Saturday, March 30, 2019

Beech A36 Bonanza, owned and operated by Landsgaard Equipment Leasing LLC, N777YF and Robinson R44 Raven II, owned and operated by a private individual, N878BC: Accident occurred January 26, 2018 at Northern Colorado Regional Airport (KFNL), Loveland, Larimer County, Colorado



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

N878BC Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N878BC

Location: Loveland, CO
Accident Number: CEN18LA087A
Date & Time: 01/26/2018, 1140 MST
Registration: N878BC
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The accident occurred when a helicopter (N878BC) and an airplane (N777YF) collided midair while on approach to the airport. The helicopter pilot intended to fly a practice instrument approach to the runway, perform the missed approach procedure, and enter the published holding pattern. The airplane pilot intended to enter the traffic pattern, with appropriate spacing, for a full stop landing on the same runway. The airplane pilot had the helicopter in sight and was following the helicopter to the runway. While on final approach, the airplane pilot thought that the helicopter had entered a hover and asked the helicopter pilot about his intentions. The helicopter pilot indicated that he would be flying the missed approach procedure and then returning to the airport, but the airplane pilot incorrectly heard the helicopter pilot's response and believed that the helicopter was going to hover near the end of the runway and then proceed to the east. As a result, the airplane pilot expected the helicopter to be east of the airport, which was a common location for local helicopter training, when the airplane would be landing; however, the helicopter was on approach to the runway at that time. During the airplane's approach, the airplane pilot lost sight of the helicopter. The airplane continued to land and collided with the helicopter.


Probable Cause and Findings


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The airplane pilot's failure to see and avoid the helicopter while in the traffic pattern, which resulted in a midair collision between the two aircraft. Contributing to the accident was the airplane pilot's misunderstanding of the helicopter pilot's intentions and the airplane pilot's expectation that the helicopter would be clear of the runway.

Findings


Personnel issues

Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot of other aircraft (Cause)
Expectation/assumption - Pilot of other aircraft (Factor)
Understanding/comprehension - Pilot of other aircraft (Factor)

Factual Information

On January 26, 2018, about 1140 mountain standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N878BC, and a Beech A36 airplane, N777YF, collided while on approach to the Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (KFNL), Loveland, Colorado. The pilot in the helicopter sustained minor injuries and the pilot and passenger in the airplane were not injured. The helicopter was owned and operated by a private individual and the airplane was owned and operated by Landsgaard Equipment Leasing LLC. Visual metrological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The helicopter departed Century Helicopters Heliport (0CO7), Fort Collins, Colorado, at 1100, and the airplane departed the Greely-Weld County Airport (KGXY), at 1110. Both intended to land at KFNL.


According to the helicopter pilot, when he approached KFNL, he announced on the common traffic advisory frequency, his intention to fly the RNAV GPS approach for runway 33. There was a National Guard UH60 helicopter flying the ILS 33 procedure. The pilots of the Guard helicopter intended to fly the ILS 33 to a missed approach, and then depart the area. The helicopter pilot informed them of his intention to perform the RNAV GPS 33 approach, perform the published missed approach procedures, and then enter the published holding pattern. He then heard the airplane pilot ask the UH60 if they intended to fly all the way to the end of the runway before turning east. They replied that they would be close to the end during the missed approach. The helicopter pilot continued the approach and the airplane pilot called that he was on the downwind, had the helicopter in sight, and would extend the downwind to give spacing. The helicopter pilot replied that he would fly the missed approach procedure and then return to the airport. The helicopter pilot heard the airplane pilot reply, "good." While descending towards the airport, the airplane pilot asked the helicopter pilot if he was stopping there, which the helicopter pilot replied that was still descending, and then intended to fly the missed approach. The airplane pilot then stated that he was passing overheard. Shortly after, the helicopter and the airplane collided.


