Sunday, March 24, 2019

Cessna 172, N7469A: Fatal accident occurred March 06, 2019 in Wasilla, Alaska

ANCHORAGE, (KTUU) - Alaska State Troopers have confirmed they found a plane belonging to a missing pilot.

AST, NTSB, and FAA investigators went a reported airplane crash site in the Alaska Range just outside of Rainy Pass.

Investigators confirmed that the plane’s tail number N7469A matched that of the plane belonging to pilot Timothy D. Twohy of Wasilla, missing since March 7, 2019.

Remains were found on the scene.

They were sent to the State Medical Examiner for confirmation.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. 

Date: 06-MAR-19
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N7469A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: WASILLA

State: ALASKA

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7469A 

Location: Nikolai, AK
Accident Number: ANC19FAMS1
Date & Time: 03/06/2019, 1700 AKS
Registration: N7469A
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 6, 2019, at an undetermined time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N7469A, went missing and is presumed to have crashed, at a location between Farwell, Alaska, and Wasilla, Alaska. The crash site and the sole private pilot's whereabouts remain unknown. The airplane was registered to the pilot who was operating the airplane as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the departure point at the time of departure, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Submarine Lake near Farewell at 1655 and it was en route to the Wasilla Airport (IYS), Wasilla, at the time of its disappearance.

The area between Farewell and Wasilla consists of remote mountainous, snow-covered terrain. The typical flight route between Farwell and Wasilla would be via Rainy Pass, a narrow mountain pass that is commonly used by Visual Flight Rules pilots to transit through the Alaska Range.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, a friend of the pilot who was hunting near Farewell, stated that the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to fly bison meat from their hunting camp located at Submarine Lake to IYS.

The friend said that the airplane arrived at Submarine Lake on March 6, about 1600, later than originally planned, and the pilot made a statement that he was delayed due to clouds near Skwentna. He also mentioned that he had difficulty navigating without his GPS unit. The pilot said that the pass was open, and the weather was good for the remainder of the flight. The pilot and his friend loaded the airplane with about 420 lbs. of bison meat, and the pilot added 5 gallons of fuel into the airplane's fuel tanks. The pilot commented to the friend that the airplane had 2.5 hours of fuel onboard. The pilot's friend reported that the weather deteriorated while they were loading the airplane, with occasional light snow and reduced visibility, but the mountains to the east were visible. The pilot agreed to send a text message to his friend's Garmin inReach satellite communication device when he arrived at IYS, and the airplane departed to the east about 1655 without incident. Later that evening, after repositioning the hunting camp, the friend noted that no text was received from the pilot and an overdue airplane report was filed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight service station.

The FAA issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 2316 on March 6. The Alaska Rescue Coordination Center (AKRCC) coordinated a joint-agency search operation in the Alaska Range that included units from the Alaska Air National Guard, Army National Guard, United States Coast Guard, Civil Air Patrol, Alaska State Troopers, and the National Park Service. There were no visual sightings of the airplane or pilot, and no emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signals were received. On March 22 the search operation was suspended by AKRCC.

A preliminary review of archived FAA primary radar data revealed that an unidentified aircraft, believed to be the missing airplane, departed Submarine Lake at 1655 and flew south along the south fork of the Kuskokwim River at an altitude of about 4,000 ft above mean sea level (msl). The radar track ended about 10 miles south of Submarine Lake 8 minutes after takeoff. A target that is believed to be the missing airplane appeared 11 minutes later 5 miles north of Rainy Pass about 6,700 ft msl tracking east. The target climbed to 6,900 ft before the track ended 1.4 minutes later. The last radar data point was at 1715:09 and indicated a track of about 110° at 102 knots ground speed, and at a latitude of 62.26993° and a longitude of -152.98216°.

The closest official weather observation station is located at Rainy Pass Lodge Airport (6AK) about 15 miles southeast of the last radar data point. At 1648, a weather observer reported, in part, wind, 250° at 4 knots; visibility, 20 statute miles; broken clouds at 2,700 ft; temperature, -2° C; dew point, -2° C; and an altimeter setting of 29.80 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7469A
Model/Series: 172
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 6AK, 1900 ft msl
Observation Time: 1648 AKS
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2700 ft agl
Visibility:  20 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Farewell, AK
Destination: Wasilla, AK (IYS) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: N/A
Latitude, Longitude:

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Timothy D. Twohy, a 61-year-old electrician and fire alarm systems technician from Wasilla, went missing while flying from Submarine Lake to Wasilla on March 5th, 2019.


Rescue officials suspended the search for a Wasilla-bound plane that went missing in the area of Rainy Pass more than two weeks ago, the Alaska Air National Guard said in a statement Friday.

