Sunday, August 20, 2017

Drone flies close to Southwest flight on its way to Denver International Airport (KDEN)

DENVER - A Southwest Airlines flight on its way to Denver International Airport Saturday evening came close to a drone about 8 miles northeast of the airport, a spokesperson told 9NEWS.

Heath Montgomery with DIA said the drone flew near the plane just before 4 p.m. but doesn't have the distance confirmed - early reports put it at 100 feet from the plane.

The plane was able to land without diverting or any other type of incident, Montgomery said.

FAA controls the airspace five miles out from the airport and said the issue was more about altitude than how close it was to the airport.

Drones get close to planes about a dozen times per year, Montgomery said.

He said the reason the airport is putting out the information at all is so people know the rules regarding drones: no drone can interfere with, or cause a collision hazard with a manned aircraft.

Ian Gregor with the FAA said people who do fly drones close to aircraft can face civil penalties - fines - from the FAA of more than $1,400 per violation.

If the drone operator violates public safety laws, they could face criminal charges up to federal criminal charges.

Story and video ➤ http://www.9news.com

Boeing A75N1(PT17), N26M, Mid Atlantic Air Museum: Accident occurred June 08, 2014 at Reading Regional Airport (KRDG), Berks County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N26M

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA280
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 08, 2014 in Reading, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: BOEING A75N1(PT17), registration: N26M
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane prepared for landing with a reported 70-degree quartering left headwind at 9 knots. After touching down on the main landing gear, and as the pilot lowered the tail, the airplane began turning to the left. The pilot applied right rudder and brake in an attempt to arrest the turn, but was unsuccessful. The airplane turned 90 degrees to the left and skidded sideways before the right wheel separated from the landing gear. The lower right wing then contacted the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the outboard portion of the wing. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot further commented that during the landing, the wind appeared to be in a state of change and that the winds had shifted to a quartering tailwind during the accident sequence.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of control while landing the tailwheel-equipped airplane in a quartering tailwind. A factor in the accident was the changing wind conditions.

Conyers, Georgia: No-drone ordinance for horse park



CONYERS — The Georgia International Horse Park is officially a no-drone zone.

The Conyers City Council passed on Wednesday an ordinance prohibiting the use of unmanned aircraft systems – or drones – within the boundaries of the horse park, including Cherokee Run Golf Course.

City Councilman Chris Bowen introduced the measure and said that the issue was raised when some visitors to the horse park complained that drones had come into close contact with them while they were walking or biking on the trails.

“There was also a concern with spooking horses on the trails,” Bowen said.

While the Federal Aviation Administration controls the airspace, the ordinance states that the city can adopt prohibitions on unmanned aircraft systems that “interfere with or harass an individual who is engaged in” recreational pursuits such as equine events, hiking, bicycling, canoeing and nature observation.

The penalty for violating the ordinance, like any other city ordinance, is up to six months in jail and $1,000 fine per violation.

Professional filming and production will be permitted if the city is first notified and gives approval for that filming.

Read more here ➤ http://www.rockdalenewtoncitizen.com

Cessna 170B, N3442D: Accident occurred June 04, 2014 at Totatlanika River Airport (9AK), Nenana, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3442D

NTSB Identification: ANC14CA037
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 04, 2014 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3442D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he was departing in his airplane from the downhill-sloping (east) runway at 9AK with a slight tailwind. He said that, as the airplane tried to become airborne, the tailwind increased considerably, and the airplane would not climb. The airplane struck brush that encroached the east end of the runway area and veered left into brush and small trees. He stated that no mechanical failures or malfunction of the airplane precluded normal operation. Damage included the separation of the right outboard elevator. (Note: Photographs of the airstrip provided by the pilot showed that 9AK was a short, narrow, rough-surfaced airstrip with brush growth encroachment.)

Piper J3C-65 Cub Special, N46286, Paramount Air Service: Incident occurred August 20, 2017 in Green Creek, Middle Township, Cape May County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N46286

Aircraft force landed in a field.

Date: 20-AUG-17
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N46286
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: J3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: BANNER TOW
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GREEN CREEK
State: NEW JERSEY

A pilot was injured after a banner plane made a hard landing in Middle Township, Cape May County, New Jersey Sunday afternoon.

The 20-year-old pilot was flying a Piper J3C-65 banner tow aircraft from Paramount Air around 2 p.m. As he was circling to land, the aircraft lost power and made a hard landing in a marsh area near the Paramount Air Service building on Stites Avenue. 

The pilot, who was the only person inside the plane, suffered lacerations to his head and was taken to the hospital. Officials have not yet revealed his condition.

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and police are investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: NYC89LA147
The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 40774.
Accident occurred Saturday, June 10, 1989 in ERMA, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/1991
Aircraft: PIPER J-3C-65, registration: N46286
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

THE PILOT WAS UNDER TRAINING FOR A BANNER TOWING LETTER OF AUTHORIZATION AND WAS PRACTICING PICKUPS OF FULL SIZE BANNERS. AFTER PICKUP, AND AT AN ALTITUDE OF 250 FEET, THE AIRPLANE STALLED AND DESCENDED INTO THE TREES. THE PILOT STATED THAT THE PICKUP WAS O.K., BUT THE WINDS WERE GUSTY AND IT WAS A HOT DAY.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
FAILURE OF THE PILOT TO MAINTAIN AIRSPEED DURING A BANNER PICKUP.