According to the airplane pilot, he approached KFNL from the east, and announced his initial position of 6-7 miles out. He heard other traffic conducting missed approaches and reported 2 miles and 1 mile out to coordinate with the local traffic. He announced crossing the field for the left downwind for runway 33 and proceeded into the pattern. While on the downwind leg for 33 and abeam the numbers he lowered the landing gear in preparation for landing. About that time the other pilot announced a straight in approach for 33, the airplane pilot saw that the aircraft was at a higher altitude, but he could see the aircraft was coming in on the approach approximately 4-5 miles out. On the radio, the airplane pilot offered to extend the downwind leg to allow the aircraft to complete its missed approach. On the base turn to final, the airplane pilot realized that the other aircraft was a helicopter and not an airplane. The helicopter continued its approach and when it was over the airport fence, the airplane turned onto final approach. About 4 miles south of the runway the airplane pilot said he could see the helicopter hovering south of the runway threshold, about ½ to ¾ mile from the end of the runway. He queried the helicopter pilot about his intentions, and he heard the helicopter pilot say that he was going to hover for a bit and then depart to the east. The airplane pilot replied "okay" and stated that he intended to fly over him for a full stop landing. The helicopter pilot responded "okay," so the airplane pilot proceeded to land on runway 33. During the approach, the airplane pilot lost sight of the helicopter. Expecting the helicopter to remain in a hover south of the runway, the airplane continued to land, descended, and collided with the helicopter. The helicopter descended, impacted terrain, and rolled on its right side resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage, and tailboom. After colliding with the helicopter, the airplane pilot saw the gear indicator show an unsafe right main landing gear. The airplane touched down on the left main landing gear and the pilot kept the right wing up for as long as possible. As the airplane slowed, the damaged right main touched down and the airplane departed the right side of the runway and came to rest in the adjacent grass.


The responding Federal Aviation Administration Inspector auditioned audio from the UNICOM frequency. He did not hear the helicopter pilot transmit that he intended to hover.


The airplane pilot stated that east of the runway 33/15 is where the local helicopter traffic usually performs their training, so he was expecting this helicopter to do the same.




History of Flight

Approach
Midair collision (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial

Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/25/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/16/2017
Flight Time:  2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 800 hours (Total, this make and model), 2000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 102 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY

Registration: N878BC
Model/Series: R44 II II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11530
Landing Gear Type: Ski;
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/29/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 49 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1479.8 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:  C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: MOATS JESSE R
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFNL, 5015 ft msl
Observation Time: 1156 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 246°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -13°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FORT COLLINS, CO (0CO7)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Longmont, CO (FNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1100 MST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information


Airport: NORTHERN COLORADO RGNL (FNL)

Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5015 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: Global Positioning System; Practice; RNAV
Runway Length/Width: 8500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Minor

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  40.440000, -105.007222 (est)



N777YF Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N777YF



Location: Loveland, CO
Accident Number: CEN18LA087B
Date & Time: 01/26/2018, 1140 MST
Registration: N777YF
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The accident occurred when a helicopter (N878BC) and an airplane (N777YF) collided midair while on approach to the airport. The helicopter pilot intended to fly a practice instrument approach to the runway, perform the missed approach procedure, and enter the published holding pattern. The airplane pilot intended to enter the traffic pattern, with appropriate spacing, for a full stop landing on the same runway. The airplane pilot had the helicopter in sight and was following the helicopter to the runway. While on final approach, the airplane pilot thought that the helicopter had entered a hover and asked the helicopter pilot about his intentions. The helicopter pilot indicated that he would be flying the missed approach procedure and then returning to the airport, but the airplane pilot incorrectly heard the helicopter pilot's response and believed that the helicopter was going to hover near the end of the runway and then proceed to the east. As a result, the airplane pilot expected the helicopter to be east of the airport, which was a common location for local helicopter training, when the airplane would be landing; however, the helicopter was on approach to the runway at that time. During the airplane's approach, the airplane pilot lost sight of the helicopter. The airplane continued to land and collided with the helicopter.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The airplane pilot's failure to see and avoid the helicopter while in the traffic pattern, which resulted in a midair collision between the two aircraft. Contributing to the accident was the airplane pilot's misunderstanding of the helicopter pilot's intentions and the airplane pilot's expectation that the helicopter would be clear of the runway. 

Findings

Personnel issues
Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot (Cause)
Expectation/assumption - Pilot (Factor)
Understanding/comprehension - Pilot (Factor)

Factual Information

On January 26, 2018, about 1140 mountain standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N878BC, and a Beech A36 airplane, N777YF, collided while on approach to the Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (KFNL), Loveland, Colorado. The pilot in the helicopter sustained minor injuries and the pilot and passenger in the airplane were not injured. The helicopter was owned and operated by a private individual and the airplane was owned and operated by Landsgaard Equipment Leasing LLC. Visual metrological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The helicopter departed Century Helicopters Heliport (0CO7), Fort Collins, Colorado, at 1100, and the airplane departed the Greely-Weld County Airport (KGXY), at 1110. Both intended to land at KFNL.

