for a month while police consider whether granting diversion would be appropriate.

TV presenter Ben Boyce, The Rock host Bryce Casey, TV producer Andrew Robinson, Daniel Watkins, Craig O'Reilly and Gregory Clarke appeared in Manukau District Court this morning facing a single charge under the Civil Aviation Act of providing false information in an attempt to gain access to a secure area.

If convicted the men face up to 12 months in jail or a fine of up to $10,000.

Lawyer Paul Gruar, who represents four of the men, told Judge Charles Blackie he was seeking to remand the matter for consideration of diversion.

Judge Blackie said as the group had indicted they would plead not guilty, the case would have to come back for another hearing. He remanded the matter until November 15.

To get diversion, the men would need to admit to the charge.

All have pleaded not guilty, and will reappear in court next month.

The skit was to be shown on TV3 show WannaBen.

Boyce, the creator of the comedy show Wanna-Ben told ONE News: "It was meant to be a harmless skit. Obviously it escalated and as soon as we found out the police were investigating we got in touch with them. And we're sorry for all the trouble we've caused."

"This was an attempt at humour which we fully accept was misplaced.

"I cannot say how sorry we all are."

But the authorities did not see the funny side of the incident.

The stunt was widely condemned by the aviation industry which said, if convicted, the men could find it difficult to travel internationally.

Police issued a picture of the fake pilot before arresting the men.

Police say the man who donned the pilot's uniform is 32-year-old Bryce Casey, a radio jock on The Rock which is owned by the same company as TV3 - MediaWorks.

CCTV footage appears to show Casey entering Auckland Airport's domestic terminal where police say he tried to get airside before being turned away and leaving in a van.

Irene King of the Airline Industry Association said the incident could have led to people having their flights delayed.

"It could have ultimately resulted in some very intrusive screening of passengers on regional operations," she said.

Prime Minister John Key said the stunt, in the middle of the Rugby World Cup and close to the anniversary of the September 11 terror attacks, was "irresponsible from a bunch of clowns that should know better".

"We are in the middle of hosting a Rugby World Cup and if these are people who are just playing games, they need to grow up."

Each week, Wanna-Ben sees Boyce search for a new job.

The series currently receives nearly $600,000 in New Zealand on Air funding.

At the time of the incident, the agency's CEO told ONE News that the pilot prank is an editorial matter.

http://tvnz.co.nz

Fatal hot air balloon crash pair may have blacked out through lack of oxygen, says accident report

TWO hot air balloonists who died when they crashed on to a bowling green may have blacked out through a lack of oxygen, a report revealed yesterday.

Pilot Lee Pibworth, 42, and friend Allan Burnett, 55, reached a record 21,780ft on New Year’s Day but then radio contact was lost.

The balloon hit the ground, just missing houses, and burst into flames at Midsomer Norton, Somerset.

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch said they had oxygen equipment but may not have used it properly.

http://www.mirror.co.uk

Low-flying Plane Scanning Central Washington for Scientific Clues to Past, Future

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

Citizens and visitors should not be alarmed if they witness a low-flying aircraft scanning central Washington terrain during the fall.

Starting on Monday, Oct. 17, and lasting for about two months, a low-flying airplane under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey will begin collecting and recording geophysical measurements over central Washington for scientific research purposes. The plane will collect measurements from the areas surrounding and including the city of Wenatchee, Stevens Pass, parts of Chelan, Douglas, and Grant Counties, and the towns of Chelan and Entiat.

This scientific analysis is designed to remotely study geologic and hydrologic features that lie below the land surface. It is part of an ongoing USGS federal research program to identify physical occurrences such as changes in rock types. The program’s goal is to provide a better understanding of the geology and hydrology of the region via an aerial perspective.

The plane is operated by Firefly Aviation Ltd., of Calgary, Canada under contract to the USGS and is controlled by experienced pilots who are specially trained for low-level flying. Firefly Aviation is working with the Federal Aviation Administration to ensure flights are in accordance with U.S. law.

http://www.usgs.gov

Plane crashes at Myricks Airport (1M8) Berkley, Massachusetts.

Emergency crews on scene of a plane crash near Myricks Airport in Berkley, Massachusetts Monday, October 17, 2011.
Photo Credit: Steve Nielsen



BERKLEY, Mass. -- Berkley firefighters and first responders were on the scene of a small plane crash at the Myricks Airport in Berkley.

The plane crashed on the tree line and was upside down. It is not known if the plane was attempting to land or if it had just taken off.

A medical helicopter was on the scene and one person was loaded into an ambulance. Injuries are unknown at this time.

BERKLEY - Authorities say a small plane has crashed in Berkley and one person has been taken by medical helicopter to Boston for treatment.

A Berkley fire department dispatcher says additional information was not immediately available because emergency officials were still at the crash scene early Monday evening.

She said the plane crashed at the Myricks airfield at about 5:15 p.m.

Television footage showed a single-engine plane that had apparently crashed into some trees at the private airfield before flipping on its nose, leaving its tail leaning against the trees. Firefighters and police officers were seen standing around the aircraft.

A medical helicopter took one person to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston for treatment.

Plane Diverted To KJAX For Engine Problems: 2nd Plane To Make Emergency Landing In Jacksonville Since Friday. Jacksonville International Airport, Florida.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- An American Airlines flight traveling from Detroit to Miami was diverted to Jacksonville late Monday afternoon.

The plane made an emergency landing at Jacksonville International Airport just after 5 p.m.

There were 149 people on board flight 1011.

Officials said the plane was diverted because an engine was going out.

A Delta plane traveling from Tampa to Detroit was diverted to Jacksonville on Friday for the same reason.

Cherry Point sets up claims center for Havelock Chili Festival incident

A temporary telephone information line will also be available to people seeking claims-related information at (252) 466-4241 beginning Tuesday, October 18th, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. until further notice.

