Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Beech 19A Musketeer Sport, N6142N, wreckage likely to remain on mountain: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, Hawaii

HONOLULU (AP) — The wreckage of a single-engine aircraft that crashed near Kunia this summer, killing all four Oahu residents on board, likely will stay in the state-owned Honouliuli Forest Reserve where it went down.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Keith Holloway said the decision to recover the wrecked Beech 19A falls to its owner, Jahn Mueller.

Mueller, owner of Aircraft Maintenance & Flight School Hawaii, said last month he is not required to remove the wreckage from the mountain and has no plans to do so, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/2gBn9XM ).

The state Department of Land and Natural Resources, which has jurisdiction of the reserve, says it has determined the wreckage is not an environmental hazard and does not plan to retrieve it.

Holloway said if the wreckage is recovered, the National Transportation Safety Board would send an investigator to examine it.

But critics are questioning the decision to leave the wrecked Beech, considering another of Mueller's planes, a Piper PA 28-140, crash-landed in a Mapunapuna stream under a Moanalua Freeway bridge June 30, seriously injuring the three people on board.

"I believe the wreckage should be retrieved for the sake of my friends' lives," said Devlyn Perugini, who was friends with the Beech passengers. "It should be a priority to explore every possibility. I'm not trying to be spiteful or attack anyone, but there are too many things left unanswered."

Robert Katz, a Dallas-based flight instructor and 36-year pilot who tracks nationwide plane crashes, said unusual factors in the fatal Beech crash warrant wreckage recovery and a full investigation.

"Not making Mr. Mueller recover this plane is like allowing the fox to guard the henhouse," Katz said. "Two crashes in such a short time is a red flag. There are a lot of loose ends here. Not enough scrutiny."

Original article can be found here  ➤ http://www.mysanantonio.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, HI
Aircraft: BEECH 19A, registration: N6142N
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii standard time (HST), a Beech BE-19A, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837 HST.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1322 HST, July 29, when family members reported that the flight was overdue. The US Coast Guard located the wreckage later that day on steep, mountainous terrain at the last identified latitude and longitude .

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest. After flying about 9 minutes along that course, the target made a left turn, and was at a mode C reported altitude of 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl). It made descending and climbing turns during the next 6 minutes. During the last minute, it climbed and was at a maximum mode C altitude of 2,000 feet when the target disappeared.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii:  http://registry.faa.gov/N4244T

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N4244T
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1330 Hawaii standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N4244T, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent hard landing near Honolulu, Hawaii. The private pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The local personal flight departed Honolulu International Airport at 1320. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff from runway 04L, the engine lost power about 300 feet agl. He made an emergency landing at the nearest clear area, which was a river bed. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest under a highway bridge and caught fire.

After Harvey, insurance drones take to Texas skies: Companies are using the drones on a much larger scale to spare human adjusters from unsafe conditions

Laura Shell, center, a Travelers catastrophe claims specialist from Lexington, Va., trains to become a certified drone operator at the insurance company’s Windsor, Connecticut, training center. 



WINDSOR, Conn. — Insurance adjusters are bringing more drones with them than ever before as they head to Texas to assess the damage from Harvey.

Companies are using the drones on a much larger scale to record images, save time and spare human adjusters from venturing into potentially unsafe areas. Insurers have increased their fleets since the Federal Aviation Administration eased some restrictions a year ago, and tried them out in areas of the southeastern U.S. hit by Hurricane Matthew last October.

Travelers Insurance, based in Hartford, had 65 certified drone pilots as of Friday among the 600 employees deployed to the Houston area. Claims specialist Laura Shell, who will be in Texas this week, spent last week at the company’s training center in Windsor, Conn., learning how to pilot drones.

“This is great,” said Shell, 55, of Lexington, Va., whose job typically involves climbing a lot of ladders. “It’s going to allow me to get a look into areas that aren’t easily accessible and onto roofs and do it quickly.”

The drones will dramatically cut the time it takes to assess damage, according to Jim Wucherpfennig, vice president of claims for Travelers. The company has trained 300 employees as certified drone operators and expects to have about 600 by early 2018, he said.

Instead of making two or three trips to a house, often with an outside contractor trained in setting up scaffolds and ladders, the adjusters will now be able to do detailed exterior inspections in one trip. The drone’s camera is linked to an application on the employee’s phone, allowing them to take measurements and shoot high-definition photos and videos, often while the customer looks on.

