Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Man who attacked flight attendant will pay back nearly $50,000 for plane’s diversion to Anchorage

A man who attacked and threatened to kill a flight attendant last year was ordered Tuesday in federal court to repay the nearly $50,000 it cost to divert the plane to Anchorage and accommodate more than 200 passengers on board.

Seksan Kumtong — now 52 — had been acting strangely since boarding a United Airlines flight from Los Angeles to Narita, Japan, last February, Brenden Ryan, an FBI special agent in Anchorage, wrote in an affidavit supporting a criminal complaint. Crew members decided to cut him off from receiving alcoholic beverages and he fell asleep in his seat for a period of the flight, the affidavit said. After he awoke, he became agitated when he was denied another drink, according to the affidavit.

The agitation gave way to violence and the affidavit said Kumtong struck a flight attendant in the face and pulled them to the ground.

“I will kill you,” he shouted at the flight attendant, along with other obscenities, the affidavit said.

Kumtong, who is from North Hollywood, California, has suffered from uncontrolled diabetes for years, his attorney, assistant federal defender Sam Eilers, said in a sentencing memorandum. When combined with alcohol consumption, that can lead to “severe hypoglycemia and consequent combativeness,” Eilers wrote. He said the reaction in this case was not an excuse, but does partially explain why Kumtong acted so violently.

The flight was diverted to Anchorage and vouchers were provided for meals and hotel stays to the airplane staff and 214 passengers on board, according to a sentencing memorandum filed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Charisse Arce. In total, the diversion cost $49,793.

During a sentencing hearing Tuesday morning, Judge Timothy Burgess said that “this is more than just an expensive inconvenience to everybody on that flight, but there’s actually a real victim in this case that has suffered physical consequences for his conduct.” The flight attendant has lasting medical conditions as a result of the assault, he said.

Kumtong pleaded guilty in November to a charge of interference with flight crew members and attendants.

As Burgess sentenced Kumtong to the five years of probation, he acknowledged the role the pandemic played in the decision: Kumtong is especially vulnerable to COVID-19 because of his diabetes, and serving a sentence in a prison would put him at risk because the virus spreads rapidly in congregate facilities and Alaska’s correctional facilities have been hit hard by the pandemic.

Kumtong will also pay back the $49,793 in restitution.

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 170, N170RH; accident occurred February 16, 2020 near High Point Airport (3KS5), Valley Center, Sedgwick County, Kansas






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: 


Location: Valley Center, KS
Accident Number: CEN20TA088
Date & Time: 02/16/2020, 1502 CST
Registration: N170RH
Aircraft: Cessna 170
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor, 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Factual Information

On February 16, 2020, about 1502 central standard time, a Cessna 170 airplane, N170RH, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 17 at the High Point Airport (3KS5), near Valley Center, Kansas. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries and the three passengers were uninjured. The fuselage was substantially damaged during the impact. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from 3KS5 at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he was taking off when the accident occurred. He conducted a preflight inspection of the airplane, and also determined the weight and balance of the airplane was within the airframe manufacturer's limits. He estimated that the takeoff ground run distance was about 1,400 ft, which was about 70% more than the owner's manual performance value for a normal takeoff with no wind using a level, paved runway. He walked some of the takeoff area and determined the grass runway was "wet, but a solid surface." The windsock indicated about 8 knots at 160°. With over 2,200 ft of runway available and a slight downhill gradient, he deemed the available runway length to be adequate. He held the brakes letting the airplane reach maximum power before he released the brakes.

The pilot reported that the aircraft was indicating 60+ mph with about 500 feet of runway left when he considered aborting the takeoff, but determined that was not safe due to the road that ran perpendicular to the end of the runway. He continued to accelerate and rotated at the end of the runway. The aircraft abruptly pitched up and the pilot lowered the nose. The aircraft began sinking and was not accelerating. the pilot determined the best course of action would be to land straight ahead in an open field. After touchdown the aircraft's right side spring landing gear broke and the spring leg dug into the ground. The airplane subsequently rotated, and the fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot indicated that there were no mechanical malfunctions with the airplane during the takeoff, and that the airplane had accelerated normally.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Unmanned (sUAS)
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/22/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/16/2019
Flight Time:  6200 hours (Total, all aircraft), 8 hours (Total, this make and model), 5000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 84 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N170RH
Model/Series: 170 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18030
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/09/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3593.6 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: C145
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAAO, 1421 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1454 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 133°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Valley Center, KS (3KS5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Valley Center, KS (3KS5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1502 CST
Type of Airspace: Airport Information
Airport: HIGH POINT (3KS5)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1395 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Soft
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2400 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.842778, -97.351389 (est)






Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N5185R: Accident occurred February 17, 2020 at Grays Creek Airport (2GC), Fayetteville, North Carolina

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

https://registry.faa.gov/N5185R

Location: Hope Mills, NC
Accident Number: ERA20LA105
Date & Time: 02/17/2020, 1350 EST
Registration: N5185R
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 4 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On February 17, 2020, about 1350 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172M, N5185R, was substantially damaged during takeoff in Hope Mills, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and three passengers sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to information provided by the operator, the purpose of the flight was to orient local youth with general aviation. The commercial pilot, who was also a flight instructor, was seated in the right cockpit seat. The passengers occupied the other three seats. During the takeoff, the passenger in the left seat reached for the control yoke and pulled back on the controls. The flight instructor called out for him to let go; however, the passenger did not relinquish the controls. The airplane pitched up to a near vertical position, stalled, then collided with terrain adjacent to the runway. Witnesses watching the takeoff reported that the engine continued to run normally during the accident sequence.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The fuselage and both wings were structurally damaged. The propeller separated from the engine. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5185R
Model/Series: 172 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: Cape Fear Aviation Maintenance Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFAY, 186 ft msl
Observation Time: 1421 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hope Mills, NC (2GC)
Destination: Hope Mills, NC (2GC)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Serious
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 34.893611, -78.843611 (est)

Two Longtime Boeing Board Members to Step Down: Plane maker’s board has undergone changes since the 737 MAX crashes in 2018, 2019



The Wall Street Journal
By Andrew Tangel and Emily Glazer
Updated February 17, 2021 6:02 pm ET

Boeing Co.said two longtime directors would step down as the aerospace giant’s board undergoes more changes in the wake of the 737 MAX crisis.

The Chicago-based plane maker said Wednesday that Susan Schwab and Arthur Collins would retire from the board and not stand for reelection at Boeing’s annual shareholder meeting April 20. The company didn’t immediately announce the nomination of new directors for the board.

Mr. Collins, who once led medical device-maker Medtronic PLC, has been a Boeing board member since 2007. Ms. Schwab, a former U.S. trade representative, has been on the board since 2010. The Wall Street Journal reported the planned departures earlier Wednesday.

“Boeing has benefited enormously from their committed and dedicated service,” Chairman Larry Kellner said in a statement.

The departures have been under consideration in recent weeks and are part of an effort following the MAX crisis to bring people with fresh perspectives onto the board, people familiar with the matter said. Four of Boeing’s 12 directors joined the board after the accidents.

Boeing’s board has faced scrutiny from investors and U.S. lawmakers ever since two of its 737 MAX jets crashed, in October 2018 and March 2019, claiming 346 lives. A year ago, the board added two new directors with safety and engineering experience, replacing two longtime members. Since the accidents, Boeing’s board has also created a permanent safety committee and split the roles of chairman and chief executive.

The accidents led to a nearly two-year grounding of the 737 MAX before U.S. regulators approved it to resume passenger flights late last year. The MAX crisis, which Boeing has estimated will cost it about $20 billion, has since been compounded by the Covid-19 pandemic and the blow it dealt to global air travel and demand for new passenger jets.

Current and former Boeing directors and executives during the MAX crisis are facing a shareholders’ lawsuit that alleges lax board oversight as developments about the crashes unfolded. The suit, filed in Delaware’s Court of Chancery, cites internal Boeing documents and in part claims the company’s board failed to challenge then-CEO Dennis Muilenburg on the 737 MAX’s safety. It also alleges current chief David Calhoun later exaggerated to journalists the extent of the board’s oversight between the two accidents as well as after.

The company is seeking to dismiss the lawsuit, saying it lacks merit and “presents a misleading and incomplete picture” of Boeing’s actions and the board’s oversight. Boeing has said the lawsuit provides a distorted account of Mr. Calhoun’s interviews, saying the board’s extensive and active oversight was accurately explained during those media interviews.

Boeing’s board is a mix of long-serving directors and fairly recent additions. Mr. Calhoun, who became CEO early last year, has been a Boeing director since 2009. Mr. Kellner, a former airline executive, joined the board in 2011.

