Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Flight from Portland International Airport (KPDX) to Santa Barbara returns over mechanical issues

PORTLAND, Ore. -- A SkyWest flight that left Portland Tuesday afternoon quickly returned for an emergency landing.

The plane left PDX for Santa Barbara around 1 p.m. and returned about 40 minutes later due to mechanical issues.

A spokesperson for SkyWest said all 70 passengers got off the plane safely and are already en route to Santa Barbara in a new plane.

Source:  http://katu.com

Siai-Marchetti SM 1019, N421EB: Incident occurred May 31, 2016 in Rindge, Cheshire County, New Hampshire

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 01-JUN-16
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N421EB
Aircraft Make: SIAI MARCHETTI
Aircraft Model: SM1019
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-65
City: RINDGE
State: New Hampshire

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ON A LAKE, BOUNCED AND FLIPPED OVER, LAKE MONONAC, RINDGE, NEW HAMPSHIRE.
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N421EB



RINDGE, N.H. —A seaplane crashed in the area of Conifer Road in Rindge on Tuesday night around 8:30.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Siai-Marchetti SM 1019 Experimental Amphibian aircraft landed on Lake Monomonac in Rindge.

The aircraft flipped over and there are no reported injuries. The FAA will investigate the incident.


According to the FAA's website, the plane is registered to Earl J. Robertson of Rindge.


Southwestern New Hampshire Fire Mutual Aid confirmed that they were assisting at the scene.


Source:  http://www.wcvb.com





RINDGE, N.H. (WHDH) — A small plane crashed into a lake in New Hampshire Tuesday evening.

The FAA said the experimental aircraft crashed into Lake Monomonac at around 8:30 p.m. Officials said the plane was trying to land on the lake when it flipped over.

People were on the plane at the time of the crash but no injuries have been reported.

Source:  http://whdh.com 




RINDGE, NH (CBS) – A small plane flipped over while landing on Lake Monomonac in Rindge, New Hampshire on Tuesday night.

The Fire Chief says two men on board got out of the water and suffered only minor injuries.

When the plane flipped, 40 gallons of fuel spilled into the lake. 

The FAA says it will investigate what caused the Siai-Marchetti SM 1019 Experimental Amphibian aircraft to flip over.

The plane will be removed from the lake on Wednesday.

Source:  http://boston.cbslocal.com

Severe weather forces flight diversions to Tulsa, Oklahoma

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

TULSA, Oklahoma  —

an Airlines flights from across the U.S. have been diverted to Tulsa International Airport while they wait for severe weather to pass through Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

Tulsa International Airport’s main commercial runway is able to accommodate aircraft sizes up to a Boeing 747 making Tulsa International Airport ideal to land large airliners.

Plane being diverted range in size from MD-80, Boeing 737, Airbus A319, Airbus A321 and a Boeing 777-200ER.

The planes come from as far away as London-Heathrow, Los Angeles (LAX), John Wayne Santa Ana, Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Denver International Airport.

Southwest Airlines is also diverting some Boeing 737s to Tulsa because of bad weather conditions at Dallas Love Field.

According to FlightAware, one of the planes is an Alaska Boeing 737 from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Source:  http://www.fox23.com

Incident occurred May 31, 2016 at Albany International Airport (KALB), Colonie, Albany County, New York

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

COLONIE - Albany Int'l Airport spokesman confirms that a small plane went off a runway.


Doug Myers from the Albany Airport says that a single-engine private aircraft rolled off Runway-28 after it had just landed.


The pilot says that the left wheel brake locked up, turning the aircraft into the grass.


The plane taxied back onto a taxiway under its own power and was escorted by the Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting Department to a nearby hangar, says Myers


The Albany County Sheriff's Office confirms that it was a small single person plane that was taxiing to prepare for take off when it veered into the grass.


The incident happened just after 2:00.


The airport was closed briefly to all traffic while emergency equipment responded to the scene.


Story and video:  http://cbs6albany.com





ALBANY, New York — Albany International Airport has reopened after being closed briefly when a small plane rolled off a runway on landing.

Airport authorities say the single-engine aircraft inbound from Indianapolis veered off the runway just before 2 p.m. Tuesday. They say the pilot, who was alone onboard, believes a wheel brake locked and caused the plane to turn onto grass lining the runway.

