Friday, September 13, 2019

Piper J3C-65, N7326H: Accident occurred September 04, 2019 in Winfield, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

https://registry.faa.gov/N7326H

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA539
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 04, 2019 in Winfield, AL
Aircraft: Piper J3C, registration: N7326H

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft flipped over while taxiing.

Date: 04-SEP-19
Time: 14:22:00Z
Regis#: N7326H
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: J3C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: WINFIELD
State: ALABAMA

Loss of Control on Ground: Champion 7KCAB, N4136Y; accident occurred September 07, 2019 at Williams Flying Service Airport (6LA6), Mangham, Richland Parish, Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N4136Y


Location: Winnsboro, LA 
Accident Number: CEN19TA310
Date & Time: 09/07/2019, 1000 CDT
Registration: N4136Y
Aircraft: Champion 7KCAB
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 7, 2019, about 1000 central daylight time, a Champion 7KCAB airplane, N4136Y, impacted a tree during landing on runway 36 (3,000 ft by 75 ft, turf) at the Williams Flying Service Airport (6LA6), near Winnsboro, Louisiana. The commercial pilot and passenger reported no injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight departed from 6LA6 about 0930.

The pilot reported that during the landing touchdown on the runway the airplane bounced once followed by a "normal" touchdown on the main landing gear wheels. The airplane then veered left off the runway centerline. Right rudder was applied, and it had "no effect." The airplane slowed "considerably" and continued veering to the left after full right rudder was applied. The airplane subsequently impacted a tree where it sustained the substantial damage. The pilot reported that there were no airplane mechanical malfunctions.

At 0953, the recorded nearby wind was 280° at 10 kts. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/30/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/15/2018
Flight Time:  1382.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 38 hours (Total, this make and model), 1250.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Champion
Registration: N4136Y
Model/Series: 7KCAB
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 595-76
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/23/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: Individual
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMLU, 81 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0953 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 320°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Haze; No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Winnsboro, LA (6LA6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Winnsboro, LA (6LA6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0930 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Williams Flying Service (6LA6)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation:79 ft 
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.220000, -91.870000 (est)

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N4136Y

Location: MANGHAM, LA
Accident Number: CEN19LA310
Date & Time: 09/07/2019, 1100 CDT
Registration: N4136Y
Aircraft: Champion 7KCAB
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On September 7, 2019, about 1100 central daylight time, a Champion 7KCAB airplane, N4136Y, impacted a tree on approach to a private airstrip near Mangham, Louisiana. The pilot and passengers reported no injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight departed from the airstrip at an unknown time.

According to initial information from the Federal Aviation Administration, the airplane impacted trees on approach to runway 36 at the airstrip.

At 1053, the recorded weather at the Monroe Regional Airport, near Monroe, Louisiana, was: Wind 280° at 7 kts; visibility 6 statute miles; present weather haze; sky condition clear; temperature 34° C; dew point 21° C; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Champion
Registration: N4136Y
Model/Series: 7KCAB No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day 
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMLU, 81 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  6 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: MANGHAM, LA
Destination: MANGHAM, LA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.316667, -91.839444 (est)

Nose Over: Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N5229F; accident occurred September 12, 2019 near Hemet-Ryan Airport (KHMT), Riverside County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N5229F


Location: Hemet, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA544
Date & Time: 09/12/2019, 1520 PDT
Registration: N5229F
Aircraft: Cessna 172F
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:Public Aircraft  

The flight instructor reported that, during landing, he directed the student pilot to initiate a go-around. During the climb, the instructor saw dust devils at the end of the runway, so he instructed the student to also initiate a slight left turn. The instructor then noticed power lines past the dust devils, so he decided to take the controls from the student and continued a shallow, 200 ft-per-minute climbing left turn to the south. While in the turn, the instructor saw other high-tension power lines to the south, so he decided to initiate a precautionary soft field landing to a plowed field adjacent to the runway. During landing, the nose landing gear touched down and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut and vertical stabilizer.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An automated weather observation station, about 20 minutes before the accident, about 15 nautical miles north from the accident site, reported the wind was 310° at 6 knots, temperature of 97ºF, altimeter setting of 29.93. The calculated density altitude was about 4,237 ft. According to the Federal Aviation Administration density altitude Koch Chart, the airplane would have likely experienced about a 37% decrease to the normal climb rate, and about a 55% increase to the normal takeoff distance. The pilot reported that the wind was 140º at 6 knots. The airplane departed from runway 23. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter; Unmanned (sUAS)
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/06/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 11497 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model), 8370 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 99 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 29 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 37, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/05/2019
Occupational Pilot:No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 42 hours (Total, all aircraft), 42 hours (Total, this make and model), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5229F
Model/Series: 172F A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17253280
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/31/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10542 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300-D
Registered Owner: United States Air Force Owner
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: United States Air Force Owner
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRIV, 1536 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2258 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 311°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Riverside, CA (RIV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Military VFR
Destination: Hemet, CA (HMT)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1443 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Hemet-Ryan (HMT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1514 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4315 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Precautionary Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.727778, -117.030556 (est)


