Saturday, April 23, 2016

Rocky start can’t keep the airport down

The good news is that PenAir’s inaugural flight from Humboldt County to Portland, Oregon, went off without a hitch on Thursday.

The flight back to McKinleyville, not so much.

PenAir’s Flight 181 encountered maintenance problems above the skies of southern Oregon, forcing the Alaska carrier to turn the plane around and return to Portland. Passengers eventually were back on their way to Humboldt County aboard another plane that had to be brought up from Aurora, 10 miles south.

The delay? Nearly six hours. While some passengers were understanding — safety comes first, last and in between — others voiced frustration not uncommonly heard from travelers longing to fly to and from Humboldt County in a timely fashion.

We understand those concerns — one of our own reporters was aboard Flight 181, and could have used those hours spent waiting on the eventual flight out of Portland covering other stories closer to home. But the occasional hitch doesn’t change our strong support for expanded airline service in and out of Humboldt County.

Not only is that service crucial to the continued growth and health of Humboldt County’s economy, but PenAir is the first airline to add service to our regional airport in McKinleyville in nearly five years. The occasional hiccup won’t change the basic math behind incentivizing more carriers to bring their business to Humboldt County: The more we fly, the more flights will be made available to us. And vice versa.

So, rough start or no, the show must go on. We welcome PenAir to Humboldt County with open arms.

Side note

You’ll notice we’ve tiptoed around the official name of our regional airport. That’s because “California Redwood Coast-Humboldt County Airport” is an abomination that never should have been allowed to escape the underground marketing lab in which it was unnaturally ushered into existence by committee.

No one calls the airport in McKinleyville formerly designated as the Eureka/Arcata airport the “California Redwood Coast-Humboldt County Airport.” The new name’s got enough syllables to choke a boa constrictor. It won’t fit in a headline in newsprint or online, and it doesn’t so much roll off the tongue as much as it ties it into knots.

It doesn’t even lend itself to a decent acronym: CRCHCA, what is that? Cucaracha? Chewbacca? We defy anyone to use it in a sentence and keep a straight face. Maybe you can do it while singing: C-R-C, H-C-A, M-O-U-S-E?

We love our airport. It deserves better than this.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.times-standard.com

Cessna 172B Skyhawk, N7614X: Accident occurred April 23, 2016 in Brimfield, Peoria County, Illinois

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA166
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 23, 2016 in Brimfield, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/06/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N7614X
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a local flight, the pilot noticed a "miss" in the engine, and observed a gradual loss of power. The pilot advanced the throttle, verified the positions of the mixture control and fuel selector, and briefly applied carburetor heat; however, the engine did not respond, and the pilot turned the carburetor heat control off. The pilot elected to perform a forced landing to a nearby field. Examination of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies. Although the airplane was operating in an area that was conducive to the serious risk of carburetor ice accumulation at a glide power setting, the engine was operating at a cruise power setting at the time of the loss of power. However, had the carburetor accumulated ice, the pilot's brief activation of the carburetor heat would have been insufficient to remedy the situation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined, as postaccident examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

On April 23, 2016, about 1300 central daylight time, a Cessna 172B airplane, N7614X, conducted a forced landing near Brimfield, Illinois. The private rated pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that during cruise flight, the engine developed a noticeable "miss"; the engine rpms then slowly decreased. The pilot advanced the throttle, with limited effect. He then preformed a magneto check, verified the fuel valve, and mixture control positions. Followed by applying carburetor heat on, then off, without the engine responding. The pilot then selected a field for the forced landing. During the forced landings the airplanes nose gear dug into the dirt, and the airplane nosed over, coming to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage during the accident.

An inspection of the engine by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector did not reveal any abnormalities.

The automated weather observation facility station, located at the General Downing - Peoria International Airport, Peoria, Illinois at 1254, recorded: wind from 050 degrees at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, a clear sky, temperature 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point 42 F, and a barometric pressure of 30.15 inches of mercury. 

The automated weather observation facility station located at the Galesburg Municipal Airport Galesburg, Illinois recorded at 1315, a temperature of 63 degrees (F), and a dew point of 44 F.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice accumulation at glide power settings.

In December 2013, the NTSB issued Safety Alert (SA-029) "Engine power loss due to Carburetor Icing", which emphasized that recognizing weather conditions and applying simple procedures can prevent accidents.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7614X

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA166
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 23, 2016 in Brimfield, IL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N7614X
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 23, 2016, about 1310 central daylight time, a Cessna 172B airplane, N7614X, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Brimfield, Illinois. The private rated pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. 

An initial report to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector was that the pilot and a passenger planned on a local flight. The pilot reported that during cruise flight, the engine had a reduction in power, before a total loss of engine power. He elected to perform a forced landing to a field. The airplane came to rest inverted and sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage during the accident.


The airplane was retained for further examination.



BRIMFIELD — The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed that a single engine plane crashed outside of Brimfield on Saturday afternoon.

The incident occurred about 1 p.m. after the pilot of a Cessna 172 plane reported engine trouble shortly after departing from Tri-County Airport in Yates City, according to the FAA.

The plane landed in a field about three miles south of Brimfield, according to the FAA.

According to media reports, two people were on the plane and were taken to a hospital for treatment of minor injuries after the crash at Shissler and Bell School roads. That information could not be confirmed Saturday night.

The cause of the crash and other details were not available Saturday night.



A single-engine plane crash near Brimfield injures two passengers.