After nearly 200 cumulative hours of searching, rescuers have found no sign of the missing red-and-white Cessna 172 or its pilot, 61-year-old Timothy D. Twohy of Wasilla, who was reported overdue late on March 5.

Twohy had flown to Submarine Lake that day to help friends pack out a bison they hunted, and went missing during his return trip to Wasilla, according to his son.

He took off from Farewell Airport after 5 p.m. for what is normally a 60- to 90-minute flight, but still hadn’t arrived by 11 p.m., search officials said.

Rough terrain in the Rainy Pass area, including altitudes reaching as high as 9,000 feet above sea level, made it impossible for rescuers to pinpoint reliable radar information, Lt. Col. Keenan Zerkel, director of the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, said in a press briefing on Saturday.

“Until we get additional information or some clue as to survivorship, we are suspending our search effort,” Zerkel said.

No signal was detected from the plane’s electronic locator transmitter, and the search effort has been hampered from the beginning by poor weather conditions, from low cloud cover and turbulence to near-constant precipitation, search officials said.

“None of these decisions were made easily," Zerkel said. “We know it’s a humanitarian decision, but once we are certain that additional effort will not result in a more positive outcome, we make the tough decision to suspend the active search.”

A “large group” of Good Samaritan pilots are likely to continue the search independently, Zerkel said, and the government may resume the official search if new information or clues develop.

Charles Twohy, Timothy Twohy’s son, said his father was a “very careful and very meticulous” pilot who knew both his plane and the landscape well. He had been flying recreationally for at least two decades when he went missing.

There is no indication that Twohy flew to a destination other than Wasilla or didn’t want to be found, according to Zerkel.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com

Piper PA-32R-301T Saratoga II TC, N316DG: Accident occurred in West End, Freeport, Bahamas

Good Grief Too LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N316DG




































AIRCRAFT:  2005 Piper PA-32R-301T Saratoga II TC N316DG, s/n: 3257375
The last Annual Inspection was accomplished on 04/10/2018 at 1844.7 AFTT
Current Hobbs time is 1889.6

ENGINE: Lycoming TIO-540-AH1A, s/n: L11962-61A
The last Annual Inspection was accomplished on 04/10/2018 at 1844.7 ETT

PROPELLER:  Hartzell HC-I3YR-1RF, s/n: HK1021B
04/10/2018 at 1844.7 PTSN, 297.0 SMOH
Prop overhauled on 11/0/13 at Hobbs 1547.7

EQUIPMENT:   All listed avionics removed for safekeeping except pilot side Avidyne display
(2)  Garmin 430W Nav/Comm
(1)  Garmin GTX-330
(1)  Garmin GMA340 Audio Panel
(2)  Avidyne Flight Max PFD/MFD Displays (Co-pilot side removed for safekeeping, pilot side with aircraft)

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Right tire blew on landing at West End, Bahamas.  Aircraft departed the runway at landing speeds.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:   
Damage includes but may not be limited to the following:   
All three prop blades are bent and engine experienced a prop strike
The landing gear is broken off at all three points and the aircraft came to rest on the belly.
The wings and belly are damaged.   
The fuselage is damaged at the aft cabin doors, which were found partially open and will not close tightly.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  The aircraft was retrieved to the FBO ramp at West End, Freeport, Bahamas, and is sitting on tires. 

The cabin door was taped shut prior to the retrieval. 

Read more here ➤ http://www.avclaims.com

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Lancair Legacy, N60JN, accident occurred March 08, 2018 near Draughon-Miller Central Texas Regional Airport (KTPL), Temple, Bell County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N60JN




Location: Temple, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA118
Date & Time: 03/08/2018, 1045 CST
Registration: N60JN
Aircraft: Bereznak Lancair Legacy
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

Analysis 

After leveling off at 9,500 ft, the airline transport pilot switched the fuel selector from the right to the left fuel tank of the experimental, amateur-built airplane. He noticed a change in the sound of the engine, a decline in fuel flow, and a partial loss of engine power. He switched back to the right fuel tank and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump, but this did not correct the problem. Realizing that he would not be able to glide to a nearby airport, the pilot made a forced landing in a plowed field. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no discrepancies that would have precluded normal operation. The fuel selector was found separated just below the selector handle, and the selector valve was found in the 90-percent-closed position. The fuel selector assembly showed extensive wear. It is likely that the fuel selector separated with the valve in an intermediate position when the pilot changed the fuel selector handle position, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power due to fuel starvation as a result of the nearly closed fuel valve. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The failure of the fuel selector valve in a nearly closed position, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel selector/shutoff valve - Fatigue/wear/corrosion (Cause)
Fuel selector/shutoff valve - Not serviced/maintained (Factor)