Cherry Point is setting up a claims center after a Marine Corps helicopter’s take-off Saturday at the Havelock Chili Festival blew down tents, damaged merchandise and sent four people to the hospital.

Those four people reportedly have been released, with one woman suffering a broken leg and shoulder. One man was knocked unconscious during the incident in which wind created by the helicopter’s rotors sent various items flying across the festival area.

The claims center will be for anyone who may have had property damage or was injured during the incident. The center will open from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday at the Havelock Tourist and Event Center.

Afterward, claims may be filed from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Cherry Point’s Joint Law Center on 2nd Avenue.

Also, a temporary phone information line has been set up at 466-4241 and will operate from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cherry Point officials are investigating the incident in which Marine Corps rescue helicopter Pedro took off Saturday afternoon for its return to the base after it was on static display during the festival.

First Lt. Megan Greathouse, media officer at Cherry Point, said there is no timetable on how long the investigation will take.

“These investigations can take a long time,” she said. “It is not possible to estimate the time as all investigations vary in length, depending on the amount of information being sought and how many witnesses are available to provide information.”

Greathouse said the investigation is a formal process.

“An investigator who is knowledgeable about the type of aircraft involved and the procedures for use of that aircraft will question anyone and everyone who can provide information about the incident,” she said. “He will likely talk to anyone who can shed light on the events.”

She said the names of the pilot and the crew of the helicopter were not being released.

A Cherry Point Pedro rescue helicopter was on static display the previous weekend at the Mumfest in New Bern and has been a regular feature at a number of festivals and events in the area, including Military Family Appreciation Day in Havelock. That event is held at the same location as the Chili Festival. Greathouse said there have not been any similar incidents at any of those events.

The Cherry Point-based HH-46 Pedro helicopter had been on static display throughout Saturday at the festival near the Havelock Police Department and took off about 3:45 p.m., flying over part of the festival grounds at Walter B. Jones Park.

The wind created from the turning rotors overturned vendor tents and sent papers, tables, chairs and merchandise flying through the air as the helicopter lifted off.

Havelock rescue personnel transported four people to CarolinaEast Medical Center in New Bern for treatment. There were also others with minor injuries such as scrapes and bruises.

Many rescue personnel were already at the festival, and others were at the nearby fire station and quickly attended to those with injuries.

When the helicopter landed around 9:30 a.m. Saturday at the start of the festival, it first circled the area and came in from the direction of Cunningham Boulevard, away from the festival grounds. It landed near the Havelock Police Department facing toward the festival area, and the wind from the rotors did not cause a problem.

When the helicopter took off near the end of the festival, the pilot headed in the direction it was facing, which was right over the festival grounds.

The helicopter took off just as the band The Yams was playing its last song and just before the awards ceremony was about to begin.

http://www.havenews.com

Brinkerhuff Q-200, N2935R: Fatal acident occurred October 06, 2011 in Holland, Michigan

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2935R 

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA010
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 06, 2011 in Holland, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/05/2013
Aircraft: BRINKERHUFF GERALD G Q200, registration: N2935R
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing the airplane when it contacted a 14-foot 8-inch tall approach light stanchion that was located about 460 feet from the approach end of the runway. The airplane crashed and came to rest inverted. Witnesses reported that the airplane appeared to be operating normally as the pilot performed touch-and-go landings before the accident. Another witness reported the airplane was low as it approached the runway on the final approach. The pilot had about 2 hours of flight time in the newly built tandem wing airplane. A postaccident examination of the airplane and engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The examination found the throttle in the retarded position and noted that its location required the pilot to reach his left hand across his body to control it while his right hand was on the control stick. According to sun and moon data for the day of the accident, the landing approach would have been in the direction of the setting sun, which likely would have obscured the pilot’s vision as he approached the runway, making it difficult to judge the airplane’s height above the ground and clearance from the approach lights.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot failed to maintain sufficient altitude during the landing approach, which resulted in the airplane contacting an approach light. Contributing to the accident was the setting sun, which most likely obscured the pilot’s vision.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 6, 2011, at 1835 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Brinkerhuff Q-200, N2935R, collided with an approach light and the terrain while landing at the Tulip City Airport (BIV), Holland, Michigan. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions without a flight plan. The pilot was performing touch and go landings at BIV and was then intending to fly to Padgham Airport (35D), Allegan, Michigan.

The airplane was making a landing approach to runway 26 when it contacted an approach light stanchion. The airplane then contacted the ground and came to rest inverted in the grass approximately 134 feet prior to the approach end of the runway.

Two pilots, located on the airport, reported seeing the airplane performing touch and go landings prior to the accident. They stated the airplane and engine appeared and sounded normal. These witnesses reported that the landings appeared to be “picture perfect.” These pilots did not see the accident occur as they became preoccupied with getting their airplane ready for a flight. Another witness on a road that bordered the airport reported seeing the airplane as it approached the airport. This witness reported the airplane's landing approach appeared to be low.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine landing rating issued December 17, 1969, and a mechanic certificate with an airframe and powerplant rating issued December 16, 1970. The pilot was issued a third-class airman medical certificate on July 20, 2011. The medical certificate contained a limitation that glasses must be available for near vision. 

A logbook for the pilot obtained during the investigation was marked as logbook number 2. This logbook contained entries dated between January 26, 1973 and September 6, 2011. There were large gaps in the dates between entries. The last total time, 438.7 hours, was noted on June 17, 2007. The next entry, which was also the last entry, did not have the pilot’s total flight time associated with it. This last entry was the only one in the accident airplane and the duration of that flight was listed as 0.3 hours. The logbooks showed that with the exception of the last entry, all of the pilot’s flight time was in airplanes with a single wing arrangement. A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot had about 2 hours of flight time in the accident airplane. The pilot reported having 472 hours of total flight time on his application for his medical certificate. 