HEMET — Minor injuries have been reported after a US Air Force plane based out of March Air Reserve Base in Moreno Valley crashed at Hemet-Ryan Airport this afternoon, Thursday,  Sept. 12. Two occupants managed to walk away from today’s crash, which left the plane upside down in a dirt field south of W. Stetson Ave. and east of Warren Rd., according to witnesses and officials.

City of Hemet Police and Fire Departments, along with AMR and other emergency personnel, were dispatched to the scene of this afternoon’s crash around 3:20 p.m., after receiving multiple reports of a plane that possibly crashed and overturned at the airport, Hemet Police Cpt. Glen Brock told RCNS in response to an email request for information and details about the accident.

Official radio traffic at the time indicated that at about the same time the crash was reported, emergency dispatchers had begun to receive reports about a missing military aircraft and the first officer to arrive at the scene confirmed the plane had military markings on it.

“When officers arrived they discovered a plane down in a dirt field,” the Cpt. explained; saying, “The only damage was to the plane and the occupants sustained minor injuries.”

Officials raced to the scene of today’s crash after it was reported that a US Air Force plane had crashed at Hemet-Ryan Airport. Hemet Valley Incidents photo

Brock and FAA registry records confirmed the plane – a 1965 Cessna 172F single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft, and had US AIR FORCE clearly marked on its sides – is registered to the United States Air Force out of March Air Reserve Base. Sources indicate the type of plane involved in the crash was and still is typically used for training purposes.

After the crash as emergency crews raced to the scene, two men could be seen self-extricating from the overturned aircraft and then removing various items from inside the cockpit. The men appeared OK, but were evaluated at the scene by paramedics and later reported to have suffered unspecified but minor injuries.

It was not immediately known if the plane was being actively used by the Air Force or if it was from the March Field Air Museum, but a check of the museum’s featured planes did not list the small aircraft as one of theirs. Calls to the museum went unanswered.

One person familiar with the crash later reported to RCNS the plane belonged to the Aero Club at March Air Reserve Base, which offers flight training and other services. Their website indicated they do offer the use of at least three Cessna 172’s for training purposes; however, calls to that organization for confirmation also went unanswered.

Witnesses from the scene later reported it appeared the plane had tried landing at the airport but overshot the runway; before going into a dirt field, where the aircraft’s wheels dug into the soft soil causing the plane to flip over. It was not immediately known if the plane had suffered an air emergency or malfunction leading to the rough landing.

“The events surrounding the accident are under investigation,” Brock advised.

As of this report, military, Federal Aviation Administration, and National Transportation Safety Board personnel were headed to the scene, but had not yet arrived.

Several streets surrounding the area of the crash have been temporarily shut down as of this report and officials have asked that the public stay away from the scene.

Original article ➤ https://riversidecountynewssource.org



Two people had to pull themselves out of a plane that crashed while attempting an emergency landing near Hemet-Ryan Airport, a fire official said Thursday afternoon.

It happened about 3:30 p.m., Hemet Fire Department Battalion Chief Kevin Kuhlman said.

According to Kuhlman, a U.S. Air Force single-engine plane flying out of March Air Reserve Base began experiencing a mechanical issue while approaching Hemet-Ryan, and the pilot tried to set down in a dirt field southwest of the airport.

The plane was able to stay upright on its landing gear for about 200 feet after it touched down, Kuhlman said, but nose-dived when it reached a section of the field where the soil was particularly soft and ended up on its roof.

One of the plane’s two occupants sustained a laceration to an elbow, but both escaped serious injuries and were able to get out of the plane before firefighters and paramedics arrived at the scene. Neither was hospitalized.

The U.S. Air Force was not immediately available for comment.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.myvalleynews.com



A single-engine plane crashed off the end of a runway at Hemet-Ryan Airport Thursday, but the two occupants apparently escaped uninjured.

The crash happened about 3:20 p.m. at the end of Runway 23, near the intersection of Stetson Avenue and Warren Road, according to the Hemet Fire Department.

Officials did not immediately know whether the two-seat plane was departing or landing when the accident happened.