Peoria County Sheriff confirms to WMBD News, the incident occurred on Shissler Rd., near Bell School Rd. after 1 p.m. Saturday.

The two passengers of the plane were able to walk away from the aircraft.

They were taken to a local hospital for treatment of minor injuries.

No word on where the plane was heading or where the flight originated from.

The incident is under investigation.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.1470wmbd.com

State budget battle has implications on Raleigh County Memorial Airport (KBKW), Beckley, Raleigh County, West Virginia

The lack of a state budget is leaving officials at Raleigh County Memorial Airport feeling uneasy.

"There are federal dollars available to every airport in the state," said Airport Manager Tom Cochran. "Those funds are contingent on there being a state budget."

Cochran said having a state budget means the airport would have the matching funds available to get monies the airport is entitled to from the Federal Aviation Administration.

There is approximately $18 million available for all state airports from the FAA; approximately $600,000 would be available for the Raleigh airport's upcoming improvement projects.

The funds would be used for airport improvement projects which would help the airport continue to meet FAA regulations and keeping the airport open, Cochran said.

"With no state budget we are compromising money coming to our state that we could use for projects that would bring jobs and revenue," Cochran said.

Cochran said it's money that the airport is entitled to, Sept. 30 is the deadline for the funds.

"If we don't get a budget, we could lose those funds," Cochran said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.register-herald.com

Collier County off-roaders may soon have a place to ride their ATVs: Immokalee Regional Airport (KIMM), Florida

Collier County off-roaders may have finally found a place to ride.

The Federal Aviation Administration has given county officials preliminary approval to build an ATV park at the Immokalee airport. The site is about half the size the county wanted, but proponents of an off-road park are willing to take what they can get after more than a decade of fruitless searching.

"At this point in time, something is better than nothing," said Jeff Close, a member of a county advisory committee tasked with finding land for the park. "It's a start."

The park would go on about 300 acres of undeveloped airport land. The county already owns the land and, with trees and tall vegetation, it may not need much work, said Steve Carnell, administrator of the county public services department.

"With the layout the way it is, the site could be big enough," Carnell said. "There isn't much we would need to work around because the things that are there are the things you want. The trees and other vegetation make for good trails."

The county needs to conduct an environmental review and put forward a business plan to show the FAA that the park would be self-sustaining.

The FAA would have to sign off on the park before it could be built. But local airport leaders think the off-roaders would complement the Immokalee airport's drag racing strip and perhaps spur enough interest to bring a campground back to the airport.

A campground would be key to a successful off-road park, Close said.

"You almost have to have one if you're going to pull people in from other counties," he said. "You can't expect people to come that distance then just load up and go home."

The airport had intended to build a campground to go with the drag strip. Construction started but never finished. With talk of an ATV park, the airport could revive plans to finish the campground, said airport manager Justin Lobb.

"It's something we're definitely interested in pursuing," Lobb said. "The idea is a campground and an ATV park would be very complementary, so we're waiting to see if the ATV park will come to fruition. There are still hurdles we need to go through, but the park would definitely be beneficial to the airport."

The money to build the park would come from a $3 million settlement the county received in 2011 from the South Florida Water Management District.

The district pledged in 2003 to find one square-mile — 640 acres — for off-roaders in return for kicking them out of the Picayune Strand State Forest as part of an Everglades restoration project. Over the next eight years, the district's search found nothing but unwilling sellers and environmental concerns. Eventually, the county government filed a lawsuit against the district. In a 2011 settlement, the district threw up its hands and paid the county $3 million to conduct the search itself.

Four years later, that money still is sitting in county coffers almost entirely untouched. In October, the county set aside $10,000 to create a program to give residents free tickets to ATV parks within a few hours drive of the county. The program offered more than 300 tickets to residents who wanted them and was used to gauge public interest. In a matter of months, all tickets were claimed.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.naplesnews.com

Four Corners Regional Airport (KFMN) receiving backing in Washington

Four Corners Regional Airport Manager Mike Lewis says an FAA bill recently adopted by the U.S. Senate would help the airport complete important paving and erosion-control projects.


FARMINGTON – The Four Corners Regional Airport is receiving backing in Washington, with members of New Mexico's congressional delegation working to secure its funding through 2017.

This week, U.S. senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, both Democrats, voted to pass a bill reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration, which contains a program that would provide $1 million in funding for the airport. The money is typically allocated to airports that serve at least 10,000 passengers a year, but Udall pushed for an exemption for small terminals like Farmington's. Heinrich supported the provision.

Udall said in a statement that the airport provides a “critical link” for regional communities.

“While many small carriers are cutting back flights, our rural airports still need funding for maintenance and essential upgrades,” he said.


Airport Manager Mike Lewis said the funds will help complete important paving and erosion-control projects this year.

The airport has seen as drastic decrease in passenger traffic recently, dropping from 14,000 travelers in 2014 to about 3,500 this year, Lewis said. He attributed the downturn to 2013 FAA regulations that increased the number of training hours co-pilots need to fly. The mandate makes it difficult for carriers to find co-pilots with the 1,500 hours of required flight time, he said.

Great Lakes Airlines, Farmington’s lone commercial carrier, made an effort to work around the rule by removing about half the seats on its planes. That change pushed the aircraft into a class that can be flown by pilots without as many logged hours. It also resulted, however, in a decline in ticket sales and fewer passengers moving through the airport.

Great Lakes has asked the FAA for an exemption allowing the airline to carry more passengers, but that request is still being processed, Lewis said.



The push for heightened pilot training came from the families of victims killed in the 2009 crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407.

