Saturday, December 3, 2011

Airport manager on Allegiant's announcement: "I was very disappointed"

TWIN FALLS, Idaho (KMVT-TV) After a year and a half, Allegiant Airlines is ending its service from Twin Falls to Las Vegas.

Andrew Levy, President of Allegiant cited 'due to lack of market demand' as a reason to cancel the service.

The carrier's last day will be January 1st.

Allegiant officials say any customer with a reservation past that date will be contacted for a full refund.

We spoke to Magic Valley Airport Manager Bill Carberry who says after the seasonal cutbacks this fall, advance sales didn't look promising.

Carberry says, "I was very disappointed to hear they'd be leaving the market...people started filling up the planes, taking advantage of the flights. But I think the problem was the ticket prices. As costs have been going up with fuel and other areas in the airline business, as ticket prices started to creep up, we weren't seeing people respond to that. And the profits weren't there right now."

Sky West still remains at Magic Valley Regional Airport.

The airline offers three daily flights to Salt Lake City as a Delta connection.

http://www.kmvt.com

Beechcraft F90 King Air, N90QL: Plane Crash Raises Concerns About Air Traffic Proximity. Midland, Texas.

Dozens of planes fly over the neighborhood near Midland Airpark every day. But now Friday's crash is raising questions for the residents about how safe they are, and if something like Friday’s event could happen again.

"It was surreal. You normally see this stuff on television happening to somebody else, but not in your own backyard," said Cary Love, who lives near the site of the crash. More than 24 hours after a plane crashes into their neighborhood, Midlanders are already analyzing what could have been done to prevent it. "The planes coming back seem to be really low and sometimes you can pick up a rock and throw it at them. It's kind of scary," Love said.

"The planes fly too low. There are some planes that come through here. If I'm in my backyard, I swear to God that I can touch the wheels," said Ann Mussinan, who also lives in the neighborhood.

But others say the chances of it happening again are highly unlikely.

"Airplane crashes are a very rare occurrence and one crashing into a house is unbelievable. There's an old movie quote about a house being hit by a plane. You should buy here now because the odds of it happening again are astronomical," said Grant Guess, who lives near the site.

"That's going to remain in this neighborhood. Maybe the community will come together now and push who ever controls the airport to correct the problem," Mussinan said.

As they try to pick up the pieces from Friday’s chaos, many say they're now ready to move on.

"It happened. I think the neighborhoods attitude is let's get back to normal," said Mussinan.

Administrators with Midland International Airport tell CBS 7 this isn't the first time a plane has crashed into a building in Midland. They say the last time it happened was in the mid 90's. The plane crashed near the staples building on North Loop 250.

http://www.cbs7kosa.com

Cirrus SR20 G2, Aerosim Flight Academy, Boston Aviation Leasing: Accidents occurred July 22, 2015, April 21, 2014 and November 22, 2011

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Lake Wales, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2017
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N610DA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that, during an instructional flight and while demonstrating how to change the route in the GPS, he noticed a "puff" of black smoke appear from under the legs of the pilot receiving instruction. The smoke dissipated quickly, and seconds later, the oil pressure light illuminated, accompanied by an aural warning. The flight instructor took control of the airplane and declared an emergency before diverting to a nearby airport. The flight instructor stated that, while on short final approach for landing, he thought "he was too high and going too fast to make the runway." He could not slow the airplane sufficiently for a safe landing and decided to conduct a go-around; however, when he advanced the throttle, the engine did not respond. When the airplane was about 400 ft above ground level, he instructed the pilot receiving instruction to activate the airframe parachute; however, the parachute did not arrest the descent before the airplane crashed in wooded terrain. The flight instructor was seriously injured, and the pilot receiving instruction was fatally injured.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the oil control rings on all the pistons were stuck. The oil ports on the pistons were clogged, and coking was present. The Nos. 1 through 3 connecting rod bearings showed evidence of the beginning stages of oil starvation. Review of the maintenance logbooks Revealed that during the two months preceding the accident, engine oil consumption increased significantly. It is likely that the engine consumed more oil in the month before the accident due to the stuck oil control rings, which caused the engine case to pressurize and vent oil overboard via the breather tube, consistent with the large amount of oil residue noted on the underside of the fuselage during the wreckage examination. The vented oil also likely resulted in the "puff" of smoke that the instructor saw during the flight. Data downloaded from the airplane's multifunction displays revealed that the oil pressure decreased significantly but that engine power was still available before the accident, indicating that, although the flight instructor stated that the engine did not respond to his throttle input, the engine was operating and producing some power at the time of the accident.

Although the manufacturer did not specify a minimum or maximum altitude for deployment of the airframe parachute, manufacturer-published information indicated that the demonstrated altitude loss from a straight-and-level deployment was 400 ft. The actual altitude loss during any deployment depended upon the airplane's attitude, altitude, speed, and other environmental factors. The Pilot's Operating Handbook stated that airframe parachute deployment at high speed, low altitude, or in high wind conditions could result in severe injury or death to the aircraft occupants.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to oil starvation. Contributing was the flight instructor's failure to maintain control of the airplane during an aborted emergency landing, and his delayed decision to deploy the airplane's parachute system.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 22, 2015, about 1044 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR20, N610DA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during a go-around at Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida. The flight instructor was seriously injured, and the private pilot receiving instruction was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Sanford, Florida to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The airplane was operated by Aerosim Flight Academy. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, he and the private pilot were in cruise flight at 5,000 feet mean sea level (msl), when air traffic control (ATC) changed their next enroute waypoint due to traffic. As the flight instructor was demonstrating how to change the route in the GPS, they noticed a "puff" of black smoke appear from under the legs of the student pilot. The smoke dissipated quickly and seconds later, the oil pressure light came on with an alarm. The flight instructor took over the flight controls and declared an emergency before diverting to X07. He maintained an altitude of 4,000 feet msl until he had the airport in sight. He made one call on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency reporting "short final for runway 17."