Personnel issues
Scheduled/routine inspection - Maintenance personnel (Factor)



Factual Information

On March 8, 2018, about 1045 central standard daylight time, a Bereznak Lancair Legacy, N60JN, experienced a partial loss of engine power while in cruise flight at 9,500 feet, and the pilot made a forced landing in a plowed field one-mile northwest of Draughon-Miller Central Texas Regional Airport (TPL), Temple, Texas. The pilot sustained minor injuries. His passenger was not injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a, Airborne Legacy, LLC, Austin, Texas, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at and about the time of the accident. A visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, Austin, Texas, and was destined for Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL), Dallas, Texas.

In his accident report the pilot said that after levelling off at 9,500 feet, he switched from the right to the left fuel tank to maintain balance. He noticed a change in the sound of the engine and a decline in fuel flow (the airplane was not equipped with a fuel pressure gauge). He switched back to the right fuel tank and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump, but this did not correct the problem. During the approach to TPL, manifold pressure was registering but airspeed was decreasing. The pilot advanced the throttle slightly, then applied full throttle. The engine did not respond. Realizing he could not glide to TPL, the pilot made a forced landing in a plowed field.

On April 4, 2018, the engine was examined at the facilities of Air Salvage of Dallas (ASOD), Lancaster, Texas. The engine was intact, undamaged, and remained attached to the airframe. No discrepancies were found that would have prohibited the production of rated horsepower.

The fuel selector handle was separated just below the handle selector. The two "U" joints and the drive shaft were intact. The selector valve was found in the 90 percent closed position. The fuel selector assembly was extensively worn. 

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Loss of engine power (partial) (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Off-field or emergency landing

Landing-landing roll
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)



Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial; Private
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/08/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/29/2017
Flight Time:  3900 hours (Total, all aircraft), 185 hours (Total, this make and model), 3650 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: Bereznak
Registration: N60JN
Model/Series: Lancair Legacy
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: L2K-263
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/02/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 34 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 310 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-N
Registered Owner: Airborne Legacy, LLC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: Airborne Legacy, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTPL, 682 ft msl
Observation Time: 1051 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 135°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 150°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Austin, TX (KAUS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Dallas, TX (KDAL)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1030 CST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Draughon-Miller Central TX Reg (TPL)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 682 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.000000, 97.000000 (est)

Piper PA-28-140, N15888: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 -and- Accident occurred October 26, 2018 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

October 17, 2019:  Aircraft landed and nose gear collapsed.


https://registry.faa.gov/N15888


Date: 17-OCT-19

Time: 15:54:00Z
Regis#: N15888
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Miami, FL

Accident Number: GAA19CA040
Date & Time: 10/26/2018, 1100 EDT
Registration: N15888
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

 Analysis 

The student pilot reported that, during a solo cross-country flight, while landing with a crosswind, the airplane bounced and landed hard. He added that the propeller struck the ground, the airplane "tilted” left, and the left wing then struck the ground. The airplane came to rest in the grass off the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount.

The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport’s automated weather observation system reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 240° at 8 knots. The airplane landed on runway 27R, which resulted in a 4-knot crosswind.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The student pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Abnormal runway contact (Defining event)
Hard landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Runway excursion

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 29, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 115.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 114.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N15888
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7325189
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/03/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  6025.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E3D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1453 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 251°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Okeechobee, FL (OBE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0943 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI EXECUTIVE (TMB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 10 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5003 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 25.649167, -80.429167 (est)

Landing Gear Not Configured: Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N5340Y; accident occurred September 14, 2018 at San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport (KSBP), California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N5340Y


Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA264
Date & Time: 09/14/2018, 1718 PDT
Registration: N5340Y
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 14, 2018, about 1718 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T210 airplane, N5340Y, was substantially damaged during landing roll at San Luis County Regional Airport (SBP), San Luis Obispo, California. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The flight originated from John Wayne-Orange County Airport (SNA), Santa Ana, California at 1613, with a destination of SBP.