Lewis said airline industry officials explained to lawmakers the potential impacts of the restrictions, but the regulations were adopted anyway.

“Everyone predicted this would happen,” Lewis said. “It’s only going to get worse and start impacting larger carriers.”

In addition to commercial flights, the Four Corners airport also caters to cargo, military and medical aircraft.

Lewis said FedEx and UPS planes come and go daily, as do air ambulances from the San Juan Regional Medical Center. The hospital relies on the airport to evacuate patients from remote parts of the region, Lewis said. Securing funding for the airport will allow those services to continue, he said.

But while the Senate’s FAA bill passed with overwhelming support, the situation in the House looks different.

The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee has drafted an Aviation Innovation Reform and Reauthorization Act, which would privatize air traffic control operations and relegate the FAA to a safety enforcement role.

Rep. Ben Luján, D-N.M., is working to include a measure in the House bill that would also fund small, regional airports, according to his spokesman Andrew Stoddard.

Ultimately, the two bodies must pass a single measure that would be sent to the president for his signature.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.daily-times.com

Bellanca 7ECA, Julie Keane Aviation Inc., N8654V: Accident occurred April 23, 2016 at Ramona Airport (KRNM), San Diego County, California

JULIE KEANE AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8654V

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA197
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 23, 2016 in Ramona, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/15/2016
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7ECA, registration: N8654V
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the touch-and-go takeoff roll, he observed the windsock shift direction, the left wing of the airplane lifted very fast, and the airplane rolled to the right. The pilot further reported that when the left wing came back down, the airplane was orientated toward the ground. Subsequently the left wing of the airplane impacted the ground, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, about the time of the accident, conditions were wind variable at 3 knots. The airplane was landing on runway 27.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff in variable wind conditions.
======

A pilot crashed his small, two-seat plane at Ramona Airport in San Diego County Saturday but survived, authorities confirmed. 

The San Diego County Sheriff’s Department (SDSO) said a 56-year-old pilot walked with only minor cuts after crashing his small aircraft near the CAL FIRE helicopter landing pad at the airport around 10 a.m.

The pilot was treated at the scene by CAL FIRE firefighters. No one else was aboard the aircraft and no one on the ground was injured in the crash, deputies said.

The SDSO said Ramona Airport officials have reported the incident to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Safety Transportation Board (NTSB). NBC 7 reached out to the FAA for further details on the plane crash, but have no yet heard back from the organization.

Ramona Airport is located at 2926 Montecito Rd., about two miles west of the central business district of Ramona, which is about 40 minutes from downtown San Diego. The airport is owned by the County of San Diego.

The site was first developed in 1943, when the U.S. Navy built a small airstrip. In 1956, the facility was conveyed to San Diego County and the airport has grown over the past six decades into an aviation center for inland and mountain communities.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N6184F: Fatal accident occurred October 08, 2015 in Hope, Bonner County, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA006 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 08, 2015 in Hope, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/31/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N6184F
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot in the left seat, a certificated flight instructor in the right seat, and a pilot-rated passenger in the rear seat departed in the airplane for a personal flight and proceeded in a northeast direction. About 10 minutes after takeoff, an emergency locator transmitter transmission was received from a location about 7 miles northeast of the departure airport. The wreckage was located at an elevation of 5,226 ft mean sea level (msl), just below a saddle in the ridgeline of mountainous terrain. The airplane had impacted numerous tree tops then collided with terrain about 156 ft beyond the initial impact point. A postcrash fire destroyed the airplane cabin. Radar data about the time of the accident depicted a target at 3,600 ft msl and climbing to the northeast; the track was heading directly toward rising mountainous terrain and was consistent with a direct course to the intended destination. The final radar return was near the accident site at 4,900 ft msl. An overcast cloud layer was present and was estimated to be around 5,000 ft msl. Based on the elevation of the wreckage at 5,226 feet msl, the pilot likely did not select an altitude sufficient to clear the terrain; the airplane most likely was flying along the base of the overcast layer or had ascended into the overcast layer immediately before its impact with terrain. The pilots did not obtain a weather briefing from a Flight Service Station the day of the accident, and it is unknown if the pilots had checked the weather for the flight using other means before their departure. The investigation was unable to determine who was flying the airplane at the time of the collision with terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's selection of an inadequate altitude to cross mountainous terrain and her subsequent failure to maintain terrain clearance. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's inadequate preflight evaluation of the weather conditions and flight plan.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 8, 2015, at 0826 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N6184F, collided with mountainous terrain about 3.5 miles northeast of Hope, Idaho. The private pilot and both the commercial pilot-rated passengers were fatally injured. The airplane impacted large pine trees near a mountain ridge line and was destroyed by a post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to the private pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at the Bird Nr 2 air strip (elevation 2,192 feet msl), Sagle, Idaho, at 0816, and was destined for Minot, ND.

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) reported that at 0823 they received reports of a single emergency locator transmitter ping in the vicinity northeast of Hope. About 6 hours later, a helicopter located the wreckage just below a ridgeline saddle on the mountain slope northeast of Hope, at an elevation of 5,226 feet mean sea level (msl). The airplane had first impacted numerous tree tops then collided with terrain about 156 feet later, along a 046-degree magnetic bearing line. There was a post-crash fire that destroyed the airplane cabin.

Radar data depicts a target over Hope, ID, at 0820, at 3,600 feet, with the track proceeding to the northeast, heading directly into rising mountainous terrain. A total of 16 radar returns were identified along this track. The final radar return was at 0823, 4,900 feet, in the vicinity of the accident site.