The airport was shut down for a short time as emergency crews were sent to check the plane and pilot.

The pilot wasn't hurt and was able to taxi to a hangar.

Incident occurred May 31, 2016 at Perdido Winds Airpark (AL08), Elberta, Baldwin County, Alabama

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com


A small aircraft has crashed in Baldwin County. 

At about 11:00am, the pilot clipped some trees while trying to take off from the Perdido Winds Airpark… that’s near Frank Road in Elberta. 

The plane then went down in a wooded area.

Luckily, the pilot walked away from the accident with only a knot on his forehead.

Story and video:  http://wkrg.com



ELBERTA, AL (WALA) -    The Baldwin County Sheriff's office confirmed the crash of a small aircraft following engine failure on Tuesday.

Officials say the pilot refused medical care and walked away from the crash with just a knot on his head.

The Elberta Police Department says the 911 call came in around 10:45 Tuesday morning. 

Elberta Police, the Baldwin County Sheriff's Office, and the Elberta Fire Department responded.

The crash happened near County Road 95 and Frank Road on private property. 

According to a sign on the property, the airstrip is the "Perdido Winds Air Park."

The Elberta police chief says the plane was hanging from some of the trees.

 The chief says the pilot told officials his engine went out while he was practicing touch and go landings.

The investigation is now in the hands of the Federal Aviation Administration. 

A spokesman said the FAA would wait on more information from local law enforcement before sending an investigator to the scene. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.wtvm.com


ELBERTA, Ala. (WEAR) — Channel 3 News is on scene of a plane crash in Baldwin County.

Authorities tell us the pilot, who authorities have not identified, was practicing touch-and-go landing at small air strip and crashed the small plane into trees.

Emergency crews responded to Frank Road, just off County Road 95, around 10:45 a.m. Tuesday.

The pilot was not hurt.

At this time authorities have not released additional details. 

Original article can be found here: http://weartv.com

Cessna 150H, N7196S: Incident occurred May 30, 2016 near Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport (KGPT), Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N7196S
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Jackson FSDO-31
City: OCEAN SPRINGS
State: Mississippi

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR OCEAN SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7196S





JACKSON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

A pilot and his passenger are safe on the ground after an emergency landing put them on Interstate 10. According to the pilot, an engine failure was to blame for turning I-10 into a temporary landing strip.

Private pilot Rodney McKnight, Jr. said he took off from Auburn, Alabama, flying a Cessna 150 with the owner sitting in the passenger seat. His original destination was Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport. That changed once the engine stopped at 3,500 feet.

"While I'm flying, I'm troubleshooting trying to figure out what it is, what's going on. Maybe it's my fault? Something I touched? Something like that? But nope, turned out the engine just wasn't putting out its power," said McKnight.

So, McKnight said his first thought was safety. Safety for him and his passenger, and safety for those on the ground. He had to figure out where he could land. He was hoping for Mobile.

"I said Gulfport, I don't think I'm going to make Mobile. I'm going to put this thing down on the road. And they go, 'Are you declaring an emergency?' And that's when I went back to Gulfport and said, 'Affirmative. I'm declaring an emergency,'" McKnight recalled.

From that point, McKnight said his skills as a pilot were tested to the extreme. But, he was relying on more than just himself to land safely.

"Let's just hope that the people in the cars can see what's happening and then adjust their actions accordingly," he said.

According to McKnight, the plane still had enough lift to coast safely to the edge of the interstate without incident.

"Dodging light poles and power lines. Traffic was worked out to where I could land in front of and behind cars. It worked out perfectly," said McKnight.

Sarah Washburn was driving on I-10 when she spotted the plane flying down low in front of her. Washburn is from Texas where it's crop dusting season, so low flying planes aren't an unusual sight to her. What caught her attention was how the pilot moved the plane’s wings.

"He started going up and down, up and down like I need to land instead of flipping back around and turning around.  So it kind of gave all of us a heads up to all us cars, and we all started putting on our brakes," Washburn recalled.

"So then he kind of landed about five cars in front of us, and we’re all still going like 20-30 miles per hour. Everybody put their hazard lights on and slowed down to almost his speed when he hit the highway blacktop and bounced a little bit, and then headed off to the right of the shoulder. Just landed that thing just perfect... I was pretty proud of him."