A year ago, Boeing added Akhil Johri, former finance chief at aerospace manufacturer United Technologies Corp. , and Steven Mollenkopf, chief executive of chip maker Qualcomm Inc. They succeeded longtime directors.

Since then, former U.S. Ambassador Caroline Kennedy, a director since 2017, has stepped down. She was succeeded by Lynne Doughtie, head of auditing firm KPMG’s U.S. operation. John Richardson, a retired Navy admiral, was named to the board in October 2019.

Two proxy advisory firms last year raised questions about board members’ oversight and recommended shareholders vote against some Boeing directors to protest their handling of the MAX crisis. Among the five board members who faced substantial opposition at last year’s annual meeting, Ms. Schwab and Mr. Collins secured backing from less than 60% of votes cast. They and the other directors overall won a majority in the shareholders’ election

Ms. Schwab has served on other corporate boards alongside fellow Boeing directors. She sits on the board of machinery maker Caterpillar Inc., where Mr. Calhoun is presiding director, according to a securities filing. Mr. Muilenburg previously served on Caterpillar’s board before his ouster as Boeing CEO in late 2019. Ms. Schwab also sits on the Marriott International Inc. board with Mr. Kellner, who is the hotel company’s lead director.

Loss of Control in Flight: Schweizer 269C-1, N731TA; accident occurred February 17, 2020 at Ormond Beach Municipal Airport (KOMN), Volusia County, Florida



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N731TA

Location: Ormond Beach, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA20CA104
Date & Time: February 17, 2020, 15:15 Local 
Registration: N731TA
Aircraft: Schweizer 269C 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The student pilot reported that, while on his first solo flight in a helicopter, the wind began to increase. Concerned the wind may become unsafe, he decided to make a full-stop landing and complete the flight. After coming in for landing and while hovering over the runway, an air traffic controller instructed the student to exit the runway via the nearest taxiway. As he made a right pedal turn onto the taxiway, the helicopter began to yaw aggressively right. Concerned the helicopter was encountering a loss of tail rotor effectiveness, he applied additional right pedal and forward cyclic to increase airspeed and abort the landing. The helicopter began to spin uncontrollably and gain altitude. He rolled off the throttle and pulled aft cyclic and full collective, the right skid impacted the ground, and the helicopter then rolled onto its right side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tailboom and fuselage. The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's improper pedal and cyclic input while maneuvering, which resulted in a loss of helicopter control.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Aircraft (general) - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-hover Other weather encounter
Maneuvering-hover Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Maneuvering-hover Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing Roll over

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 39,Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: December 19, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 64.6 hours (Total, all aircraft), 13.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 14 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Schweizer
Registration: N731TA
Model/Series: 269C 1
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0236
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/03/2020, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2717.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-G1A
Registered Owner: Tomlinson Aviation Inc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Tomlinson Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOMN, 29 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2050 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 171°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Atual: None / None
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ormond Beach, FL (OMN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ormond Beach, FL (OMN)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  EST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Ormond Beach Muni (OMN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 27 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4005 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.301111, -81.113889 (est)



Abnormal Runway Contact: Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, N2763V; accident occurred February 18, 2020 at Spirit of St. Louis Airport (KSUS), St. Louis County, Missouri













Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board
 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N2763V


Location: Chesterfield, MO
Accident Number: CEN20LA095
Date & Time: 02/18/2020, 1850 CST
Registration: N2763V
Aircraft: Cessna 177RG
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Factual Information

On February 18, 2020, about 1850 central standard time, a Cessna 177RG airplane, N2763V, sustained substantial damage during landing at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport (SUS), Chesterfield, Missouri. The student pilot and flight instructor were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The flight instructor reported the landing gear selector handle was down and the gear down indicator (green) light was illuminated on short final. The right main landing gear appeared to be fully extended when viewed out the right-side window. After the airplane touched down on the runway, the landing gear collapsed.

The student pilot reported the flight instructor stated "green clear to land" as the airplane crossed the airport perimeter fence on final approach. The student pilot completed a before landing "GUMPS" check and placed his hand on the landing gear handle to ensure it was in the down position. Landing touchdown was "soft;" however, the airplane started "sinking" during the rollout. The belly of the airplane subsequently contacted the ground.

A postaccident examination of the landing gear system was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector with assistance from a local maintenance facility. The airplane was placed on jacks and the landing gear was retracted and extended 5 times with no anomalies noted. The landing gear system functioned normally, locking in both the up and down positions. The cockpit gear position indicator lights operated normally. The landing gear was actuated using the emergency extension system with no anomalies observed.