Family members reported that the intended route of flight was to depart Sagle, proceed to Minot, then to Maine, and then proceed along the east coast of the US, with a final destination of Gainesville, Florida. The flight was scheduled to depart on Wednesday, October 7, but was delayed due to poor weather conditions. Just before the airplane departed, the pilot-rated passenger told the ranch foreman that they were heading to Minot, but because of the weather they were probably going to try to go south. The ranch foreman also stated that on Tuesday he had fueled the airplane to maximum capacity.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating, issued May 23, 2013, and a third-class airman medical certificate issued January 22, 2015, with the limitation that she must have glasses available for near vision. The pilot's logbook was not recovered for examination. On the pilot's January 22, 2015, medical certificate application, she reported her total flight time was 250 hours, with 60 hours flown in the previous six months.

The pilot-rated passenger (copilot), age 80, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for single-engine and multiengine airplane land, and instrument airplane, she also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, instrument airplane, and ground instructor (basic). She held a second-class airman medical certificate issued on October 30, 2013, with the limitation that she wear corrective lenses. Her pilot logbook was not recovered for examination. On her October 30, 2013, medical application she reported her total flight time was 3,500 hours, however, on her 2012 medical certificate application she reported 13,000 hours of flight time.

The pilot-rated passenger in a rear seat, age 84, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for single-engine land, and instrument-airplane. He held a third-class medical certificate issued October 31, 2013, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. His pilot logbook was not recovered for examination. On his October 31, 2013, medical application he reported his total flight time was 2,000 hours, however, on his 2012 medical certificate application he reported 7,030 hours of flight time.

A photo of the airplane was taken immediately prior to the departure. The photo showed the private pilot in the left front seat, the CFI in the right front seat, and a male passenger in one of the rear seats.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear, airplane, serial number 18264118, was manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-470-F27B, 260-hp engine, and equipped with a McCauley constant speed propeller model 2A34C66-NP. Airplane maintenance records were not located, and are believed to have been onboard the airplane. The records are presumed to have been destroyed in the post-crash fire. The mechanic who performed the most recent maintenance stated that he performed an annual inspection on September 27, 2015, and provided an invoice of the work.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting station was the Sand Point Airport (KSZT), elevation 2,131 feet msl, located 15 miles west of the accident location, and operates a AWOS-3 (automated weather observation system). On October 8, at 0815, the KSZT AWOS-3 observation reported calm wind, an overcast layer at 2,800 feet above ground level (agl), 7 statute miles visibility, temperature of 11 degrees C and dew point of 11 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.29 inHg. The 0835 observation recorded an overcast layer at 2,800 feet agl, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 12 C, dew point 12 C, and altimeter 30.29 inHg.

WSR-88D Level-II weather radar imagery from Spokane, Washington (KOTX), KOTX was located approximately 66 miles southwest of the accident site at an elevation of about 2,400 feet. Assuming standard refraction and considering the 0.95° beam width for the WSR-88D radar beam, the KOTX 0.457° tilt would have "seen" altitudes between about 5,200 and 11,800 feet above msl at the accident location. KOTX did not depict any pertinent areas of reflectivity during the time of the accident.

A North American Mesoscale (NAM) model sounding for the accident location at 0800 PDT was retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory. The wind between the surface and about 8,000 feet was less than 10 knots and veered from a south surface wind to a westerly wind near 8,000 feet. Above this level through about 10,000 feet, the wind was from the west at near 10 knots. Relative humidity was 90 percent or greater from the surface to about 6,500 feet. The freezing level was identified as 11,375 feet. No significant areas of turbulence were noted by the Rawinsonde Observation Program (RAOB).

The satellite GOES-15 visible imagery identified cloudy conditions in the accident region, with infrared cloud-top temperatures varying between approximately -6°C and -24°C in the vicinity of the accident site. When considering the NAM model sounding, -6°C and -24°C corresponded to cloud heights of approximately 15,300 and 24,000 feet, respectively.

The Aviation Section of the Area Forecast discussed the weather conditions as follows for the 0800 PDT Terminal Area Forecast (TAF): the surface layer is well saturated this morning and with up-sloping flow into the higher terrain of northern Washington and Idaho expect areas of stratus and fog for Spokane, Felts Field, and Lewiston (KGEG/KSFF/KLWS) with a mix of IFR and MVFR conditions through the morning. Surface winds are expected to come around to the ESE between 0500 -0800. This will push the low level out into the basin with drying at KGEG/KSFF/KLWS between 1100 -1300 with VFR conditions expected for all TAF after 1300.

AIRMET's (Airman's Meteorological Information) for IFR and mountain obscuration were active in the vicinity of the accident for altitudes below 10,000 feet.

A video taken of the accident aircraft's departure from the Bird Nr 2 air strip is included in the NTSB docket for this accident. The video shows the accident airplane departing to the south. Ceiling and prevailing visibility cannot be measured definitively from this video (and only about half of the horizon circle is visible), however terrain and trees immediately surrounding the air strip are clearly visible. Some low cloud (or smoke) is evident in the region, and distant terrain to the south is almost completely obscured by cloud (a comparison was made with a clear day image of the distant terrain from the air strip). Ceiling of unknown height appears broken, with "blue sky" visible. Lighting is consistent with a cloudy or overcast day-time environment.