The flight instructor said he was, "too high and going too fast to make the runway." He side-slipped the airplane, but could not get it slowed down enough for a safe landing so he decided to abort the landing and make a 360 degree turn. He advanced the throttle but the engine did not feel like it was generating any power. He saw the adjacent runway, and although a yellow "X" was on runway, he elected to land anyway. He stated the engine lost complete power and about 400 feet above ground level (agl) he told the student pilot to deploy the airplane's emergency parachute. The parachute did not arrest the descent before the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall and crashed in wooded terrain. After the crash the flight instructor telephoned 911 and requested emergency assistance.

According to witnesses at X07, they watched as the airplane approached runway 17. They said that as the airplane reached the runway threshold the pilot appeared to abort the landing before "throttling up" and continuing to fly down the runway. The airplane then made a left turn towards the departure end of runway 6. As the airplane reached the end of the runway, witnesses reported that it seemed "slow and wobbly," before it entered a descending left turn. The witnesses also stated that the airframe parachute was deployed but not fully inflate prior to impact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor, age 33, held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single engine, multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His flight instructor certificate had ratings for airplane single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument airplane. The flight instructor's most-recent first class medical certificate was issued in April 2013, was issued without any limitations. According to records provided by the operator, the flight instructor had accumulated about 1,170 total flight hours.

Private Pilot

The private pilot, age 26, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He was issued a combined student pilot and first class medical certificate with limitations requiring the use of corrective lenses. A review of the pilots training records reveal that the pilot took his check ride on April 5, 2015 and received his private pilot certificate on April 13, 2015. A review of his flight training log revealed he accumulated about 70 hours of total flight experience; all of his flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 2007. It was powered by a Continental IO-360-ES16B engine rated at 210 horsepower, and was equipped with a Hartzell two-blade constant-speed propeller. The last 100-hour inspection of the airframe and engine occurred on July 11, 2015, at an airframe total time of 6,263.8 hours. As of that inspection the engine had accumulated 2,046 total hours of operation.

According to Continental Motors Service Information Letter SIL 98-9C, the recommended overhaul interval for the engine was 2,200 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest recorded weather at Bartow Municipal Airport Bartow, Florida (BOW) located 9 nautical miles northwest from the accident site at 1047, included winds from 250 degrees at 7 knots; 10 statute miles visibility, scattered clouds at 2,000 feet, temperature 28 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 24 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination of the wreckage was conducted at the accident site, and all major components of the airframe were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a heading of about 320 degrees magnetic, and was 46 feet in length. Examination of the right wing revealed that it was splintered and the fuel tank was breached. The cockpit was broken away from the fuselage and crushed, and the fuselage displayed crush damage throughout the hull. The empennage was intact and revealed impact damage. The left wing was intact and approximately 12 gallons of fuel were drained from the main tank. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all flight control surfaces. A cursory examination of the engine revealed that it was impact-damaged and crushed aft towards the firewall. The propeller was fractured off of the engine crankshaft and located in the debris path approximately 20 feet from the main wreckage. Further examination of the fuselage revealed that the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) was deployed and located 320 degrees magnetic and approximately 226 feet from the main wreckage.

Examination of the engine revealed that it was impact-damaged.. The exhaust pipes were crushed. The rocker covers and top spark plugs were removed, and the cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope. All of the pistons and cylinder domes exhibited normal combustion deposits, and the valves were in place. Further examination of the pistons revealed that the oil ports on the pistons were clogged and coking was present. The oil control rings on all pistons were "stuck." The Nos. 1, 2 and 3 connecting rod bearings showed evidence of incipient oil starvation. Examination of the crankshaft revealed it was broken at the flange where it entered the crankcase halves. The remainder of the crankshaft had continuity when it was rotated. Thumb compression was obtained on all of the cylinders. The camshaft was observed when the oil sump was removed and was coated with oil. The oil sump was removed and examined. The sump was impact damaged and the broken part of the sump that held the oil plug was not located. A small amount of oil was observed in the bottom of the remaining portion of the sump and no metal particles were observed. A large amount of oil residue noted on the belly of the airplane.

The top spark plugs were removed and examined. They exhibited normal wear and had light gray deposits in the electrode areas. The bottom spark plugs were examined with the borescope and they appeared similar to the top spark plugs. The top number one spark plug was broken. An examination of the magnetos revealed a hole was observed in the side of the left magneto. The right magneto was in place and not damaged. Both magnetos sparked at all terminals when the drive shafts were rotated.

Examination of the fuel pump revealed that it was in secure to the engine and impact damaged. The mixture control was still connected and bent to the rear. The drive coupling was not damaged. The drive shaft was free to rotate. The vapor return line was separated, along with the exit line to the metering unit. The unit was disassembled and no internal damage was observed. Examination of the throttle body and metering unit revealed that it was impact damaged.

The throttle control was free to move. The metering unit was disassembled and no internal damage was observed. The fuel nozzles were in place on the cylinders. Nozzles 2 and 5 were impact damaged. All of the nozzles were clear.

