Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Beech 19A Musketeer Sport, N6142N: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, Hawaii

Dean "Dingo" Hutton, private pilot 

Alexis Aaron, passenger

 Heather Riley and Gerrit Evensen, passengers


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii
Lycoming Engines; Chandler, Arizona
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
Location: Waipi'o, HI
Accident Number: WPR17FA170
Date & Time: 07/28/2017, 1852 HST
Registration: N6142N
Aircraft: BEECH 19A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii-Aleutian standard time, a Beech BE-19A airplane, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which departed Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837.

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Although the airplane was not in contact with air traffic control after departure from HNL, recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary transponder beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest.

At 1843, radar data showed the airplane at 1,800 ft mean sea level (msl) about 4 miles north of the airport and on a northwesterly heading (see figure 1). For the next 2 minutes, the airplane's altitude varied and descended to 1,500 ft when it turned west. About 1 minute later, the airplane started the first of three 360° turns. The first was a right turn at 1,200 ft. At the completion of the turn, the airplane resumed a westerly heading at 1,100 ft. Shortly thereafter, the airplane began the second 360° turn to the left, maintaining an altitude of 1,100 ft. At the completion of the turn, the airplane resumed a northerly heading and climbed to 1,600 ft.

About 3 minutes after the completion of the second 360° turn, the airplane turned to the west toward a ridgeline. The airplane climbed to 1,800 ft and, about 1 minute later, began the third 360° turn to the left. At the completion of the turn, the airplane climbed to 2,000 ft on a westerly heading as it approached a ridgeline that ran perpendicular to its flight path. About 10 seconds later, the airplane initiated a descending left turn. The last target, at 1852, depicted the airplane at 1,900 ft.

A witness located 1/2-mile east of the accident site reported that he saw the airplane flying "very low." He added that the airplane was making a turn and eventually went out of view. The witness reported that he heard the engine producing power then heard a "boom," followed by silence.

At 1859, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Honolulu Control Facility (HCF) Front Line Manager (FLM) contacted the Coast Guard to report that aircraft in the vicinity of BOOKE intersection, west of O'ahu, were receiving a strong emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal. The Coast Guard reported that they had no active signals and advised that they did not have any further information but asked the HCF to pass on any additional reports. At 0844 the following morning, the FLM reported to the Coast Guard that the strongest signal was being received 5 nautical miles northwest of HNL. The Coast Guard reported that they had a C130 airplane returning to HNL and would do a shoreline pass.

At 1239, the owner of the accident airplane reported to the HCF that his airplane was missing; an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued at 1322. The Coast Guard subsequently located the wreckage in the vicinity of the last recorded radar return on the east side of steep, mountainous terrain at an elevation of 1,900 ft.


Figure 1. Radar Tracking 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/22/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/04/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 127.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 60 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

A review of FAA airman records revealed that the 29-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, which was issued on May 4, 2017. The pilot held an FAA first-class medical certificate issued in August 2012 with no waivers or limitations.

The logbook indicated that his first flight in the Beech 19A was a checkout flight with a flight instructor on June 8, 2017, for a total of 1.3 hours. The airplane flight time log indicated that this flight was actually recorded on July 8, 2017. Three other flights in the Beech 19A were identified in the pilot's logbook, with the last logged flight on July 19, 2017. The airplane flight time log indicated that the pilot also flew on July 21, 2017 for a total time of 0.9 hour; this flight was not logged in the pilot's logbook. Based on the entries in both logbooks, the pilot had accumulated about 6.3 hours in the Beech 19A.

The pilot's total flight experience was about 127.5 hours. He logged 9.1 hours in the previous 90 days, and 5.1 hours in the previous 30 days. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N6142N
Model/Series: 19A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: MB-413
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5072 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The 4-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number MB-413, was manufactured in 1969 and was powered by a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-E2A engine, serial number L-24212-27A. A review of the maintenance logbooks showed that the airplane had accumulated a total airframe and engine time of 5,072.11 hours at the most recent annual inspection, dated February 1, 2017. The engine time since major overhaul was 1,613.51 hours, with 153.61 hours since top overhaul.