The pilot reported that during the approach to land at SBP, he selected the landing gear to the DOWN position, after which he felt the gear extending into place. Following the gear extension, he observed the left main landing gear out the window and felt that everything was normal. As the airplane contacted the runway at 65 to 70 knots, he felt a "…bump up from the right" as the nose landing gear immediately made contact with the runway. The airplane veered to the right as it exited the runway, and completed a 180° turn before coming to rest in the runway safety area. Additionally, the pilot reported that he did not hear the landing gear warning horn, nor did he remember seeing the landing indicator lights during the approach. The pilot wore a noise cancelling headset during the flight.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right main landing gear was retracted, and that the right horizontal stabilizer and the right elevator had impacted the ground and were buckled upwards. Subsequent to the airplane being relocated to a facility on the airport, the landing gear extension motor was replaced. The landing gear was tested, and no anomalies were noted. The warning horn sounded, and landing gear indicator lights illuminated during the testing. It was revealed during the examination that the landing gear extension motor was the original pump installed during the manufacturing of the airplane. When the motor was disassembled, internal wear was observed.

The six-seat, high-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number (S/N) 21064173 was manufactured in 1981 and had accumulated 6,813.5 hours total airframe time at the last annual inspection on March 22, 2018.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/31/2017
Flight Time: 2563.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2521 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5340Y
Model/Series: T210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21064173
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/22/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6813.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Teledyne Continental
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520R
Registered Owner: Cripe Michael L
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSPD, 200 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1655 PST
Direction from Accident Site: 290°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Santa Ana, CA (KSNA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: San Luis Obispo, CA (KSBP)
Type of Clearance: Traffic Advisory; VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1613 PST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: SAN LUIS COUNTY RGNL (SBP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 212 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6101 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.237500, -120.640556 (est)

Fuel Exhaustion: American Aviation AA-1A Trainer, N9218L; accident occurred September 14, 2018 in Warthen, Washington County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N9218L




Location: Warthen, GA
Accident Number: ERA18TA250
Date & Time: 09/14/2018, 1020 EDT
Registration: N9218L
Aircraft: American Aviation AA1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 14, 2018, about 1020 eastern daylight time, an American Aviation AA-1A, N9218L, was substantially damaged after it impacted terrain during a forced landing in Warthen, Georgia. The commercial pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from the Oconee County Regional Airport (CEU), Clemson, South Carolina, and was destined for Summerfield, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported that earlier during the day of the accident, he purchased the airplane in Morristown, Tennessee. He filled up each of the two fuel tanks with 12.5 gallons of fuel and departed from Moore-Murrell Airport (MOR), Morristown, Tennessee around 0730 destined for Summerfield, Florida. While flying at a cruise altitude of 9,500 ft. mean sea level, about 20 minutes after takeoff, he noticed the fuel level was down to a one-fourth tank of fuel in each fuel tank. The pilot thought the fuel burn was very high and decided to land at the closest airport, which was CEU. He filled up again with 24 gallons of fuel and departed about 0950. About 30 minutes into the flight he noticed that the fuel level was at one-fourth tank in each wing fuel tank again. The pilot further stated that he decided to divert to the nearest airport, which was OKZ. About 15 miles away from the airport, the engine lost all power, he switched fuel tanks to the right fuel tank, activated the electric boost pump and the engine restarted. A few minutes later the engine again lost all power again and he noticed both fuel tanks were empty. The pilot located a field and configured the airplane for landing. During the rollout in the field, the nose landing gear contacted some soft dirt and collapsed. The airplane slid 90° to the left and came to rest upright. Both occupants egressed through the canopy.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the left-wing tip was crushed, and the main spar was damaged, and the nose landing gear had collapsed. There was no fuel in either the left or right fuel tank. Two gallons of fuel was poured into the right fuel tank, and the electric fuel pump was turned on. Fuel began draining from the carburetor float bowl, and examination of the bowl revealed that its threaded plug was missing.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate issued August 30, 2018. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 700 total hours of flight experience.

The airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on June 9, 1971. According to the FAA type certificate data sheet for the American Aviation AA-1A, the airplane was originally equipped with a 108-horsepower Lycoming O-235-C2C engine, driving a two-bladed McCauley 1A105 SCM 7157 propeller. The engine had been replaced with a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-E2 engine, driving a two-bladed Sensenich propeller. The airplane was also equipped with two 12-gallon fuel tanks, for a total fuel capacity of 24 gallons, of which 2 gallons were unusable.

The pilot reported that the airplane had recently undergone an annual inspection as well as a pre-purchase inspection; however, he was unable to locate the airplane's maintenance logbooks log books following the accident. The airplane's maintenance history, including any work done to, or inspections of the carburetor could not be determined.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/30/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 532.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2 hours (Total, this make and model), 525.5 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: American Aviation
Registration: N9218L
Model/Series: AA1 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: AA1A-0118
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1560 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 2 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2093 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320E2
Registered Owner: Bird Mary C
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMLJ, 384 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1415 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 279°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Clemson, SC (CEU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Summerfield, FL
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0950 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  33.086389, -82.751111 (est)