According to the helicopter, when he approached KFNL, he announced on the common traffic advisory frequency, his intention to fly the RNAV GPS approach for runway 33. There was a National Guard UH60 helicopter flying the ILS 33 procedure. The pilots of the Guard helicopter intended to fly the ILS 33 to a missed approach, and then depart the area. The helicopter pilot informed them of his intention to perform the RNAV GPS 33 approach, perform the published missed approach procedures, and then enter the published holding pattern. He then heard the airplane ask the UH60 if they intended to fly all the way to the end of the runway before turning east. They replied that they would be close to the end during the missed approach. The helicopter pilot continued the approach and the airplane pilot called that he was on the downwind, had the helicopter in sight, and would extend the downwind to give spacing. The helicopter pilot replied that he would fly the missed approach procedure and then return to the airport. The helicopter pilot heard the airplane pilot reply, "good." While descending towards the airport, the airplane pilot asked the helicopter pilot if he was stopping there, which the helicopter pilot replied that was still descending, and then intended to fly the missed approach. The airplane pilot then stated that he was passing overheard. Shortly after, the helicopter and the airplane collided.

According to the airplane pilot, he approached KFNL from the east, and announced his initial position of 6-7 miles out. He heard other traffic conducting missed approaches and reported 2 miles and 1 mile out to coordinate with the local traffic. He announced crossing the field for the left downwind for runway 33 and proceeded into the pattern. While on the downwind leg for 33 and abeam the numbers he lowered the landing gear in preparation for landing. About that time the other pilot announced a straight in approach for 33, the airplane pilot saw that the aircraft was at a higher altitude, but he could see the aircraft was coming in on the approach approximately 4-5 miles out. On the radio, the airplane pilot offered to extend the downwind leg to allow the aircraft to complete its missed approach. On the base turn to final, the airplane pilot realized that the other aircraft was a helicopter and not an airplane. The helicopter continued its approach and when it was over the airport fence, the airplane turned onto final approach. About 4 miles south of the runway the airplane pilot said he could see the helicopter hovering south of the runway threshold, about ½ to ¾ mile from the end of the runway He queried the helicopter pilot about his intentions, and he heard the helicopter say that he was going to hover for a bit and then depart to the east. The airplane pilot replied "okay" and stated that he intended to fly over him for a full stop landing. The helicopter pilot responded "okay," so the airplane pilot proceeded to land on runway 33. During the approach, the airplane pilot lost sight of the helicopter. Expecting the helicopter to remain in a hover south of the runway, the airplane continued to land, descended, and collided with the helicopter. The helicopter descended, impacted terrain, and rolled on its right side resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage, and tailboom. After colliding with the helicopter, the airplane pilot saw the gear indicator show an unsafe right main landing gear. The airplane touched down on the left main landing gear and the pilot kept the right wing up for as long as possible. As the airplane slowed, the damaged right main touched down and the airplane departed the right side of the runway and came to rest in the adjacent grass.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration Inspector auditioned audio from the UNICOM frequency. He did not hear the helicopter pilot transmit that he intended to hover.

The airplane pilot stated that east of the runway 33/15 is where the local helicopter traffic usually performs their training, so he was expecting this helicopter to do the same.

History of Flight

Approach
Midair collision (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/16/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/28/2017
Flight Time:  620 hours (Total, all aircraft), 320 hours (Total, this make and model), 620 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 37 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N777YF
Model/Series: A36 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1989
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: E-2495
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/14/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3651 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 40 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2540 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-B6F
Registered Owner: LANDSGAARD EQUIPMENT LEASING LLC
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: LANDSGAARD EQUIPMENT LEASING LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFNL, 5015 ft msl
Observation Time: 1156 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 246°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -13°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GREELEY, CO (GXY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Longmont, CO (FNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1110 MST
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: NORTHERN COLORADO RGNL (FNL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5015 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.440000, -105.007222 (est)