A Hemet fire captain at the scene said the aircraft plowed into the ground nose-first, coming to a stop in the dirt on the edge of the airport perimeter. No one on the ground was hurt.

Cal Fire air tanker and helicopter crews are based at the airfield, which is operated by the Riverside County Economic Development Agency, and the state personnel went to the crash site to assist the pilot and passenger, who were walking around the damaged aircraft by the time Hemet firefighters arrived, according to reports from the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration did not immediately respond to requests for information about the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://nbcpalmsprings.com

Beech C-23 Sundowner, N6009U: Accident occurred September 09, 2019 at Keystone Heights Airport (42J), Clay County, Florida

View of damage to the left wing.
Federal Aviation Administration


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N6009U

Location: Keystone Heights, FL
Accident Number: GAA19CA585
Date & Time: 09/09/2019, 0900 EDT
Registration: N6009U
Aircraft: Beech 23
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that after landing on runway 11, "I realized that (runway) 5-23 was being used as a taxiway." He back taxied on runway 23, with the intent of departing runway 5. He made several CTAF transmissions to an airplane that had begun to taxi toward him on runway 23. Not knowing the taxiing airplane's intentions, he maneuvered his airplane to the left side of runway 5 and the left wing struck a construction sign.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to left wing and aileron.

According to airport NOTAM 09/076, runway 5/23 closed except to taxi Monday-Friday.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/05/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/05/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 820.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 518 hours (Total, this make and model), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration:N6009U 
Model/Series: 23 C23
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: M-2088
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3320 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K42J, 197 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1335 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 303°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 11000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Middleburg, FL (FL13)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Keystone Heights, FL (42J)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0840 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Keystone Airpark (42J)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 196 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5046 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 29.844722, -82.047500 (est)

Piper PA-28R-200, N5036S: Incident occurred September 12, 2019 at Herlong Recreational Airport (KHEG), Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft landed with the gear retracted.

Arrow II Flyers LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N5036S

Date: 12-SEP-19
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N5036S
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-28R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JACKSONVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Mooney M20J 201, N202JB: Accident occurred September 12, 2019 near Freeway Airport (W00), Bowie, Prince George's County, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N202JB

Location: Bowie, MD
Accident Number: ERA19LA269
Date & Time: 09/12/2019, 1130 EDT
Registration: N202JB
Aircraft: Mooney M20J
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 12, 2019, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20J airplane, N202JB, impacted a car after aborting a takeoff from Freeway Airport (W00), Bowie, Maryland. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the personal cross-county flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, he performed a preflight inspection of the airplane with no anomalies noted. Then, he taxied to the active runway and initiated the takeoff roll; he noted that the airspeed rose to 40 knots. A moment later he looked again, and the airspeed did not rise above 40 knots. The airplane was about one-third to halfway down the 2,420-ft runway when pilot elected to abort the takeoff, and subsequently overran the departure end of runway 36. The airplane broke through the airport perimeter fence and struck a car on a highway just off the airport property.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness records, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate in 1978. It was equipped with a Lycoming IO-360-A386D, a 200-horsepower engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was completed on June 19, 2019, at a total time of 4,405.2 hours. The most recent altimeter/Pitot-static system check was completed August 8, 2018.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane after the accident and noted that the fuselage and wing sustained substantial damage. The left wing was impact separated during the accident sequence. The glare shield was removed to facilitate examination of the pitot/static system and the pitot/static system tubing remained in place. Uncalibrated pressurized air was applied to the system at the system break at the left-wing root and the airspeed indicator moved and indicated about 95 knots. The pitot mast remained attached to the left wing. It was removed and no debris was noted in the holes. An attempt was made to run pressurized air from the pitot mast to the left-wing root, however the line was impact damaged and the air did not pass through.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N202JB
Model/Series: M20J No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CGS, 50 ft msl
Observation Time: 1122 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Bowie, MD (W00)
Destination: Charleston, WV (CRW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 38.945000, -76.773333 (est)




A small plane that had just taken off from Freeway Airport in Bowie, Maryland, struck a car traveling along U.S. 50 and crash-landed on the highway late Thursday morning. But remarkably, the crash did not lead to any major injuries, authorities said.

Two people who were inside the car that was struck were taken to the hospital with minor injuries, according to Prince George’s County Fire and EMS. The plane’s pilot and passenger were evaluated and treated for their injuries at the scene but declined to be taken to the hospital.

Photos from the scene showed a frightening scene. A small plane, with its left wing entirely sawed off, lay in the shoulder of U.S. 50 at Church Road. A silver Nissan with its front end smashed sat about 30 feet down the road.

