Friday, May 22, 2015

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, N4506W, Dayton Pilots Club Inc: Accident occurred May 07, 2014 in Covington, Tennessee

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA227 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 07, 2014 in Covington, TN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/14/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-181, registration: N4506W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the instrument flight rules flight plan filed by the pilot, the airplane departed on an estimated 3.1-hour-long flight and had sufficient fuel on board for an estimated 4.8-hour-long flight. A direct 20- to 25-knot headwind existed at the airplane’s cruise altitude. Based on the tachometer reading, about 4.2 hours into the flight, the pilot announced over the destination airport’s common traffic advisory frequency that the airplane was “out of fuel.” The airplane subsequently impacted swampy, wooded terrain 3 miles from the airport. The cockpit and cabin areas were destroyed by impact. There was no evidence of fuel in the wreckage or fuel spillage at the accident site. A detailed examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact mechanical anomaly with the airframe, engine, or fuel system that would have precluded normal operation. 
According to the engine manufacturer, at the minimum allowable fuel flow, the engine had a fuel consumption rate of slightly less than 6 gallons per hour (gph) at 45 percent of rated power to slightly less than 15 gph at 100 percent power. Operators of similarly powered airplanes reported that the engine usually consumes 8.8 to 8.9 gph in a cruise configuration, which did not account for fuel used during taxi, takeoff, and climb. A review of flying club logs and aircraft fueling records revealed that the airplane consumed about 10 gph of fuel during the 12 flights in the month before the accident. According to the airplane manufacturer’s Pilot’s Operating Handbook, the performance charts are unfactored, and the effect of conditions not considered on the charts, including wind aloft on cruise and range performance, must be evaluated by the pilot. The handbook recommends that pilots conduct in-flight fuel flow and quantity checks. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper preflight and in-flight fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and a subsequent total loss of engine power over unsuitable terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 7, 2014, at 1107 central daylight time (CDT), a Piper PA-28-181, N4506W, operated by the Dayton Pilots Club, Inc., was destroyed when it collided with wooded terrain during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power on approach to Covington Municipal Airport (M04), Covington, Tennessee. The certificated private pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), Dayton, Ohio, about 0710 CDT. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

Air traffic control information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the airplane was at an altitude of 6,000 feet and 8 miles northeast of M04 when the pilot reported the destination airport in sight, and cancelled his IFR clearance. The controller then issued the airplane a frequency change to the M04 common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). There were no further communications from the accident airplane.

In a telephone interview, the airport manager stated he was monitoring the CTAF when the accident pilot announced he was 7.5 miles from the airport, and in-bound for landing. The manager recognized the pilot's voice, as they had spoken by telephone the previous day, and was aware of the pilot's plans upon arrival. He advised the pilot that parking, fueling of his airplane, and ground transportation had been arranged. Approximately 2 minutes later, the pilot announced over the radio that he was "out of fuel, and putting [the airplane] down short of the airport." The manager stated there were no further radio transmissions from the accident airplane.

Due to his injuries, the pilot was not interviewed, but he provided an NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator report through a personal friend; an airline transport pilot (ATP) and flight instructor.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION


The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued March 26, 2014. According to a friend who reviewed the pilot's records, the pilot had accrued approximately 272 hours of flight experience, of which 196 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.


The pilot was issued his private pilot certificate on September 8, 2010. His instrument rating was added to his certificate on August 15, 2013. The pilot did not hold a flight engineer certificate or any other FAA certificates


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION


According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1979. Its most recent annual inspection was completed December 9, 2013, at 7,945 aircraft hours.


The airplane had a fuel capacity of 50 gallons, of which 48 gallons were usable. According to a line technician at MGY, he serviced the airplane with 13 gallons of aviation gasoline prior to the accident flight, which filled the tanks. Interpolation of flying club logs and aircraft fueling records revealed that the airplane consumed approximately 10 gallons of fuel per hour over the 12 flights in the month previous to the accident. 


The airplane tachometer reading was 321.1 hours at the completion of the flight previous to the accident flight, and the tachometer showed 325.3 hours when examined after the accident.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1050, the weather conditions reported at Millington Regional Jetport (NQA), 20 miles southwest of M04, included few clouds at 2,500 feet, 10 miles of visibility, and winds from 180 degrees at 9 knots. The temperature was 25 degrees C, the dew point was 17 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.98 inches of mercury. An NTSB meteorologist observed that the winds aloft at the airplane's cruising altitude of 6,000 were from about 225 degrees at 20 to 25 knots. Throughout the flight, the airplane maintained an approximate ground track of 225 degrees.


WRECKAGE INFORMATION


Examination of photographs revealed the airplane came to rest in standing water among wooded terrain. The cockpit and cabin areas were destroyed by impact, and had also been cut by first responders. The empennage appeared separated from the fuselage, but still attached by cables. The left wing separated before the airplane came to rest, and the left main fuel tank was breached. According to detectives of the Tipton County Sheriff's Office, there was no odor of fuel, no evidence of fuel in the airplane, and no evidence of fuel spillage at the scene. The Chief of Detectives stated she did not order any environmental remediation of the crash site due to fuel spillage because "there was nothing to remediate."

On September 5, 2014, a detailed examination of the wreckage was completed at a recovery facility. Continuity of the fuel system was confirmed from the fuel tanks, through the fuel lines, the fuel selector, and to the fuel pump. Several breaks were noted due to impact damage, and cutting by rescue and recovery personnel.


The fuel tank fuel caps were serviceable and properly vented. Both fuel tank intake finger strainers were intact, and absent of blockage or debris. The drain petcocks were intact, functioned properly, and displayed no evidence of leakage or fuel staining. Both left and right fuel quantity indicating sensors were secure and free to move through their full-travel range. 

The fuel selector valve was free to move, displayed a positive detent in all positions, and the spring-loaded lock-out function for the "off" position functioned as designed. The fuel lines from the left and right tanks were separated at the fuel valve, but the fuel line to the gascolator was intact. There was no evidence of blockage in the fuel selector or the fuel line to the gascolator. The line from the gascolator to the electric fuel pump was intact and secure. There was no evidence of blockage in the line. The line from the electric pump to the engine driven pump was secure at the electric pump, but impact-separated from the engine driven pump.