Quartz Mountain Aerospace Inc 11E, registered to and operated by Oracle Aviation LLC and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight, N515BW: Accident occurred January 24, 2018 in Millard, Omaha, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N515BW




Location: Omaha, NE
Accident Number: CEN18LA085
Date & Time: 01/24/2018, 1418 CST
Registration: N515BW
Aircraft: QUARTZ MOUNTAIN AEROSPACE L-11E
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

During an instructional flight, the two pilots—an airline transport pilot giving instruction and a commercial pilot receiving instruction—flew to two airports and made an instrument approach at each airport. Upon returning to the pilots' home airport and while on another instrument approach, the engine lost all power. The pilot giving instruction assumed control of the airplane and made a forced landing in a school baseball field. During the forced landing, the airplane struck trees and a fence, causing substantial damage to a wing spar.

During a postaccident examination, a total of ½ gallon of fuel was drained from both tanks. The airplane's fuel capacity was 42 gallons, of which 40 gallons was usable. The airplane had been serviced with fuel several days before the accident, and the service technician estimated that 34 gallons of fuel was on board the airplane at the beginning of the accident flight. The pilot giving instruction reported that he had visually verified that the airplane was "full of fuel" before the flight, and he expected that there would be enough fuel for 4 hours of flight. The pilot giving instruction planned 3 hours of flight time, and the airplane's Hobbs meter indicated 3.1 hours of flight time.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The instructor pilot's inadequate preflight fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and a total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid level (Cause)
Fuel - Not inspected (Cause)

Personnel issues
Preflight inspection - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)
Identification/recognition - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)


Factual Information

On January 24, 2018, at 1418 central standard time, a Quartz Mountain Aerospace (Luscombe) 11E, N515BW, struck trees and a fence during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power in Omaha, Nebraska. The certificated airline transport flight instructor and certificated commercial flight instructor receiving instruction were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The rental airplane was registered to and operated by Oracle Aviation, LLC, Omaha, Nebraska, and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Millard Airport (MLE), about 1100.

According to the instructor's accident report, the airplane was full of fuel (verified visually), which should have provided about four hours of flight time. The planned flight time was 3 hours. They flew to Wayne Municipal Airport (LCG), Wayne, Nebraska, and Central Nebraska Regional Airport (GRI), Grand Island Nebraska, where they made an instrument approach at each airport before returning to MLE. The airplane was on the GPS (Global Positioning System runway) 12 instrument approach, about 5.3 miles from MLE, when the engine lost power. Following the emergency checklist, the engine regained power for about 10 seconds. The instructor assumed control and made a forced landing in a school baseball field near a road intersection. During the forced landing, the airplane struck trees and a fence, causing damage to a wing spar.

The airplane was towed back to MLE where Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors from the Lincoln, Nebraska, Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) examined the airplane. They drained a total of ½-gallon of fuel from both tanks. Both the tachometer and Hobbs meter indicated a flight duration of 3.1 hours.

The instructor noted that a similar incident occurred about two weeks earlier. In that case, the pilots were able to land at the airport. No determination was made as to why the engine lost power, but the instructor surmised that either the tanks did not hold 42 gallons, or the engine was consuming a "significantly greater amount" of fuel.

According to the service technician, when he serviced the airplane a few days before the accident, and it was not full of fuel. He added fuel to a level "just above the tab portion" of the fuel neck. Using another similar airplane, the technician demonstrated to FAA inspectors how he fueled the airplane to his customary level. He then added 6 additional gallons (3 gallons per tank) to reach the full level. It was estimated about 34 gallons of fuel was on board the airplane. 

History of Flight

Approach
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Off-field or emergency landing

Landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/13/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/05/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 16046 hours (Total, all aircraft), 60 hours (Total, this make and model), 13400 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/03/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1420 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 1337 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: QUARTZ MOUNTAIN AEROSPACE
Registration: N515BW
Model/Series: L-11E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1006
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/21/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2280 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 276 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-ES
Registered Owner: Oracle Aviation, LLC
Rated Power: 185 hp
Operator: Oracle Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MLE, 1051 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1415 CST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Omaha, NE (MLE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Omaha, NE (MLE)
Type of Clearance: IFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1100 CST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Millard (MLE)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 105 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Snow; Wet
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: Global Positioning System; Practice
Runway Length/Width: 3801 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.196111, -96.112222 (est)

Christavia Mk I, N746LM: Accident occurred January 20, 2018 in Grand Detour, Ogle County, Illinois


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional participating entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines, Illinois


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N746LM



Location:  Grand Detour, IL
Accident Number:  CEN18LA082
Date & Time:  01/20/2018, 1233 CST
Registration:  N746LM
Aircraft: MATHENY LARRY E CHRISTAVIA MK 1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event:  Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The private pilot was flying an experimental airplane at a low altitude along a river when the airplane struck a power line suspended 30 ft above the river, causing the airplane to cartwheel. The power line wrapped around the airplane, and the airplane descended straight down, impacting the ice-covered river.