Examination of the accessory case and oil pump revealed that the oil screen was clean, free of debris and coated with oil. The oil pump was in place and the shaft was free to rotate. The pump was disassembled and the pump gears were coated with oil and were not damaged. The oil filter was separated from the engine and not located.

Examination of the propeller revealed that it had separated from the engine during the impact sequence; the engine crankshaft fractured aft of the propeller mounting flange. The propeller assembly with spinner was intact but damaged. Both blades appeared to be resting on the low pitch setting and exhibited noticeable chordwise abrasion in the tip area on the camber side. One blade exhibited an S-bending and twisted leading edge down. Impact marks on one of the blades and on its preload plates indicated the propeller was in the normal operating blade angle range prior to impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the flight instructor, with negative results for drugs and alcohol.

Forensic toxicology testing and an autopsy was not performed on the private pilot.

TESTS & RESEARCH

Oil Consumption

The operator provided a spreadsheet that detailed oil added to engine of the accident airplane since June 1, 2015. Over the month of June, 9 quarts of oil were added and the airplane was flown 67.2 hours. From July 1st until the date of the accident, 17 quarts of oil were added in 68.1 flight hours.

The Continental Motors publication, "Tips on Engine Care" states: "Oil consumption can be expected to vary with each engine depending on the load, operating temperature, type of oil used and condition of the engine. A cylinder differential pressure check and borescope inspection should be conducted if oil consumption exceeds one quart every three hours or if any sudden change in oil consumption is experienced and appropriate action taken."

Non-Volatile Data (NVM)

According to recovered NVM, the majority of the flight occurred at a pressure altitude of approximately 4,000 feet and engine readings were stable. Fuel flow was about 9.9 gph, manifold pressure (MAP) was about 22.6 inches, and the oil pressure was about 40 psi.
At about 10:33 the airplane climbed to about 4,900 feet pressure altitude. During the climb the fuel flow increased to about 16 gph, the MAP to about 26 inches, and oil pressure ranged from 32-38 psi. At 10:35:24, at 4,900 feet pressure altitude, a reduction in fuel flow is noted that appeared consistent with leaning for cruise flight. Oil pressure was 38 psi at this data point. At 10:35:36, oil pressure was recorded at 24 psi. At 10:35:42, oil pressure was recorded at 8 psi. At 10:35:48, oil pressure was recorded at 3 psi and remained below this value for the remainder of the flight. By 10:36:00, the data was consistent with a power reduction. MAP was at about 11 inches and fuel flow at around 4 gph. At 10:39:30, the data showed an additional power reduction. MAP was about 9 inches or just under 9 for the remainder of the flight and fuel flow was 2.0 to 2.3 gph. The engine monitoring data ended at 10:40:30. When plotted on Google Earth the location for the last data point was about .38 statute miles from the arrival end of runway 17 at a pressure altitude of 257 feet.

Primary Fight Display (PFD)

PFD data that began after the last multi-function display's engine data log file data point, showed a marked increase in engine percent power, MAP, and engine RPM. The recovered PFD data showed the airplane reached its lowest altitude of approximately 283 feet about a quarter mile north of the arrival end of runway 17. Indicated airspeed at this data point was 106 knots and altitude rate was negative 1,306 feet per minute. At the runway 17 threshold the PFD data indicated the airplane was at approximately 338 feet. Indicated airspeed at this data point was 95 knots and the altitude rate was positive 563 feet per minute. PFD data showed the airplane turned to the left, then a series of roll and pitch oscillations occur prior to impact. The last data point prior to impact showed 22.66 degrees nose down pitch and 99.54 degrees of right roll.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Airframe Parachute System

The airplane was equipped with a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). A review of information about the system provided by the manufacturer revealed the demonstrated loss of altitude from a straight and level CAPS deployment was 400 feet agl for the SR20 model. The demonstrated loss of altitude from a 1-turn spin was 920 feet. The altitude loss during a CAPS deployment depended primarily on the direction that the airplane was traveling at the time of deployment.

Section 10 of the Cirrus SR20 pilot operating handbook stated in the "Cirrus Airframe Parachute System Deployment" section:

"The CAPS is designed to lower the aircraft and its passengers to the ground in the event of a life-threatening emergency. However, because CAPS deployment is expected to result in damage to the airframe and, depending upon adverse external factors such as high deployment speed, low altitude, rough terrain or high wind conditions, may result in severe injury or death to the aircraft occupants, its use should not be taken lightly. Instead, possible CAPS activation scenarios should be well thought out and mentally practiced by every SR20 pilot. The following discussion is meant to guide your thinking about CAPS activation. It is intended to be informative, not directive. It is the responsibility of you, the pilot, to determine when and how the CAPS will be used."
The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Orlando, Florida
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell; Piqua, Ohio

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N610DA

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Lake Wales, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N610DA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 22, 2015, about 1044 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR20, N610DA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during a go-around at Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida. The flight instructor was seriously injured, and the private pilot receiving instruction was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Sanford, Florida to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The airplane was operated by Aerosim Flight Academy. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, he and the private pilot were in cruise flight at 5,000 feet mean sea level (msl), when air traffic control (ATC) changed their next enroute waypoint due to traffic. As the flight instructor was demonstrating how to change the route in the GPS, they noticed a "puff" of black smoke appear from under the legs of the student pilot. The smoke dissipated quickly and seconds later, the oil pressure light came on with an alarm. The flight instructor took over the flight controls and declared an emergency before diverting to X07. He maintained an altitude of 4,000 feet msl until he had the airport in sight. He made one call on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency reporting "short final for runway 17."