The certified flight instructor (CFI, pilot-rated passenger) contacted Prescott Flight Service on the afternoon of October 7, 2015, at 1343, requesting a weather briefing for a flight from Sandpoint, ID, to Minot, ND, departing within the next hour. The briefer described AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions and mountain obscuration at the higher elevation terrain, VFR flight not recommended, and conditions extend from the departure location all the way through the mountains. At that point the CFI stopped the briefing and asked for the next day's outlook. The briefer stated that conditions would remain similar to current conditions but the amount of precipitation would decrease by early morning. The CFI stated that she was not going to fly in the mountains with the type of conditions described. The briefer continued to say that it would be a couple of days before conditions changed significantly. The CFI then asked if conditions would be better if they flew south then east, and the briefer stated that the AIRMET extended to central Idaho in every direction. Prescott Flight Service had no record of additional weather briefings for the accident airplane.


WRECKAGE & IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located by a local helicopter crew about 6 hours after the airplane departed ID19, Sagle, ID. The wreckage was located 7 miles northeast of the departure airport on the western slope at the end of a box canyon that feeds the Strong Creek and is oriented southwest-northeast. The terrain is populated by 80-foot mature pine trees, underbrush, and the ground consists of shale rock. The wreckage was located on the western face of a ridge line that dips into a saddle 0.5 miles northwest of Round Top Mountain at an elevation of 5,226 feet, approximately 25 feet below the ridgeline. The initial point of impact was identified by freshly broken pine tree tops and two fragments of the right elevator 156 feet from the main wreckage. The directional bearing between the initial point of impact and the main wreckage was 046° magnetic. The airplane cabin, and both wings were subjected to a post-impact fire which destroyed all cockpit instruments, furnishings, and personal items.

On-scene examination of the airframe revealed that both wings and the left elevator had been separated from the airframe during impact with the trees. Control continuity was established for the ailerons left and right quadrants through multiple overload separations of the control cables. The elevator cable was examined from end to end and had an overload separation one foot from the forward termination. The rudder control cable was continuous from end to end and attached to the rudder bar in the cockpit and rudder horn on the rudder. The elevator trim measured 1.4 inches which equates to 5 degrees up tab setting. The flap jack screw was observed in the fully retracted position, corresponding to full flap retraction.

The cockpit was completely destroyed by fire. No instruments were readable, no avionics, or engine instruments were recognizable, except for the wet compass. The windscreen had separated from the cabin intact and was off to the side of the wreckage. The engine controls (prop, mixture, throttle) handles were all fully pushed into their stops. The control cables passed through the firewall and forward to the engine.

The engine accessory section had been exposed to extreme heat and fire. Forward of the baffle between the accessory section and the engine block was discolored black, both magnetos were attached to their respective mounting pads, magnetos and the spark plug leads exhibited heat damage. The fuel distribution valve was discolored black; when disassembled the diaphragm was undamaged and the filter screen was clear of visible debris. Spark plugs were removed, the electrodes were dark grey in color with no mechanical damage evident, consistent with normal wear signatures. There were no visible oil leaks from any of the cylinder covers. The intake and exhaust manifolds appeared undamaged.

Attached to the engine crankshaft flange was a two-bladed constant-speed propeller. The spinner had a dent on one side but remained attached to the hub. Blade 1 exhibited no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. Torsional twisting back toward the blade face was evident along the length of the blade. Blade 2 exhibited no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. The blade was bent aft approximately 50 degrees at mid-span.

On November 10, 2015, the engine was examined by a technical representative of the engine manufacturer under the oversight of an FAA Inspector. No pre-accident anomalies were identified with the engine and engine-related systems that would have prevented the engine's ability to produce full, rated power.

The wreckage examination identified no anomalies or malfunctions of the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL & PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot was not recovered from the wreckage and her remains were presumed to have been completely consumed by the post-crash fire.

An autopsy was performed on the copilot on October 12, 2015, by the Spokane County Medical Examiner.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimen from the copilot with negative results for ethanol or listed drugs.

ADDITONAL INFORMAITON

Family members of the copilot were able to login into the copilot's ForeFlight account, and using a surrogate tablet computer accessed the most recent flight plan activity. The ForeFlight application flight plan page showed the route of flight as ID19 (Bird Nr2 airport) to KMOT (Minot, ND) as the first leg of the flight. The following destination were shown in order, KMOT to KDVL (Devils Lake, ND), KERY (Newberry, MI), KMCD (Mackinac Island, MI), KHBI (Asheboro, NC), KMHT (Manchester, NH), MHKY (Hickory, NC), and KGNV (Gainsville, FL). The planned cruising altitude was 8,500 feet, and airspeed was 137 kts. The initial direction of flight was 99 degrees magnetic.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report   -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA006
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 08, 2015 in Hope, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N6184F
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 8, 2015, at 0826 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N6184F, collided with mountainous terrain about 3.5 miles northeast of Hope, Idaho. The private pilot and both the commercial pilot-rated passengers were fatally injured. The airplane impacted large pine trees near a mountain ridge line and was destroyed by a post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to the private pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at the Bird Nr 2 air strip (elevation 2,192 feet msl), Sagle, Idaho, at 0816, and was destined for Minot, ND.

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) reported that at 0823 they received reports of a single emergency locator transmitter ping in the vicinity northeast of Hope. About 6 hours later, a helicopter located the wreckage just below a ridgeline saddle on the mountain slope northeast of Hope, at an elevation of 5,226 feet mean sea level (msl). The airplane had first impacted numerous tree tops then collided with terrain about 156 feet later, along a 046-degree magnetic bearing line. There was a post-crash fire that destroyed the airplane cabin.