A postaccident examination of the airplane showed that the fuselage forward of the instrument panel, the engine cowling, and the engine were bent upward about 30°. The forward fuel tank between the cabin and the engine had broken open, and the smell of fuel was apparent. The airplane's propeller showed indications that the engine was producing high power when the airplane struck the power line. Flight control continuity was confirmed. Examination of the engine and other airplane systems showed no preimpact anomalies. Thus, the accident likely occurred because the pilot did not see the power line suspended across the river while he was flying close to the river surface.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's failure to see and avoid the power line. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's intentional flight at low altitude.



Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Factor)

Personnel issues
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)
Incorrect action selection - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Wire - Awareness of condition (Cause)
Wire - Effect on operation (Cause)


Factual Information

On January 20, 2018, about 1233 central standard time, a Matheny Christavia Mk1 homebuilt airplane, N746LM, struck a power line and impacted on an ice-covered river during low-altitude flight near Grand Detour, Illinois. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger were seriously injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed for the local flight, which had departed from the Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Poplar Grove, Illinois.

Witnesses observed the airplane flying low over the Rock River between 1120 and the time of the accident. One witness who lived near Machesney Park, Illinois, saw the airplane flying 100 ft. above the river and within 400 to 500 ft. above houses. Another witness who lived along the back channel of the river near Grand Detour said the airplane went by her house so close that she could see the pilot in the airplane. She estimated the airplane was 15 ft. above the river. Moments later, the airplane struck a power line that ran from the river bank across to an island in the river. The airplane subsequently cartwheeled in the air wrapping the power line around it, and then dove straight down, impacting on the ice-covered river.

An examination of the airplane showed a power line wire wrapped around the leading and trailing edges of both wings at the wing roots, and around the aft cabin. The left aft cabin window was broken inward and showed wire marks on the Plexiglas. The right main landing gear was broken inward and under the airplane's cabin. Wire marks were observed on the tire and gear strut. The front windscreen was broken out and fragmented, and the forward fuselage at the instrument panel, the engine cowling, and the engine were bent upward 30°. The forward fuel tank between the cabin and the engine was broken open and the smell of AVGAS was prevalent. The airplane's wood propeller was broken aft and splintered circumferentially. The outboard 5 ft. of the airplane's left wing was broken aft and downward. Wire marks were observed along the top wing skin starting at the fracture and running aft and outboard toward the wing tip and wing trailing edge. Flight control continuity was confirmed. An examination of the engine and other airplane systems showed no preimpact anomalies.

According to Commonwealth Edison, the electricity provider to Grand Detour, the power line height above the river where the airplane came in contact with it was about 30 ft.

A NTSB Form 6120.1, Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report form was sent to the pilot to complete. The pilot never returned the filled-out form, despite several attempts on the part of the NTSB and the Federal Aviation Administration to have him do so.

History of Flight

Maneuvering

Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 850 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer:  MATHENY LARRY E
Registration: N746LM
Model/Series: CHRISTAVIA MK 1 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2009
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate:  Experimental
Serial Number: 015
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:  CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:  O-200
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RFD, 742 ft msl
Observation Time: 1154 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 35°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 23000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point:  POPLAR GROVE, IL (C77)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Destination: POPLAR GROVE, IL (C77)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  41.895000, -89.411389 (est)

Swearingen SA227-TT, N6UP, registered to and operated by AIRCO JN LLC as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 corporate flight, N6UP: Accident occurred January 19, 2018 at Ellington Airport (KEFD), Houston, Harris County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N6UP

Location: Houston, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA086
Date & Time: 01/19/2018, 1630 CST
Registration: N6UP
Aircraft: SWEARINGEN SA227 TT
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Electrical system malf/failure
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Executive/Corporate