The drones do have limitations. They cannot fly in heavy wind or rain, and they cannot go inside homes to inspect damage.

That’s one reason State Farm has decided, for now, not to use its drone fleet in Houston, spokesman Chris Pilcic said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.union-bulletin.com

Temporary use for helicopter tours could become thing of the past in Wilmington, North Carolina



WILMINGTON — Catching a bird’s-eye view of Downtown Wilmington could get tougher if a proposed amendment is passed. The Wilmington’s Planning Commission will vote on Wednesday to amend the land development code to prohibit helicopter tours as a temporary use within city limits. The amendment would not prohibit helicopter tours that leave from permanent airport facilities like ILM or the Cape Fear Regional Jetport, only those requesting temporary use permits

The move comes after City Council discussed several complaints it had received during a July 17 meeting, after which the council directed city staff to process an amendment.

The proposed amendment would state, “Other temporary recreation or entertainment related events or activities such as fairs or concerts except that the use of vehicles with vertical take-off and landing capabilities, including helicopters, for entertainment and recreational use shall be prohibited.”

Currently, “Special recreation or entertainment events, including helicopter tours, are classified as temporary uses and are permitted in commercial and industrial districts subject to the requirements of City Code Section 18-340,” according to documents included in the Planning Commission’s agenda.

While the city claims that helicopter tours are currently classified as temporary use activities, there is nothing in city documents that specifically mention helicopters.

According to the documents, since September of 2016, the city has issued four temporary use permits for helicopter tours. All four have operated from 712 Surry Street and have received a number of complaints due to noise and safety concerns.

City staff conducted research and compared Wilmington to 11 different benchmark cities including Asheville, Savannah, Charleston, and Chattanooga. According to the staff findings only two of the cities (Chattanooga and New Bern) would allow a helicopter tour company to operate as a temporary use, but as of yet have not had a tour company make the request.

Raleigh and Savannah do require special permits for permanent helicopter facilities and only in Charleston, specific regulations have been adopted that prohibit the takeoff and landing of helicopters in the city for entertainment uses.

The Planning Commission will meet Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the City Council’s Chambers to hold the public hearing on this issue as well as several others. If the Planning Commission approves the amendment, it would then have to go before City Council before approved.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://portcitydaily.com

Kitfox Super Sport, N429NC: Accident occurred September 02, 2017 at Afton Municipal Airport (KAFO), Lincoln County, Wyoming

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N429NC

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA518
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 02, 2017 in Afton, WY
Aircraft: CROFT ROBERT C KITFOX SUPER SPORT, registration: N429NC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced, so he applied power for a go around. He added that the airplane "immediately banked left sharply". He attempted to recover by using rudder and aileron inputs, but the airplane impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was calm. The airplane was landing on runway 34.

Stinson SM-8A, N934M: Incident occurred September 01, 2017 at Paine Field (KPAE), Everett, Snohomish County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Seattle, Washington

Aircraft on landing, struck lights and went off the runway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N934M

Date: 01-SEP-17
Time: 19:22:00Z
Regis#: N934M
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: SM8A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EVERETT
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna 182P Skylane, N6849M: Accident occurred September 04, 2017 at Woodfield Airpark Inc (MU27), Lockwood, Dade County, Missouri

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6849M

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA525
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 04, 2017 in Lockwood, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N6849M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, the airplane touched down on the first 1/3 of the wet grass runway, at 80 mph with 10° of flaps extended. He added, that about 2/3 of the way down the runway the airplane "hit a bump and became airborne again." As the airplane touched down for the second time, he felt as though he was running out of room and applied the brakes. Subsequently, the end of the runway was approaching fast and he attempted to turn the airplane, but continued to slide off the runway, "as the brakes were locked."

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Air Force drop zone request at Red Wing Regional Airport (KRGK), Goodhue County, Minnesota




City of Red Wing has been asked to consider the potential use of the Red Wing Regional Airport as a drop zone for Air Force training purposes.

The Airport Board will discuss and listen to recommendations on what the next steps are during a meeting 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 6.

An email for the request was sent from Brandon Schrader, chief of weapons and tactics to Rick Moskwa, Red Wing public works director, states:

"The 934th Airlift Wing is searching for a drop zone closer to MSP for training. This drop zone would be a tertiary drop zone for us and would potentially be used 50-80 times a year. We conduct airdrops from 500-1,000 feet," Schrader said. "Our airdropped loads are a 15 pound sandbag with a small parachute, which are under canopy for up to 30 seconds."