Radar data depicts a target over Hope, ID, at 0820, at 3,600 feet, with the track proceeding to the northeast, heading directly into rising mountainous terrain. A total of 16 radar returns were identified along this track. The final radar return was at 0823, 4,900 feet, in the vicinity of the accident site.

Family members reported that the intended route of flight was to depart Sagle, proceed to Minot, then to Maine, and then proceed along the east coast of the US, with a final destination of Gainesville, Florida. The flight was scheduled to depart on Wednesday, October 7, but was delayed due to poor weather conditions. Just before the airplane departed, the pilot-rated passenger told the ranch foreman that they were heading to Minot, but because of the weather they were probably going to try to go south. The ranch foreman also stated that on Tuesday he had fueled the airplane to maximum capacity.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating, issued May 23, 2013, and a third-class airman medical certificate issued January 22, 2015, with the limitation that she must have glasses available for near vision. The pilot's logbook was not recovered for examination. On the pilot's January 22, 2015, medical certificate application, she reported her total flight time was 250 hours, with 60 hours flown in the previous six months.

The pilot-rated passenger (copilot), age 80, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for single-engine and multiengine airplane land, and instrument airplane, she also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, instrument airplane, and ground instructor (basic). She held a second-class airman medical certificate issued on October 30, 2013, with the limitation that she wear corrective lenses. Her pilot logbook was not recovered for examination. On her October 30, 2013, medical application she reported her total flight time was 3,500 hours, however, on her 2012 medical certificate application she reported 13,000 hours of flight time.

The pilot-rated passenger in a rear seat, age 84, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for single-engine land, and instrument-airplane. He held a third-class medical certificate issued October 31, 2013, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. His pilot logbook was not recovered for examination. On his October 31, 2013, medical application he reported his total flight time was 2,000 hours, however, on his 2012 medical certificate application he reported 7,030 hours of flight time.

A photo of the airplane was taken immediately prior to the departure. The photo showed the private pilot in the left front seat, the CFI in the right front seat, and a male passenger in one of the rear seats.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear, airplane, serial number 18264118, was manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-470-F27B, 260-hp engine, and equipped with a McCauley constant speed propeller model 2A34C66-NP. Airplane maintenance records were not located, and are believed to have been onboard the airplane. The records are presumed to have been destroyed in the post-crash fire. The mechanic who performed the most recent maintenance stated that he performed an annual inspection on September 27, 2015, and provided an invoice of the work.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting station was the Sand Point Airport (KSZT), elevation 2,131 feet msl, located 15 miles west of the accident location, and operates a AWOS-3 (automated weather observation system). On October 8, at 0815, the KSZT AWOS-3 observation reported calm wind, an overcast layer at 2,800 feet above ground level (agl), 7 statute miles visibility, temperature of 11 degrees C and dew point of 11 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.29 inHg. The 0835 observation recorded an overcast layer at 2,800 feet agl, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 12 C, dew point 12 C, and altimeter 30.29 inHg.

WSR-88D Level-II weather radar imagery from Spokane, Washington (KOTX), KOTX was located approximately 66 miles southwest of the accident site at an elevation of about 2,400 feet. Assuming standard refraction and considering the 0.95° beam width for the WSR-88D radar beam, the KOTX 0.457° tilt would have "seen" altitudes between about 5,200 and 11,800 feet above msl at the accident location. KOTX did not depict any pertinent areas of reflectivity during the time of the accident.

A North American Mesoscale (NAM) model sounding for the accident location at 0800 PDT was retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory. The wind between the surface and about 8,000 feet was less than 10 knots and veered from a south surface wind to a westerly wind near 8,000 feet. Above this level through about 10,000 feet, the wind was from the west at near 10 knots. Relative humidity was 90 percent or greater from the surface to about 6,500 feet. The freezing level was identified as 11,375 feet. No significant areas of turbulence were noted by the Rawinsonde Observation Program (RAOB).

The satellite GOES-15 visible imagery identified cloudy conditions in the accident region, with infrared cloud-top temperatures varying between approximately -6°C and -24°C in the vicinity of the accident site. When considering the NAM model sounding, -6°C and -24°C corresponded to cloud heights of approximately 15,300 and 24,000 feet, respectively.

The Aviation Section of the Area Forecast discussed the weather conditions as follows for the 0800 PDT Terminal Area Forecast (TAF): the surface layer is well saturated this morning and with up-sloping flow into the higher terrain of northern Washington and Idaho expect areas of stratus and fog for Spokane, Felts Field, and Lewiston (KGEG/KSFF/KLWS) with a mix of IFR and MVFR conditions through the morning. Surface winds are expected to come around to the ESE between 0500 -0800. This will push the low level out into the basin with drying at KGEG/KSFF/KLWS between 1100 -1300 with VFR conditions expected for all TAF after 1300.

AIRMET's (Airman's Meteorological Information) for IFR and mountain obscuration were active in the vicinity of the accident for altitudes below 10,000 feet.

A video taken of the accident aircraft's departure from the Bird Nr 2 air strip is included in the NTSB docket for this accident. The video shows the accident airplane departing to the south. Ceiling and prevailing visibility cannot be measured definitively from this video (and only about half of the horizon circle is visible), however terrain and trees immediately surrounding the air strip are clearly visible. Some low cloud (or smoke) is evident in the region, and distant terrain to the south is almost completely obscured by cloud (a comparison was made with a clear day image of the distant terrain from the air strip). Ceiling of unknown height appears broken, with "blue sky" visible. Lighting is consistent with a cloudy or overcast day-time environment.