Dean "Dingo" Hutton, pilot 


Weight and Balance

A current weight and balance calculation form was located within the wreckage. The form indicated a maximum gross weight of 2,250 lbs, and an empty weight of 1,436.40 lbs. Additional paperwork located within the wreckage addressed the fuel capacity for the airplane. A highlighted section of the Beechcraft Shop Manual indicated that each of the 2 fuel tanks contained a visual measuring tab in the filler neck; the lower tab indicated 15 gallons, and the upper tab indicated 20 gallons. The owner of the airplane reported that he checked the fuel level before the accident flight and that each tank indicated about 17.5 gallons of fuel.

The occupant seating locations and their weights were verified by an investigator for the Department of the Medical Examiner.

The gross weight at the time of departure was estimated at 2,311 lbs, 61 lbs over the airplane's maximum certificated gross weight. Per the center of gravity envelope graph for the airplane, it was loaded near its forward center-of-gravity (CG) limit at takeoff. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHNL, 13 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 40°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 20°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 23 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1837 HST
Type of Airspace: 

An automated surface weather observation at HNL (elevation 13 ft msl, 12 miles southeast of accident site) was issued 1 minute after the accident. It indicated wind from 060° at 12 knots gusting to 23 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 2,500 ft and 3,600 ft, scattered clouds at 7,500 ft and 20,000 ft, temperature 27°C, dew point 20°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of mercury.

An automated surface weather observation at Wheeler Army Airfield (HHI), Wahiawa, Hawaii (elevation 843 ft msl, 5 miles northeast of accident site), was issued 1 minute after the accident. It indicated wind from 070° at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 2,000 ft, temperature 25°C, dew point 21°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  21.427222, -158.084722 (est) 

The wreckage was located on steep mountainous terrain at an elevation of about 1,900 ft. The airplane collided with densely-vegetated terrain in a nearly wings-level attitude about 50 ft below a ridge that ran perpendicular to the main north/south-running ridgeline. The highest point of the ridge line near the accident site was about 2,800 ft. The accident site was located south of Pohakea Pass (2,100 ft), an area commonly used by pilots to transition the inland mountains of O'ahu (see figure 2).


Figure 2. Accident Site Location

All major components of the airplane were located and identified in the immediate area of the main wreckage. The outboard section of the right wing, with aileron attached, separated from the inboard section at the aileron/flap junction and was located about 30 ft below the main wreckage. The inboard section of the right wing remained attached at the wing root. The right flap separated from the inboard wing section and was also located below the main wreckage.

The left wing remained attached to the airframe wing root, and the aileron and flap remained intact and attached to the wing. Extensive compression-like impact damage was noted to the outboard section of the wing assembly.

The tail cone was compressed and buckled to the left. The vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizers, and elevators remained attached to the tail. The elevator control cables and rudder cables remained attached to the flight control surfaces in the tail.

Extensive impact-related damage was noted to the cockpit and cabin area. The inboard attachment points of the two front seats were impact-separated from the floor assembly.

The engine remained attached to the airframe by the engine mount and was displaced upward and aft toward the firewall. The vacuum pump and drive coupler were visible from the top rear section of the engine. The carburetor was not visible due to the engine positioning and surrounding terrain.

The spark plugs were secure, and their respective leads were attached. The top spark plugs were removed. The spark plug electrodes remained undamaged and displayed normal operating signatures when compared to the Champion Spark Plugs "Check-a-Plug" chart AV-27. Both magnetos appeared to be securely mounted at their respective mounting pads with their harnesses secured.

The rocker box covers at cylinder Nos. 1, 2, and 4 were removed. The No. 3 cover was not removed due to corrosion of the cover screws. The rocker boxes and valve train components appeared undamaged with no evidence of oil contamination or foreign objects.

The combustion chamber of each cylinder was examined through the spark plug holes via a lighted borescope. The chambers remained mechanically undamaged with no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The valves were intact and undamaged.

The fixed-pitch, metal propeller blades remained partially attached to the crankshaft flange. Complete rotation of the crankshaft was not possible due to the engine position; however, partial rotation was obtained, and continuity to the vacuum pump drive was confirmed.

The propeller blades displayed leading edge gouging, torsional twisting, chordwise striations across the cambered surface, and trailing edge "S" bending. The signatures were consistent with rotational forces applied at the crankshaft at the time of impact.