Not only was the plane's landing flawless, none of the vehicles on the road had a problem getting out of the way. It's a happy ending, and an exciting start to Washburn's vacation. She kept driving, headed to Florida.

"We were just coming on, crossing the state line and I saw wow, Mississippi was crazy. I wonder what Alabama has got next? How are they going to top that?" Washburn laughed.

According to Rodney McKnight Jr's Linkedin page, he's employed as a Ground Instructor at MzeroA.com. Even the shirt he was wearing Monday seemed to have a prophetic message. It read, "Keep calm and land on the centerline."

Story and video:  http://www.wlox.com

Piper PA-23-250, N62654: Incident occurred May 30, 2016 in Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 04:52:00Z
Regis#: N62654
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA23
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Birmingham FSDO-09
City: PANAMA CITY
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH GEAR RETRACTED, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA.

http://registry.faa.gov/N62654

Unregistered powered parachute: Incident occurred May 30, 2016 in Sewal, Wayne County, Iowa

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Des Moines FSDO-61
City: SEWAL
State: Iowa

UNREGISTERED POWERED PARACHUTE CRASHED ON TAKEOFF, SEWEL, IOWA.

Air Tractor Inc AT-502, Coco Aviation LLC, N7315L: Incident occurred May 30, 2016 in Gueydan, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N7315L
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT502
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Aerial Application
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03
City: GUEYDAN
State: Louisiana

AIRCRAFT DURING AERIAL APPLICATION, STRUCK A POWERLINE AND FORCE LANDED, NEAR GUEYDAN, LOUISIANA.

COCO AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N7315L

Beechcraft Baron 58, Moreys Piers Aviation LLC, N517MP: Incident occurred May 30, 2016 at Cape May County Airport (KWWD), Wildwood, New Jersey

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 20:07:00Z
Regis#: N517MP
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17
City: WILDWOOD
State: New Jersey

AIRCRAFT ON A REJECTED TAKEOFF, OVERSHOT THE RUNWAY AND WENT INTO THE GRASS, WILDWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

MOREYS PIERS AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N517MP

Pitts S-1C Special, N95R: Accident occurred May 29, 2016 in Carlsbad, Eddy County, New Mexico

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N95R

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA202
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 29, 2016 in Carlsbad, NM
Aircraft: Harry Oas Pitts S1C, registration: N95R
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 29, 2016, about 1100 mountain daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Harry Oas Pitts S1C airplane, N95R, was substantially damaged when it nosed over following a runway excursion during landing on runway 14L (4,616 feet by 150 feet, asphalt) at the Cavern City Air Terminal (CNM), Carlsbad, New Mexico. The pilot was not injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by private individuals under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Big Spring McMahon-Wrinkle Airport (BPG), Big Spring, Texas, at about 0935.

The pilot reported that the landing approach and touchdown were without incident. As the airplane slowed, it entered a left turn. The pilot applied right rudder and brake inputs in an attempt to maintain directional control; however, those efforts were not effective. The left turn continued until the airplane departed the runway pavement and subsequently nosed over about 15 feet from the edge of the runway.

Rainbow Sky Reach BushCat, Executive Aircraft and Jewelry LLC, N273BC: Accident occurred May 29, 2016 in Mack, Mesa County, Colorado

Executive Aircraft and Jewelry LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N273BC

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA270

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 29, 2016 in Mack, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: RAINBOW SKY REACH (PTY) LTD BUSHCAT, registration: N273BC
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in gusty wind conditions, the airplane veered off the runway to the left, impacted an irrigation ditch, and nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left lift strut. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

According to the pilot, the weather at the time of the accident was wind variable at 5-7 knots, and wind gusts 10 knots. The airplane landed on runway 25.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in runway excursion, impact with a ditch, and nose over.

Piper PA-18-150, AK AC LLC, N6966D: Accident occurred May 29, 2016 in Shulin Lake, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N6966D

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA273
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 29, 2016 in Shulin Lake, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18, registration: N6966D
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, on short final during landing, he thought that he had cleared the trees on the approach end of the private airstrip. He reported that he aimed for his landing spot, but the propeller struck a tree and the airplane impacted the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical anomalies or malfunctions during the flight with any portion of the airplane that would have prevented normal flight operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from trees during final approach.