In addition to only minor injuries, the crash did not cause a fire or spill any fuel, authorities said.

“I have to say, we are incredibly lucky this was not a more tragic story,” told Mike Yourishin, a spokesman with Prince George’s County Fire and EMS Department.

During an interview with NBC Washington, Fire Chief Benjamin Barksdale called it a “miracle.”

“No fire, no fuel spillage at all,” he said. “So yes, we’re very fortunate today.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said he was relieved there were no major injuries and tweeted his thanks to first responders “who acted so quickly to help those involved.”

The cause of the crash, which happened about 11:20 a.m. Thursday, is still unknown. Maryland State Police said the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were both on the scene to investigate the crash.

State police identified the pilot of the small plane as 58-year-old Julius Tolson, of Laurel, Maryland, and his passenger as 57-year-old Michael Garrah, of Columbia, Maryland. The two men in the car were identified as 29-year-old Ryan McClain, D.C., and Eric Diprospero, of Baltimore.

The large response from police and emergency crews blocked the two eastbound lanes of U.S. 50 and one lane of the westbound lanes for several hours Thursday afternoon. All lanes had reopened shortly before 3:30 p.m.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wtop.com





BOWIE, Maryland (WJLA) -A small airplane crashed into a car on Route 50 near Freeway Airport Thursday in Bowie, Maryland.

Prince George's County Fire officials say four people have been injured. Two adults in the car were taken to a hospital for treatment of minor injuries. The pilot of the plane and his passenger were treated at the scene.

Maryland State Police later identified the pilot of the plane as Julius Tolson, Jr., 58, of Laurel, Maryland, and the passenger of the plane, Michael Garrah, 57, of Columbia, Maryland, along with the driver of the passenger vehicle, Ryan McClain, 29, of Washington D.C., and his passenger, Eric Diprospero, 31, of Baltimore, Maryland,

Two eastbound left lanes and one westbound lane were closed on Route 50. After hours of heavy traffic delays, the lanes were reopened mid-afternoon.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the aircraft departed from Freeway Airport. Maryland State Police believe the pilot misjudged the landing prior to the crash.

According to the aircraft registration, the Mooney M20J is registered to Derrick A. Early of Greenbelt, Maryland.

Federal Aviation Administration officials say they're investigating the accident.

Story and video ➤ https://wjla.com
















For months now, the family that owns Freeway Airport in Bowie, Maryland, has been working on a plan to sell the property, close the airstrip and get out of the aviation business.

The Prince George’s County Council held a hearing on their plan to do just that days before a near-tragic crash that involved a plane taking off from the airport and came close to voting to approve the plan.

The county council was supposed to hold a vote this past Tuesday on legislation that would change the zoning density for the land the airport is on.

Right now, that land is zoned to allow one home for every two acres of land. But, with so much development having already occurred in the area around the airport, the owners are pushing for a change that would allow developers to build hundreds of homes on the land.

During a county council meeting Tuesday, Kim Rodenhauser — whose family has owned and operated the airport since the 1940s — explained that the restrictions imposed on the airport by the 9/11 attacks have drained their finances and hindered the way Freeway Airport used to operate.

She said that at this point, she’s down to two choices:

“For us to spend our remaining money on marketing efforts [or] working to increase airport activity to allow more flights, lessons, fueling stops, maintenance operations,” and other activity.

At the time the airport was built, it was all farmland and far more rural than it is today, she admitted. In recent years, hundreds of new homes have been built just on the other side of Route 50, across from the airport.

“The area has changed from sleepy agricultural enclave to suburban residential,” Rodenhauser said. “I do not feel increasing airport activities is the best option. Accidents are a reality of general aviation airports. I personally know of 10 fatalities caused by accidents coming from the airport.”

For Rodenhauser, the second option is to sell to developers. But that venture also faces criticism.

Though the airport sits outside the boundaries of the city of Bowie, the family still went to the city asking to support the zoning change. City leaders unanimously opposed the plan, agreeing with many residents who live there and worried the plans were too big for Church Road, amid concerns that it wouldn’t be able to keep up with the increased traffic.

Earlier this summer, a teenager was hit and killed by a car while jogging along the road only a few hundred feet from the airport.

“Whatever they do, it’s not without controversy,” admitted Bowie Mayor Fred Robinson.

Robinson wouldn’t guess whether Thursday’s plane crash would change anyone’s opinion about the future of the airport. And while he’s still against the plans as they are now, it’s not something he’ll have a say in anyway.

The final decision rests with the county council, which ended up putting off a vote on the zoning change requested by the airport Tuesday.