The certified flight instructor (CFI, pilot-rated passenger) contacted Prescott Flight Service on the afternoon of October 7, 2015, at 1343, requesting a weather briefing for a flight from Sandpoint, ID, to Minot, ND, departing within the next hour. The briefer described AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions and mountain obscuration at the higher elevation terrain, VFR flight not recommended, and conditions extend from the departure location all the way through the mountains. At that point the CFI stopped the briefing and asked for the next day's outlook. The briefer stated that conditions would remain similar to current conditions but the amount of precipitation would decrease by early morning. The CFI stated that she was not going to fly in the mountains with the type of conditions described. The briefer continued to say that it would be a couple of days before conditions changed significantly. The CFI then asked if conditions would be better if they flew south then east, and the briefer stated that the AIRMET extended to central Idaho in every direction. Prescott Flight Service had no record of additional weather briefings for the accident airplane.


WRECKAGE & IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located by a local helicopter crew about 6 hours after the airplane departed ID19, Sagle, ID. The wreckage was located 7 miles northeast of the departure airport on the western slope at the end of a box canyon that feeds the Strong Creek and is oriented southwest-northeast. The terrain is populated by 80-foot mature pine trees, underbrush, and the ground consists of shale rock. The wreckage was located on the western face of a ridge line that dips into a saddle 0.5 miles northwest of Round Top Mountain at an elevation of 5,226 feet, approximately 25 feet below the ridgeline. The initial point of impact was identified by freshly broken pine tree tops and two fragments of the right elevator 156 feet from the main wreckage. The directional bearing between the initial point of impact and the main wreckage was 046° magnetic. The airplane cabin, and both wings were subjected to a post-impact fire which destroyed all cockpit instruments, furnishings, and personal items.

On-scene examination of the airframe revealed that both wings and the left elevator had been separated from the airframe during impact with the trees. Control continuity was established for the ailerons left and right quadrants through multiple overload separations of the control cables. The elevator cable was examined from end to end and had an overload separation one foot from the forward termination. The rudder control cable was continuous from end to end and attached to the rudder bar in the cockpit and rudder horn on the rudder. The elevator trim measured 1.4 inches which equates to 5 degrees up tab setting. The flap jack screw was observed in the fully retracted position, corresponding to full flap retraction.

The cockpit was completely destroyed by fire. No instruments were readable, no avionics, or engine instruments were recognizable, except for the wet compass. The windscreen had separated from the cabin intact and was off to the side of the wreckage. The engine controls (prop, mixture, throttle) handles were all fully pushed into their stops. The control cables passed through the firewall and forward to the engine.

The engine accessory section had been exposed to extreme heat and fire. Forward of the baffle between the accessory section and the engine block was discolored black, both magnetos were attached to their respective mounting pads, magnetos and the spark plug leads exhibited heat damage. The fuel distribution valve was discolored black; when disassembled the diaphragm was undamaged and the filter screen was clear of visible debris. Spark plugs were removed, the electrodes were dark grey in color with no mechanical damage evident, consistent with normal wear signatures. There were no visible oil leaks from any of the cylinder covers. The intake and exhaust manifolds appeared undamaged.

Attached to the engine crankshaft flange was a two-bladed constant-speed propeller. The spinner had a dent on one side but remained attached to the hub. Blade 1 exhibited no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. Torsional twisting back toward the blade face was evident along the length of the blade. Blade 2 exhibited no leading edge gouges or chordwise scratches. The blade was bent aft approximately 50 degrees at mid-span.

On November 10, 2015, the engine was examined by a technical representative of the engine manufacturer under the oversight of an FAA Inspector. No pre-accident anomalies were identified with the engine and engine-related systems that would have prevented the engine's ability to produce full, rated power.

The wreckage examination identified no anomalies or malfunctions of the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL & PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot was not recovered from the wreckage and her remains were presumed to have been completely consumed by the post-crash fire.

An autopsy was performed on the copilot on October 12, 2015, by the Spokane County Medical Examiner.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimen from the copilot with negative results for ethanol or listed drugs.

ADDITONAL INFORMAITON

Family members of the copilot were able to login into the copilot's ForeFlight account, and using a surrogate tablet computer accessed the most recent flight plan activity. The ForeFlight application flight plan page showed the route of flight as ID19 (Bird Nr2 airport) to KMOT (Minot, ND) as the first leg of the flight. The following destination were shown in order, KMOT to KDVL (Devils Lake, ND), KERY (Newberry, MI), KMCD (Mackinac Island, MI), KHBI (Asheboro, NC), KMHT (Manchester, NH), MHKY (Hickory, NC), and KGNV (Gainsville, FL). The planned cruising altitude was 8,500 feet, and airspeed was 137 kts. The initial direction of flight was 99 degrees magnetic.





Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

PAMELA R. BIRD:  http://registry.faa.gov/N6184F

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Spokane FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA006
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 08, 2015 in Hope, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N6184F
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 8, 2015, at 0826 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N6184F, collided with mountainous terrain about 3.5 miles northeast of Hope, Idaho. The private pilot and the commercial pilot were fatally injured, the pilot-rated passenger has not been located and is presumed to be a fatality. The airplane impacted large pine trees near a mountain ridge line and was destroyed by a post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to the private pilot, and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at the Bird Nr 2 air strip, Sagle, Idaho, at 0816, and was destined for Minot, North Dakota.