The pilot was a member of the Marshall Soaring Club. On August 21, 2011, he was the pilot of a glider that was being towed when the tow plane was involved in a fatal accident (CEN11LA585). At that time, he reported having 472 hours of total flight time. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was an amateur-built Brinkerhuff Q-200, serial number 2036, which was built by the pilot from an incomplete kit and other parts. It was a two-seat composite airplane with tandem wings. The forward wing contained the elevators which provided both lift and pitch control. The ailerons were mounted on the inboard section of the aft wing. Pitch and roll were controlled by a stick mounted on the floor between the seats. The rudder was mounted on the tail of the airplane and was controlled with conventional rudder pedals. The airplane was equipped with conventional landing gear with the main gear mounted on the tips of the canard. 

The airplane was issued a Special Airworthiness Certificate and operating limitations on July 8, 2011. The airplane was operating in Phase 1 of the Experimental Operation Limitation, which stated that for the first 40 hours of flight time, the airplane must be operated within a 25 mile radius of Padgham Field (35D), Allegan, Michigan. The recording hour (Hobbs) meter showed a time of 6.9 hours. 

The airplane was equipped with a Continental O-200-A engine, serial number 61076-5-A. 

Records indicate the airplane was fueled with 5 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel on August 2, 2011. 

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Weather conditions recorded by the BIV Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), recorded at 1853, were: calm wind, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 22 degrees Celsius, dew point 9 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.25 inches of mercury.

Sun and moon data obtained by the U.S. Naval Observatory for the date and time of the accident indicate sunset was at 1918. At 1840, the sun was 6.1 degrees above the horizon on an azimuth of 257.2 degrees.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane contacted the left arm of a 14-foot 8-inch tall T-shaped stanchion that was part of the medium intensity approach light system (MALSR). The light stanchion was located about 460 feet from the approach end of the runway. The horizontal arm at the top of the vertical pole contained five lights. The distance between the lights was approximately 2-feet 5-inches. The center light and the two lights to the left of center were knocked off. The pole and mounting arm were painted orange. White paint transfer was visible on the horizontal bar where the lights were mounted and on the diagonal brace that ran from the tip of the horizontal bar down to the vertical pole. The distance between the light pole that was contacted and the next light pole (closest to runway) was 210 feet.

The first pieces of wreckage along the wreckage path were from the elevator trim tab. These pieces were located about 34 feet west of the light stanchion. The first ground impact was 190 feet west of the light stanchion. There was a 10 inch long slash mark in the terrain along with pieces of the propeller near the beginning of the 10 foot long impact mark. Pieces of Plexiglas were also found throughout the main impact mark. The distance from the main impact mark to the main wreckage was 105 feet. The airplane came to rest inverted on a heading of 194 degrees. 

There were three punctures on the bottom of the left forward wing. The distances between the marks were 2 feet 6 inches and 2 feet 4 inches. Orange paint transfer was visible on the forward wing and on the front of the landing gear cover. The left elevator remained attached at the inboard attach point. Impact damage was visible on the elevator which correlated with the locations of the punctures on the bottom of the forward wing. The wooden trim tab was broken off and was located near the light stanchion. The right forward wing and elevator remained intact. 

The left aft wing was broken about 2 feet 6 inches from the fuselage. The aileron remained attached at the inboard attach point. The empennage was separated from the fuselage in front of the vertical stabilizer with the control cables intact. The tailwheel remained attached to the empennage. The fuselage was cracked just aft of the wing. 

Aileron, elevator and rudder flight control continuity was established. The left elevator control rod that was connected to the bottom of the control stick was longer than the right elevator control rod. The left torque rod lever contacted the top of the fuel tank when the control stick was pulled to the aft position preventing the stick from contacting the aft control stop. A notch had been filed in the top of the fuel tank which would have increased the aft travel of the control stick. The throttle was found in the retarded position.

Both propeller blades were separated. Pieces of one blade were found along the wreckage path. The separated piece of the other blade was found lodged in the fuselage.

No fuel was present in the airplane’s fuel tank; however, there was a strong odor of fuel at the accident site and blight was noted on the vegetation near the airplane. 

The battery cables were separated from the battery. The cables were pushed in place and an attempt was made to start the engine; however, the starter would not engage due to impact damage. The oil filter mount was loose due to impact damage. Five quarts of oil were indicated on the oil dip stick. The propeller hub cone was not installed on the airplane at the time of the accident. The hub was located inside the pilot’s hangar. The engine was equipped with an electronic ignition system that ignited the top automotive spark plugs. A magneto was installed to ignite the bottom aviation spark plugs. The propeller turned freely by hand. The bottom plugs were removed, the propeller was rotated and compression and suction was noted on all cylinders. The magneto also sparked at the ignition coils for the bottom plugs when the propeller was rotated by hand. The valve continuity was established. Borescope examination of the pistons and cylinders revealed normal operational signatures. The spark plugs appeared relatively new and in good condition. The throttle cable remained connected to the carburetor. The mixture control cable was connected at the carburetor, however it would not move when the cockpit mixture control was moved as it was jammed up against the oil tank which sustained impact damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot at Sparrow Health Systems, Lansing, Michigan. The cause of death was attributed to multiple injuries sustained in the accident. 

Toxicology testing for the pilot was performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. The test results were negative for all substances in the screening profile.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The airplane was equipped with a mini-cockpit camera. The camera was sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for review. The data for the camera is stored on a microSD card which was not in the camera. Therefore, no recorded data was retrieved from the camera. 