The flight instructor said he was, "too high and going too fast to make the runway." He side-slipped the airplane, but could not get it slowed down enough for a safe landing so he decided to abort the landing and make a 360 degree turn. He advanced the throttle but the engine did not feel like it was generating any power. He saw the adjacent runway, and although a yellow "X" was on runway, he elected to land anyway. He stated the engine lost complete power and about 400 feet above ground level (agl) he told the student pilot to deploy the airplane's emergency parachute. The parachute did not arrest the descent before the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall and crashed in wooded terrain. After the crash the flight instructor telephoned 911 and requested emergency assistance.

According to witnesses at X07, they watched as the airplane approached runway 17. They said that as the airplane reached the runway threshold the pilot appeared to abort the landing before "throttling up" and continuing to fly down the runway. The airplane then made a left turn towards the departure end of runway 6. As the airplane reached the end of the runway, witnesses reported that it seemed "slow and wobbly," before it entered a descending left turn. The witnesses also stated that the airframe parachute was deployed but not fully inflate prior to impact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor, age 33, held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single engine, multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His flight instructor certificate had ratings for airplane single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument airplane. The flight instructor's most-recent first class medical certificate was issued in April 2013, was issued without any limitations. According to records provided by the operator, the flight instructor had accumulated about 1,170 total flight hours.

Private Pilot

The private pilot, age 26, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He was issued a combined student pilot and first class medical certificate with limitations requiring the use of corrective lenses. A review of the pilots training records reveal that the pilot took his check ride on April 5, 2015 and received his private pilot certificate on April 13, 2015. A review of his flight training log revealed he accumulated about 70 hours of total flight experience; all of his flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 2007. It was powered by a Continental IO-360-ES16B engine rated at 210 horsepower, and was equipped with a Hartzell two-blade constant-speed propeller. The last 100-hour inspection of the airframe and engine occurred on July 11, 2015, at an airframe total time of 6,263.8 hours. As of that inspection the engine had accumulated 2,046 total hours of operation.

According to Continental Motors Service Information Letter SIL 98-9C, the recommended overhaul interval for the engine was 2,200 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest recorded weather at Bartow Municipal Airport Bartow, Florida (BOW) located 9 nautical miles northwest from the accident site at 1047, included winds from 250 degrees at 7 knots; 10 statute miles visibility, scattered clouds at 2,000 feet, temperature 28 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 24 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination of the wreckage was conducted at the accident site, and all major components of the airframe were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a heading of about 320 degrees magnetic, and was 46 feet in length. Examination of the right wing revealed that it was splintered and the fuel tank was breached. The cockpit was broken away from the fuselage and crushed, and the fuselage displayed crush damage throughout the hull. The empennage was intact and revealed impact damage. The left wing was intact and approximately 12 gallons of fuel were drained from the main tank. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all flight control surfaces. A cursory examination of the engine revealed that it was impact-damaged and crushed aft towards the firewall. The propeller was fractured off of the engine crankshaft and located in the debris path approximately 20 feet from the main wreckage. Further examination of the fuselage revealed that the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) was deployed and located 320 degrees magnetic and approximately 226 feet from the main wreckage.

Examination of the engine revealed that it was impact-damaged.. The exhaust pipes were crushed. The rocker covers and top spark plugs were removed, and the cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope. All of the pistons and cylinder domes exhibited normal combustion deposits, and the valves were in place. Further examination of the pistons revealed that the oil ports on the pistons were clogged and coking was present. The oil control rings on all pistons were "stuck." The Nos. 1, 2 and 3 connecting rod bearings showed evidence of incipient oil starvation. Examination of the crankshaft revealed it was broken at the flange where it entered the crankcase halves. The remainder of the crankshaft had continuity when it was rotated. Thumb compression was obtained on all of the cylinders. The camshaft was observed when the oil sump was removed and was coated with oil. The oil sump was removed and examined. The sump was impact damaged and the broken part of the sump that held the oil plug was not located. A small amount of oil was observed in the bottom of the remaining portion of the sump and no metal particles were observed. A large amount of oil residue noted on the belly of the airplane.

The top spark plugs were removed and examined. They exhibited normal wear and had light gray deposits in the electrode areas. The bottom spark plugs were examined with the borescope and they appeared similar to the top spark plugs. The top number one spark plug was broken. An examination of the magnetos revealed a hole was observed in the side of the left magneto. The right magneto was in place and not damaged. Both magnetos sparked at all terminals when the drive shafts were rotated.

Examination of the fuel pump revealed that it was in secure to the engine and impact damaged. The mixture control was still connected and bent to the rear. The drive coupling was not damaged. The drive shaft was free to rotate. The vapor return line was separated, along with the exit line to the metering unit. The unit was disassembled and no internal damage was observed. Examination of the throttle body and metering unit revealed that it was impact damaged.

The throttle control was free to move. The metering unit was disassembled and no internal damage was observed. The fuel nozzles were in place on the cylinders. Nozzles 2 and 5 were impact damaged. All of the nozzles were clear.

Examination of the accessory case and oil pump revealed that the oil screen was clean, free of debris and coated with oil. The oil pump was in place and the shaft was free to rotate. The pump was disassembled and the pump gears were coated with oil and were not damaged. The oil filter was separated from the engine and not located.

Examination of the propeller revealed that it had separated from the engine during the impact sequence; the engine crankshaft fractured aft of the propeller mounting flange. The propeller assembly with spinner was intact but damaged. Both blades appeared to be resting on the low pitch setting and exhibited noticeable chordwise abrasion in the tip area on the camber side. One blade exhibited an S-bending and twisted leading edge down. Impact marks on one of the blades and on its preload plates indicated the propeller was in the normal operating blade angle range prior to impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the flight instructor, with negative results for drugs and alcohol.