For more information, see the Airport Board agenda at www.red-wing.org/airportboard.html.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.republican-eagle.com

Mooney M20E, N9134V: Incident occurred September 04, 2017 at Decatur Municipal Airport (KLUD), Wise County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9134V

Date: 04-SEP-17
Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N9134V
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20E
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DECATUR
State: TEXAS

Private pilots take key role in bringing supplies to Harvey victims



GEORGETOWN, Texas – Jim Rice could have spent his Labor Day weekend visiting family in San Antonio or flying off to a remote beach.

Instead, on Sunday, he loaded up his four-seat, single-engine Mooney prop plane with diapers, bottled water, Gatorade, toilet paper, dog food and boxes of Girl Scout cookies and flew it 280 miles to Orange, Texas, which is still recovering from the devastating floods brought on by Tropical Storm Harvey.

It was Rice's ninth flight in and out of flood-ravaged areas in three days.

“It’s the right thing to do,” said Rice, 48, a NASA engineer who’s been flying small planes in his spare time for 25 years. “I want to help the people (who) can’t help themselves right now.”

Rice is part of a small army of citizen pilots and private plane owners who are taking a key role in the massive effort of getting supplies into Houston, Orange, Beaumont and other flood-damaged areas where roads are still impassable.

The U.S. military and groups such as the Red Cross also get supplies and workers into areas cut off from the rest of the world by Harvey’s record-breaking floods. But the private pilots and aircraft aficionados have been able to mobilize quicker than the government or NGOs and often beat the military to disaster areas with much-needed supplies, organizers and local officials in the impacted areas said.




Since Friday, the Cessnas, Pilatus, Mooneys and Falcon aircraft have been lifting off from Georgetown Municipal Airport, about 30 miles north of Austin, and flying supplies into the worst-hit areas, said René Banglesdorf, chief executive of Charlie Bravo Aviation, which buys and sells corporate planes, and who is coordinating the effort.

The effort is part of volunteer Sky Hope Network, a group that sends aviators to disaster zones. As of Sunday morning, they had dispatched about 40 planes from Georgetown and another 30 from other parts of the country, she said. The private aviators have donated more than $1 million in fuel, maintenance and pilot time, she said.

Though the military could drop more supplies in a single shipment aboard a C-130 than the smaller planes could bring in an entire afternoon, the private pilots often get to disaster zones quicker, Banglesdorf said. Unlike the military, where commands run through a bureaucracy, she could mobilize willing pilots into small airports within disaster zones within hours, she said. 

On Saturday, the group ran 27 missions into Beaumont with cases of bottled water when that embattled city lost drinkable water. “We’re snipers instead of bomber planes,” she said.

With large swaths of his county cut off from the rest of Texas by strangling floods, Orange County Commissioner John Gothia watched in awe on Friday as Cessna after Cessna landed at the small Orange County Airport in West Orange. The small planes got there well before the military did and dropped off much-needed cases of water, food and medicine, he said. They haven’t stopped coming since.

“It’s huge,” Gothia said. “We wouldn’t have been able to respond as fast without them.”

On Sunday, teams of the Texas National Guard, Red Cross workers and volunteers worked steadily to offload supplies from the planes and stack them onto pallets inside the airport’s only hangar. Later National Guard or other trucks take the supplies to one of four distribution centers around town.   

"It's been amazing," said Glynis Gothia, John Gothia's wife who was helping to inventory all the supplies. "It's been non-stop small planes from all over the place."

Eric Wood, 38, a corporate pilot from Georgetown, learned from a friend at around 3 p.m. Saturday that Beaumont was running low on diabetic supplies. After a few phone calls, Wood had secured a plane — a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 turboprop — and the medicine and flown it down to Beaumont.

“We put it all together in two or three hours,” said Wood, who was delivering supplies again to Orange on Sunday. “We got the plane fueled and loaded and we were off.”

Later on Sunday, Jerry Simon, a Houston investment banker, landed his Cessna Citation CJ1 jet aircraft at Orange County Airport. Inside was a 1,000-pound load that included bananas, sandwiches, water and diapers. Simon usually ferries cancer patients to treatment centers aboard his jet through a volunteer group called Angel Flight. When the opportunity arose to carry supplies to flood victims, he snatched it.