A friend of the pilot provided the following information. The pilot moved the airplane to BIV on July 19, 2011, because he wanted a longer runway for the airplane’s initial test flights. The first flight was on September 6, 2011. Following this flight, the pilot determined he needed to make adjustments to the pitch and lateral control of the airplane. It was determined that the pilot had used the wrong template to set the pitch control limits and that trim tabs needed to be added to the elevators. The pilot subsequently removed the elevators, added the trim tabs, and adjusted the elevator torque rods. The adjustments made when installing the torque rods provided for a 1/4 inch clearance between the torque rod lever arms and the fuel tank. The pilot’s friend stated that when he left the pilot on the day prior to the accident, the pilot indicated that he would take care of the remaining items which consisted of reattaching the elevator trim control wheel, connecting the airbrake control cable to the airbrake, and replacing the interior trim. 

A local pilot who was also an airframe and powerplant mechanic spoke with the accident pilot on the day of the accident. He stated the pilot showed him how the elevator control was contacting the fuel tank prior to the control stop. 

The throttle in the airplane was located at the bottom center of the instrument panel directly above the control stick. When throttle and control stick application are simultaneously required, the pilot had to reach across to the center of the cockpit with his left hand to control the throttle while the right hand is on the control stick. Quickie Aircraft Corporation plans for building the Q-2/Q-200 state, “It is further recommended that the throttle be located on the left sub panel.” The pilot’s friend stated that he voiced his concerns regarding the throttle position to the pilot.

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA010
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 06, 2011 in Holland, MI
Aircraft: BRINKERHUFF GERALD G Q200, registration: N2935R
Injuries: 1 Fatal. 

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.
 
On October 6, 2011, at 1835 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Brinkerhuff Q-200, N2935R, collided with an approach light and the terrain while landing at the Tulip City Airport (BIV), Holland, Michigan. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions without a flight plan.

Two witnesses, located on the airport, reported seeing the airplane performing touch and go landings prior to the accident. They stated the airplane and engine appeared and sounded normal. Another witness on a road that bordered the airport reported seeing the airplane as it approached the airport. This witness reported the airplane's landing approach appeared to be low.

The airplane was making a landing approach to runway 26 when it contacted the horizontal light mounting beam on top of a medium intensity approach light system (MALSR) pole. The 14-foot 8-inch tall light stanchion that was contacted was the second one from the approach end of the runway. The airplane then contacted the ground and came to rest inverted in the grass approximately 134 feet prior to the approach end of the runway.

Top 2 executives at Piper Aircraft released, Altaire jet program being reviewed

VERO BEACH — Piper Aircraft Inc.'s Altaire business jet program is "under review" and two of the company's top executives have been released.

Piper spokeswoman Jackie Carlon on Monday morning said there have been no layoffs and construction of the jet's manufacturing building is still ongoing.

The company said in a release that it will announce the conclusion of the review to employees and the industry as soon as possible.

In July, the company said almost 200 engineers and workers had been assigned to the development of the new single-engine business jet. The total workforce at the time was about 840 people.

At one time, Piper said it had about 160 advance orders for the new jet, which it redesigned and renamed the Altaire to much fanfare last October. The company traveled to various events throughout the United States with a mock-up of the model during the past year.

Piper was seen by some industry observers to have a leg up on the competition because of the investment being made into the program by its parent company, Imprimis. The corporate financial and investment management firm, in conjunction with the Ministry of Finance of Brunei, acquired Piper in 2009.

Carlon said the review is to determine whether the company should proceed with the business jet based on current and forecast market conditions.

President and Chief Executive Officer Geoffrey Berger and Executive Vice President Randy Groom are no longer with the company. Groom joined Piper as executive vice president in June 2010, while Berger joined the company as chief executive officer in July 2010.

Simon Caldecott, vice president of operations, has been named interim president and chief executive officer. Caldecott was named vice president of operations for Piper in November 2010.

In a prepared statement, Caldecott, said "While the company continues to achieve internal financial and delivery targets for the existing turboprop and piston product lines, we have initiated a review of the Altaire business jet development program. This is being undertaken to ensure the company is properly aligning business goals and light jet market forecasts with investment strategies and economic forecasts."

The construction of the PiperJet and the jobs it would produce was a selling point that company supporters used in obtaining government incentives to keep the company in Vero Beach. The county and state came up with a $32 million incentive package to keep the company, successfully competing with several other communities that were trying to lure the company away. The package called for providing $12 million in county money and $20 million from the state if the company met certain benchmarks in investments and employment.

The company used about $4 million of incentive money from the county and $6.7 million from the state in 2008, combining that with its own money to make various capital improvements and repairs to its buildings. The company has not met the numbers needed for additional payments and could have to repay one-seventh of the money it received from the county if it fails to meet certain benchmarks by the end of the year.

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

http://www.tcpalm.com

Police: Plane that crash-landed in Williamsburg lost power

A man and woman in a small plane were unharmed when it crash-landed this morning at a parking area on Richmond Road.

The crash was reported about 11 a.m. at the High Street Garage in the 1400 block of Richmond Road, according to Sgt. Michelle Anaya, Virginia State Police spokeswoman.

The single-engine plane was having engine problems when the pilot saw an open field and planned to land there, said Eric Stone, spokesman for the Williamsburg Fire Department. One of the plane's wings clipped the parking garage as it tried to land, then the aircraft ended up in a parking lot behind a strip shopping center.

Virginia State Police said the 1973 Cessna lost power. The pilot, Hans Kopper, 81, of Williamsburg, and his passenger each escaped without injury and no one on the ground was injured.

The plane was heavily damaged, Stone said.

Virginia State Police were still on the scene investigating about 1 p.m.

Pilot writer Lauren King contributed to this story.

Rick Huseman Glen Helen Interview. Beechcraft Bonanza E33, N7011N. Aircraft crashed in desert terrain, the 3 persons on board were fatally injured, 5 miles from Daggett, California.

by OFFROADEXIT on Oct 16, 2011

Live on Dirt Interviews Rick Huseman at the 2011 Glen Helen August Lucas Oil Offroad Race. Tragically Huseman was killed on October 16th 2011 in a plane crash along with his brother Jeff and friend Danny.
Rick Huseman 1973-2011.