The airplane sustained extensive scraping damage to the lower fuselage, which included the aft, exterior portion of the nose landing gear doors, and the forward, outboard portion of the steps installed on the main landing gear struts. The main wheel tires appeared to exhibit normal wear and without any transverse abrasion.

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/05/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  57 hours (Total, all aircraft), 48 hours (Total, this make and model), 14 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):None 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/25/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/01/2018
Flight Time:  4322 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11 hours (Total, this make and model), 4163 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 73 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2763V
Model/Series: 177RG No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number:177RG0687 
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/15/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:2800 lbs 
Time Since Last Inspection: 56 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4231 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-A1B6D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: SUS, 463 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1854 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: 
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chesterfield, MO (SUS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Chesterfield, MO (SUS)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1800 CST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Spirit of St. Louis (SUS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 463 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.657222, -90.651111

Low Altitude Operation/Event: Bell OH-58A, N288NS; accident occurred February 18, 2020 in Calexico, Imperial County, California



Forward Fuselage 

 Top of Helicopter and Engine Compartment 

 Cabin Area 

Left Side of Helicopter 


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N288NS

Location: Calexico, California 
Accident Number: WPR20CA092
Date & Time: February 17, 2020, 19:15 Local
Registration: N288NS
Aircraft: Bell OH 58A 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

Analysis

The pilot reported that, during an agricultural application flight, he sprayed a row on the field and then climbed the helicopter to avoid wires on the south side of the field. He then turned the helicopter right and began to descend back to the field. After he cleared the wires, he entered the field's spray line and began raising the collective and noticed that the torque gauge was responding; however, he failed to arrest the descent, and the helicopter subsequently impacted terrain and came to rest on its right side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to arrest the descent rate while maneuvering at low altitude, which resulted in impact with terrain.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Descent rate - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-low-alt flying Miscellaneous/other
Maneuvering-low-alt flying Low altitude operation/event (Defining event)
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Post-impact Roll over

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 41,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 18, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: April 11, 2019
Flight Time: 2713 hours (Total, all aircraft), 713 hours (Total, this make and model), 2583 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell 
Registration: N288NS
Model/Series: OH 58A No Series 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1970 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted (Special) 
Serial Number: 70-15288
Landing Gear Type: High skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 28, 2019 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 32 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Turbo shaft
Airframe Total Time: 11218 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: C20C SERIES
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 420 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: IPL,-54 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Imperial, CA (IPL) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Imperial, CA (IPL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 10:15 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.133335,-115.699996(est)

Cessna 150G, N8428J: Accident occurred February 17, 2021 near Maryland Airport (2W5), Indian Head, Charles County, Maryland

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Herndon, Virginia 


Location: Indian Head, MD 
Accident Number: ERA21LA132
Date & Time: February 17, 2021, 09:45 Local 
Registration: N8428J
Aircraft: Cessna 150G
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On February 17, 2021, about 945 eastern standard time, a Cessna 150G, N8428J, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Maryland Airport (2W5), Indian Head, Maryland. The flight instructor and pilot-rated student were uninjured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. 

According to the pilot-rated student, he kept his airplane tied down on the ramp at the Potomac Airfield (VKX), Friendly, Maryland. On the day of the accident, he was flying with his flight instructor to prepare for his initial flight instructor checkride. He added 10 gallons of fuel to the fuel tanks, conducted a preflight inspection, and rocked the wings to free any water that might have been trapped in the fuel tank before draining the fuel tank sumps. He noted no water from the wing sump fuel samples; however, there was water in the fuel drained from the fuel strainer drain. He also noted that the right wing sump did not "flow as freely" as the left wing sump.

About 90 minutes into the lesson while performing a left chandelle maneuver, the engine “hiccuped” momentarily. The instructor and pilot-rated student climbed to 4,000 ft msl and proceeded about 10 miles to 2W5 for a precautionary landing. The pilot-rated student reported that upon arrival over 2W5, he descended in a circle over the airport. Upon arriving abeam the runway numbers on a right downwind leg to runway 20, the airplane was still several hundred feet above pattern altitude. He stated that the instructor took control of the airplane and initiated a side slip to lose altitude, keeping the throttle set to 1,400 rpm to ensure that the engine did not lose power. The instructor stated that flaps were not extended during the side slip because the airplane’s airspeed was “above the white arc.” When the airplane reached the midpoint of the 3,740-ft runway at an indicated airspeed of 100 knots, the instructor executed a go-around maneuver. During the maneuver, after the airplane climbed about 300-400 feet, the engine stopped producing power and the propeller windmilled momentarily before stopping. With inadequate time to perform remedial actions, the instructor executed a forced landing into the trees. The empennage and both wings sustained substantial damage. 