The wreckage was not recovered and remained at the accident site. 



Medical And Pathological Information

The Department of the Medical Examiner, Honolulu, Hawaii completed an autopsy of the pilot and concluded that the cause of death was blunt impact to the torso.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens recovered from the pilot. The results of the testing were negative for carbon monoxide, volatiles, and tested drugs. The laboratory did not perform tests for cyanide. 

Additional Information

FAA-H-8083-25B (2016), Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, stated:


The detrimental effects of overloading on performance are not limited to the immediate hazards involved with takeoffs and landings. Overloading has an adverse effect on all climb and cruise performance, which leads to overheating during climbs, added wear on engine parts, increased fuel consumption, slower cruising speeds, and reduced range.



NTSB Identification: WPR17FA170 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, HI
Aircraft: BEECH 19A, registration: N6142N
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii standard time (HST), a Beech BE-19A, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837 HST.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1322 HST, July 29, when family members reported that the flight was overdue. The US Coast Guard located the wreckage later that day on steep, mountainous terrain at the last identified latitude and longitude .

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest. After flying about 9 minutes along that course, the target made a left turn, and was at a mode C reported altitude of 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl). It made descending and climbing turns during the next 6 minutes. During the last minute, it climbed and was at a maximum mode C altitude of 2,000 feet when the target disappeared.

HONOLULU (AP) — The wreckage of a single-engine aircraft that crashed near Kunia this summer, killing all four Oahu residents on board, likely will stay in the state-owned Honouliuli Forest Reserve where it went down.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Keith Holloway said the decision to recover the wrecked Beech 19A falls to its owner, Jahn Mueller.

Mueller, owner of Aircraft Maintenance & Flight School Hawaii, said last month he is not required to remove the wreckage from the mountain and has no plans to do so, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/2gBn9XM ).

The state Department of Land and Natural Resources, which has jurisdiction of the reserve, says it has determined the wreckage is not an environmental hazard and does not plan to retrieve it.

Holloway said if the wreckage is recovered, the National Transportation Safety Board would send an investigator to examine it.

But critics are questioning the decision to leave the wrecked Beech, considering another of Mueller's planes, a Piper PA 28-140, crash-landed in a Mapunapuna stream under a Moanalua Freeway bridge June 30, seriously injuring the three people on board.

"I believe the wreckage should be retrieved for the sake of my friends' lives," said Devlyn Perugini, who was friends with the Beech passengers. "It should be a priority to explore every possibility. I'm not trying to be spiteful or attack anyone, but there are too many things left unanswered."

Robert Katz, a Dallas-based flight instructor and 36-year pilot who tracks nationwide plane crashes, said unusual factors in the fatal Beech crash warrant wreckage recovery and a full investigation.

"Not making Mr. Mueller recover this plane is like allowing the fox to guard the henhouse," Katz said. "Two crashes in such a short time is a red flag. There are a lot of loose ends here. Not enough scrutiny."

Original article can be found here  ➤ http://www.mysanantonio.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, HI
Aircraft: BEECH 19A, registration: N6142N
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii standard time (HST), a Beech BE-19A, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837 HST.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1322 HST, July 29, when family members reported that the flight was overdue. The US Coast Guard located the wreckage later that day on steep, mountainous terrain at the last identified latitude and longitude .

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest. After flying about 9 minutes along that course, the target made a left turn, and was at a mode C reported altitude of 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl). It made descending and climbing turns during the next 6 minutes. During the last minute, it climbed and was at a maximum mode C altitude of 2,000 feet when the target disappeared.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii:  http://registry.faa.gov/N4244T

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N4244T
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1330 Hawaii standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N4244T, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent hard landing near Honolulu, Hawaii. The private pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The local personal flight departed Honolulu International Airport at 1320. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff from runway 04L, the engine lost power about 300 feet agl. He made an emergency landing at the nearest clear area, which was a river bed. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest under a highway bridge and caught fire.

After Harvey, insurance drones take to Texas skies: Companies are using the drones on a much larger scale to spare human adjusters from unsafe conditions

Laura Shell, center, a Travelers catastrophe claims specialist from Lexington, Va., trains to become a certified drone operator at the insurance company’s Windsor, Connecticut, training center. 