Forensic toxicology testing and an autopsy was not performed on the private pilot.

TESTS & RESEARCH

Oil Consumption

The operator provided a spreadsheet that detailed oil added to engine of the accident airplane since June 1, 2015. Over the month of June, 9 quarts of oil were added and the airplane was flown 67.2 hours. From July 1st until the date of the accident, 17 quarts of oil were added in 68.1 flight hours.

The Continental Motors publication, "Tips on Engine Care" states: "Oil consumption can be expected to vary with each engine depending on the load, operating temperature, type of oil used and condition of the engine. A cylinder differential pressure check and borescope inspection should be conducted if oil consumption exceeds one quart every three hours or if any sudden change in oil consumption is experienced and appropriate action taken."

Non-Volatile Data (NVM)

According to recovered NVM, the majority of the flight occurred at a pressure altitude of approximately 4,000 feet and engine readings were stable. Fuel flow was about 9.9 gph, manifold pressure (MAP) was about 22.6 inches, and the oil pressure was about 40 psi.
At about 10:33 the airplane climbed to about 4,900 feet pressure altitude. During the climb the fuel flow increased to about 16 gph, the MAP to about 26 inches, and oil pressure ranged from 32-38 psi. At 10:35:24, at 4,900 feet pressure altitude, a reduction in fuel flow is noted that appeared consistent with leaning for cruise flight. Oil pressure was 38 psi at this data point. At 10:35:36, oil pressure was recorded at 24 psi. At 10:35:42, oil pressure was recorded at 8 psi. At 10:35:48, oil pressure was recorded at 3 psi and remained below this value for the remainder of the flight. By 10:36:00, the data was consistent with a power reduction. MAP was at about 11 inches and fuel flow at around 4 gph. At 10:39:30, the data showed an additional power reduction. MAP was about 9 inches or just under 9 for the remainder of the flight and fuel flow was 2.0 to 2.3 gph. The engine monitoring data ended at 10:40:30. When plotted on Google Earth the location for the last data point was about .38 statute miles from the arrival end of runway 17 at a pressure altitude of 257 feet.

Primary Fight Display (PFD)

PFD data that began after the last multi-function display's engine data log file data point, showed a marked increase in engine percent power, MAP, and engine RPM. The recovered PFD data showed the airplane reached its lowest altitude of approximately 283 feet about a quarter mile north of the arrival end of runway 17. Indicated airspeed at this data point was 106 knots and altitude rate was negative 1,306 feet per minute. At the runway 17 threshold the PFD data indicated the airplane was at approximately 338 feet. Indicated airspeed at this data point was 95 knots and the altitude rate was positive 563 feet per minute. PFD data showed the airplane turned to the left, then a series of roll and pitch oscillations occur prior to impact. The last data point prior to impact showed 22.66 degrees nose down pitch and 99.54 degrees of right roll.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Airframe Parachute System

The airplane was equipped with a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). A review of information about the system provided by the manufacturer revealed the demonstrated loss of altitude from a straight and level CAPS deployment was 400 feet agl for the SR20 model. The demonstrated loss of altitude from a 1-turn spin was 920 feet. The altitude loss during a CAPS deployment depended primarily on the direction that the airplane was traveling at the time of deployment.

Section 10 of the Cirrus SR20 pilot operating handbook stated in the "Cirrus Airframe Parachute System Deployment" section:

"The CAPS is designed to lower the aircraft and its passengers to the ground in the event of a life-threatening emergency. However, because CAPS deployment is expected to result in damage to the airframe and, depending upon adverse external factors such as high deployment speed, low altitude, rough terrain or high wind conditions, may result in severe injury or death to the aircraft occupants, its use should not be taken lightly. Instead, possible CAPS activation scenarios should be well thought out and mentally practiced by every SR20 pilot. The following discussion is meant to guide your thinking about CAPS activation. It is intended to be informative, not directive. It is the responsibility of you, the pilot, to determine when and how the CAPS will be used."



The plane was operated by Aerosim Flight Academy Inc., based out of Sanford, Florida,  was being flown by Flight Instructor Anthony Arzave, 32, and private pilot receiving instruction, Sheng-yen Chen, 26, who were both hospitalized after the accident. Chen later succumbed to his injuries. Cirrus SR20, N610DA, accident occurred July 22, 2015 near Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida.




































NTSB Identification: ERA15FA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Lake Wales, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N610DA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 22, 2015, about 1044 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR20, N610DA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while performing a go-around at Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida. The certified flight instructor (CFI) was seriously injured, and the student pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Sanford, Florida to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) information, the CFI reported to ATC that the airplane was displaying a low oil pressure indication and he was experiencing smoke in the cockpit. The CFI then declared an emergency with ATC and was provided radar vectors to and cleared for landing at X07. 

According to witnesses at X07, they watched as the airplane approached runway 17. They stated that as the airplane reached the runway threshold, it appeared to abort the landing, "throttle up," and continued to fly down the runway. The airplane then made a left turn towards the departure end of runway 6. As the airplane reached the end of the runway, witnesses reported that it seemed "slow and wobbly," then began a descending left turn. Witnesses stated that the airframe parachute was deployed prior to impact. 