Finding into pilot's death due today

Nick Cree, 32, a flight commander at the central training school in Ohakea, died when he crashed near the Raumai weapons range.

The findings of an inquiry into an air force training crash that killed Squadron Leader Nick Cree will be released this afternoon.

The New Zealand Defence Force is releasing the Court of Inquiry findings into the January 2010 crash.

Cree, 32, a flight commander at the central training school in Ohakea, died when he crashed near the Raumai weapons range, west of Bulls, on a training flight for the air force's elite aerobatics team the Red Checkers.

He was survived by a wife and young son.

Cree was practising manoeuvres for the Red Checkers, but at the time was said to be trying one of the safer moves performed by the squad.

The five-plane team of experienced pilots routinely fly in formation just one metre apart but were practising moves separately at the time.

Cree was described by his family as an excellent sportsman, who had completed two Ironman competitions, as well as a skilled pilot and a family man.

The Red Checkers were grounded after the crash while investigations were carried out.

Beechcraft E33 Bonanza, Fly Corona (Owner - West Island LLC), N7011N: Accident occurred October 16, 2011 in Daggett, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N7011N

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA012
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2011 in Daggett, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/30/2013
Aircraft: BEECH E33, registration: N7011N
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While in cruise flight, the pilot transmitted that he was in trouble and thought the airplane had experienced a propeller failure. The air traffic controller provided the pilot with instructions to the nearest airport, which was about 21 miles away. The pilot radioed that he thought that he could make it and began a descent toward the airport. A witness near the accident site observed the airplane flying in a southwesterly direction about 500 feet above ground level. As the airplane approached a set of suspended power lines, it pitched up 15 degrees, increased altitude by 100 to 200 feet, yawed to the right, made two 360-degree rotations descending vertically, and impacted terrain, consistent with an aerodynamic stall/spin.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed a 2-inch hole in the top of the crankcase between the Nos. 3 and 4 cylinders. The No. 1 piston connecting rod had separated from the crankshaft, bending the end cap flat with no thermal discoloration evident. Laboratory examination of the bearing insert half identified circumferential wear marks on the back side of the bearing insert. The wear marks on the backside of the intact insert, the lack of heat damage to the connecting rod journal, and the lack of heat damage to the connecting rod and end cap suggest that the bearing began to spin, which led to extrusion/ejection of half of the connecting rod bearing. Once the bearing was free, fragments of bearing material worked their way up between the piston and the cylinder wall causing damage to and embedding in the piston skirt. The increased clearances between the connecting rod end cap and connecting rod journal caused large stress amplitudes that resulted in a fatigue fracture of the connecting rod bolts.

In 1998, after 1,002 hours of operation, the engine was top overhauled. A top overhaul does not inspect or replace items inside the crankcase, such as the main bearings or connecting rod bearings. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 2,601 hours. The engine manufacturer recommends that the time between overhaul be 1,500 hours or every 12 years.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A loss of engine power due to the separation of a connecting rod, and the pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during a sudden maneuver to avoid power lines during the descent, which resulted in an unrecoverable aerodynamic stall and subsequent spin. Contributing to the accident was noncompliance with the manufacturer-recommended engine overhaul schedule.

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On October 16, 2011, at 1256 Pacific standard time, a Beech E33, N7011N, reported experiencing a loss of engine power, and subsequently impacted terrain during the forced landing 9 miles northeast of the Daggett-Barstow Airport, Daggett, California. The airplane was operated by Fly Corona! as a rental airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The pilot, who had rented the airplane, sustained fatal injuries along with the two passengers. The airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated from North Las Vegas Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, about 1200, with a planned destination of Corona, California.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provided a video file containing the radar track of the airplane and associated radio communications. A review of the video file revealed that the pilot checked in with Los Angeles Center at 1253:02, stating that he was level at 8,500 feet mean sea level (msl). At 1253:30, the pilot radioed that he was in trouble, and that he thought the airplane had experienced a propeller failure. At 1253:47, Los Angeles Center radioed to the pilot that the Daggett Airport was at his 1 o’clock at 15 miles. Although the controller stated that the airport was 15 miles away, the radar track plot shows that the airport was 21 miles away at the this time. The pilot said that he thought he could make it to Daggett. Between 1254 and 1256, the pilot and Los Angeles Center exchanged information regarding the number of people on board, fuel state, and airplane color. During this time the airplane continued on a southwesterly course, stabilizing at 105 knots ground speed, and descending from 7,900 feet to 5,400 feet msl. Los Angeles Center continued to call traffic that was ahead about 2 miles, and about 1,000 feet below the airplane; however, the pilot never reported positive visual contact with the traffic. At 1256:29, the final radar return was recorded traveling at a ground speed of 105 knots, at 4,800 feet msl, approximately 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), and 13.7 miles from Daggett. The final radio transmission by the pilot was made at 1257:03, where he stated that he was still watching for the traffic that Los Angeles Center had identified ahead of him.

A US Army helicopter pilot in the area at the time of the accident, reported that he heard the pilot state on the Daggett-Barstow airport radio frequency that he had an engine problem, and was 10 miles north of Barstow-Daggett Airport. He then observed the airplane flying on a southwesterly course about 500 feet agl as it approached a series of power lines. The airplane then pitched up 15 degrees, yawed to the right, and made two 360-degree rotations while in a vertical descent before the impacting terrain. There was no post impact fire.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 35, held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land rating issued June 26, 2011, and a third-class medical certificate issued on October 13, 2010, with no limitations. The pilot’s logbook was recovered and examined. His total flight time as of the last logbook entry on September 25, 2011, was 94.4 hours, which included 21 hours in the make and model of the accident airplane. The pilot’s most recent flight review was his FAA private pilot check ride on June 25, 2011.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The four seat, low wing, retractable landing gear airplane, serial number CD-1123, was manufactured in 1967. It was powered by a remanufactured Teledyne Continental Motors IO-470K3, 225-hp engine, installed on March 19, 1992. The airplane was equipped with a McCauley model 3A36C343 constant speed propeller, which was installed on June 16, 1998. A review of copies of the maintenance records showed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on July 27, 2011, at a total airframe time of 5,468 hours. The engine was last serviced on October 4, 2011, at an engine total time of 2,581.89 hours, with Aero Shell 100 oil.