After the proposal passed a council committee over the summer, the belief is that the county will likely end up approving the project eventually — despite the opposition of those in the surrounding communities.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wtop.com

Kubicek BB60Z, N505CZ: Accident occurred September 12, 2019 in Goodsprings, Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N505CZ

Location: Good Springs, NV
Accident Number: WPR19LA257
Date & Time: 09/12/2019, 0930 PDT
Registration: N505CZ
Aircraft: Kubicek BB60
Injuries: 3 Serious, 6 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation - Sightseeing 

On September 12, 2019, about 0930 Pacific daylight time, a Kubicek BB60, N505CZ, ejected all occupants from the basket during a hard landing near Good Springs, Nevada. A private individual owned the balloon and Vegas Hot Air Sin City Balloon Rides was operating the balloon under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries; the remaining six passengers sustained minor injuries. The balloon sustained substantial damage to the envelope. The local area sightseeing flight departed from a parking lot in Las Vegas about 0750. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed.

The pilot stated that after about an hour into the flight he planned to touch down near a water basin. As the balloon was about 0.5 miles away, the wind changed and the balloon's direction shifted south toward inhospitable terrain for landing. The pilot ascended in an attempt to find wind in a different direction. The balloon continued over a ridge and he aligned the balloon to land on a dirt road and began the descent. As he neared the surface, the wind increased, and he briefed the passengers of a potential high-wind landing. He pulled the vent line and the balloon did not deflate as he expected. The balloon landed hard and he was ejected out of the basket.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector stated that after landing hard the pilot and five occupants were ejected out of the basket. Thereafter, the balloon continued flying at a low level about 0.5 miles and the remaining four passengers were ejected. The balloon came to rest on a hillside in remote desert terrain located approximately 17 miles southwest of Las Vegas, near Good Springs.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Kubicek
Registration: N505CZ
Model/Series: BB60 Z
Aircraft Category: Balloon
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Vegas Hot Air Sin City Balloon Rides
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dawn
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHND, 2458 ft msl
Observation Time: 0756 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 27.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Las Vegas, NV
Destination: Las Vegas, NV 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious, 6 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Serious



Nine people were injured Thursday morning when a hot air balloon made a hard landing in a desert area near Goodsprings, southwest of Las Vegas.

Metropolitan Police Department Sgt. Jeff Dean said the hot air balloon crashed about 9:25 a.m. in a desert area just off Cottonwood Pass Trail, about three miles north of Goodsprings and approximately 40 miles from Las Vegas.

When the balloon’s basket hit the ground, it tipped over and several passengers were ejected, Dean said.

One woman was transported by helicopter to a local hospital with serious injuries, but was expected to survive.

Dean said the other eight passengers suffered minor injuries and were transported to local hospitals by ambulance.

At 11 a.m., emergency vehicles crowded along Goodsprings Bypass Road. Medical personnel loaded one person on a stretcher into a waiting ambulance as another pulled away.

Just before noon, two vehicles from Las Vegas Hot Air Sin City Balloon Rides pulled up and a group of people in matching shirts walked into the desert. They declined to speak to reporters.

A phone call to the company went unanswered.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating, Dean said. He said it was unclear why the balloon made a hard landing.

The National Weather Service clocked winds at Mountain Springs Peak, to the north of the crash site, at between 7 and 15 mph at 8 a.m., and said surface winds in Jean were increasing at the time, starting at about 5 mph at 8 a.m. and reaching 15 mph by about 10 a.m.

Las Vegas police, Clark County firefighters and the Nevada Highway Patrol also responded to the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.reviewjournal.com









3:30 P.M. UPDATE September 12th: Officials are now saying that 9 people were on the hot air balloon went it attempted to land. According to the FAA, the pilot was thrown from the gondola during the landing and it took about half a mile to come to a complete stop.

It was reported earlier that the balloon had crashed. The Federal Aviation Administration is now saying that it was a "hard landing." 

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the accident.

ORIGINAL STORY

GOODSPRINGS (KTNV) -- Several agencies have responded to a hot air balloon crash in the Nevada desert near Goodsprings.

Chopper 13 was able to find the site of the crash in the desert just north of Goodsprings off of Route 161.

Clark County Fire Department responded to the crash at approximately 9:25 a.m. They were joined by Las Vegas police, Nevada Highway Patrol and Bureau of Land Management.

Several ambulances and Mercy Air also responded to the scene and ambulances have been seen leaving with patients.

Clark County Fire Department confirmed that 7 people have been transported to UMC Trauma. One of those people, a woman, was airlifted.

At this time, there is no confirmed information on number of people involved, how many people injured or why the balloon crashed.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ktnv.com