“It’s using this incredible asset for doing something good,” Simon said. “It’s pretty special.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.usatoday.com

Piper PA-28, N132AV, Vortex Aviation LLC: Accident occurred September 02, 2017 at Caledonia County Airport (KCDA), Lyndonville, Vermont

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine
Vermont Agency of Transportation; Burlington, Vermont

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Vortex Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N132AV

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA312
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 02, 2017 in Lyndonville, VT
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N132AV
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 2, 2017, about 1810 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-181, N132AV, was substantially damaged during collision with terrain during takeoff from Caledonia County Airport (CDA), Lyndonville, Vermont. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a written statement, the pilot said he performed a preflight inspection of the airplane in front of the five passengers he intended to fly that day with no anomalies noted. He demonstrated the corresponding movements between the flight controls, and the flight-control surfaces; highlighting the corresponding movement between the ailerons and the control yoke.

The pilot said he then completed a 20-minute flight with two of the passengers and returned to CDA. There, a friend volunteered to fly the fifth passenger in his airplane while the pilot flew with the third and fourth passenger. The pilot cautioned his friend about the density altitude, and how his airplane "needed more time to build speed" during the takeoff roll.

After taxi, the pilot positioned the airplane on the runway for departure and performed a flight control deflection check. He said there was corresponding movement with the flight control surfaces, but that the resistance in the controls was light. His concern led him to perform the check 8 times, before he initiated the takeoff.

The pilot stated that after rotation, the airplane was unresponsive, or slow to respond, in the roll axis when he applied aileron corrections. He elected to close the throttle, and perform a forced landing to the grass area beyond the departure end of the runway. The landing resulted in substantial damage to the wings, cabin, empennage, and the tail section of the airplane.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot reported 310 total hours of flight experience, of which 305 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 1984 and had accrued approximately 4,287.8 total aircraft hours. Its most recent annual inspection was completed June 8, 2017.

At 1855, the weather recorded at CDA included clear skies and calm wind. The temperature was 18°C, and the dew point was 6°C. The altimeter setting was 30.19 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site by an FAA inspector and a Vermont Agency of Transportation operations manager, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The airplane came to rest upright about 700 ft beyond the departure end of runway 20, and about 250 ft left of the runway centerline.

Flight control continuity was established from the individual flight controls to all flight control surfaces, except for the left aileron. The aileron was significantly impact damaged, and its control rod was fractured. The corresponding fractured control-rod piece inside the wing was observed to move with control yoke inputs.


Each half of the fractured control rod was harvested from the wreckage and retained for further examination at the NTSB Materials Laboratory.

Piper PA-44-180, N44K, SkyWarrior Avionics Inc: Accident occurred September 02, 2017 at Pensacola International Airport (KPNS), Florida

SkyWarrior Avionics Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N44K

Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Birmingham

Date: 02-SEP-17
Time: 18:48:00Z
Regis#: N44K
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PENSACOLA
State: FLORIDA

Aviation is among the rising careers in Polk County’s economy




LAKELAND — The future of employment in Polk County is up in the air.

And that does mean in the air.

“A piece (of Polk employment) that I would say is less well known is aviation and aerospace,” said Sean Malott, president of the Central Florida Development Council, the county’s business recruitment agency. “It’s been part of our economy because of Sun ’n Fun, but it’s really growing.”

Polk is the home to many aviation services companies, such as Draken International at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, and to companies that rely on aviation in the normal course of business, such as Saddle Creek Corp., a Lakeland warehouse and distribution company.

Other national companies have local distribution hubs that rely on aviation to move products, notably the Amazon fulfillment center in Lakeland.

A July 24 report from aircraft manufacturer Boeing forecast a global need for 637,000 new pilots and 648,000 new airplane technicians during the next 20 years.

That market demand created Polk State College’s Aerospace Program, which offers two- and four-year degrees for pilots and mechanics, said Eric Crump, the program’s director.

“In North America alone, that figure (demand for pilots) will be 117,000,” he said. “Boeing has done the study every year since 2012, and every year that number goes up.”

The study projected the demand for aircraft mechanics in North America through 2036 at 118,000.

“Part of the reason the numbers from Boeing are going up is the growing demand for air travel,” Crump said. “We’ve also got a lot of growth in the commercial air industry.”

Driving the latter is the growth of e-commerce, he added.