The engine driven fuel pump was broken and separated by impact. The gascolator and filter element were separated by impact, and not recovered. No evidence of preimpact damage or deterioration of the fuel system was noted. No evidence or staining indicative of static or dynamic fuel leakage was noted anywhere in the fuel system or surrounding aircraft structure.

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller flange. Continuity was established through the powertrain and valvetrain to the accessory section. Creek water was ejected from the sparkplug holes during rotation. Compression was confirmed on all cylinders using the thumb method. Intake and exhaust valve operation was confirmed. The magnetos were removed, and rotated by electric drill. Neither magneto sparked due to water immersion and corrosion. 

The carburetor was disassembled, and no mechanical anomalies were noted. The carburetor bowl contained several ounces of creek water. The floats were intact and moved freely. The filter screen was clear and absent of debris or blockage.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the statement prepared by the pilot's friend, the airplane departed with 48 gallons of useable fuel on board. Prior to departure, the pilot told his wife that based on his planned flight time and taking winds "into consideration," he should arrive at his destination with 13 gallons of fuel remaining. The friend calculated that the airplane's engine produced 65 percent power at 6,000 feet while consuming approximately 8.5 gallons per hour. He then calculated the airplane should have landed with "14 gallons of fuel (1.4 hours of flight time)."

At 0538, the pilot filed a flight plan through an online commercial vendor (CSC DUATS). The pilot filed an estimated fuel endurance of 4.8 hours and an estimated time en route of 3.1 hours.

According to the engine manufacturer, at the minimum allowable fuel flow, an O-360 engine had a fuel consumption rate of slightly less than 6 gallons per hour at 45 percent of rated power to slightly less than 15 gallons per hour at 100 percent power. Operators of similar powered airplanes reported that the engine usually consumed 8.8 to 8.9 gallons per hour in a cruise configuration, which did not account for fuel used during taxi, takeoff, and climb.

According to FAA Private Pilot Practical Test Standards, the examiner ensures the pilot applicant "Corrects for and records the differences between preflight groundspeed, fuel consumption, and heading calculations and those determined en route." 

According to the airplane manufacturer's Pilot's Operating Handbook, Section 5, Performance:

The performance charts are unfactored and do not make any allowance for varying degrees of pilot proficiency or mechanical deterioration of the aircraft. This performance, however, can be duplicated by following the stated procedures in a properly maintained airplane.

Effects of conditions not considered on the charts must be evaluated by the pilot, such as the effect of soft or grass runway surface on takeoff and landing performance, or the effect of winds aloft on cruise and range performance. Endurance can be grossly affected by improper leaning procedures, and inflight fuel flow and quantity checks are recommended.In a letter to the Chairman of the NTSB, the Ohio Attorney General stated that the pilot graduated from the United States Air Force Test Pilot School (TPS), was a 20-year Air Force veteran, and after retirement spent 11 years as a "professional flight engineer." He suggested that the NTSB had predetermined the probable cause of the accident, that the pilot's experience made an operational cause unlikely, and requested that the NTSB inspect the wreckage for problems that could not be detected through normal maintenance or preflight inspection.

According to the United States Air Force Test Pilot School, the pilot attended Flight Test Engineer (FTE) Class 78B from July 31, 1978 to July 16, 1979, and an official history and curriculum from the class was examined.

When asked to draw a distinction between an Air Force Test Pilot and a Flight Test Engineer, representatives of the school stated, "[The] role as an FTE encompasses data collection, safety of test, technical adequacy, and data analysis. FTEs are not trained to be navigators or fuel planners. They are provided with a basic intro to aviation, which includes performing fuel calculations using flight manuals, but not to the extent of planning fuel or [estimated time en route] calculations for cross-country sorties. Cross-country planning is neither taught nor evaluated at TPS. That type of training would be covered in Undergraduate Pilot/Nav training (UPT or UNT), but FTEs do not obtain any of this training at TPS since they are trained to be flight test engineers, not navigators. Additionally, unlike military pilots, FTEs cannot apply any military flying training/experience to get credit towards an FAA rating." 

According to the head of the FTE Airmanship Program, and a graduate of FTE Class 82A, the current airmanship program began in 2000. Prior to that year, students were not flown in light aircraft as an introduction to the course. Students were instructed on the use of Pilot Operating Handbooks to compute fuel consumption rates; "however, cross-country flight planning was neither taught nor evaluated."




Dayton Pilots Club Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/4506W 


COVINGTON, Tenn. –An emotional reunion in Covington, Tennessee between first responders and a man who nearly died in a plane crash.

Kent Wingate was the pilot of a single engine plane that went down in a heavily wooded area of Lauderdale County near the Hatchie River in May of 2014.

Wingate suffered broken bones and a traumatic head injury that caused him to lose most of his memory.

The Covington, Tennessee native, who now lives in Ohio, was trapped for several hours in the wreckage.

“I recall absolutely nothing about the crash,” said Wingate.

The dozens of first responders, volunteers and “everyday people”  who played a role in saving his life were a mystery to him until Friday.

“It just kind of blows me away. A lot of these folks I’ve never met before. So I have no idea who some of these people are,”he said.

Former Memphis Firefighter Rick Finney was a crop duster who first spotted the “downed” plane from the air.

Finney landed his plane,  swam the Hatchie River to get to Wingate and did what he could to help the unconscious pilot.

He recalled having to cut the pilot’s Mississippi State alumni belt to get him out of the plane.

“It caught on the control yoke in the airplane, so I had to cut it. So that was the sacrifice he had to make to get out of the airplane. He had to sacrifice his college belt,” said Finney.

Rita McCoy was a flight nurse with the Hospital Wing.

The last time she saw Kent Wingate, he was suffering from traumatic head and internal injuries and clinging to life.

“He was unconscious when we received him. So naturally I knew he would not know who I was, as well as the other responders that day. But that’s okay,” she told WREG.

A year later, she said Wingate’s recovery was a true miracle.

And while no one at Friday’s unique reunion wanted to be called a “hero”, Katherine Wingate, Kent’s wife, felt very differently.

“I appreciate you guys saving his life,” she said.

Source:  http://wreg.com


"I think any time you can make a difference, you should," he Rick Finney, who rescued Kent. "It wasn't by accident that I had EMT training and had skills to land that plane there."  

Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee
 




(Photo source: Tipton County Sheriff's Office)



 
Kent Wingate 
~ 


 Kent Wingate.




Wingate lives in Xenia, Ohio, which is a suburb of Dayton. He works at Sinclair Community College.

Rockwell 114 Commander, N4775W, Fuzz Aviation LLC: Accident occurred May 17, 2015 near Laughlin/Bullhead Intl Airport (KIFP), Bullhead City, Arizona

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA163
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 17, 2015 in Laughlin, NV
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 114, registration: N4775W
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 17, 2015, about 1800 Pacific daylight time (PDT), a Rockwell Commander 114, N4775W, crashed after takeoff near Laughlin, Nevada. The owner/pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot sustained serious injuries, and three passengers were fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. The cross-country personal flight departed Laughlin/Bullhead International Airport (IFP), Bullhead City, Arizona, at 1756, with a planned destination of Goodyear, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

At 1756 PDT, ATC cleared N4775W for a straight out departure to the south. In a post-accident interview the pilot stated that shortly after takeoff the engine started to run rough and the airplane was not climbing. The pilot realized he was going to make an off airport landing and was trying to stay away from any buildings.

Witnesses in the accident area noted the airplane flying at a very low altitude with some reporting the engine sounds being erratic. Witnesses saw the airplane continue to fly lower in altitude until losing sight of it. They then saw a fireball.

The accident site was located in the Big Bend State Park Recreational Area. The main wreckage was located 4.6 NM southwest of IFP. The airplane first hit a mesquite tree, then impacted the sand, and finally came to rest 120 feet south of the first impact point facing 273 degrees. The post impact fire thermally consumed a majority of the aircraft.

The accident site was documented, and the wreckage was recovered for further examination.

FAA FSDO: FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19

FUZZ AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4775W


Greg Torres and Diana Soto



LAS VEGAS (FOX5) - The Clark County Coroner's Office has confirmed two other deaths have been linked to Sunday's Laughlin plane crash.

A small aircraft with four people on board departed Laughlin-Bullhead City airport Sunday and was heading to the Phoenix area before it crashed.

According to the NTSB, the single-engine Rockwell Commander flew for about four minutes before crashing, hitting a tree and erupting in flames.

The Clark County Fire Department first reported the plane crash just before 6 p.m. Sunday near the Big Bend State Recreation Area along Needles Highway.

Firefighters said they found the aircraft ablaze and four people on board when they arrived on scene.

Authorities confirmed one person was pronounced dead on the scene. The Coroner identified him as 72 year-old James Walker of Avondale, Arizona.

Three people on board were transported to UMC, two of whom passed away Wednesday.

The Coroner identified them as 58-year-old Diana Soto of Goodyear, AZ and 64-year-old Evelin Walker of Avondale, AZ.

Incident occurred May 22, 2015 at St. George Municipal Airport (KSGU), Utah



ST. GEORGE – A plane crashed at the airport Friday afternoon after experiencing mechanical failure involving the landing gear.

Just before 5 p.m., a Piper Arrow, single-engine prop plane, was landing at the St. George Municipal Airport on runway 19 when the left landing gear malfunctioned and collapsed, causing the plane to skid off the runway and crash, Airport Operation Supervisor Brad Kitchen said.

Emergency responders stationed at the airport, as well as personnel from the St. George Fire Department, responded to the scene.

The plane’s occupants, the pilot and a passenger, were unharmed and declined medical attention. The same can’t be said for the plane.

The left landing gear snapped off the plane and that left wing looks like it will need to be replaced, Kitchen said. The plane’s nose gear was also damaged, he said.

Initial estimates of the structural damage are around $40,000.

A similar incident occurred at the airport two months ago when a twin-engine Cessna 310 also experienced landing gear failure upon landing.

This report is based on preliminary information provided by the authorities and may not contain the full scope of findings.








Two passengers in a single-engine airplane escaped injury after part of the aircraft’s landing structure failed Friday afternoon at the St. George Municipal Airport.

Emergency response personnel were alerted to a plane crash at the north end of Runway 19 shortly before 5 p.m., but within 10 minutes they were informed they could cancel their response.

Airport Manager Rich Stehmeier said there were two passengers on board the Piper Arrow and that neither required medical attention, and there was no fire danger for the plane.

“It was a gear collapse. … There was minimal damage to the airplane,” Stehmeier said.

Stehmeier said he had already contacted the National Transportation Safety Board and federal officials had “released” the airplane, authorizing local personnel to remove the aircraft from the runway.

The only deadly crash at the airport’s current location occurred in May 2012 when four residents from St. George, Washington City and Santa Clara were killed immediately after takeoff during an after-midnight incident that was not observed by airport personnel.

The most recent deadly crash in Washington County occurred last May when a training flight originating at the airport crashed in the mountains south of Santa Clara. Two Northern Utah teens were killed a couple of months later in a plane crash in the Virgin River Gorge.

Weather conditions were reportedly clear at the time of all three incidents but gusty winds were reported at the time of the crash in the gorge.

Source: http://www.thespectrum.com

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, TLT and GGB LLC, N5802V: Accident occurred May 08, 2015 near Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA208
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 08, 2015 in Atlanta, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-32R-300, registration: N5802V
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 8, 2015, about 0959 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-300, N5802V, collided with a highway barrier during a forced landing attempt near Chamblee, Georgia. The commercial pilot and three passengers were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by TLT and GGBB LLC., as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The flight originated from Peachtree DeKalb airport (PDK), Chamblee, Georgia, about 0956 and was destined for University-Oxford Airport (UOX), Oxford, Mississippi.

The accident flight was the second leg of a cross-country flight that originated earlier that morning from Asheville Regional Airport (AVL), Asheville, North Carolina.

Review of air traffic control (ATC) voice communication data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot contacted clearance delivery for an IFR clearance. ATC provided the clearance, which included radar vectors, and "climb and maintain 3,000; expect 8,000 in 10 minutes." The pilot read back the clearance correctly and confirmed that he had the most recent automatic terminal information service, which was information "Whiskey." The pilot contacted ground control and indicated that he was ready to taxi. Ground control instructed the pilot to taxi to runway 3R, via taxiway Bravo, hold short of runway 3L and the pilot read back the instructions correctly. The pilot then contacted the tower controller, informing him that he was holding short of runway 3L and ready to depart. The tower controller instructed the pilot to "fly heading 360 and cleared for takeoff." The pilot then questioned the controller regarding which runway to take off from and the controller cleared the pilot for takeoff from runway 3L, which was 3,746 feet long. Approximately 3 minutes after departure, the tower controller called the pilot to verify his heading. The pilot responded "zero-two-victor, I'm having some problem climbing here." The pilot subsequently stated "zero-two-victor; were going down here at the intersection." This was the last transmission made by the pilot.