Examination of the airplane was conducted at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a heading about 320 degrees magnetic, and was 46 feet in length. Examination of the right wing revealed that it was splintered and the fuel tank was breached. The cockpit was broken away from the fuselage and crushed, and the fuselage displayed crush damage throughout the hull. The empennage was intact and revealed impact damage. The left wing was intact and approximately 12 gallons of fuel was defueled from the main tank. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all flight control surfaces. A cursory examination of the engine revealed that it was impact damaged and crushed aft towards the firewall. The propeller was fractured off of the engine crankshaft and located in the debris path approximately 20 feet from the main wreckage. NTSB Identification: ERA15FA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Lake Wales, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N610DA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 22, 2015, about 1044 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR20, N610DA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while performing a go-around at Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida. The certified flight instructor (CFI) was seriously injured, and the student pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Sanford, Florida to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) information, the CFI reported to ATC that the airplane was displaying a low oil pressure indication and he was experiencing smoke in the cockpit. The CFI then declared an emergency with ATC and was provided radar vectors to and cleared for landing at X07. 

According to witnesses at X07, they watched as the airplane approached runway 17. They stated that as the airplane reached the runway threshold, it appeared to abort the landing, "throttle up," and continued to fly down the runway. The airplane then made a left turn towards the departure end of runway 6. As the airplane reached the end of the runway, witnesses reported that it seemed "slow and wobbly," then began a descending left turn. Witnesses stated that the airframe parachute was deployed prior to impact. 

Examination of the airplane was conducted at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a heading about 320 degrees magnetic, and was 46 feet in length. Examination of the right wing revealed that it was splintered and the fuel tank was breached. The cockpit was broken away from the fuselage and crushed, and the fuselage displayed crush damage throughout the hull. The empennage was intact and revealed impact damage. The left wing was intact and approximately 12 gallons of fuel was defueled from the main tank. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all flight control surfaces. A cursory examination of the engine revealed that it was impact damaged and crushed aft towards the firewall. The propeller was fractured off of the engine crankshaft and located in the debris path approximately 20 feet from the main wreckage.


The plane was operated by Aerosim Flight Academy Inc., based out of Sanford was being flown by Flight Instructor Anthony Arzave, 32, and student pilot Sheng-yen Chen, 26, who were both hospitalized after the accident. Chen later succumbed to his injuries. Cirrus SR20, N610DA, accident occurred July 22, 2015 near Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida.




Every weekday, Jared O’Conner makes the 90-mile trek from his Osceola County home to join a small work crew working on safety upgrades at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport.

For the first few hours of his shift last Thursday, it was a non-eventful day, his large front-loader doing its routine business of moving dirt.

But in the blink of an eye, O’Conner and his co-workers saw their day switched from ho-hum to heroic when a small single-engine plane went down about a quarter-mile from the Lake Wales Municipal Airport.

“We got on scene, but we weren’t aware of exactly where the plane was located,” Lake Wales Fire Chief Joe Jenkins said. “We could first see the parachute, and that’s when we noticed it.”

The first responders jumped into a “gator” four-wheel drive vehicle provided by the airport to initially get to the site, a swampy area that was clearly not going to be accessed by conventional fire and rescue equipment.

“They had all their medical equipment, but we didn’t have all of the extrication tools,” Jenkins said.

That’s when O’Conner and members of the Dickerson Florida work crew swung into action. They loaded rescue equipment into the bucket of a front end loader that lumbered through the marsh, cutting a path to the downed plane.

“It was definitely a team effort. It was a great example of public-private relationship. They were more than willing to do anything we asked them to do, above and beyond,” Jenkins said. Extrication tools were needed to cut the plane’s dashboard away from student pilot Sheng-yen Chen, a 26-year-old from China.

Chen passed away over the weekend from his injuries, but his instructor, Anthony Arzave, while still hospitalized as of Monday, is in stable condition.

Sources on scene said Chen was unconscious during the rescue effort, while Arzave was able to communicate some with medical personnel.

Chen was transported from the crash site in the front-loader bucket along with a couple of first responders. They were taken to a nearby pickup truck which then transported the victim to a waiting ambulance.

“Had it happened on a runway, it would have been a lot more simple, but you just have to kind of improvise. It was an usual vehicle to move a patient to be sure, but when you looked around, the helicopters couldn’t even land in that area because it was too wet,” Jenkins said.

The plane sustained heavy damage, and Jenkins said he was surprised anyone survived the crash.

“I am, to be honest with you, really surprised,” he said.

O’Conner said he didn’t hesitate for a second to offer the company’s equipment and aid, estimating that the crash was probably 2,000 feet from a spot where rescue vehicles could reasonably be staged.

“It wasn’t exactly a normal day,” O’Conner said. “I didn’t even think. We knew people needed help, so that’s what we did.”

Kathy McBride, onsite representing the engineering firm Hoyle, Tanner who is overseeing the airport construction project, was outside near the railroad track crossing on Airport Road when she saw the doomed plane overhead.

“We noticed him coming in and then he seemed to accelerate and pull back up, and we thought ‘that’s odd’ and then he curved to the left,” she said. “I never heard anything.”

The plane was equipped with an emergency parachute, which investigators are trying to determine whether or not it was actually deployed or may have opened upon impact.

There was at least one worker who heard an ominous sound.

“We heard a pop,” said Austin Berg, who also works for Dickerson. “I think it was the parachute opening.”

From afar, however, there was no other obvious signs of an impact, the workers said.

“There was gas leaking there, but there was no explosion like you see in the movies,” O’Conner noted.

Despite the challenging conditions, both Jenkins and the workers estimated it only took about 10 minutes to get the victims out of the wreckage.