Virtually every overnight package delivered from a retailer to a residence travels by air, Crump said, and approximately 80 percent of other shipments do, too.

According to a May report on retailing from the Wall Street bank Credit Suisse, e-commerce accounts 17 percent of U.S. retail sales and will grow to 35 percent in five years.

Expanding programs

The growth in the travel and retail markets, combined with the fact that the U.S. military cannot provide enough trained pilots and mechanics, has left the job of providing them to the public and private educational institutions.

The Polk State program began with nine students when it opened in January 2013, Crump said. Today, it has 240 students in three associate in science degrees in professional pilot science, aerospace administration and aviation maintenance administration, and a bachelor of science degree in aerospace sciences geared to pilots or mechanics.

Six years earlier, the Polk County School District opened the Central Florida Aerospace Academy at the Lakeland Linder Airport, said Keith Smith, supervisor of the academy that is part of Kathleen High School.

It started with 55 freshmen and sophomores studying aerospace for pilots, avionics, engineering and aircraft mechanics as well as the standard high school subjects, Smith said. It now has 370 students and will probably reach its capacity of 500 students within the next three years.

The academy is one of only a handful of high schools in the nation that offers Federal Aviation Administration certification for mechanics, which allows students to get a job upon graduation, he said.

Like Polk State, the School District also started the academy in response to market demand, said Smith, who added he was also familiar with the numbers from Boeing’s annual survey.

So are his students, many of whom come from families with members in the aviation industry.

“They’ve been exposed to it and they like what they see,” he said. “I think most of them are looking at something they would be good at and make some money.”

New jobs in logistics

Warehousing and distribution has been a staple of the Polk economy for the past several decades because of its prime location in the center of Florida and between two of its largest metro areas, Tampa and Orlando.

The county will continue as a focus for new business and jobs, Malott said.

“Polk is recognized as one of the best locations for distribution not only because of its location but because of Polk’s reputation as business friendly,” he said.

Like the aviation industry, e-commerce also is transforming warehousing and distribution, also known as “logistics,” said Donna Slyster, chief information officer at Saddle Creek.

The company and the entire industry is transitioning from the traditional distribution model of supplying products by the truckload to brick-and-mortar stores to an e-commerce model of fulfilling individual orders for its retail clients and shipping them to a single residence, she said.

Slyster agreed with the industry consensus on the growth of e-commerce and its potential to provide new jobs.

“Consumers will desire to continue to consume,” she said. “Logistics is getting consumers the right product at the right time for the right price.”

Although logistics companies are turning increasingly to computers and robotics to manage so-called “omni-channel” distribution — handling both traditional and e-commerce at a single warehouse — those trends don’t necessarily mean a loss of good jobs, Slyster said.

“If anything, I see more warehouse jobs in the future even with automation as long as it’s omni-channel,” she said.

That’s because individual fulfillment on the e-commerce side requires as many as four times more employees as the traditional warehouse model, Slyster said.

It simply takes more people to fulfill individual orders than to fill a truck for a retail store.

Eric Schwarz, director of the Machine Intelligence Lab at the University of Florida, agreed with Slyster.

Loading a truck already can be entirely mechanized in the warehouse, Schwarz said. A human is still needed only at the loading dock to drive the truck away.

But in a warehouse fulfillment center like the ones operated by Amazon, filling order requires more human labor because of the range of products and the variety of their characteristics, including size and weight, he said.

A fulfillment center must handle everything from stuffed animals to chewing gum and items weighing from hundreds of pounds to a few ounces, Schwarz said.

Driving jobs may disappear

The one area that might see a dramatic change resulting in a loss of jobs is at the loading dock, Schwarz and Slyster agreed, because of the rise of self-driving, or “autonomous,” trucks.

Schwarz predicted distribution companies will begin using self-driving trucks in about five years. A driver will probably take the truck from the warehouse to some spot on the highway, probably a rest stop, where the autonomous system will take over until it reaches a highway stop near its destination, he said.

If that system proves viable, widespread adoption could come in about 10 years, Schwarz said.

Slyster offered a similar timeline.

“I would hope in five years, early adopters will be there,” said Slyster, adding the technology will become more common in 10 years.

One possible obstacle to widespread deployment of autonomous trucks, and autonomous vehicles in general, would be public and/or consumer acceptance, Schwarz and Slyster said.