A witness stated that he was about 2,300 feet off the departure end of the runway. He stopped to look at the airplane because it was moving extremely slow and only 75 to 100 feet above ground level when it went over his head. He added that the engine sounded normal and despite the slow speed. He continued to watch the airplane as it flew out of his view.

Another witness that observed the airplane prior to the accident said he heard a "clacking sound," but the engine rpm did not change. The engine sounded like it was at "wide open throttle" as it descended onto the highway and exploded.

According to the pilot's mechanic, about 4 days prior to the accident flight, the mechanic observed a departure conducted by the pilot. He said that during climbout he watched as the airplane cleared trees at the departure end of the runway by approximately 50 feet. He added that shortly after that flight, the pilot called him and expressed his concern that the airplane was not climbing well. The mechanic mentioned to him that it was a warm day, and he was only a few hundred pounds under gross weight, with a slight tailwind. The mechanic further stated that the pilot said that he would do a run-up and if everything checked out, he would conduct a test flight the next day. The following day the pilot sent a text message to the mechanic and said that the run-up was good, but he wasn't getting full rpm at full power while static. About 30 minutes later, the pilot called the mechanic and told him he flew the airplane and everything was normal.

According to pilot's flight instructor, he said that the pilot called him 4 days prior to the accident flight and told him that he went flying and had some difficulty getting the airplane to gain altitude. He said that he had used up more than half of the runway when he was able to finally get the airplane in the air. The pilot told the instructor that he almost hit the trees near the end of the runway. The pilot also stated to the flight instructor that he did conduct "pre and post flight engine checks and noted no problems."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He reported a total flight experience of 667 hours, including 40 hours during the last 6 months, on his FAA second-class medical certificate application, dated November 18, 2014. The medical certificate indicated no restrictions. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accumulated 687 total hours; of which, 672 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540-K1G5D engine rated at 300 horsepower at 2,700 rpm, and was equipped with a Hartzell three-bladed constant speed propeller.

The last annual inspection of the airframe and engine occurred on July 22, 2014, at an airframe total time of 5616.03 hours. The last recorded maintenance included the installation of a battery on May 5, 2015.

The airplane's maintenance logbooks were not located and were presumed to have burned in the aircraft wreckage. Copies of airframe and engine logbook entries dated July 22, 2014 were provided by the mechanic who completed an annual inspection of the airplane on that date. The airframe logbook entry noted the tachometer hour meter reading and airframe total time as 5616.03 hours. The engine logbook entry indicated that the engine had accumulated 774.86 hours since major overhaul, as of that date.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The recorded weather at PDK, at 0953, included winds from 080 degrees at 4 knots; 6 statute miles visibility, few clouds at 6,000 feet, temperature 24 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 16 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. The calculated density altitude was about 2,259 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located in the eastbound lane of interstate 285, approximately 2 miles from PDK. The airplane came to rest in the left service lane against a 5 foot barrier wall on a heading of 021 degrees magnetic. There was a postcrash fire that consumed the majority of the airplane. There were ground scars across four traffic lanes up to the concrete highway divider.
The cockpit and fuselage were fragmented and destroyed by postcrash fire. Flight control cables were attached to fragments of the flight controls. The right and left wings were fragmented and was destroyed by postcrash fire. The flight control surfaces were molten metal on both wings. The aileron bellcranks on the left and right wings were located within the fragments of the wings and connected to the flight control cables and turnbuckles. Flight control cable separations exhibited signs of overstress failures. The empennage was fragmented and fire damaged. The flight control cables to the rudder control sector and stabilator bell crank remained attached to the fragmented fuselage and were traced to the forward section of the cockpit.
The left and right main landing gear were found in the extended position and the flap handle was impact damaged and observed in the 10-degree flap extension position. The throttle was found forward in the "full power" position, the propeller lever was forward at the "full increase" position, and the mixture lever was full forward at the "full rich" position. The fuel boost pump switch and selector was destroyed. Engine control linkage continuity was established from the cockpit controls to their respective engine connections.

An examination of the fuel system revealed that the all of the fuel lines before the firewall were destroyed. The fuel lines from the firewall to the fuel manifold were partially fire damaged. The fuel manifold and injector lines did not show signs of fire damage. The fuel manifold was removed during the examination of the engine and placed on a test bench and did not flow when tested up to 7 psi (normal test pressure is 4.5 psi). The unit was removed from the test bench and the bottom cover was removed. Following removal of the bottom cover, the gasket did not exhibit heat damage. The bottom portion of the movable portion of the body assembly was measured and found to be positioned 0.032 inch below the spool of the body assembly (normal closed position). The bottom of the movable portion of the body assembly was pushed by hand and some resistance was noted at first, but it then moved. The bottom cover was reinstalled and the four screws were torqued to the proper setting. The fuel manifold was placed on the test bench and debris was noted coming from the ports during initial flow. The unit was flowed at 4.5 psi (normal) and it was found to flow equally from all ports at 132 pounds-per-hour (pph); the minimum specification was 135 pph. The fuel manifold was removed from the test bench and the top cover, which was safety wired, was removed. Test bench fluid was noted on the top side of the diaphragm (air side) and some slivers of material were also noted. The movable portion of the body assembly was removed and contamination/debris was noted. Re-insertion of the movable portion of the body assembly into the body revealed slight binding.

The debris recovered from the fuel manifold was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory and examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The spectrum for the debris contained peaks that corresponded to signatures indicative that the material contained a carboxylic acid. A spectral library search was done on the debris spectrum. There were no strong matches found in the search; however, the debris spectrum had many similarities to several dicarboxylic acids, such as terephthalic acid and isophthalic acid. Carboxylic acids are pervasive in nature and are often found as precursors in polymer production, in adhesives and coatings, and are often naturally present in fuel as well as used as fuel additives (corrosion inhibitors and lubricity improving additives).