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N82057; accident occurred May 27, 2016 in Palmer, Alaska -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N82057 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA287

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Palmer, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18, registration: N82057
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was practicing off airport landings on a soft gravel strip. The pilot further reported that during the landing roll, he applied excessive brake and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right forward lift strut and empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's incorrect brake application during the landing roll, which resulted in a nose over.

Cessna 402B, Business Aviation Courier Inc., N76MD: Accident occurred May 27, 2016 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Rapid City FSDO-27

BUSINESS AVIATION COURIER INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N76MD

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Sioux Falls, SD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 402B, registration: N76MD
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot in the left seat and the airline transport pilot in the right seat were conducting new-hire training for the left-seat pilot. While maneuvering for a practice approach, the pilots noticed the left engine was running rough. The left-seat pilot activated the auxiliary fuel pump, and the roughness resolved temporarily. Shortly thereafter, the left engine tachometer went to zero, and the left-seat pilot noticed flames emitting from the left engine cowling. The pilots declared an emergency, secured the left engine, and landed the airplane uneventfully; the wing structure was damaged by the fire. Examination of the left engine revealed thermal damage to the No. 4 cylinder, consistent with a preexisting crack condition that allowed exhaust gas to erode the cylinder head and resulted in an engine fire.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the No. 4 cylinder head, which resulted in an engine fire and subsequent damage to the wing structure.

On May 27, 2016, at 0915 central daylight time, a Cessna 402B airplane, N76MD, experienced an in-flight left engine fire while maneuvering near the Joe Foss Field Airport (FSD), Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The airline transport pilot and commercial pilot were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was operated by Encore Air Cargo, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a company flight plan was filed. The local flight departed FSD at 0840.

According to the airline transport pilot, while maneuvering for a practice approach, the flight crew noticed a rough running left engine. The commercial pilot activated the auxiliary fuel pump, and the engine then operated without issue. Shortly thereafter, the left engine tachometer went to zero and the commercial pilot, who was seated in the left seat, noticed flames emitting from the left engine cowling. The flight crew declared an emergency and secured the left engine. The airplane landed uneventfully and taxied to the company ramp. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector and company mechanics revealed substantial damage to the left wing structure and firewall. In addition, the number 4 cylinder was burned through at the exhaust port. The number 6 cylinder valve cover displayed thermal damage consistent with the observed damage to the number 4 cylinder. The number 4 cylinder was removed and sent to Continental Motors Group, Mobile, Alabama, for further examination.

On October 13, 2016, the number 4 cylinder was examined by the Continental Motors Group under the supervision of a National Transportation Safety Board investigator. Examination of the cylinder showed a burned through area at the cylinder head exhaust port, consistent with a preexisting crack that allowed exhaust gas to erode the cylinder head. A preexisting crack could not be determined due to the erosion of the burned through area. In addition to the burned through area, a crack was noted on the opposite side of the exhaust port.

According to the maintenance records, the number 4 cylinder was overhauled 178.3 hours prior to the accident.

Cessna 150J, N60252: Accident occurred May 27, 2016 in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

http://registry.faa.gov/N60252

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA267
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in ALBUQUERQUE, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N60252
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that while on a cross country flight the airplane's engine started to "sputter" and then stopped. During the off airport forced landing the airplane impacted a ravine. 

According to the student pilot, prior to the loss of engine power, there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount. 

The airplane recovery specialist reported that he drained about two gallons of fuel from the airplane's fuel tanks prior to the airplane being moved. According to the manufacturer the airplane has 3 gallons of unusable fuel.

As a safety recommendation the student pilot reported that he should have visually inspected the fuel with a fuel hawk dipstick.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's inadequate preflight inspection/planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion, loss of engine power, and impact with terrain.

Avipro, N4393H: Accident occurred May 27, 2016 in Minden, Douglas County, Nevada

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N4393H

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA117
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Minden, NV
Aircraft: HOWELL BOB HOWELL SPECIAL, registration: N4393H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 27, 2016, about 1050 Pacific daylight time, an experimental, amateur built, Howell Special, N4393H, sustained substantial damage during the landing roll at the Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada, following a landing gear collapse. The airplane was registered and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and sole passenger on the airplane were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which originated from Bryant Field Airport, Bridgeport, California, at about 1015. 