“For hundreds of years, people have gotten worked up that automation is going to destroy jobs and that there’ll be no jobs left,” said Jim Dewey, director of economic analysis at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland.

What’s overlooked is that automation complements other jobs and boosts worker productivity, both leading to more jobs, albeit different kinds of employment, he said.

Robotics, computerization and other types of workforce automation won’t affect today’s workers in their 20s and 30s, who can more easily retrain for the next generation of employment, Dewey said.

Older workers at risk

It’s the older workers who will take the hit.

“Once you’ve reached a certain age, it’s not easy to retrain,” he said. “It follows that the person directly put out of work by this type of automation will never recover to his previous income level.”

If for no other reason, Dewey said, most workers reach their peak earning power in their 40s and 50s. Starting again in a new field means starting at the bottom of the career ladder.

For workers looking at new careers who can’t return to college, he said, “focus on job involving interpretative skills and common sense judgment and not repetitive, mechanical skills.”

That would include plumbers, electrician and home remodelers or in health care — the kinds of jobs still in demand, Dewey said.

“Those kinds of jobs have not suffered the same kind of decline,” he added. “What might be down for you won’t be down for your grandchildren. Just because your sky is falling doesn’t mean their sky is falling.”

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.newschief.com

Glastar GS-1, N65EW: Fatal accident occurred September 02, 2017 at Sulphur Creek Ranch (ID74), Cascade, Valley County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N65EW

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA195
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 02, 2017 in Cascade, ID
Aircraft: WALKER EDGAR E GLASTAR, registration: N65EW
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 2, 2017, about 1030 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Glastar GS-1, N65EW, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during maneuvering flight above a federal wilderness about 15 miles east-southeast of Cascade, Idaho. The private pilot was seriously injured, and his pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

According to the previous owner ("the seller") of the airplane, he lived in Idaho and based the airplane at Nampa Municipal Airport (MAN), Nampa, Idaho. About two weeks before the accident, he sold the airplane to another individual ("the buyer") who lived in Georgia. Several days before the accident, the buyer notified the seller that he was having a friend of his, who also lived in Georgia, come to Idaho to pick up the airplane and fly it back to Georgia. On September 1, the pilot met the seller at MAN to complete the transfer of the airplane. The seller offered to fly with the pilot in order to familiarize him with the airplane, but said that he could only do that if the seller could fly from the left seat, since he had never flown from the right seat. Alternatively, the seller also offered to provide a certified flight instructor (CFI) if the pilot preferred to fly from the left seat; the pilot opted for this course of action. Later that day, the pilot and CFI flew the airplane for about one and a half hours, after which the ownership transfer was completed. The pilot told the seller that he was leaving for Georgia the following morning, and did not mention any other flight plans to the seller. About 6pm the next day (September 2), the seller texted the pilot to ask how the return flight was progressing, and the pilot informed him of the accident.

According to the pilot, his cousin, who was also a pilot, lived in Idaho, and the two planned to take the airplane to a private backcountry airstrip, Sulfur Creek Ranch Airport, (ID74), Cascade, Idaho. At some point enroute to ID74, the pilot inadvertently flew into a "box canyon," and realized that the airplane was unable to out climb the terrain. He began executing a course reversal turn to escape, but the airplane stalled and impacted the ground. The pilot was able to use his mobile telephone to notify authorities of the accident. About 3 hours after the accident, a US Forest Service helicopter rendered assistance to the pilot. About an hour later, first responders were lowered to the pilot to prepare him for aerial extraction.

The wreckage was tightly contained on a rocky clearing in a forested area. The left wing was canted forward about 80 degrees, and the right wing was canted aft a similar amount. The two-blade propeller and hub had separated from the engine, and were located in a ravine about 150 feet forward of the wreckage. There was no fire. The impact site elevation was approximately 7,500 feet above mean sea level. According to the helicopter pilot who effected the recovery of the pilot, smoke from a nearby forest fire reduced visibility somewhat, but the smoke was "not an issue" of impediment or concern.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued in February 2017. On his application for that certificate, the pilot indicated that he had a total flight experience of 998 hours. According to the seller, the pilot told him that he (the pilot) did not have any backcountry flight experience, but that he hoped to move to Idaho and begin gaining backcountry flying experience.