The airplane and engine were recovered and retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N8428J
Model/Series: 150G Aircraft
Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAA,73 ft msl
Observation Time: 09:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C /-14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 21000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.44 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Friendly, MD (VKX)
Destination: Indian Head, MD (2W5)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.585556,-77.067778
 











BRYANS ROAD, Maryland (ABC7) — A plane crashed near Bryans Road, Maryland, state police reported Wednesday. The plane landed in the treetops and fell roughly 65 feet to the ground, according to the public information officer for the Charles County Fire Department.

Two people were aboard the plane, a male pilot and a female passenger. Both individuals refused medical attention and are being interviewed by Maryland State Police.

The fire department received a call around 9:47 a.m. for the report of a small plane down near Maryland Airport. Officials were able to ping the cell phone the pilot was using to get a better location of where the plane crashed, according to the PIO.

Fire officials were able to find the pilot along a bike trail off Bumpy Oak Road in Indian Head, Maryland roughly 300 yards down the trail.

Officials say they apparently experienced engine trouble and tried to return to Maryland Airport but were unsuccessful.

Maryland State Police say hazmat crews are on the scene of the crash to assist with spilled fuel and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been notified of the incident.

Piper PA-23-250 Aztec C, N6521Y: Fatal accident occurred April 30, 2020 near Hemet-Ryan Airport (KHMT), Riverside County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California
Piper Aircraft
Lycoming Engines

Landcare Aviation Inc


Location: Hemet, CA
Accident Number: WPR20LA135
Date & Time: 04/30/2020, 1230 PDT
Registration: N6521Y
Aircraft: Piper PA-23-250
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Other Work Use 

On April 30, 2020, about 1230 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-23-250 airplane, N6521Y, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hemet, California. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial survey flight.

According to a second pilot, employed by the same company, he and the accident pilot were conducting aerial survey work over selected areas of land around the city of Palm Springs, California. The two airplanes departed Chino Airport (CNO) to begin the survey flights in two separate areas and remained in radio contact. between 1140 and 1210, the second pilot heard a distress call that sounded like "I'm going down". He attempted to communicate via radio and received a second unintelligible reply. The second pilot reported that he observed, via a flight navigation application on his iPad, the accident airplane descending rapidly.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted steep mountainous terrain and came to rest inverted about 15 miles west of the intended aerial survey area. The debris path was about 300 ft in length, oriented on a heading of about 270°. One propeller was unaccounted for. All other major structural components of the airplane were located within the debris path.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6521Y
Model/Series: PA-23-250
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Landcare Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHMT, 1514 ft msl
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Chino, CA (KCNO)
Destination: Chino, CA (KCNO)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.618056, -116.865556 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Paul Andre Mitchell
1992 - 2020

On Thursday, April 30, 2020, Paul Andre Mitchell, tragically died in a plane crash at the age of 27 years old in Riverside County, California.

Paul was born on August 10, 1992 in Waltham, Massachusetts to Locksley and Viviene Clarke-Mitchell. Paul graduated from Waltham High School in 2011 and received his Bachelor of Science from Dowling College in 2016 in Aviation Management.

He attended Kennedy Middle School and the Ezra C. Fitch Elementary School. While in elementary school, he received his first job as a newspaper carrier. In high school, he worked at an after-school program for youth at the Waltham Boys and Girls Club and humbly worked on a farm when he was in college. From the age of 2 years old, Paul was interested in flying and wanted to become a pilot when he first entered into the cockpit of an American Airlines plane where he got his first wings from the captain of the plane.

He was determined in his heart to become a pilot. He worked various positions for airline companies and airports through college and his professional career and achieved 1,000 hours of flying time 2 months before his death. He enjoyed reading, photography, and traveling where one of his positions provided him the opportunity to travel to Malta, Africa, which was one of his favorite experiences.

Paul was a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, East Coast Aero Club, and Alpha Eta Rho Fraternity.