The engine logbook documented that on February 27, 1998, at 1,002.72 hours total time, a top overhaul was completed. The work order for the top overhaul listed the parts that were replaced which included; valve guides, exhaust valve, seals, hose, shaft, gasket set, ring set, clamps, bolds, nuts, gaskets, grade 80/SAE 40 aviation mineral oil, and the overhaul of 6 cylinders. Not included in the parts list were the main bearings or connecting rod bearings. Advisory Circular 43-11 Reciprocating Engine Overhaul Terminology and Standards, defines a Top Overhaul as follows: “Top overhaul consists of repair to parts outside of the crankcase, and can be accomplished without completely disassembling the entire engine. It can include the removal of cylinders, inspection and repair to cylinders, inspection and repair to cylinder walls, pistons, valve-operation mechanisms, valve guides, valve seats, and the replacement of piston and piston rings. All manufacturers do not recommend a top overhaul. Some manufacturers indicate that a powerplant requiring work to this extent should receive a complete overhaul.” On July 1, 2010, trace amounts of metal were found in the oil filter. The engine logbook indicates that the subsequent eight oil filter inspections did not reveal any metal in the filter elements. The total time on the engine at the time of the accident was 2,601.76 hours; time since the top overhaul was 1,599.04 hours.

Teledyne Continental Motors Service Information Letter SIL98-9A states that the time between overhaul (TBO) for the IO-470 series engines is 1,500 hours or every 12 years.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT

The wreckage was located in a shallow dry desert gully, resting on a 30-degree slope. Witness marks on the slope the same length of the wing indicated about 30-degree angle of bank to the left at the moment of ground impact. The propeller had separated from the engine and was located 15 feet up hill above the main wreckage. The propeller blades were not deformed, and each blade shank was in its proper location relative to the propeller hub. The blades exhibited some light erratic scratches. The engine, firewall, and cockpit floor decking had been pushed up and back into the cockpit and cabin space. The wings exhibited leading edge crushing and hydraulic deformation along the entire length of each wing; the fuel cells had been breached and no fuel was identified within either wing fuel cell. The landing gear main mounts were extended. The ailerons on both wings were attached, the flaps were extended, with both flap actuators exhibiting about 6 inches of extension. The aft section of fuselage and tail were intact with the rudder attached to the vertical stabilizer and the elevators attached to the horizontal stabilizer. Aileron, elevator, and rudder control continuity was established by tracing the control cables from their respective bell cranks to the cockpit. The left side of belly of the airplane exhibited a uniform coating of oil and dirt along its entire length.

Examination of the engine revealed a 2-inch hole in the top of the crank case between the number 3 and 4 cylinders. Metal flakes were identified in the folds of the oil filter, and metal flakes were observed distributed on the interior surface of the oil sump. The number 1 piston connecting rod was not attached to the crankshaft; the end cap was bent flat, and was not discolored. The number 4 and 6 connecting rods had separated from the crank shaft and exhibited black discoloration consistent with extreme thermal stress. The number 5 connecting rod was attached to the crankshaft with its end cap attach bolts in place, however, it was discolored brownish-black, and the bearing had deformed, extruding from between the crankshaft and connecting rod yoke. The number 2 connecting rod was attached to the crankshaft and had dark discolorations. Mechanical damage to the interior of the engine case was evident with the most damage observed by the numbers 1, 2, and 4 cylinders.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on October 20, 2011, by the San Bernardino County Medical Examiner, San Bernardino, California.

The FAA’s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) performed the toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The report indicates that the specimens had experienced putrefaction. No carbon monoxide or listed drugs were detected in the blood samples. The following concentrations of ethanol were detected; 144 mg/dl in muscle, 40 mg/dl in heart, and 20 mg/dl in vitreous. Additionally, 44 mg/dl of n-butanol was detected in muscle, and 1 mg/dl of n-propoanol was detected in vitreous. Toxicological review determined that the ethanol detected by CAMI toxicology was most likely from sources other than ingestion.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

NTSB Material Laboratory Examination of Engine Components

The components that were examined by the lab consisted of the number 1 piston assembly (part no. 649044), piston pin, connecting rod (part no. 646126-B), fragment of the number 1 connecting rod yoke, number 1 connection rod end cap with bolt fragment, one connecting rod bearing shell, and one bolt fragment (part no. 629340). The yoke and the end cap each have a slot to accommodate an anti-rotation tang located on each bearing shell. When the connecting rod is assembled, these slots face one another. For convenience, the side of the yoke and end cap with the slot was referred to as the slot side and the side without the slot was referred to as the plain side. The bolts that attached the end cap to the yoke were fractured approximately midway along their length. The fractured ends were mechanically damaged and had no identifiable fracture features. The threaded bolt ends, along with their respective nuts, were missing, as was one of the connecting rod bearing shells.

The piston skirt exhibited a matte grey appearance in some regions, below the pin boss, and a brown tinting in other regions. The underside of the piston exhibited multiple nicks and divots around both pin bosses and the adjacent skirt. The piston was fractured along a 45° spiral path starting at the bottom of the skirt and progressing around and toward the top of the skirt. A lip was observed along the edge of the fracture surface, consistent with an overstress fracture.

The matte grey areas on the piston skirt were examined using an optical microscope. Multiple depressions and scratches were seen on the surface as were multiple embedded third-body particles. This part of the skirt was sectioned from the rest of the piston and examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A backscatter image of the region shows bright regions that are embedded third-body particles and the dark regions are the aluminum piston. Multiple embedded particles were detected. One of the third-body particles was examined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The particle was composed primarily of copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn), consistent with the materials used to manufacture the connecting rod bearings.