The pilot reported a normal landing, however, during the landing roll he noticed the airplane settled to the right and he was unable to maintain direction control of the airplane as it veered off the runway, to the left.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The wreckage was transported to a secure location for further examination.

Criquet Storch FI-156, N429BB: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2016 in Fordsville, Kentucky

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N429BB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Louisville FSDO-17

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 30, 2016 in Fordsville, KY
Aircraft: CRIQUET AVIATION BOGOTA COLUMB STORCH FI-156, registration: N429BB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 30, 2016, at an unknown time, an experimental amateur-built Storch FI-156 airplane, N429BB, crashed in a wooded area near Fordsville, Kentucky. The private pilot, the sole occupant was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as a Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed on that day, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated about 1130 central daylight time, from Rough River State Park Airport (2I3), Falls of Rough, Kentucky.

According to a friend of the accident pilot, since purchasing the airplane 2 days prior, the pilot flew it on several flights, including a flight earlier in the day from Owensboro-Daviess County Airport (OWB), Owensboro, Kentucky to 2I3, landing there about 0945. After landing, he and the pilot ate at a local restaurant and then prepared to depart from 2I3. The friend reported hearing an engine run-up before takeoff, and noted that the magneto drops were normal and the engine was "running strong." After takeoff he watched as the pilot turned to a heading of 315 degrees (normal) and lost sight of the airplane when it was about 1.5 miles away.

The pilot's friend indicated that the pilot might have intended to fly to a nearby ultralight airstrip, or return to OWB. The pilot's friend then departed 2I3 in his airplane, and attempted to contact the pilot via radio, but the pilot did not reply to any of his transmissions. He proceeded to the Ohio County Airport (JQD), Hartford, Kentucky and landed uneventfully. He later contacted law enforcement because the pilot had not returned to OWB, and met with law enforcement later that evening. The following day he performed an air search himself but did not locate the wreckage. Personnel of the Civil Air Patrol were also involved in a search for the missing airplane; the wreckage was located on the afternoon of June 1st.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




HANCOCK, Co., Ky.(WHAS 11)--An autopsy will be performed to positively identify a body pulled from a plane that crashed near Fordsville in Hancock County.

It's believed to be 70-year-old Robert Dalzell of Owensboro.

The pilot went missing on May 30 shortly after take off.

The Kentucky Army National Guard spotted scorched marks a few miles from the Falls of Rough Airport in Grayson County.

Investigators located the debris from the downed plane.

WHAS11's John Humphress went to the heavily wooded area where the wreckage was discovered.

The property owner just returned from out of town.

Kentucky State Police say while they could not positively identify the body as Dalzell however, authorities have notified the pilot's family of their investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.whas11.com

Robert C. Dalzall Jr. 
(Image Source: Kentucky State Police) 




LOUISVILLE (WHAS11) – The plane of missing Owensboro pilot Robert Dalzell Jr. was located on Wednesday afternoon, according to authorities.

Lt. Col. Greg Bell found the plane in a heavily wooded area seven miles from the Falls of Rough Airport, but Dalzell Jr. has not been located at this time.

Kentucky State Police and Civil Air Patrol have been looking for Dalzell since Monday after he departed from the airport at 11:20 a.m. and never returned.

Officials give update on missing Owensboro plane found on Wednesday

KSP said his last cell phone activity ping was at 11:32 a.m. Monday.

Dalzell Jr. is a white male, 5’05”, 175 pounds and has grey hair and Hazel eyes.

He was last seen flying a 2012 Green Aero Criquet Bogota fixed wing plane with the tail number of N429BB.


Story and video:  http://www.whas11.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Kentucky State Police say they are searching for a missing Owensboro pilot.

According to a KSP news release, 70-year-old Robert C. Dalzall Jr. left the Owensboro Regional Airport Monday around 9:10 a.m. Officials say he successfully landed at the Falls of Rough airport, located in Grayson County, at 9:45 a.m. According to Kentucky State Police, Dalzall left the Falls of Rough airport at 11:20 a.m. and did not return to the Owensboro airport.