FAA records indicated that the airplane was manufactured in 1998, and had an empty weight of 1,331 lbs. The records indicated that the current seller had purchased the airplane in November 2016, and that he was the third owner. According to the seller, the airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine, and he had accumulated about 40 hours on the engine since he had had it partially overhauled a few months after he purchased the airplane. The seller stated that the maximum allowable gross weight was about 1,990 lbs., and that the total fuel capacity was 50 gallons. Fuel records at NAM indicated that the airplane was fueled with 38.9 gallons at about 5 pm on September 1, which was several hours after the ownership transfer was completed. 

Review of meteorological information indicated that visual meteorological conditions (VMC) existed at the accident locale about the time of the accident, and first responder reports indicated that the area remained VMC for most of the day. Based on the upper air sounding data for the accident site for 1000 local time, the temperature would have been 19.2 degrees C at the accident site elevation.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

David Henderson passed away suddenly on September 2, 2017, as a result of a small aircraft accident near Sulphur Creek Ranch, Idaho. A loving husband, father, son and brother, he will be dearly missed by his family, countless friends, and co-workers. David was born May 22, 1967, at St. Alphonsus Hospital in Boise, Idaho, the first of two children born to Al and Pat Henderson.

He attended Cole Elementary, Fairmont Junior High, and graduated Capital High School in 1985. David was a starting offensive guard on Capital's Championship football team, and was very active in the Young Life community. Following high school he attended the University of Idaho and later enlisted in the United States Navy, where he earned his degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and worked as an air traffic controller at the Alameda NAS in California.

David moved back home to Boise where for the past 19 years he has been employed by Hewlett-Packard. His life was made complete when he met Tracy Jameson in 1998. They were married on January 9, 1999, and were blessed with three beautiful daughters.

David loved the Lord, and will always be remembered for his tremendously kind and generous heart. He quietly gave support and love to many people & families in need.

David is survived by his loving wife Tracy and three daughters Makenna, Faith and Hope; his parents Al and Pat Henderson; brother Dan and his wife Barbara and their son, Jack. He is survived by Jim and Sue Jameson, Tracy's parents, and Tracy's brother, Brad. There are many aunts, uncles, and cousins too numerous to mention who were important to David. 


A celebration of the gift of David's wonderful life will be held Saturday, September 16th at 1:00 p.m., at Vineyard Boise Church at 4950 N. Bradley St., Garden City, ID 83714. Please come in casual, bright attire, ready to laugh and share. No suits or mourning black! Funeral arrangements are being handled by Alden-Waggoner. In lieu of flowers, a memorial contribution can be made to Young Life, PO Box 4056, Boise, ID, 83711, or the Hope House, 7696 Old Bruneau Hwy, Marsing, ID 83639




CASCADE -- One man was killed and another injured when a small airplane crashed in Cascade Saturday morning.

The crash happened at 10:38 a.m. in a remote area near the Sulfur Creek Air Strip.

The Valley County Sheriff's Office says the pilot, 54-year-old Andrew D. Akin of Griffin, Georgia, told dispatchers his plane had stalled out and he had been forced to crash-land.

Akin said he was injured, and needed medical help. He also told the sheriff's office that his only passenger, 50-year-old David R. Henderson of Boise, was killed in the crash.

Sheriff's officials began working to find the wreckage and the injured man, pinging his cell phone to get a general location. A LifeFlight was then dispatched to see if they could reach the pilot.

After several more pings of the man's cellphone, however, his location was less clear. At 11:30 a.m., the United States Air Force contacted the sheriff's office with GPS information for the plane's emergency radio beacon. The pilot also called dispatch again, and was able to describe where he was.

After determining that the LifeFlight helicopter would not be able to rescue the pilot, the sheriff's office called in Two Bear Air out of Flathead County, Montana, while the LifeFlight and its crew waited at  Sulfur Creek Air Strip.

The sheriff's office also reached out to the Boise National Forest Dispatch Center, which was coordinating the fight against the Bearskin Fire.

A crew in a Forest Service helicopter spotted the wrecked plane at 1:20 p.m., and dropped a first-aid kit down to the pilot.

A little more than an hour later, Two Bear Air, lowered a rescue specialist down to the crash site to get the injured man. He was taken to the Cascade Airport, then flown to a local hospital by LifeFlight.

Henderson's body was recovered from the wrecked plane. The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified and will investigate the crash.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and friends of the 2 men involved in this crash," the sheriff's office wrote in a release.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ktvb.com



VALLEY COUNTY, ID - A Boise man is dead and a Georgia man is in the hospital following a weekend plane crash in Valley County.