Analysis

During a corporate flight, as the pilots climbed the airplane to flight level 180, both electrical generators failed and would not reset. The pilots attempted to troubleshoot the problem but could not regain electrical power. The airplane's battery power was rapidly deteriorating, so the pilots declared an emergency and diverted to the nearest airport. Due to the loss of electrical power, the pilots lost communications and had to manually extend the landing gear. They could not verify, with air traffic control tower personnel, if the landing and nose gear were extended and locked. The pilots made a forced landing with the nose landing gear not fully extended, causing the airplane to skid on the forward fuselage after touchdown and substantially damaging the engines.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed the right generator current limiter had failed. A mechanic connected a battery to the airplane, and the left propeller immediately began to rotate. The mechanic determined that there was uncommanded voltage to the left starter, which was caused by a failure of the left starter relay when the engine was started before the flight. During the flight, the right generator was managing all of the airplane's electrical load, the cumulative electrical load exceeded the capacity of the right generator current limiter, and the generator failed. At that point, the airplane's electrical load was only being supplied by battery power, which was quickly depleted. Postaccident examination of the nose landing gear did not identify a mechanical reason to explain why the nose landing gear did not extend during the pilots' emergency landing gear extension procedure.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The failure of the left starter relay during engine start, which resulted in a loss of electrical and battery power during the flight and led to a forced landing with the nose landing gear not fully extended, causing substantial damage to the engines.

Findings

Aircraft
AC power distribution system - Failure (Cause)
Nose/tail landing gear - Incorrect use/operation (Cause)

Factual Information 

On January 19, 2018, about 1630 central standard time, a Swearingen SA227-TT airplane, N6UP, had an electrical malfunction during climb, and the flight crew executed a forced landing to Ellington Airport (EFD), Houston, Texas. The two pilots and two passengers were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to both engines during landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by AIRCO JN LLC, Freedom, Oklahoma, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 corporate flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Beaumont, Texas, at 1515, and was destined for Uvalde, Texas.

According to the pilots, during climb about 18,000 ft, both generators failed and would not reset. The pilots attempted to troubleshoot the problem and could not regain electrical power. The battery power was rapidly deteriorating so the pilots declared an emergency and diverted to EFD as the nearest airport. Due to the loss of electrical power, the pilots lost communications and also had to manually extended the landing gear. They could not verify if all the landing gear were extended and locked with the control tower personnel. During the forced landing, the nose landing gear was retracted, and the airplane skidded on the forward fuselage after touchdown. Due to the nose gear being retracted during the landing, both propeller assemblies and engines sustained substantial damage.

Examination of the airplane by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors and a mechanic revealed the right generator current limiter was failed (blown). The mechanic connected a battery to the airplane and the left propeller immediately began to rotate. After troubleshooting, the mechanic determined there was uncommanded voltage to the left starter which was caused by the left starter relay that failed at the engine start prior to the flight. During the flight, the right generator was managing all the airplane's electrical load, and the cumulative electrical load exceeded the capacity of the right generator current limiter and it failed. At that point, the airplane electrical load was only being supplied by battery power.

According to the mechanic, on January 2, 2018, the emergency landing gear extension was successfully tested during the airplane's most recent inspection. During the postaccident examination, a mechanical reason for the nose landing gear not extending during the pilots' emergency landing gear extension procedure could not be determined. 

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Electrical system malf/failure (Defining event)

Landing
Landing gear not configured

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/17/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/21/2017
Flight Time:  21850 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4000 hours (Total, this make and model), 21000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 120 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s):  Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/21/2017
Flight Time:  10000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 8000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 100 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SWEARINGEN
Registration: N6UP
Model/Series: SA227 TT TT
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: TT-441
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 10
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/02/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 12500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 9258.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Garrett
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TPE 331
Registered Owner: AIRCO JN LLC
Rated Power: 900 hp
Operator: AIRCO JN LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EFD, 32 ft msl
Observation Time: 1550 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 9°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility: 5 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 80°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: Beaumont, TX (BPT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Uvalde, TX (UVA)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1515 CST
Type of Airspace: Class B

Airport Information

Airport: Ellington Airport (EFD)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 32 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 17R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 9001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.607222, -95.158611 (est)