WINDSOR, Conn. — Insurance adjusters are bringing more drones with them than ever before as they head to Texas to assess the damage from Harvey.

Companies are using the drones on a much larger scale to record images, save time and spare human adjusters from venturing into potentially unsafe areas. Insurers have increased their fleets since the Federal Aviation Administration eased some restrictions a year ago, and tried them out in areas of the southeastern U.S. hit by Hurricane Matthew last October.

Travelers Insurance, based in Hartford, had 65 certified drone pilots as of Friday among the 600 employees deployed to the Houston area. Claims specialist Laura Shell, who will be in Texas this week, spent last week at the company’s training center in Windsor, Conn., learning how to pilot drones.

“This is great,” said Shell, 55, of Lexington, Va., whose job typically involves climbing a lot of ladders. “It’s going to allow me to get a look into areas that aren’t easily accessible and onto roofs and do it quickly.”

The drones will dramatically cut the time it takes to assess damage, according to Jim Wucherpfennig, vice president of claims for Travelers. The company has trained 300 employees as certified drone operators and expects to have about 600 by early 2018, he said.

Instead of making two or three trips to a house, often with an outside contractor trained in setting up scaffolds and ladders, the adjusters will now be able to do detailed exterior inspections in one trip. The drone’s camera is linked to an application on the employee’s phone, allowing them to take measurements and shoot high-definition photos and videos, often while the customer looks on.

The drones do have limitations. They cannot fly in heavy wind or rain, and they cannot go inside homes to inspect damage.

That’s one reason State Farm has decided, for now, not to use its drone fleet in Houston, spokesman Chris Pilcic said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.union-bulletin.com

Temporary use for helicopter tours could become thing of the past in Wilmington, North Carolina



WILMINGTON — Catching a bird’s-eye view of Downtown Wilmington could get tougher if a proposed amendment is passed. The Wilmington’s Planning Commission will vote on Wednesday to amend the land development code to prohibit helicopter tours as a temporary use within city limits. The amendment would not prohibit helicopter tours that leave from permanent airport facilities like ILM or the Cape Fear Regional Jetport, only those requesting temporary use permits

The move comes after City Council discussed several complaints it had received during a July 17 meeting, after which the council directed city staff to process an amendment.

The proposed amendment would state, “Other temporary recreation or entertainment related events or activities such as fairs or concerts except that the use of vehicles with vertical take-off and landing capabilities, including helicopters, for entertainment and recreational use shall be prohibited.”

Currently, “Special recreation or entertainment events, including helicopter tours, are classified as temporary uses and are permitted in commercial and industrial districts subject to the requirements of City Code Section 18-340,” according to documents included in the Planning Commission’s agenda.

While the city claims that helicopter tours are currently classified as temporary use activities, there is nothing in city documents that specifically mention helicopters.

According to the documents, since September of 2016, the city has issued four temporary use permits for helicopter tours. All four have operated from 712 Surry Street and have received a number of complaints due to noise and safety concerns.

City staff conducted research and compared Wilmington to 11 different benchmark cities including Asheville, Savannah, Charleston, and Chattanooga. According to the staff findings only two of the cities (Chattanooga and New Bern) would allow a helicopter tour company to operate as a temporary use, but as of yet have not had a tour company make the request.

Raleigh and Savannah do require special permits for permanent helicopter facilities and only in Charleston, specific regulations have been adopted that prohibit the takeoff and landing of helicopters in the city for entertainment uses.

The Planning Commission will meet Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the City Council’s Chambers to hold the public hearing on this issue as well as several others. If the Planning Commission approves the amendment, it would then have to go before City Council before approved.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://portcitydaily.com

Kitfox Super Sport, N429NC: Accident occurred September 02, 2017 at Afton Municipal Airport (KAFO), Lincoln County, Wyoming

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Afton, WY
Accident Number: GAA17CA518
Date & Time: 09/02/2017, 1500 MDT
Registration: N429NC
Aircraft: CROFT ROBERT C KITFOX SUPER SPORT
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced, so he applied power for a go-around. He added that the airplane "immediately banked left sharply." He attempted to recover by using rudder and aileron inputs, but the airplane impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was calm. The airplane was landing on runway 34.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain bank control during an attempted go-around.