The end cap was flattened and mechanically damaged. A bolt fragment on the plain side of the end cap was trapped in the bolt hole. The bolt on the slot side had separated from the end cap. On the slot side, the end cap bolt hole outer strap was split apart. The bearing surface on the end cap (the backing surface for the bearing insert) had a shiny appearance and exhibited circumferential wear lines that were consistent with burnishing of the surface.

One fragment of the yoke had fractured from the connecting rod. The fracture surface had a rough appearance, consistent with an overstress fracture. The bearing surface on the yoke has a burnished appearance, similar to the end cap. The material around the bolt hole was mechanically damaged except for the material around the outer strap, which had a burnished appearance.

The connecting rod bearing shell was visually examined. The tang was fractured from the bearing, but the fracture surface had no interpretable features. On the inside of the shell, the Babbitt was worn through exposing the copper under layer at the edges. In the center of the bearing surface, Babbitt material was still present. The backside of the shell had a shiny appearance and exhibited circumferential wear lines consistent with burnishing of the surface.


The entire Materials Laboratory Factual Report is located in the official docket of this investigation.


 NTSB Identification: WPR12FA012 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2011 in Daggett, CA
Aircraft: BEECH E33, registration: N7011N
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


 
On October 16, 2011, at 1256 Pacific daylight time, the pilot of a Beech E33, N7011N, reported experiencing a loss of engine power and the airplane subsequently impacted terrain during the forced landing nine miles northeast of the Daggett-Barstow Airport, Daggett, California. The airplane was operated by Fly Corona! as a rental airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot who had rented the airplane and his two passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from North Las Vegas, Nevada, about 1200.

A US Army helicopter pilot in the area at the time of the accident reported that he heard the pilot state on the Daggett-Barstow airport radio frequency that he had an engine problem and was 10 miles north of Barstow-Daggett airport. He then observed the airplane flying on a southwesterly course about 500 feet above ground level (agl) as it approached a series of power lines. The airplane then pitched up 15 degrees, yawed to the right, and made two 360-degree rotations while in a vertical descent before the airplane impacted terrain. There was no post impact fire.

Examination of the engine revealed a 2-inch hole in the top of the crank case between the number 3 and 4 cylinders. Metal flakes were identified in the folds of the oil filter, and metal flakes were observed distributed on the interior surface of the oil sump. The number 1 piston connecting rod was not attached to the crankshaft and the end cap was bent flat. The connecting rod and end cap were not discolored. The number 4 and 6 connecting rods had separated from the crank shaft and exhibited black discoloration consistent with extreme thermal stress. The number 5 connecting rod was attached to the crankshaft with its end cap attach bolts in place, however, it was discolored brownish-black. The bearing had extruded and deformed between the crankshaft and connecting rod yoke. The number 2 connecting rod was attached to the crankshaft and had dark discolorations. Mechanical damage to the interior of the engine case was evident with the most damage observed by the numbers 1, 2, and 4 cylinders.

Authorities in Southern California say three Riverside men died when their small plane crashed in San Bernardino County. 



BARSTOW, Calif. (AP) — Off-road racing fans are mourning the death of champion Rick Huseman and two others killed in a Southern California desert plane crash.

Toyota confirms Monday that the 38-year-old Huseman, his brother, Jeff, and a pilot died in Sunday's crash in San Bernardino County.

Coroner's officials said earlier that three Riverside men, ages 26, 35 and 38, died but that their names were being withheld pending official confirmation.

Huseman was a member of Toyota's off-road racing program. He won the 2010 Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series Pro-4 championship.

Authorities say a Beech 33 Bonanza was flying from North Las Vegas, Nev., to Corona when the pilot declared an emergency Sunday afternoon. The plane was heading to Barstow-Daggett Airport to land when it went down in Newberry Springs.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Wyoming commercial air traffic rises slightly

October 17, 2011 --
Commercial air traffic in Wyoming during the first eight months of 2011 increased slightly, 1.3 percent, from 2010 during the same period. Cheyenne Regional Airport showed the biggest gains in total passengers (enplaning and deplaning) at 31,414 for the first eight months, 71.1 percent over last year.

Officials attributed the dramatic rise to American Eagle’s daily flight between Cheyenne and Dallas-Fort Worth. Passenger use of the regional jet service appears to be increasing. The airline started out with two round-trip flights, but cut service back to one daily trip. The service is heavily subsidized by local interests in Cheyenne.

Overall, Wyoming’s 10 commercial airports saw 726,111 passengers through August, according to figures provided by Amber Schlabs at the State Aeronautics Division office in Cheyenne.

Jackson Hole Airport experienced nearly a 3 percent decline compared to last year. The airport still saw 424,447 passengers boarding and arriving. Airlines using Jackson take advantage of subsidies offered by the community. The Sheridan County Airport dropped 7.7 percent with 17,980 passengers. Sheridan competes with Billings for airline passengers, as do some other Wyoming airports

The Rock Springs-Sweetwater County Airport experienced a generous gain of 25.3 percent, with 35,939 passengers in and out. The airport enjoys service to Denver and Salt Lake City, plus a flight from Gillette to Rock Springs to Salt Lake City.

The Gillette-Campbell County Airport showed a healthy 15.7 percent increase over last year with a 41,203 passenger total. The Casper-Natrona County Airport experienced a slight decrease of 1.5 percent through August, with a total to date of 106,576 passengers.

Worland Municipal Airport saw a 12.1 percent increase over last year with 4,011 passengers boarding and deplaning during the first eight months of this year. Worland is one of two Wyoming commercial airports where airlines receive Essential Air Service subsidies per passenger. Laramie, the state’s only other EAS airport, experienced a 3.3 percent increase in passengers in 2011.