KSP says Dalzall's last cell phone activity ping was Monday at 11:31 a.m., within five miles of the Fall of Rough airport.

Officials describe Dalzall as a white male. He is five feet, five inches tall and weighs 175 pounds. He has grey hair and hazel eyes.

Police say he was flying a 2012 Green Aero Criquet Bogota fixed wing plane. The plane's tail number is N429BB.

The Civil Air Patrol currently has two airplanes conducting a search from Owensboro to Falls of Rough.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wdrb.com

GRAYSON COUNTY, Ky. —Kentucky State Police and Civil Air Patrol are looking for a missing Owensboro pilot and airplane last seen Monday morning in Grayson County.

Troopers said Robert C. Dalzall Jr., 70, left Owensboro Regional Airport on Monday at 9:10 a.m. and landed at the Falls of Rough airport, in Grayson County, at 9:45 a.m.

Police said Dalzall left the Falls of Rough airport at 11:20 a.m. and never returned to the Owensboro airport.

KSP said his last cellphone activity ping was 11:32 a.m. Monday within five miles of Falls of Rough airport.

Dalzall was flying a 2012 green Aero Criquet Bogota fixed wing plane with tail number N429BB.

He is 5 feet 5 inches tall, 175 pounds with grey hair and hazel eyes.

Two Civil Air Patrol planes are searching from Owensboro to Falls of Rough.

Officials ask those who are in the Falls of Rough area to be extra vigilant.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wlky.com

Airbus Ponders How to Blunt Boeing Range Advantage: A330neo jetliner, although cheaper, lacks range of Boeing’s 787-9 Dreamliner

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

The Wall Street Journal
By ROBERT WALL
May 31, 2016 5:39 a.m. ET


HAMBURG, GERMANY—Airbus is studying whether to upgrade its new A330neo jetliner to blunt the range advantage of a rival plane built by Boeing Co.

The move is the latest in the move, countermove chess match between the two biggest plane makers as they jostle for sales in the highly lucrative market for widebody airplanes. Boeing has traditionally dominated the high-end of the long-range plane market.

Airbus chief operating officer for customers John Leahy on Tuesday said the enhancement to the plane that is also called the A330-900 would allow airlines to carry more fuel to allow the plane to fly farther or carry more load at the current range. The effort is still in the design stage, he said, with no decision made on pursuing the upgrade.

Mr. Leahy said the upgrade of the A330-900 would help reduce a range advantage Boeing’s 787-9 Dreamliner currently has on the European plane maker’s product. Airbus sees the Boeing plane as offering 1,473 miles (2,370 kilometers) of greater range, although Mr. Leahy said the A330 is far less costly.

The A330-900 is due to enter service at the end of next year.

Airbus designers are assessing whether they can upgrade the A330 to carry more weight with minimal design changes, Mr. Leahy said. The company wants to avoid major structural changes, such as adding a much larger landing gear, which can make changes costly. The Rolls-Royce Holdings PLC engine to power the plane should be able to handle the higher weight, he said.

As part of the continuous back and forth on produce developments, Airbus also continues to study whether it should launch a bigger version of its largest twin-engine, long-haul plane, the A350-1000, to take on the Boeing’s 777X. The Chicago-based plane maker’s jetliner, which is still in development, seats more than 400 people or around 40 more than the model Airbus currently sells.

But a dearth of orders for Boeing’s big plane since an initial flurry of deals has Airbus wondering whether there is sufficient market potential left to build a more direct competitor. Developing a larger A350 would cost several billion dollars, Mr. Leahy said.

The product competition also is playing out at the lower end of the plane market, where Boeing is assessing changes to its 737 Max single-aisle product lineup to more forcefully compete against Airbus’s A320neo narrowbodies, which have won a greater share of orders. Boeing has yet to announce exactly how the single-aisle family may change.

The efforts by both plane makers to refine their products to win orders comes at a time the pace of deals has slowed this year.

Airbus booked more than 1,000 plane orders in each of the past three years but has secured only 92 net orders in the first four months of 2016, feeding investor concern that the boom times for plane makers are over. Rival Boeing Co., the world’s largest plane maker by deliveries, has secured 265 net orders this year through May 24.