Findings

Aircraft
Lateral/bank control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Hard landing
Approach-VFR go-around
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/05/2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 289.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 91.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 191.8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27.3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CROFT ROBERT C
Registration: N429NC
Model/Series: KITFOX SUPER SPORT NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: KA10123166
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/22/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 175.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotec
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: R2800 MKII
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 110 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAFO, 6221 ft msl
Observation Time: 2055 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 4°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 0°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.33 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MOUNTAIN HOME, ID (U76)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Afton, WY (AFO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1240 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: AFTON MUNI (AFO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 6220 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7025 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.702500, -110.942778 (est)

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N429NC

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA518
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 02, 2017 in Afton, WY
Aircraft: CROFT ROBERT C KITFOX SUPER SPORT, registration: N429NC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced, so he applied power for a go around. He added that the airplane "immediately banked left sharply". He attempted to recover by using rudder and aileron inputs, but the airplane impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was calm. The airplane was landing on runway 34.

Stinson SM-8A, N934M: Incident occurred September 01, 2017 at Paine Field (KPAE), Everett, Snohomish County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Seattle, Washington

Aircraft on landing, struck lights and went off the runway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N934M

Date: 01-SEP-17
Time: 19:22:00Z
Regis#: N934M
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: SM8A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EVERETT
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna 182P Skylane, N6849M: Accident occurred September 04, 2017 at Woodfield Airpark Inc (MU27), Lockwood, Dade County, Missouri

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Lockwood, MO
Accident Number: GAA17CA525
Date & Time: 09/04/2017, 1000 CDT
Registration: N6849M
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that the airplane touched down on the first third of the wet, grass runway at 80 mph with 10° of flaps extended. He added that, about two-thirds of the way down the runway, the airplane "hit a bump and became airborne." As the airplane touched down for the second time, he felt as though he was running out of room and applied the brakes. Subsequently, the end of the runway was approaching fast, and he attempted to turn the airplane, but it continued to slide off the runway because "the brakes were locked."

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's unstabilized approach and failure to go around, which resulted in a runway overrun on a wet, grass runway. 

Findings

Aircraft 

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Wet surface - Ability to respond/compensate

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Runway excursion
Nose over/nose down 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/02/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/12/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2251 hours (Total, all aircraft), 727 hours (Total, this make and model), 2130 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N6849M
Model/Series: 182 P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18263860
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  09/27/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3895 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-S
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator:
On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dawn
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSGF, 1270 ft msl
Observation Time: 1452 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 29 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 118°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 21°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 230°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LAMAR, MO (LLU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Lockwood, MO (MU27)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0930 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: WOODFIELD AIRPARK INC (MU27)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1050 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Rough; Wet
Runway Used: E
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2600 ft / 120 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.468056, -93.930278 (est)

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6849M

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA525
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 04, 2017 in Lockwood, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N6849M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, the airplane touched down on the first 1/3 of the wet grass runway, at 80 mph with 10° of flaps extended. He added, that about 2/3 of the way down the runway the airplane "hit a bump and became airborne again." As the airplane touched down for the second time, he felt as though he was running out of room and applied the brakes. Subsequently, the end of the runway was approaching fast and he attempted to turn the airplane, but continued to slide off the runway, "as the brakes were locked."

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Air Force drop zone request at Red Wing Regional Airport (KRGK), Goodhue County, Minnesota




City of Red Wing has been asked to consider the potential use of the Red Wing Regional Airport as a drop zone for Air Force training purposes.

The Airport Board will discuss and listen to recommendations on what the next steps are during a meeting 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 6.

An email for the request was sent from Brandon Schrader, chief of weapons and tactics to Rick Moskwa, Red Wing public works director, states:

"The 934th Airlift Wing is searching for a drop zone closer to MSP for training. This drop zone would be a tertiary drop zone for us and would potentially be used 50-80 times a year. We conduct airdrops from 500-1,000 feet," Schrader said. "Our airdropped loads are a 15 pound sandbag with a small parachute, which are under canopy for up to 30 seconds."