The Bonner County Sheriff reported that at 0826 he received reports of a single emergency locator transmitter ping in the vicinity northeast of Hope. About 6 hours later a helicopter located the wreckage just below a ridgeline saddle in the mountains above Hope, at an elevation of 5,226 feet mean sea level (msl). The airplane had first impacted numerous tree tops then collided with terrain about 156 feet later, along a 046-degree magnetic bearing line. There was a post-crash fire that destroyed the airplane cabin. Both pilots were located in the wreckage, however, the passenger, who had been in the rear seats of the airplane, has not been located.

Family members reported that the intended route of flight was to depart Sagle, proceed to Minot, then over to Maine, and then proceed along the east coast of the US, with a final destination of Gainesville, Florida. The flight had been planned to depart on Wednesday, October 7, but was delayed due to poor weather conditions. Just before the airplane departed the pilot-rated passenger told the ranch foreman that they were heading to Minot, but because of the weather they were probably going to try to go south. The ranch foreman also stated that on Tuesday he had fueled the airplane to maximum capacity.

The nearest weather reporting station was the Sand Point Airport (KSZT), elevation 2,131 feet msl, located 15 miles west of the accident location and operates a AWOS-3 (automated weather observation system) . On October 8, at 0835, the KSZT AWOS-3 automated recording reported calm wind, an overcast layer at 2,800 feet above ground level (agl), 10 statute miles visibility, temperature of 12 degrees C and dew point of 12 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.29 inHg.


In a photo taken by a Bird Aviation Museum and Invention Center staff member, Pam Bird and Tookie Hensley in the front seats, and Don Hensley in the back seat smile shortly before taking off October 8th. The trio was killed when the plane crashed a short time later. 



SANDPOINT — The National Transportation Safety Board is mum on the status of the investigation into a plane crash last year that killed aviator and entrepreneur Dr. Pam Riddle Bird and two passengers.

The NTSB probe into the Oct. 8, 2015, crash near Hope has been in the preliminary phase for months. Agency officials decline to release any additional information at this time.

“This is what is available at this time,” NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said, referring to the preliminary report.

Bird’s Cessna 182P airplane departed from the Bird Aviation Museum & Invention Center in Sagle shortly before 8:30 a.m., according to the NTSB report. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center reported receiving a emergency locator transmitter ping northeast of Hope at around the same time.

About six hours later, wreckage was discovered by a helicopter near a ridge line on Round Top Mountain.

The airplane collided with numerous treetops before crashing into the mountainside.

“There was a post-crash fire that destroyed the airplane cabin,” the report said.

Also killed in the crash were Bessie “Tookie” Hensley and Don Hensley, 80 and 84, respectively. They were close friends and flying companions of Bird.

The remains of the Hensleys were positively identified through the Spokane County Medical Examiner’s Office. The remains of Bird were unaccounted, although the NTSB report said it’s presumed that she died in the crash.

Family members told investigators that Bird was en route to Gainsville, Fla., with stops planned in Minot, N.D. The flight was originally scheduled for Oct. 7, but was called off due to poor weather conditions. The plane had been fueled to maximum capacity prior to taking off, according to NTSB.

Weather conditions at the time of the crash were a calm wind with an overcast layer about 2,800 above ground level, NTSB said.

Bird was the widow of Dr. Forrest Morton Bird, an aviator and inventor and biomedical engineer. He passed away at age 94, two months before his wife was killed.

The current phase of the NTSB investigation involves probable causes of the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.bonnercountydailybee.com

Dr. Pam Riddle Bird with Bonner County commissioners Todd Sudick, left, and Cary Kelly, right, in 2015.


Tookie Hensley, left, and Pamela Bird 
A undated photo of Tookie and Don Hensley - they were still active pilots at ages 80 and 84.



McCarran International Airport (KLAS) reopens longest runway after 5-month overhaul

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The longest runway at the Las Vegas airport has reopened after a nearly five-month overhaul.

McCarran International Airport said it reopened the 14,500-foot runway on Friday just before noon.

The runway was closed in late October in order to replace the asphalt with more durable concrete.

The construction project was the second phase of a $65 million renovation project that was paid for with the airport's money and Federal Aviation Administration grants.

The runway handles about one-third of the airport's annual traffic but is used less during the cooler months because wind patterns often push traffic to other runways that go from north to south.

McCarran airport marked 2015 with the third highest passenger count in its history with more than 45 million passengers total.

Original article can be found here: http://www.expressnews.com

Cessna 170, N170XP: Aircraft tipped onto the nose resulting in a prop strike and right wing hit the ground






CESSNA 170
INCEPTUS INC
N170XP
http://registry.faa.gov/N170XP

AIRCRAFT:   1948 Cessna 170; N170XP; S/N: 18523

ENGINE: Continental 0 300 D 15 B; S/N: 30R364-H

Propeller Type: McCauley 1A175SFC

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated Times from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:       TT: 3368   TSMO: 178

Propeller:       TT:   UNK

AIRFRAME:  TT: 3368      

OTHER EQUIPMENT: 180 Landing gear, PePonk gear upgrade, one piece windshield with V brace; 8:50X6 tires, seaplane doors, Icom-A210 radio newer interior.

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft tipped onto the nose resulting in a prop strike and right wing hit the ground.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Prop, Cowl, engine, right wing, and fuselage.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   Coeur d’ Alene, ID

REMARKS:  Sold AS IS/WHERE IS; Logbooks and bill of sale with insurance company.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N170XP.htm