During examination of the fuel servo, it was noted that it was fire damaged. Due to the heat damage of the diaphragms, the unit could not be flow tested.

Examination of the propeller revealed that one blade was fractured off the hub. The spinner dome separated from the spinner bulkhead. All three blades exhibited rotational scoring and curling of the blade tips. There were impression marks on the preload plates indicating that the propeller was in the low blade angle position prior to impact. The propeller showed signs of power ON prior to impact. There were no discrepancies noted that would preclude normal operation. All damage was consistent with impact damage.

The propeller governor was mounted in a governor test stand and run through the standard factory acceptance test procedure for new or overhauled governors. The governor functioned normally and met all factory specifications, except for the maximum rpm. The governor maximum rpm setting was 2,660 rpm verses a factory specification of 2,555 +/- 10. Although the high rpm setting was higher than factory specifications, it did not affect the governor performance. A higher than specified rpm setting indicated an adjustment was made to the governor high rpm stop while installed on the airplane. The governor was then disassembled for visual examination of the governor components. There were no unserviceable conditions noted during the visual examination.

Examination of the engine revealed it was discolored consistent with exposure to the postimpact fire. The propeller and crankshaft flange were separated from the engine. The crankshaft flange was impact damaged. The left side of the exhaust system was crushed. The engine accessories were fire damaged. Both crankcase halves were fractured in the area of the No. 1 and No. 2 cylinders. The No. 2 cylinder head on the left side was impact damaged. The engine mount was bent and the engine was displaced toward the firewall. Three of the four engine mounts were impact fractured. The engine could not be rotated by turning the crankshaft flange due to impact damage and was further disassembled to examine the engine internal components. The cylinders were removed and no damage noted to the cylinders, pistons or valves other than fire and impact damage. The oil sump was removed and contained an unmeasured quantity of oil. The accessory case was removed and no damage to the rear gears was noted. The oil pump was disassembled and no damage to the pump bore or gears was noted. The crankcase halves were disassembled and the crankshaft and rod assembly was lifted out. The rods were free to rotate on the crankshaft rod journals and were not disassembled. The crankshaft main journals and crankshaft bearing surfaces did not show any anomalies. The camshaft was removed and no damage noted to the crankcase camshaft bearing surfaces. No damage was noted to the camshaft except that the cam lobe, which serviced the No. 3 intake and the No. 4 exhaust cam followers were worn. The cam lobe was measured at 1.364 inches using an uncalibrated dial caliper. The No. 4 exhaust lobe was measured at 1.464 inches. The No. 3 intake and No. 4 exhaust cam followers were pitted and worn.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the DeKalb County Medical Examiner, Decatur Georgia.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot with negative results for drugs and alcohol.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The weight and balance record dated August 24, 1999, noted the airplane's empty weight to be 2,154 lbs. According to the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) the maximum takeoff and landing weight for this aircraft was 3,600 lbs. With full fuel (94 gallons useable), an estimated cargo weight of 216 lbs, and reported pilot and passengers weights of 690 lbs, the total weight computed was 3,624 lbs. According to fueling records the airplane was topped off with 20 gallons of fuel prior to departure. The estimated cargo weight was based on the fire damaged items that were collected during the airplane recovery.

The airplane's calculated takeoff distance assuming that it was loaded to its maximum gross weight, the flaps were set to 25 degrees, and given the weather conditions reported about the time of the accident, was about 1,050 feet. The distance required to clear a 50-foot barrier was about 2,000 feet.

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA208 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 08, 2015 in Chamblee, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-32R-300, registration: N5802V
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2015, about 1010 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-300, N5802V, collided with a highway barrier during a forced landing attempt near Chamblee, Georgia. The commercial pilot three passengers were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by TLT and GGBB LLC. as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from Peachtree DeKalb Airport (PDK), Chamblee, Georgia, about 1008 eastern daylight time and was destined for University-Oxford Airport (UOX), Oxford, Mississippi.

A review of the air traffic control (ATC) transcript revealed that the pilot contacted clearance delivery for an IFR clearance. ATC provided the clearance, which included radar vectors, and "climb and maintain 3,000; expect 8,000 in 10 minutes." The pilot read back the clearance correctly, and confirmed that he had the most recent automatic terminal information service (ATIS), which was information "Whiskey." The pilot contacted ground control, and indicated that he was ready to taxi. Ground control instructed the pilot to taxi for runway 3R, via bravo, hold short 3L, and the pilot read back the instructions correctly. The pilot then contacted the tower controller informing them that he was holding short 3L and ready. The tower controller instructed the pilot to "fly heading 360 and cleared for takeoff." The pilot then questioned the controller regarding which runway to take off from and the controller cleared the pilot for takeoff from runway 3L. Approximately two minutes after departure the tower controller called the pilot to verify heading. The pilot responded "zero-two-victor, I'm having some problem climbing here." Followed by "zero-two-victor; were going down here at the intersection." This was the last transmission made by the pilot.

A witness stated that he was about 2,300 feet off the departure end of the runway. He stopped to look at the airplane because it was moving extremely slow and only 75-100 feet above ground level when it went over his head. He went on to say that the engine sounded normal and despite the slow speed the airplane was not "wobbling" left to right. He continued to watch the airplane as it flew out of his view.

First responders to the accident site located the airplane in the eastbound lane of interstate 285, approximately 2 miles north of PDK. There were ground scars across four traffic lanes that ended at a 5 foot concrete highway divider where the airplane came to rest. The airplane was found fragmented and a post-crash fire ensued. The wreckage path was on a heading of 021 degrees magnetic, at coordinates 33°54'44.12"N, 84°17'8.46"W.


TLT AND GGB LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5802V 

DORAVILLE, Ga. - New video released Friday by Chamblee Police may give aviation investigators new insight into what led to the deadly plane crash on Interstate 285 earlier this month.

Dash cam video from the first responding officer from Chamblee captures the plane descending from the right of the screen. The plane then seems to perform a hard right turn before disappearing on the horizon. A plume of smoke can be seen seconds later. The officer then speeds up an off ramp to the fiery scene.

The National Transportation Safety Board released its preliminary findings on the May 8th crash on Tuesday. Those findings did not offer a cause for the crash, the investigation continues and  may not be complete for up to a year.