For more information, see the Airport Board agenda at www.red-wing.org/airportboard.html.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.republican-eagle.com

Mooney M20E, N9134V: Incident occurred September 04, 2017 at Decatur Municipal Airport (KLUD), Wise County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9134V

Date: 04-SEP-17
Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N9134V
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20E
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DECATUR
State: TEXAS

Private pilots take key role in bringing supplies to Harvey victims



GEORGETOWN, Texas – Jim Rice could have spent his Labor Day weekend visiting family in San Antonio or flying off to a remote beach.

Instead, on Sunday, he loaded up his four-seat, single-engine Mooney prop plane with diapers, bottled water, Gatorade, toilet paper, dog food and boxes of Girl Scout cookies and flew it 280 miles to Orange, Texas, which is still recovering from the devastating floods brought on by Tropical Storm Harvey.

It was Rice's ninth flight in and out of flood-ravaged areas in three days.

“It’s the right thing to do,” said Rice, 48, a NASA engineer who’s been flying small planes in his spare time for 25 years. “I want to help the people (who) can’t help themselves right now.”

Rice is part of a small army of citizen pilots and private plane owners who are taking a key role in the massive effort of getting supplies into Houston, Orange, Beaumont and other flood-damaged areas where roads are still impassable.

The U.S. military and groups such as the Red Cross also get supplies and workers into areas cut off from the rest of the world by Harvey’s record-breaking floods. But the private pilots and aircraft aficionados have been able to mobilize quicker than the government or NGOs and often beat the military to disaster areas with much-needed supplies, organizers and local officials in the impacted areas said.




Since Friday, the Cessnas, Pilatus, Mooneys and Falcon aircraft have been lifting off from Georgetown Municipal Airport, about 30 miles north of Austin, and flying supplies into the worst-hit areas, said René Banglesdorf, chief executive of Charlie Bravo Aviation, which buys and sells corporate planes, and who is coordinating the effort.

The effort is part of volunteer Sky Hope Network, a group that sends aviators to disaster zones. As of Sunday morning, they had dispatched about 40 planes from Georgetown and another 30 from other parts of the country, she said. The private aviators have donated more than $1 million in fuel, maintenance and pilot time, she said.

Though the military could drop more supplies in a single shipment aboard a C-130 than the smaller planes could bring in an entire afternoon, the private pilots often get to disaster zones quicker, Banglesdorf said. Unlike the military, where commands run through a bureaucracy, she could mobilize willing pilots into small airports within disaster zones within hours, she said. 

On Saturday, the group ran 27 missions into Beaumont with cases of bottled water when that embattled city lost drinkable water. “We’re snipers instead of bomber planes,” she said.

With large swaths of his county cut off from the rest of Texas by strangling floods, Orange County Commissioner John Gothia watched in awe on Friday as Cessna after Cessna landed at the small Orange County Airport in West Orange. The small planes got there well before the military did and dropped off much-needed cases of water, food and medicine, he said. They haven’t stopped coming since.

“It’s huge,” Gothia said. “We wouldn’t have been able to respond as fast without them.”

On Sunday, teams of the Texas National Guard, Red Cross workers and volunteers worked steadily to offload supplies from the planes and stack them onto pallets inside the airport’s only hangar. Later National Guard or other trucks take the supplies to one of four distribution centers around town.   

"It's been amazing," said Glynis Gothia, John Gothia's wife who was helping to inventory all the supplies. "It's been non-stop small planes from all over the place."

Eric Wood, 38, a corporate pilot from Georgetown, learned from a friend at around 3 p.m. Saturday that Beaumont was running low on diabetic supplies. After a few phone calls, Wood had secured a plane — a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 turboprop — and the medicine and flown it down to Beaumont.

“We put it all together in two or three hours,” said Wood, who was delivering supplies again to Orange on Sunday. “We got the plane fueled and loaded and we were off.”

Later on Sunday, Jerry Simon, a Houston investment banker, landed his Cessna Citation CJ1 jet aircraft at Orange County Airport. Inside was a 1,000-pound load that included bananas, sandwiches, water and diapers. Simon usually ferries cancer patients to treatment centers aboard his jet through a volunteer group called Angel Flight. When the opportunity arose to carry supplies to flood victims, he snatched it.

“It’s using this incredible asset for doing something good,” Simon said. “It’s pretty special.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.usatoday.com