Mr. Leahy said he still expected order intake at Airbus to be roughly on par with planes delivered this year. Airbus has committed to shipping a company record of 650 airliners in 2016. As long as orders match deliveries Airbus would be “content,” he said.

“We have to get back into balance,” Mr. Leahy said, after years in which new deals secured were twice as high or more than planes delivered. Airbus’s backlog of planes orders and not yet built is above 6,700 aircraft.

That backlog underpins Airbus’s plan to boost production, especially of its popular A320 single-aisle plane. Airbus is ramping up output to 60 narrow body planes a month in 2019 from the mid-40s today. Mr. Leahy said there was scope to go even higher, although others at Airbus are urging caution.

Mr. Leahy played down the threat from the newcomer to the single-aisle market, Canada’s Bombardier Inc. which recently won a landmark order for its CSeries aircraft from Delta Air Lines Inc. The U.S. carrier in April said it would take 75 of the planes with options for 50 more, a breakout order for Bombardier that had struggled to gain wide market acceptance from well-known airlines.

The pricing the Canadian plane maker offered the U.S. carrier is unsustainable, Mr. Leahy said.

Bombardier announced a $500 million provision alongside the Delta deal. It said the provision took into account the sales price and the production costs. Bombardier said such provisions are typical meeting early orders for a new jet.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Unregistered MX Quicksilver: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2016 near Weldon Spring, Missouri

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-MAY-16
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Destroyed
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA St. Louis FSDO-62
City: WELDON SPRING
State: Missouri

UNREGISTERED MX QUICKSILVER ULTRALIGHT CRASHED INTO A FIELD, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, NEAR WELDON SPRING, MISSOURI.



A local man lost his life Monday evening after he crashed his ultralight plane in a field just north of Potosi near Highway 185.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Sgt. Al Nothum said Dean Warner, 68, of Belgrade was piloting the plane when it crashed. 

“The crash happened about 6 p.m. off Puckett Road off Highway 185 in a field,” said Nothum. “This aircraft is considered an ultralight plane, it’s an ultralight single engine plane. It’s not registered with the FAA, so they aren’t involved in this and we are just going to take the report on it. So it’s non-registered aircraft.”

Nothum said there were a fair amount of witnesses that were watching Warner flying and he was doing some kind of stunts.

“He wasn’t doing flips, but he was doing some kind of stunts while flying up there,” said Nothum. “Apparently there was some kind of failure on one of the wings. Something happened to one of the wings while he was flying and that was when he fell or dropped.”

Washington County Sheriff’s Department Captain Zach Jacobsen said his department was dispatched at approximately 6 p.m. for the plane crash.

Jacobsen added the man did take off from the Washington County Airport and the plane is for recreational use.

“He had been flying in Potosi and when he was in the city limits, he was actually spotted by several officers,” said Jacobsen. “He was just flying around, doing some tricks and things like that. My assumption is he was heading back to the airport at the conclusion of his flight.”

Jacobsen said he went over to help with the investigation and the plane was an obvious total loss, but there were a couple pieces intact that left the plane identifiable.

Original article can be found here: http://dailyjournalonline.com




WASHINGTON COUNTY, MO (KTVI) – A sad end to the Memorial Day weekend as an ultralight plane crashed Monday evening in Washington County Missouri just outside of Potosi.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says the accident happened at 6 pm in a field near Pucket Road not far from Missouri State Highway 185.  Sergeant Al Nothum said witnesses saw the pilot doing loops when one of the wings bent backwards before the plane crashed.

The pilot, 68-year-old Dean Warner of Belgrade, Missouri died at the scene.

Story and video:  http://fox2now.com 


 A man is dead after an aircraft crash near Potosi, Missouri, Monday evening.

A spokesperson with the Missouri State Highway Patrol confirmed that a small aircraft went down near Missouri Route 185 and Puckett Road At around 6, killing one person, 68-year-old Dean Warner.

Witnesses said Warner — a Belgrade, Missouri, resident — was doing some minor stunts in his ultralight one-seater, single-engine aircraft. Then, witnesses said, the ultralight had a structural problem with one of the wings and crashed.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.ksdk.com