The plane crashed about a mile from DeKalb-Peachtree Airport and shut down the interstate in both directions for much of that day.

The crash tragically cut short the lives of Greg Byrd, sons Phillip Byrd and Christopher Byrd and Christopher's fiancée Jackie Kulzer. They were headed to the commencement ceremony at the University of Mississippi.

Source:  http://www.myfoxatlanta.com


Family photo of Christopher Byrd and Jackie Kulzer just moments before they took off in plane that crashed. 
  

Obituary
Greg, Phillip, Christopher Byrd

Asheville - Greg and his sons Christopher and Phillip Byrd died tragically in a plane crash on May 8 in Atlanta, GA on their way to Oxford, MS. Also lost in the accident was Christopher's fiancée, Jackie Kulzer of Atlanta, GA.

Greg Byrd, 53, is survived by his parents, Peggy and Grady Byrd and his devoted partner of five years, Theresa Trebon; his son, Robert Winslow Byrd; and his sisters, Leslie Byrd Farquhar and Elizabeth Byrd Etheridge and their children. Greg, who graduated from Christ School in 1980 and attended NC State, was the owner of Tan Universe and a former deputy with the Buncombe County Sheriff's Department for 17 years. Most recently, he served as an active reserve officer.

Christopher Freeman Byrd, 27, and Phillip Armstrong Byrd, 26, are survived by their mother Hope Swicegood Byrd, their brother Robert Winslow Byrd and grandparents Peggy and Joe Swicegood and Peggy and Grady Byrd. Christopher and Phillip's aunts and uncles are Lynda and Carr Swicegood, Michele Swicegood, Leslie and Gordon Farquhar, and Elizabeth and Jonathan Etheridge. Their beloved cousins are Steven and Alexander Demetriou; Reggie King; Joseph, Andrew and Sarah Margaret Swicegood, Chelsea and Jack Farquhar and Amelia and Colson Etheridge.

Memorials in Greg's name may be made to Christ School, 500 Christ School Road, Arden NC 28704. Memorials in Christopher and Jackie's names may be made to the University of Mississippi Alumni Association, Triplett Alumni Center, PO Box 1848, University, MS 38677. Christopher and Jackie, both graduates of The University of Mississippi, were employed in Atlanta. Phillip Byrd was the owner of Curb Appeal Landscaping. Memorials in Phillip's name may be made to Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Church Street, Asheville NC 28801.

The family will receive friends from 4:00-7:00 PM on Sunday, May 10, 2015 at the Biltmore Forest Town Hall, 355 Vanderbilt Road, Asheville NC 28803. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 PM on Monday, May 11, 2015 at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Church Street, Asheville, NC 28801.

Groce Funeral Home at Lake Julian is assisting the family and a memorial guest register is available at grocefuneralhome.com.


- See more at: http://www.legacy.com













May 8, 2015 Atlanta - NTSB Safety Investigator Eric Alleyne (center) and other officials investigate on I-285 at Peachtree Industrial Boulevard, where four people died aboard a small plan on Friday, May 8, 2015. Traffic was shut down in both directions. Three men and one woman were killed in the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board is in charge of the investigation and will determine probable cause. 


May 8, 2015 Atlanta - NTSB Safety Investigator Eric Alleyne (center) and other officials investigate on I-285 at Peachtree Industrial Boulevard, where four people died aboard a small plan on Friday, May 8, 2015. Traffic was shut down in both directions. Three men and one woman were killed in the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board is in charge of the investigation and will determine probable cause.













Cessna 210F Centurion, N1842F: Fatal accident occurred May 21, 2015 near Livermore Municipal Airport (KLVK), California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA166
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 21, 2015 in Pleasanton, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/14/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 210F, registration: N1842F
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Before beginning the cross-county flight under visual flight rules (VFR), the pilot received a weather briefing that reported VFR conditions at the departure and destination airports but included an airmen’s meteorological information notice for instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions along the route of flight. About 8 minutes after departure, recorded radar data showed the airplane’s altitude varying between 321 and 635 ft above ground level (agl) for about 1.5 minutes before the impact. 

Until about 30 seconds before impact, the airplane was tracking south on course along a valley, but it then began to deviate west toward rising terrain. The airplane then began a slow, descending right turn. The last recorded radar target showed the airplane about 0.2 miles from the accident site, at an altitude of about 410 ft agl. 

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. A review of weather observations and satellite imagery indicated that IFR conditions prevailed in the vicinity of the accident site due to low clouds and restricted visibility. It is likely that the pilot was varying his altitude to remain clear of the clouds and subsequently entered an area where continued flight on course was not possible and initiated a right turn. During the turn, the airplane collided with rising terrain.  

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s continued visual flight into instrument flight rules conditions, which resulted in his failure to maintain sufficient clearance from rising terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 21, 2015, about 0857 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 210F, N1842F, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Pleasanton, California. The instrument rated private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed within the area for the personal cross-country flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Buchanan Field Airport (CCR), Concord, California, at 0848, with an intended destination of the Reid-Hillview Airport (RHV), San Jose, California.

The pilot obtained an official weather briefing from Direct Use Access Terminal (DUAT) at 0802. When the airplane failed to arrive at KRHV, a friend of the pilot contacted the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA subsequently issued an Alert Notification (ALNOT). The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and local law enforcement commenced search and rescue operations throughout the area. The wreckage was located by CAP on the morning of May 22, 2015.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 

The pilot, age 66, held a private pilot certificate for airplane single engine land, and he was instrument rated. A second-class airman medical certificate was issued on April 13, 2014, with the following limitation: must wear corrective lenses. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated about 1,232.2 hours of total flight time as of May 13, 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The six-seat, single-engine, high-wing, retractable landing gear airplane, serial number 21058742, was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-520-A engine, serial number 111396-6-A, rated at 285 horse power. The airplane was also equipped with a McCauley three bladed constant speed propeller, model D3A34C402-C. A review of maintenance records showed that the most recent annual inspection was completed May 17, 2015, at a total aircraft time of 3,811.6 hours, and tachometer time of 721.3 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

A NTSB staff meteorologist prepared a factual report for the area and timeframe surrounding the accident.