Paul is survived by his parents, Locksley and Viviene, his brother Mark Mitchell (and wife Lisa), his sister Monique Mitchell, aunts, uncles, cousins, a nephew, girlfriend Jennifer Sylvia and close friends.

The Brasco & Sons Memorial Chapels of Waltham assisted the family with arrangements.

https://www.tributearchive.com

Paul Andre Mitchell
Waltham, Massachusetts
August 10, 1992 - April 30, 2020


WALTHAM, Massachusetts — When Paul Mitchell was very little, his family took a plane trip to visit relatives in Jamaica. The crew invited the chubby-faced child into the cockpit. Not only did Paul become enamored with that interaction — the gears, the view and the possibility they brought — but it set him on a trajectory that would shape the rest of his life.

"Ever since then, his goal from Day 1 was to learn how to fly planes and then become a pilot for a commercial airline," said Mark, Paul's older brother.

Paul was just months from making that part of his lifelong dream a reality when, on April 30, he died in a crash while flying a twin-engine Piper PA-23 near Bautista Canyon in Riverside County, California. He was 27.

Paul was born and raised in Waltham, the youngest of three children. He attended Fitch and MacArthur elementary schools. He then went to Kennedy Middle School and played sports for and graduated from Waltham High School in 2011 and spent a lot of time at the Waltham Boys & Girls Club.

He was the baby of the family and was adored by his parents, his aunts and his siblings — who were convinced, though their mom would never say it, he was her favorite. Paul — the tall, gentle giant — was everyone's favorite.

When Paul's older brother and sister graduated from college in 2008, his parents threw them a party at a hotel. At the event, people were taking turns congratulating the duo when Paul took the mic. His siblings thought the high school sophomore was about to congratulate them.

But in true Paul style, he said, "My name is Paul Mitchell, I'm a future pilot: I'm starting to take donations for flights around the world. Think of it as an investment."

He promised anyone who donated that once he got his pilot's license, he would put it toward their flights.

His family thought it was hilarious.

"We were dying," Mark said. "He made a decent amount of money that day."

Family, friends and children he mentored at the Boys & Girls Club and acquaintances alike all knew Paul as playful, upbeat and kind. Paul and his friends racked up inside jokes, and he was quick and generous with his smile. He just wanted people around him to be happy. He would wow with his dance moves and had a laugh that friends described as nothing less than infectious.

But after being diagnosed with a concussion his senior year in high school on the football field, his dream and his own happiness came into question. He went to see a doctor and, during a scan, found a cyst on his pituitary gland. If not treated, it could cause blindness and would mean he would not pass Federal Aviation Administration health requirements that would allow him to fly.

Paul — the same guy who as a child saved every single paper airplane cutout he lovingly designed, complete with their make and model and carefully drawn windows — was devastated.

But with the support of his mother, Paul got the surgeries necessary and was eventually cleared by the FAA.

"It was probably his happiest day when he got that letter and got cleared by the FAA," Mark said.

Paul studied aviation at Dowling College on Long Island, was known to fly his then-girlfriend from Waltham to her home in New Hampshire, and learned even more about flying. It seemed Paul could tell you anything about the mechanics of it all. Anytime there was a crash, Paul would research it in an effort to understand what happened.

"That's why it came as such a surprise — this plane crash," Mark said.

After college, Paul worked as a customer service representative at a private jet company and then worked at a handful of similar companies in the area. He spent nearly two years as a flight manager at PlaneSense in New Hampshire before he got his most recent job in California flying for a company that surveyed land. The gig would take him to several states, and he loved it. Not least because, instead of having to pay to fly to log hours to get to his next goal, he was being paid to fly.

"Not everyone can say that they love their job. He loved it," Mark said. Paul had plans to work for a commercial airline and had hoped to get a job with Delta in September, settle down with his girlfriend and, eventually, start his own airline in the Caribbean.

Though Paul was seven years younger than he, Mark said in many ways he looked up to Paul for his ability and determination to live his life fully doing what he loved most.

He wasn't the only one who looked up to Paul.

Paul was a "Club Kid" who spent much of his youth at the Waltham Boys & Girls Club and then his early adult years gave back as a staff member and mentor.

Mark said he's been getting texts from other Club Kids saying they looked up to him and sharing how much of an impact he had on them.

"He was kind, caring, and had a great sense of humor," said Waltham Boys & Girls Club Executive Director Erica Young. "He lit up any room he walked into and could easily put a smile on anyone's face. He was a great role model for the youth in our community and made a positive impact on anyone he met."