“It really went smooth, extremely smooth. The guys did a wonderful job,” Jenkins said, noting that the department hasn’t done any specific airport training. “It would have been easy to become overwhelmed by the situation, but they didn’t miss a beat.”

According to a report in the Taipei Times, Chen was one of about 50 pilot trainees for China Airlines — that nation’s largest carrier — that are being schooled at the Aeorism Flight Academy in Sanford, which according to the airlines, was formed in 1989.

The report said the injured pilot came to the academy last year, and was scheduled to finish his flight training by the end of this year. He would still have needed an additional year of training once he returned to Taiwan, the report added.

O’Conner and workers from the Dickerson crew are to be honored for their efforts at next Tuesday’s meeting of the Lake Wales City Commission which starts at 6 p.m. in city hall.

“Their sole objective was to do anything and everything we needed them to do,” Jenkins added. “They made it a lot easier and a lot faster. We’re fighting the clock at that point. We need to get them transported and get them to a hospital.”

Source:  http://yoursun.com



LAKE WALES -- A student pilot injured in a plane crash last week has died. 

Flight instructor Anthony Arzave, 32, of Lake Mary, and student pilot Sheng-yen Chen, 26, of China, were in a Cirrus SR20 plane when it crashed near a runway at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport last Wednesday.

Chen succumbed to his injuries over the weekend.

Arzave remains at a local hospital and in stable condition.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. 

Cirrus SR20, N610DA, Aerosim Flight Academy: Accident occurred July 22, 2015 near Lake Wales Municipal Airport (X07), Lake Wales, Florida 

Date: 22-JUL-15
Time: 14:44:00Z
Regis#: N610DA
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: Destroyed
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15
City: LAKE WALES
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO THE TREES OFF THE RUNWAY, LAKE WALES, FL

BOSTON AVIATION LEASING II LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N610DA







Taipei, July 24 (CNA) One of Taiwan's major international airlines on Friday confirmed that one of its student pilots has been injured in a plane crash in central Florida. 

China Airlines said its representatives will accompany relatives of the student pilot to the United States and the company will do its best to help provide medical care for the young man.

News reports in Florida identified the man as Chen Sheng-yen, 26, a would-be pilot receiving a year-long training at Aerosim Flight Academy based in Sanford near Orlando.

He was flying with instructor pilot Anthony Arzave, 32, when their Cirrus SR20 crashed Wednesday morning (local time) near a runway at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport to the south of Orlando, Bay News 9 reported on its website.

An emergency parachute on the Cirrus SR20 was activated although investigators said they don't know if the parachute had been deployed by the pilots or deployed on impact, the report said.

The two were taken to a local hospital, the report said, adding Chen was in critical condition while Arzave's condition was listed as stable.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Bureau.

According to Aerosim Flight Academy Inc., the company that runs the flight school, Arzave, a certified flight instructor, and the student experienced difficulty at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport during a routine training flight before the crash.

China Airlines said Chen is one of around 50 student pilots being trained at Aerosim Flight Academy, which was founded in 1989. Chen began his training late in 2014 and was scheduled to receive more training after returning to Taiwan late this year. 

Source:  http://focustaiwan.tw

Statement from Aerosim Flight Academy Inc: 

"At approximately 11 a.m. Wednesday morning, July 22, 2015, an Aerosim Flight Academy Cirrus SR-20 aircraft crewed by a Certified Flight Instructor and student experienced difficulty at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport during a routine training flight. The instructor and student were transported to a local hospital for medical evaluation and care. 

"At the present time, Aerosim is gathering all available information on the condition of the crew, status of the aircraft and potential causes of this incident.  Aerosim is working closely and cooperating with all local, state and federal entities to ensure that a proper and complete investigation is conducted.

"The safety of our students and instructors is our top priority.  We remain in close communications will all authorities as the incident remains an active investigation."

Read more here: http://www.baynews9.com

LAKE WALES | The two men injured in Wednesday's plane crash at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport have been identified. 

Flight instructor Anthony Arzave, 32, of Lake Mary, and student pilot Sheng-yen Chen, 26, of China were injured when a plane belonging to Aerosim Academy Inc. out of Sanford crashed into a swampy area near the runway at the airport before 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, according to the Lake Wales Police Department.

The men were airlifted to a local hospital, where they remain. Arzave is currently listed in serious condition, while Chen's injuries are considered critical, police said.

Police said the plane came equipped with a parachute, which deployed during the crash, but it is unclear whether it was deployed by the men or upon impact. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been working with police, but have not yet determined the cause of the crash.
======

A small plane carrying two adults crashed Wednesday morning in a marshy area next to Lake Wales Municipal Airport, according to Polk County Fire Rescue.

Both adult males, an instructor and a student, were flown to a local hospitals.

According to Lake Wales police, both victims are alive. Their names will be released once family is notified.

Both suffered serious injuries, and as of late Wednesday, one of the men was still in surgery.

Emergency responders received a call about the crashed Cirrus SR20 aircraft about 10:45 a.m. The flight departed from Orlando-Sanford International Airport and was headed for Page Field in Ft. Myers, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Lake Wales was not on the flight plan, so it's possible the men were attempting an emergency landing while en route to Ft. Myers.

The plane crashed just short of the runway.

Investigators said during a news conference the parachute which can be seen in photos and video from Action Air 1 is actually part of the plane.

The operators of this particular plane can deploy the chute in an emergency. It's unclear how high the plane was when the chute was deployed.