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 0800 depicted a surface trough to the east of the accident site in central Nevada, and oriented from north to south into western Arizona with a surface low pressure center at 1005-hectopascals (hPa). The station models around the accident site and along the California coast depicted air temperatures in the low to mid 50's Fahrenheit (F), with temperature-dew point spreads of 2 degrees F or less, a west-to-northwest wind between 5 and 10 knots, cloudy skies, and areas of fog. The station models east of the accident site and in the central valley of California coast depicted air temperatures in the mid to upper 50's Fahrenheit (F), with temperature-dew point spreads of 8 degrees F or more, variable winds between 5 and 15 knots, and partly cloudy skies. The accident site was located in an area where the marine air was moving onshore and into the terrain helping to produce clouds and some precipitation. The area is favored for widespread low cloud cover.

An Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) located 2 miles west of Hayward Executive Airport (HWD), Hayward, California, elevation of 52 feet mean sea level (msl), reported at 0835, wind from 290° at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, a broken ceiling at 800 feet above ground level (agl), overcast skies at 1,300 feet agl, temperature of 13 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature of 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, rain began at 0822 and ended at 0831 PDT, ceiling varying between 600 and 900 feet agl, one-hourly precipitation of a trace, maintenance is needed on the system.

At 0854, HWD reported wind from 280 degrees at 5 knots, 10 miles visibility, a broken ceiling at 800 feet agl, overcast skies at 2,500 feet agl, temperature of 14 degrees C, dew point temperature of 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, rain began at 0822 and ended at 0831 PDT, ceiling varying between 600 and 1,400 feet agl, sea-level pressure of 1015.3 hPa, one-hourly precipitation of a trace, temperature 13.9° degrees C, dew point temperature of 12.2 degrees C, maintenance is needed on the system.

At 0919, HWD reported wind from 270 degrees at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 800 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 1,600 feet agl, overcast skies at 4,700 feet agl, temperature of 14 degrees C, dew point temperature of 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, maintenance is needed on the system.

The Livermore Municipal Airport (LVK), Livermore, California, was located 8 miles east of the accident site, at an elevation of 400 feet msl, also had an ASOS. At 0853, LVK reported wind from 240 degrees at 8 knots, 10 miles visibility, a broken ceiling at 1,500 feet agl, overcast skies at 2,000 feet agl, temperature of 15° C, dew point temperature of 10 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of mercury. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, sea-level pressure 1013.8 hPa, temperature 15.0 degrees C, dew point temperature 10.0 degrees C.

The closest sounding was from Oakland, California. The 0500 sounding indicated a relatively moist environment from the surface to 4,000 feet msl in a conditionally unstable environment. With any lifting mechanism in the area of the accident site, such as a mid-level trough or hilly terrain, the formation of clouds would be expected in the moist conditionally unstable environment. The Rawinsonde Observation program (ROAB) indicated that clouds were likely from the surface through 4,000 feet msl and this is consistent with the observations from HWD and LVK.

Visible and infrared data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 15 (GOES-15) indicated abundant cloud cover over and around the accident site at the accident time with that cloud cover moving from west to east. The imagery indicated that the approximate cloud-top heights over the accident site were 7,000 feet at 0845.

Two pilot reports (PIREPs) from unknown types of aircraft were received over San Francisco, California, at 0646; an overcast ceiling at 700 feet msl with tops to 4,300 feet msl during the climb from San Francisco (SFO), and an overcast ceiling at 800 feet msl with tops to 3,000 feet msl during descent into SFO. 

An AIRMET Sierra, issued at 0745, forecasted IFR conditions with ceilings below 1,000 feet agl, visibilities below 3 miles, precipitation, and mist.

An area forecast, issued at 0345, forecasted an overcast ceiling at 2,000 feet msl with tops at 6,000 feet msl. The ceiling was forecasted to become broken at 3,000 feet msl by 0800 with isolated light rain showers.

Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) issued at 0442, and valid at the accident time, forecasted wind from 220 degrees at 5 knots, greater than 6 miles visibility, and a broken ceiling at 2,500 feet agl. This TAF accurately forecasted the weather conditions at LVK at the time of the accident. However, the ceiling and visibility conditions were likely lower at the accident site at the accident time, given the surface observations reported at HWD and the surrounding weather environment.

The DUATs weather briefing that the pilot received prior to the accident flight provided the Area Forecast issued at 0345, AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions and mountain obscuration, and the two PIREPs from KSFO. TAFs for locations along the route of flight and winds aloft were also provided. The official weather briefing from DUATs specifically mentioned IFR conditions along the route of flight given that the AIRMET was briefed.

The complete weather report is appended to this accident in the public docket.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that it was located on the side of a hill, at an elevation of 1,237 feet msl. The airplane wreckage was spread along a 230-foot-long upsloping debris path through grass on an approximately heading of 044 degrees magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest at an elevation of about 1,257 feet msl. 

The first point of impact is a ground scar about 10 inches wide containing a piece of a green lens, and a piece of a wing structure. The ground scar extended about 17 feet into a large area of disturbed dirt. A propeller slash mark was found about 16 feet from the initial point of impact. About 43 feet northeast-east from the first point of impact were one of the airplane's propeller blade, and a right wing lift strut. Plexiglas, portions of engine cowling, engine mount structure, and fuselage debris were scattered across the ground beginning at the first point of impact, and extended to the main wreckage. Another propeller blade was located about 115 feet from the first point of impact. 

The terrain from the first point of impact to where the airplane's main wreckage came to rest was upsloping, at an angle of approximately 9 degrees. The main wreckage was located 145 feet from the first point of impact, and consisted of the airplane's engine, right wing, right landing gear, aft fuselage, and empennage. The fuselage came to rest upright on a heading of about 300 degrees. Those components were partially charred, melted, and damaged by the impact. The forward fuselage and the cabin were consumed by fire. A burned area of grass surrounded the main wreckage within about 10 feet. 

The left wing was located 165 feet from the first point of impact. The third propeller blade was located at 193 feet, and it was attached to the propeller hub. The horizontal stabilizer, elevators, vertical stabilizer, and rudder remained attached to the empennage. The bulkhead and the bottom of aft fuselage were bent inward. Front seats and center seats were found outside the main wreckage. The two rear seats remained attached to the airframe.

The airplane wreckage was examined at the facilities of Plain Parts, Pleasant Grove, California, on May 24, 2015, by representatives from Textron Aviation, Continental Motors, Inc., and FAA under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. Examination of the recovered airframe, engine, and system components revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation.