About 130 a.m. Saturday, September 2nd, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office received a  9-1-1 transfer call from the Boise County Sheriff’s Office.


“The caller stated he was a pilot of a small airplane which had crashed near the Sulfur Creek Air Strip. (He said) his plane stalled and he was forced to crash land. The pilot stated he was injured and needed medical help. We were also told the sole passenger in the plane had died in the crash,” said valley County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Lt. Jason Speer.


The Valley County Sheriff’s Office Communications Center started working to dispatch rescuers to the crash site.


“We contacted the Boise County Sheriff’s Office and learned their Phase 2 9-1-1 equipment did not function correctly with this call. Contact with Verizon Wireless was made and a ping of the cell phone was conducted to get a general location of the pilot,” Speer explained. “Once GPS coordinates were received, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office requested Life Flight to launch -- to see if their crew could locate and provide medical assistance to the pilot. As further pings were conducted the location of the pilot was less clear.” 


About 11:30 a.m., the United States Air Force contacted the Valley County Communication Center and gave GPS location information on the plane.  “We also received another phone call from the pilot where he described his location. Given this latest information, it was clear Life Flight wouldn’t be able to affect the rescue of the pilot,” Speer said. 


Valley County Sheriff Patti Bolen then authorized the request for Two Bear Air out of Flathead County, Montana. “We provided this information to Life Flight, and they decided to land at the Sulfur Creek Airstrip to await Two Bear Air.  At that time, the Communications Center contacted the Boise National Forest Dispatch Center to advise we were bringing two helicopters into the area of Bearskin Fire Operations,” Speer said.    


About 1:20 p.m., a Forest Service helicopter crew located the crash and dropped a first aid kit to the pilot. “It was observed that the pilot was injured and needed assistance,” Speer stated. 


About an hour later, Two Bear Air lowered a rescue specialist down to the crash site and rescued the pilot.  He was then airlifted to the Cascade Airport and taken by Life Flight to Boise.


“Two Bear Air then transported a detective from the Valley County Sheriff’s Office to the crash site and lowered him and the rescue specialist down to the crash site,” Speer said. 


The deceased passenger was hoisted from the scene and transported to the Cascade Airport, where the Valley County Coroner took possession of the body.


The pilot has been identified as Andrew D. Akin, 54, of Griffin, Georgia.  The passenger has been identified as David R. Henderson, 50, of Boise. 


The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kivitv.com





David R. Henderson, 50, of Boise was killed and Andrew D. Akin, 54, of Griffin, Ga. was injured Saturday when their aircraft went down somewhere near the Sulphur Creek Ranch airstrip.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office released the men’s names Monday morning in a press statement describing the rescue effort. Dispatchers said the plane was attempting to make it to the airstrip before it crashed.

Akin, the pilot, was apparently able to call 911. Due to the remote, forested location of the crash, it took four hours for a mountain rescue crew out of Montana to retrieve him.

The circumstances of the crash remain under investigation, and the National Transportation Safety Board has investigators on the way, according to the sheriff’s office. Akin reportedly told dispatchers his plane stalled and he was forced to land it.

Dispatchers on Monday did not know where the plane was coming from before it crashed on its way to the airstrip.

The exact model of Akin’s plane was not clear, other than it was a personal plane. Photos show a small aircraft crashed amid trees on a mountainside.

Henderson died in the crash, Akin told dispatchers.

Akin’s call first reached Boise County’s 911 dispatch, which transferred him over to Valley County at 10:38 a.m.

Rescuers first tried to ping Akin’s cellphone to find his location. That apparently was not completely successful, but the sheriff’s office was able to instead use detailed GPS coordinates provided by the U.S. Air Force from an emergency radio beacon on the plane.

A traditional air ambulance wasn’t equipped for the terrain, so Valley County turned to Two Bear Air out of Montana, which specializes in mountain search and rescue.

A Forest Service helicopter flew over the area at about 1:20 p.m. and dropped off a first aid kit for Akin.

Two Bear Air arrived at 2:36 p.m. and flew Akin to Cascade, where paramedics with a ground ambulance cared for him until an air ambulance picked him up.

Two Bear Air also took a sheriff’s office detective to the crash site, and helped retrieve Henderson’s body.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.idahostatesman.com