Source:  http://www.abcactionnews.com

LAKE WALES, Fla. (WFLA) -Two men are in the hospital with serious injuries after their plane crashed near the Lake Wales Municipal Airport Wednesday morning. Investigators tell us the men were airlifted to a nearby hospital after they were pulled from the wreckage. The plane hit the ground in a swampy area next to the airport, which shook many nearby homes. 

“I heard like a loud sound I heard the plane going and I heard a loud boom,” said Mireya Cardona who lives just behind the airport. She and her family watched as helicopters landed and airlifted the men to the airport. We understand the victims were a pilot and a passenger.

An Orlando based Federal Aviation Administration team made it to the scene Wednesday afternoon. Investigators are still waiting on the NTSB team from Atlanta to arrive. Meantime, they are not releasing the names of the men on the plane until they can reach their families. Lake Wales Police could not tell us if the plane was leaving the airport or landing. Skydiving schools located at the airport shut their doors for the day after the crash.

Lake Wales police tell News Channel 8 that someone called 911 to notify them of the crash around 10:45 Wednesday morning. They found the men still in the aircraft once they arrived. They were using a four wheeler Wednesday to access the crash site which was in a wet swampy area.

Source:  http://wfla.com
Lake Wales, Florida -- Two people have been airlifted to the hospital after their small plane crashed at Lake Wales Municipal Airport late Wednesday morning. 

An FAA spokesperson says the pilot and passenger were on a Cirrus SR20 that departed from Orlando Sanford International Airport and was headed to Page Field in Ft. Myers when it appears it tried to land at Lake Wales Municipal Airport.

Based on aerial footage from the scene, it appears the pilot had deployed the plane's parachute to help land the plane safely.

The FAA is continuing to investigate the crash.

Source:  http://www.wtsp.com































~



http://registry.faa.gov/N497DA

NTSB Identification: ERA12CA082 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 22, 2011 in Brooksville, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/16/2012
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N497DA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

According to the pilot, while in the vicinity of an unfamiliar airport, he used his global positioning system (GPS) to align the airplane with the runway. During the landing roll, the airplane impacted mailboxes and fences, and the pilot realized that he had landed on a residential street. The runway was about 1.5 miles to the west. According to a representative of the flight school that operated the airplane, there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane. Examination of the airplane revealed that the wings sustained substantial damage.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's incorrect identification of the runway, which resulted in an off-airport landing and subsequent collision with objects. 

=========

According to deputies, the 22-year-old student pilot said his GPS indicated that Citation Road in the Pasco Trails subdivision was a Pilot Country Airport landing strip. The airport is less than three miles from where he actually landed.

His Cirrus SR20 plane hit some mailboxes, small trees and a fence. No one was injured in the landing. 

Dave Torro saw the plane land in his neighborhood and tells 10 News he spoke with the pilot afterwards.  According to Torro, the pilot was from China and did not speak English well.

"He said, 'We land here all the time ... this is Pilot Country.' And I'm like, 'No. It's not.  This is a horse community and you got them mixed up,'" Torro recalls.
The plane had taken off from Sanford. The FAA will be investigating the incident.



Spring Hill, Florida -- It appears the pilot of a single-engine plane mistook a Pasco County neighborhood for a nearby airport landing strip.

Photo Gallery: Plane hard landing in Pasco






JAY CONNER
The 23-year-old student pilot said his GPS indicated Citation Road in the Pasco Trails subdivision was a landing strip.

The 23-year-old student pilot said his GPS indicated Citation Road in the Pasco Trails subdivision was a landing strip




NTSB Identification: ERA14CA2
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 21, 2014 in Sanford, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/05/2014
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N497DA
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During the supervised solo flight, the student pilot had completed three previous circuits in the traffic pattern, with two of the three landing attempts aborted. On the fourth landing attempt, a 70-degree right crosswind "blew" the airplane off the left side of the runway. The student pilot then applied full engine power to conduct a go-around, and the airplane "veered left and banked 45 degrees to the left." The student pilot stated that the airplane continued left "no matter how hard I pushed the control stick to the right." The student pilot also reported that there were no mechanical deficiencies with the airplane that would have prevented normal operation. According to FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-23C, Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge:

"The effect of torque increases in direct proportion to engine power, airspeed, and airplane attitude. If the power setting is high, the airspeed slow, and the angle of attack high, the effect of torque is greater. During takeoffs and climbs, when the effect of torque is most pronounced, the pilot must apply sufficient right rudder pressure to counteract the left-turning tendency and maintain a straight takeoff path."

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the aborted landing. Contributing to the accident was his failure to compensate for torque, P-factor, and the reported crosswind conditions.

During the supervised solo flight, the student pilot had completed three previous circuits in the traffic pattern, with two of the three landing attempts aborted. On the fourth landing attempt, a 70-degree right crosswind "blew" the airplane off the left side of the runway. The student pilot then applied full engine power to conduct a go-around, and the airplane "veered left and banked 45 degrees to the left." The student pilot stated that the airplane continued left "no matter how hard I pushed the control stick to the right." The student pilot also reported that there were no mechanical deficiencies with the airplane that would have prevented normal operation. According to FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-23C, Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge:

"The effect of torque increases in direct proportion to engine power, airspeed, and airplane attitude. If the power setting is high, the airspeed slow, and the angle of attack high, the effect of torque is greater. During takeoffs and climbs, when the effect of torque is most pronounced, the pilot must apply sufficient right rudder pressure to counteract the left-turning tendency and maintain a straight takeoff path."


AIRCRAFT WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY AND THROUGH A DITCH, SANFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ORLANDO, FL 

http://registry.faa.gov/N497DA