The complete engine and airframe examination report is appended to this accident in the public docket.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot May 26, 2015, by the Alameda County Sheriff's Office, Coroner's Bureau, Oakland, California. The cause of death was determined to be "extensive blunt trauma."

The FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The specimen used to test for volatiles tested positive for ethanol in muscle but negative for ethanol in liver. The specimen used to test for drugs detected a presence of atorvastatin in liver. Tests for carbon monoxide and cyanide were not performed. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A Garmin GPSMAP 396 unit was recovered from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination. Track log data dated from May 18, 2009, to June 26, 2009, was recovered from the unit. No track log data was identified correlating with the date of the accident. The complete GPS report is appended to this accident in the public docket.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A review of archived Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar data showed the airplane's altitude varied between 1,100 feet msl and 1,225 feet msl from 0849:08 until 0850:13, with a general south-east heading. The radar data was not shown from 0850:14 until 0855. At 0855:16, the airplane was depicted at 1,724 feet msl. From 0855:17 until 0856:12, the airplane's altitude varied between 1,625 feet msl (about 321 feet agl) and 1,774 feet msl (about 438 feet agl), with a south-west heading. At 0856:17, the heading changed to west, and the airplane started a climb. At 0856:38, radar data showed the airplane at 1,850 feet msl (about 635 feel agl). The airplane then began a slow descent with a slight right turn until the collision with terrain. The last observed target on the accident airplane was recorded at 0856:54 about 1,525 feet msl (about 410 feet agl). 

Radar data video and raw data are appended to this accident in the public docket.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA166
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 21, 2015 in Pleasanton, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 210F, registration: N1842F
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 21, 2015 about 0857 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 210F, N1842F, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Pleasanton, California. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual and instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity of the personal cross-country flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Buchanan Field Airport, Concord, California, at 0848, with an intended destination of the Reid-Hillview Airport, San Jose, California. 

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that a friend of the pilot contacted the FAA on the evening of May 21, 2015, and reported that the pilot had not arrived at his intended destination. The FAA subsequently issued an Alert Notification (ALNOT). The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and local law enforcement commenced search and rescue operations throughout the area. The wreckage was located by CAP on the morning of May 22, 2015.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed that the airplane impacted the side of a hill at an elevation of 1,237 feet (ft) mean sea level (msl). The airplane wreckage debris path was about 230 ft in length along upsloping terrain on about a 023-degree magnetic heading. All major structural components of the airplane were located at the accident site. The fuselage and inboard portions of both wings were mostly consumed by a postimpact fire. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

ANDREW A. MORSE: http://registry.faa.gov/N1842F 




Andrew Morse, 66, was killed Thursday after he crashed a small plane into the hills around the Castro Valley. The Lafayette man was survived by his wife and two adult sons.
 (Photo courtesy of Catherine Goff)



LAFAYETTE -- Andrew Morse was a small-plane pilot with big-time plans.

So when the 66-year-old contractor and residential developer from Lafayette started work on a project in San Jose, the experienced pilot figured he'd cut around the nasty Interstate 680 traffic by flying right over.

"He flew for 20 years and just loved it," said sister-in-law Christine Goff on Saturday. "We're all really in shock right now and we don't have any answers."

Morse was killed Thursday after crashing his single-engine Cessna 210 into a rugged, hilly site two miles south of Interstate 580 in an unincorporated area in Castro Valley.

He was flying from the Buchanan Field Airport in Concord, headed to Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose.

Alameda County Sheriff's officers found the wreckage Friday morning.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Safety Transportation Board were investigating.

Morse, who was flying alone, was killed at the scene.

Goff said Morse had been married to her sister, Jo Ann Morse, for more than 30 years and had two adult sons, Colin and Eric.

Jo Ann Morse was "devastated" and couldn't talk Saturday, Goff said.

The family had no indication of what caused the crash, Goff said. Investigators haven't said whether Morse may have had a medical incident, or if the plane had a mechanical failure.

"He was always such a cautious, responsible pilot. He always checked the weather, that sort of thing, but unfortunately something happened, and we just don't know what," Goff said.

Goff described Morse as an outgoing man who loved fixing things and was active in his community, nicknamed the "Mayor of Stow Lane," the street the family lived on since moving from Oakland in 1988.

Morse was active in the community, a Boy Scout troop leader and a baseball coach, and was an avid skier.

Goff said Morse was on the Sugar Bowl Ski Patrol in Soda Springs until a few years ago and kept in great shape.

"He was very active and healthy," she said.

Morse got his bachelor's degree from UC Davis and his business degree from San Francisco State University, Goff said.

A memorial service hasn't yet been set.

"I think my sister needs some time to deal. I don't think she's ready yet," she said.











CASTRO VALLEY (CBS SF) — A man is dead after a plane crashed in rural Alameda County Thursday morning, according to the Alameda County coroner’s bureau, the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office and the Santa Clara County Airports administration.

Acting Director of Santa Clara County Airports Eric Peterson said investigators found the plane at about 8:30 a.m.

Alameda County Sheriff’s Sgt. J.D. Nelson identified the location as a rural area of hills and trees between Pleasanton, Dublin, Castro Valley and Hayward, near Rowell Ranch Rodeo. Nelson said there are no homes close by and so it’s likely no one heard the crash.

Nelson said the crash started a small grass fire that extinguished itself due to the rain, fog and mist in the area.

Preliminary information today from the Federal Aviation Administration initially said the crash occurred near Livermore.

FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said that according to preliminary information a Cessna 210F Centurion en route to Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose from Concord was reported as overdue on Thursday. Gregor said he could not confirm the tail number for the aircraft.

Peterson said when pilots file a flight plan they indicate when they will depart and when they will arrive at their destination. When the plane arrives, the pilot usually calls the control tower and the air traffic controllers will close out the flight plan, Peterson said.

If the pilot does not call in, the FAA will initiate a search by calling airports along the plane’s planned route to see if the pilot landed and failed to call the tower, Peterson said.

“And that’s the call we got,” Peterson said.

Gregor said that according to local authorities the pilot was the only person on board. Nelson confirmed that.

Nelson said officials with the coroner’s bureau have retrieved the body.

Gregor said officials with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash. The NTSB will be the lead investigating agency, Gregor said.