Passenger fares play a large role in determining usage of Wyoming commercial airports. According to numbers released by the Aeronautics Division, there were significant increases in walk-up fares in August of this year compared to August of 2010. For instance, Cody walk-up fares increased 38 percent. Fares last year were $744 compared to 2011 fares of $1,024.

Casper fares climbed by 19 percent; Cheyenne 16 percent; Laramie 25 percent, and Rock Springs and Sheridan, both 18 percent. Jackson’s walk-up fare increased 27 percent. Leisure fares at some airports saw increases, but not as severely as the walk-up fares. In one case, the Rock Springs leisure fare dropped 10 percent from $409 to $368. The largest leisure increase was at Jackson, with a 28 percent increase from $525 to $624.

Capacity changes — seats available — also impact airport usage. Casper lost seats when Delta pulled regional jet service in favor of SkyWest’s small propjets to Salt Lake City. Rock Springs added seats to Denver and saw an increase in daily usage.

http://www.wyomingbusinessreport.com

Yakima, Washington: Man restores antique and classic airplanes

YAKIMA, Wash.-- Hobbies can come in all shapes and sizes, for one Yakima man, it's airplane sized.

Richard Pingrey collects and restores antique and classic airplanes in his hangar at the Yakima Airport. Pingrey took up his hobby after retiring as a Pan Am pilot several years ago.

He has a plane from 1929 that he takes around to air shows, and he's currently restoring two aircraft from 1927. He says proper restorations can take years.

"Just one way or another kinda came into... focus and existence. And we've got 'em coming along and if I live to be 120 years old I'll be able to get them finished," he says.

Pingrey is actually completely rebuilding one plane all the way up from its frame. If you want to see these planes for yourself, Pingrey says he is in his hangar at the Yakima Airport a few days a week.

http://www.kndo.com

Raw Video: Helicopter Demo Injures Kids

by Associated Press

Police say eight children were injured by flying debris as they watched a helicopter land during a police exercise in Serbia. (October 17)
 .

JAGODINA -- Eight spectators were injured at the FC Jagodina football stadium in Jagodina, central Serbia, during a helicopter landing.

The police aircraft was used in an exercise by a counter-terrorist unit.

The helicopter's main rotor lifted up panels used to display advertisements, which were placed beside the pitch, and sent them flying towards the stands.

This resulted in injuries of children - most of them local second and third graders. 20 were examined by doctors, while eight were hospitalized, however, none with serious injuries, according to the doctors.

Reports suggest that one of the children suffered a concussion, while another had a broken collarbone.

The exercise was part of the celebration marking an anniversary of Jagodina's liberation from Nazi German occupation in the Second World War.

Jagodina Mayor Dragan Marković and his grandson escaped injury "by pure chance", according to reports.

Airport worker convicted in case of masked man who flew to Vancouver

The unidentified man who apparently swapped boarding passes with a 55-year-old American citizen in Hong Kong, and donned a disguise, which consisted of a silicone mask that covered his head, neck and part of his chest. He topped it off with a brown cardigan and apple cap, and a pair of spectacles.

Canada Border Services

The Chinese man donned a silicone mask to fool immigration officials 
Photo: EPA


An airport worker in Hong Kong has been convicted in the case of a young Chinese man who flew to Canada last year using a mask to disguise himself as an elderly Caucasian.

Radio Television Hong Kong, or RTHK, says a district court has found the airport worker guilty of being part of a conspiracy to smuggle people with false passports and boarding passes.

The government-run broadcaster says the employee worked as an airport ground services agent in Hong Kong.

Sentencing in the case has been adjourned, according to RTHK.

Previous reports said eight people in Hong Kong had been arrested in the case, which attracted widespread attention largely because of the bizarre appearance of the silicon mask used for the disguise.

The identity of the masked man who flew to Vancouver last October is protected by a publication ban.

He was detained in Vancouver for three months but an Immigration and Refugee Board adjudicator ordered him released in February on condition he post a $5,000 bond and report weekly to the Canada Border Services Agency.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com

Kingfisher Airlines sacks 30 engineers

Cash-strapped Kingfisher Airlines, saddled with huge losses and debts, is learnt to have sacked 30 engineers last month.

The sacking, company sources said, comes at a time when the airline is consolidating operations, and did not rule out the possibility of more technical staff being pink slipped in the coming months.

The Vijay Mallya-led airline hasn’t made a profit since its inception in 2005. “Decisions made in the day-to-day running of the airline are not communicated, shared or discussed externally,” Kingfisher said in an email reply to the questions from HT.

“With the Indian air transport market undergoing upheaval and changes, we shouldn’t be surprised to see more engineers or flight crews leave Kingfisher,” said Saj Ahmad, a London-based aviation analyst. “If, engineers have been asked to leave, one has to ask what is happening to the eventual fleet size at Kingfisher? The real question is whether this new direction Kingfisher heads-in, actually delivers any benefits?”

“There exists some excess technical staff in Kingfisher because of reduction in fleet by 20% in last 2-3 years and since Kingfisher is consolidating operations and not expanding, allowing engineers to leave is in line with their current operational requirements,” said Kapil Kaul, South Asia CEO of Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, an aviation consultancy and research firm.

 http://www.hindustantimes.com

Florida: Flooding closes Key West airport for 3 hours

MIAMI -- The Monroe County Sheriff's Office says Key West International Airport was closed for almost three hours Monday morning due to taxiway flooding. Sheriff's spokeswoman Becky Herrin says the airport may close again and most flights have been canceled.

The Florida Division of Emergency Management is urging beachgoers to stay out of the water where red flags are posted.

Authorities say 48 accidents were reported on South Florida highways Sunday night after a day of rain. That includes nine hit-and-runs and a fatal accident in the Florida Keys involving a pedestrian.

Forecasters expect the stormy weather to continue through Wednesday.